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Japan's New Supercomputing Toy

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 8 years ago | from the i'll-take-two dept.

190

deman1985 writes "As reported by UPI, Japan has unveiled their fastest supercomputer yet. Assembled from Hitachi and IBM components, the new system sports total performance around 59 trillion calculations per second and comes at a cool 5-year lease price of $30 million. Pictures of the beast can be found at Mainichi Daily News."

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FP (0, Offtopic)

Enzero (956379) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827736)

FP

Re:FP (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14827823)

59 trillion of them! Per second!

I wonder (1)

bherman (531936) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827739)

Is it getting the most of that computing power by running Windows?

Re:I wonder (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14827763)

Imagine a beowulf cluster of those!

Oh wait.

Re:I wonder (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14827808)

Just in case anyone does not know, Blue Gene and Blue Gene/L both run Linux.

Re:I wonder (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14828069)

/golfclap

Re:I wonder (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14828139)

funny

Re:I wonder (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14828189)

not

Re:I wonder (2, Funny)

Cygfrydd (957180) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827939)

Reportedly, it is just fast enough to use Windows Vista’s Aero Glass GUI.

FP (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14827744)

toys rool!

Yes.... (0, Redundant)

JoeLinux (20366) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827757)

But imagine a a beowulf cluster of these.

*sigh* I miss when that was popular...I was in college, dating a total bitch, living off of ramen, playing CS until my grades started to suffer, and getting four hours of sleep a night...good times, good times.

Re:Yes.... (2, Insightful)

j79 (875929) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827863)

*sigh* I miss when that was popular...I was in college, dating a total bitch, living off of ramen, playing CS until my grades started to suffer, and getting four hours of sleep a night...good times, good times.

Shit. That's my life right now, and trust me...it ain't good times...

Then again, maybe a few years down the road, when I have a shit job, married to a total bitch, living off of ramen, and still play games till the wee hours in the morning, I'll be able to reflect and think, "yeah...good times...good times..."

Wow. That just made me even more depressed.

*SIGH*

Re:Yes.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14828299)

Maybe if you stopped referring to your SO as "bitch", you wouldn't be so unhappy?

Just a thought...

Beowulf Cluster (0, Redundant)

Nazmun (590998) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827759)

Imagine a beowulf cluster of these. And also does this run linux?!?!?

There, i've said it...you know someone would have!

Re:Beowulf Cluster (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Rockstar (624854) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827804)

and don't forget the ever popular... Now I can run Longhorn/Vista.

I for one... (0, Redundant)

JDSalinger (911918) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827767)

I for one welcome our Japanese Supercomputing Toy overlord!
I also welcome Godzilla to fight this Supercomputer in an epic battle (Pictures of the beast can be found at a random website http://www.xofacto.com/justin20/shinzen-godzilla-6 2.jpg [xofacto.com] ).
I also welcome females back to my crib.

Fastest? (1)

leipzig3 (528671) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827773)

According to top500.org, the fastest computer is an IBM Blue Gene/L with 280 TeraFlops. This Japanese team would have been #1 about a year ago.

Re:Fastest? (1)

WeAzElMaN (667859) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827848)

The article didn't say that it was the fastest in the world, but merely the fastest to yet be built by the Japanese.

Yes, Blue Gene/L still reigns supreme.

-WeAz

This contains a BlueGene implementation (1)

tubbtubb (781286) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828051)

True, the biggest BlueGene/L implementation does best this number. Also interesting to note, this thing has BlueGene in it: " The supercomputer, consisting of two systems -- Hitachi's multipurpose supercomputer with a peak performance of 2.15 terra flops and IBM Japan's Blue Gene Solution with a peak performance of 57.3 terra flops -- is capable of making about 59 trillion calculations per second, the Mainichi Shimbun reported Wednesday. "

Re:This contains a BlueGene implementation (1)

Pollardito (781263) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828262)

Hitachi's multipurpose supercomputer with a peak performance of 2.15 terra flops and IBM Japan's Blue Gene Solution with a peak performance of 57.3 terra flops -- is capable of making about 59 trillion calculations per second, the Mainichi Shimbun reported Wednesday.
i wonder how many nanoseconds it took this new supercomputer to add 2.15 to 57.3 and round that off to 59

And Yet (0, Troll)

Herkum01 (592704) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827779)

It still cannot run Windows Vista...

Re:And Yet (0, Offtopic)

PishiGorbeh (737623) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827799)

I might run Vista but is it fast enough to run Vista with Areo?

Re:And Yet (1)

dvhh (763607) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828622)

And OSX hasn't been hacked yet to run on these .....

Re:And Yet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14827935)

Nor serve more than 10 ruby on rails pages per second.

ask public? (2, Interesting)

tomstdenis (446163) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827784)

They're gonna ask the public for research themes? ... AFTER THEY BOUGHT IT???

I'd love to see this from top500.org

name,where,how many processors,average FLOPS,max FLOPS,***actually being used FLOPS***

Then sort it based on the latter. :-)

Tom

Uses? (1)

Douglas Simmons (628988) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827803)

That's a lot of calculations per second, but other than satisfying man's desire to have the biggest or fastest thing on the block, what possible uses of real value, other than decryption, could this thing bring to the table? Quicker searching for prime numbers? Weather modeling? SETI@Home nonsense?

And does anyone have an update on the Jap's supersonic jet project? Last story I remember was a model crashing in Australia. Go Japan!

Re:Uses? (1)

Rob T Firefly (844560) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827825)

You're Bill Gates and I claim my five pounds.

Re:Uses? (1)

muhgcee (188154) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827942)

What uses? TFA said particle accelerator research. So they're studying physics. What's wrong with that?

Re:Uses? (1)

Douglas Simmons (628988) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828000)

Fuck TFA.

Re:Uses? (1)

everphilski (877346) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828030)

EQ2 at 30FPS :P

(i kid, i kid)

Re:Uses? (1)

Mercaptan (257186) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828044)

Biological simulations.

Protein folding, modeling cell machinery, and simulations of other biological systems at the molecular level. Think about the number of calculations involved in modeling the interactions between a few million atoms [lanl.gov] in something as simple as the ribosome. Now imagine adding the water and solute environment that surrounds these sorts of molecules. Oh, you could ignore the water and do the simulation in a vacuum, but let's remember that a driving force in protein conformation is hydrophobicity. And if you want to try this over time, say even a few nanoseconds, then start multiplying baby.

So yeah, there are some good uses.

Re:Uses? (1)

cdrudge (68377) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828046)

I beleive traditional uses is in partical physics and nuclear testing, among other things. Knowing what happens when you slam two particals together, along with the reaction to the surrounding enviroment, takes an extrodinary amount of calculations.

Re:Uses? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14828096)

You have to remember, these are Japanese men... they have to do SOMETHING to compensate for their tiny penises!

Re:Uses? (1)

canning (228134) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828124)

I guess if you need a supercomputer why not build the fastest?

Re:Uses? (1)

bermudatriangleoflov (951747) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828133)

One of the most useful things a super computer can do is model nuclear explosions. This allows government scientists to research the explosion without actually having to test a real one.

Can We Please Institue an Intelligence Filter? (1)

raftpeople (844215) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828142)

And how did the parent get a score of 2?

Re:Uses? (1)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828500)

Super computers are used in weather simulations, weapon design simulations, energy grid and so on. Louisiana's vulnerabilities to hurricanes was learned around 1999 because of a supercomputer simulations, the problem is that politicians apparently chose to ignore the threat. One man is trying to use supercomputers to help determine if there was a way to affect a hurricane by seeing if it could be affected with weather modification tools when it starts to form.

Give it 5 years (1)

airlynx (957866) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827811)

Give it five years and it'll be a commercially available laptop, ten at the most.

Re:Give it 5 years (1)

woah (781250) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827998)

Good luck with that. Moore's law is dead.

mod parent insightful! (1)

Pollardito (781263) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828305)

i'm writing this from my Earth Simulator laptop that will be commercially available next year

I suggest size cap on these stats... (1)

syslog (535048) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827819)

You know, I think there should be a kind of "size cap" on these stats. A computer should be ranked higher if it can squeeze more performance out of so many cm2 worth of die or something. Otherwise you can just keep making computers more powerful by just adding more and more nodes. That does not excite me *shrug*. -naeem

Re:I suggest size cap on these stats... (1)

muhgcee (188154) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827966)

I think the more appropriate statistic would be computations per watt. Because land can be very cheap, but electricity doesn't have nearly the same variance across different parts of the world/country.

Re:I suggest size cap on these stats... (1)

syslog (535048) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828080)

Agreed. The only thing I wanted to stress is that there has to be *some* reasonable sandbox within which the compute power of these machines is measured. Otherwise just keep tacking those nodes on to move higher and higher on this most useless of rankings... :)

-naeem

Re:I suggest size cap on these stats... (1)

tetabiate (55848) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828125)

I totally agree, There are in fact some physical and mathematical problems involving correlations which might not be easy to parallelize or cannot be parallelized at all.

Fastest Supercomputer Yet (1)

digitaldc (879047) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827830)

Now what to do with it?

How about installing one over at Slashdot HQ?
You guys need it for all the people who keep missing their chance at getting the first post.

teraflops (1)

wesw02 (846056) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827832)

Does 59 trillion calculations approximately equal 59 teraflops?

Re:teraflops (1)

Spy der Mann (805235) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827908)

Does 59 trillion calculations approximately equal 59 teraflops?

Good point. I live in Mexico, and here "illions" are measured in 10^6 units. So here, a billion is 10^12, a trillion is 10^18, etc.

And actually I don't know how it's handled in different countries, so yes, it's confusing. Using mega,giga,tera is much more specific and doesn't lead to confusions.

Re:teraflops (1)

oliverthered (187439) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828004)

Same here in Europe, all US mesurements seem to be a bit screwed (hence the US gallon etc...) there is a milliard [wikipedia.org] which is what the US call a billion.

Re:teraflops (1)

Main Gauche (881147) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828280)

"Same here in Europe, all US mesurements seem to be a bit screwed (hence the US gallon etc...) there is a milliard which is what the US call a billion."

Yes, but to avoid confusion, we both have billiards [wikipedia.org] .

Re:teraflops (2, Informative)

Secrity (742221) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828061)

59 trillion calculations a second equals exactly 59 teraflops, of which, 57.3 of the 59 teraflops is from a smallish IBM Blue Gene.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has an IBM Blue Gene that does 280.6 teraflops or 280.6 trillion calculations a second.

Re:teraflops (1)

ciroknight (601098) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828109)

Not if they're integer operations. Then its 59 teraiops.

I still prefer 59 teracyclops though.

Re:teraflops (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14828457)

"280.6 teraflops or 280.6 trillion calculations a second."

*nerdgasms*

nr 6? (1)

B.Stolk (132572) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827843)

Isn't that nr 6 in the world?
The list [top500.org] is here.

IBM Blue Gene Project (1)

nharmon (97591) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827862)

Using PowerPC processors too (1)

kuwan (443684) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827962)

Processor - PowerPC 440 700MHz; two per compute node - Lowpower allows dense packaging; better processor-memory balance

Not particularly powerful CPUs individually, but I guess if you cram enough of them together it adds up.

Re:IBM Blue Gene Project (1)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828165)

Yes, it runs Linux! Well, sort of... the I/O processors run Linux; the actual compute nodes run a proprietary low-overhead executive. Linux is a general purpose OS, and interrupting CPUs for system processes and timer ticks has a huge cumulative impact on highly parallel tasks. Ideally, one would want the compute nodes to get a chunk of work and work on nothing else until that chunk of work is finished, i.e. preemptive multitasking is actually a liability for massively parallel machines.

Japan's fastest? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14827866)

The supercomputer, consisting of two systems -- Hitachi's multipurpose supercomputer with a peak performance of 2.15 terra flops and IBM Japan's Blue Gene Solution with a peak performance of 57.3 terra flops -- is capable of making about 59 trillion calculations per second, the Mainichi Shimbun reported Wednesday.

Err, I know it comes from IBM Japan, but since the bulk of the horsepower is coming from an IBM Blue Gene, does this really qualify as meaningful with relation to Japan? I think they'd be much more interested in Hitachi coming out with their own unit that could topple the IBM's.

slanted? (1)

ejamie (765128) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827872)

Interesting slanted design of the racks.

Is there a design reasons for that (air flow, etc)?

Or is this marketing wanting to be "different"?

Re:slanted? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14827964)

<racist joke>It's slanted because it was installed in Asia, it would have been round for the US install</racist joke>

Re:slanted? (1)

jo42 (227475) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828097)

Yes, it would go faster if they angled it even more. And added a "Type R" sticker with soup can size pipes.

Re:slanted? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14828230)

It needs a spoiler, and should probably be lower to the ground.

yup, cooling (1)

tubbtubb (781286) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828188)

Yeah, its for air flow.
See the large ppt presentation here:
http://www.research.ibm.com/bluegene/briefing_day. html [ibm.com]
Power, Packaging and Cooling, slide 20, I think.
Basically, the ducts are larger where the airflow is greater.

This thing's not so fast... (1)

prisoner-of-enigma (535770) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827895)

...but imagine a Beowulf cluster of them!

Hey, somebody had to say it!

Re:This thing's not so fast... (1)

cdrudge (68377) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828115)

You know, these comments were funny. In 1998. 8 years later, their dumb. No. Seriously. No one is laughing.

Re:This thing's not so fast... (1)

prisoner-of-enigma (535770) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828143)

8 years later, their dumb.

And eight years later you still haven't discovered the difference between "their" and "they're." You're a poster child for grammatical stupidity all by yourself, so remind me again why you're casting stones?

Re:Ultimate Redudant post (1)

vertinox (846076) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828329)

1. Someone posted the BeoWulf joke 5 posts up.
2. Supercomputer are basically BeoWulf clusters
3. Someone else posted the same joke 3 posts up, but included "Will it run linux".
4. It isn't the first time someone has made the mistake of their/they're
5. You aren't the first to point that out to anyone.
6. Somone else will reply to your post and point that out two posts after mine.
7. Someone else in this comment thread will also make misuse of their and they're.
8. Somone two posts down from your original will also make a mention of a Beowulf cluster.
9. And 5 posts after that another will try to get modded funny by trying to include "In Soviet Russia, only old people use Beowulf Clusters Running linux."

Really... Soviet russia cliches may still be funny, but Beowulf and "Will it run linux" aren't.

Please think of the children and refrain from mentioning either two ever again. If you are tempted to mention it, it means 5 other people already have by the time somone posts it.

No one has to say. Really... They don't.

Re:Ultimate Redudant post (1)

prisoner-of-enigma (535770) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828417)

1. Someone posted the BeoWulf joke 5 posts up.

That what this all is, a Beowulf cluster of Beowulf cluster jokes. You don't get it, do you?

2. Supercomputer are basically BeoWulf clusters

Congratulations! You win the "Duh!" Awards of the day!

3. Someone else posted the same joke 3 posts up, but included "Will it run linux".

Humor is in the eye of the beholder.

4. It isn't the first time someone has made the mistake of their/they're

This isn't the first time I've corrected them, either. Nor will it be the last. Your ability to use proper grammar, spelling, and punctuation is a reflection on your intelligence level. Ergo, he's an idiot. You're defending an idiot. What does that make you?

5. You aren't the first to point that out to anyone.

Yet they never seem to learn...

6. Somone else will reply to your post and point that out two posts after mine.

Dept. of Redundancy Dept.

7. Someone else in this comment thread will also make misuse of their and they're.

And I'll gleefully point out their flaws as well.

8. Somone two posts down from your original will also make a mention of a Beowulf cluster.

See response to #1.

9. And 5 posts after that another will try to get modded funny by trying to include "In Soviet Russia, only old people use Beowulf Clusters Running linux."

See response to #3.

Proposal (1)

phoric (833867) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827907)

"The institute will ask the public to propose specific themes of research activities using the supercomputer system." Seti@Home! Duh...

Here's one... (1)

from mars (191694) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827984)

Well, the answer to life, the universe and everything still hasn't been answered....

Toy (1)

muhgcee (188154) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827911)

"Toy" seems pretty appropriate here. They seem to have bought it without fully knowing what they were going to do with it yet: "The institute will ask the public to propose specific themes of research activities using the supercomputer system."

Its real use (1)

BecomingLumberg (949374) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827925)

is to allow for more FF-XI servers. Duh.

Re:Its real use (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14828229)

Funny you should mention that. EVE Online just installed a new cluster consisting of 70 dual Opteron nodes. Sure, it's no Earth weather simulator, but it's certainly in the running for having a little sticker labelled, 'Supercomputer!' stuck on it.

And as subscribers continue to rise, they'll undoubtedly reach the point where if they wanted to, they could easily can the game and run, say, nuclear weapons simulations. :p

It's interesting to see how far client-server games have come. Yesterday, it was some guy living down the block with a 486. Tomorrow, it'll be top of the line, world-class supercomputers.

What's happened to the moderation system??? (3, Interesting)

advocate_one (662832) | more than 8 years ago | (#14827992)

Have we had another moderation system failure... the number of posts making it to my +3 browsing has dropped dramatically in the last two days... I'm expecting there to be almost minimal moderation after today and it to be a general trollfest again by Friday...

Re:What's happened to the moderation system??? (1)

ZachPruckowski (918562) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828504)

I've noticed the same thing. there seem to be a lot of down-mods burning the mod-points. I've seen stories out for hours with all of 0 Score: 4s or 5s

Re:What's happened to the moderation system??? (1)

toxicity69 (925460) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828511)

I noticed that also, and attributed it to most of /. using up their karma modding everyone in the Monty Python poll a +5 interesting/insightful/funny.

Re:What's happened to the moderation system??? (2, Insightful)

demachina (71715) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828625)

Having read the replies so far to this thread there simply isn't anything worthy of being modded up, in particular there is a steady stream of predictable Beowulf comments, which just aren't funny or worth posting anymore.

At least for this thread, I'd say its not the moderation system failing, there just isn't anyone with anything intelligent to say posting anything.

Slashdot posters seem to be the thing cratering.

Articles on IBM throwing together another giant collection of CPU's for someone with money to burn really aren't very interesting anymore either. If it was an absolute record that would be something but this system is already behind similar IBM systems already in U.S. labs. If it was a revolutionary new architecture that would be something but this isn't.

Governments somehow seem to think they can garner prestige by assembling these white elephants that tend to be obsolete before a 5 year lease is up. Me personally I think they should be focusing more on developing new and interesting software that does useful things on somewhat smaller and more practical systems. Well done and useful software has a lot longer lifespan than thousands of CPU's that will be obsolete in a couple years.

I'm sure climate modelling, molecular modelling, CFD etc. might find a good home on this machine but the machines themselves just really aren't that newsworthy any more except to the IBM marketing department and the governments engaged in the penis size contest.

how long before a singularity? (1)

Sub Zero 992 (947972) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828024)

Hi,

Given Moore's Law, and given increasing performance gains in computer architecture and new work on algorithms, how likely is it that one of these days one of these machines (or one of their exponentially more powerful progeny) bootstrap themselves into a "Singularity", an AI which at the point of self-awareness becomes almost instantaneously god-like?

I know that this has been the stuff of Science - Fiction wet dreams for decades, but will this old idea - like so many other ideas first found in science-fiction - one day become reality? And would the God-Head be dictatorial in its nihilistic contempt of its creators, or perhaps more Frankenstinian in its attempts to be accepted by humanity?

Re:how long before a singularity? (1)

sandmaninator (884661) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828308)

Given Moore's Law, and given increasing performance gains in computer architecture and new work on algorithms, how likely is it that one of these days one of these machines (or one of their exponentially more powerful progeny) bootstrap themselves into a "Singularity", an AI which at the point of self-awareness becomes almost instantaneously god-like?

No.

Must be good at math... (1)

Ixne (599904) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828025)

The supercomputer, consisting of two systems -- Hitachi's multipurpose supercomputer with a peak performance of 2.15 terra flops and IBM Japan's Blue Gene Solution with a peak performance of 57.3 terra flops -- is capable of making about 59 trillion calculations per second...

You don't say. I wonder if they put those numbers into the machine(s) to get that sum...

Off-Topic (1)

wanerious (712877) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828039)

Ok, I haven't been keeping up --- this Japanese machine is, I gather, massively parallel. Suppose I wanted to find out which single processor was the speed king for floating point calculations. Is it as simple as sorting for the highest number on SpecFP2000?

Re:Off-Topic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14828199)

700 mhz powerpc440 processor. 2 per node.

5-year-lease (1)

RealProgrammer (723725) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828041)

Under Moore's Law, the price of computing power halves every 18 months. So that means in 5 years, the price ought to be about 1/(2^(5/1.5)) =~ a tenth of that.

That means in five years I'll be able to afford it on my desktop for about what I make an hour.

Woohoo!

I hope it comes with a better mouse. I have one of those mechanical ones, and it keeps getting granola in it.

Like the name... KEK (3, Funny)

BitwizeGHC (145393) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828070)

In other news, South Korea unveiled its new supercomputer: KEKEKE ^____^

Geekdom (1)

bookemdano63 (261600) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828083)

How sad is it that I was thrilled they included a link to a picture of it?

NOT a Toy! (1)

ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828148)

It's not a toy OK! It just's able to run Counterstrike at really high framerates because scienctific simulations and game mechanics are very similar operations...

Now if you'll excuse me, my aimbots need seeing to.

Slashdotted (1)

G3ckoG33k (647276) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828155)

I just wait for that beast to get slahsdotted, any minute now. Wait, they didn't run the web server on that one, did they? High energy accelerator research... Hrrmmmppff..

We're almost there... (1)

suitepotato (863945) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828169)

...we almost have a computer that can start Adobe applications in less than one full work day.

PS3 (0, Offtopic)

dasare1503 (875182) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828200)

What they don't tell you is that the PlayStation 3 is expected to have the power of TWO of these babies. Also, it will model the weather in your neighborhood down to the atomic molecule scale, WHILE putting out fifteenteen HD video streams. Sony PS3 department was heard to say "We are not competing against that new supercomputer. It is too slow."

2006 supercomputer = ten teraflops (1)

peter303 (12292) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828241)

I think when the lists are released this year, the top one hundred computers will be in the 10 to 300 teraflop range. With the cell CPU chipset peaking at a quarter-teraflop, one teraflop is merely high performance these days.

Apple will use this in their next Mac Mini (1)

TheSkepticalOptimist (898384) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828259)

Their tag line will be "Finally, something fun to do with 59 trillion calculations per second!". But nobody will buy it still because there really isn't anything fun about Mac what with virtually no game support.

Why have the Hitachi? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14828260)

What use if the Hitachi supercomputer if it only adds a mere 2 teraflops? Shouldn't they discard these 2 teraflops if it's only the front-end used to access the IBM system?

Not very expensive... (1)

Buttonius (31377) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828322)

That lease price is probably per year and a year is approximately 31556909 [nist.gov] seconds.
Assuming a US trillion (1E12), gives 59E12 operations per second, or about 1.86E21 operations per year. That is about 62E12 operations per dollar. There will probably be some (rather significant) additional costs to run and cool the beast...

Mainichi daily news? (1)

anza (900224) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828331)

Isn't that redundant?

Re:Mainichi daily news? (1)

Fry-kun (619632) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828508)

For those who don't speak Japanese, "mainichi" means "daily"

yeah but (1)

Trailer Trash (60756) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828338)

what kind of frame rate does it pull on HL2?

it's filled with Jawas! (1)

illtron (722358) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828388)

Did you see the pictures? It's powered by millions of tiny little Jawas!

A few minor details (1)

frankie (91710) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828425)

  1. It's the fastest in Japan , aka should beat Earth Simulator (40TFlops, ranked #7 last November).
  2. It's basically yet another IBM Blue Gene, but with a much weaker Hitachi attached to it.
  3. #1 ranked BlueGene/L running at Livermore hits 280TFlops.
  4. IBM PPCs dominate the high end of the Top500.

Just imagine... (1)

fm6 (162816) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828429)

...a Beowulf .... AAAACK!!!

Yeah, yeah... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14828538)

As usual, the Japanese press acts like it's a Hitachi product. But really it's an IBM. We know the drill... America sucks, everyone else is great... Japan is so high tech, until you actually go there.

Hooray!

What the hell do you do with 59TFlops anyway? Levitation?

Clarification (1)

necro81 (917438) | more than 8 years ago | (#14828596)

This is not, as a misinterpretation of the summary might suggest, the fastest supercomputer on the planet, just the fastest one in Japan. That title of world's fastest is still held by the BlueGene at Lawrence Livermore, which boasts something like 350 teraflops peak. Interestingly enough, this new machine in Japan is a smaller BlueGene computer: same architecture, fewer racks.
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