Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Current Console Transition Far Worse Than Previous

Zonk posted more than 8 years ago | from the it's-the-end-of-the-world-as-we-know-it dept.

87

A report released yesterday indicates that this console transition is far worse than previous hardware iterations. From the Gamasutra article: "This console transition, he said, is 'far worse' than that seen from the years 1999 through 2001. Additionally, Lowell points fingers at the increased popularity of online games, a general lack of creativity in game development, and 'no Halo or Grand Theft Auto-type blowout titles launched in 2005,' echoing the sentiments of many other analysts." Next Generation has an analysis of what makes this transition so bad. (this last piece is satire)

cancel ×

87 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

A Joke (2, Insightful)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 8 years ago | (#14834509)

This article is a joke.

It blames the Germans.

It blames companies (Nintendo) and consoles (the PSP).

It lists developers at number five.

Can't we just admit that there's been a severe lack of imagination in video game design recently? We have no one to blame but the people who envision the games--and even then, we can't really blame them for not coming up with the latest and greatest concept.

Maybe we should be encouraging developers to think outside the box and have them attend liberal arts colleges instead of 2 year technical colleges where they only learn how to make clones out of already existing games?

Re:A Joke (2, Insightful)

Henry V .009 (518000) | more than 8 years ago | (#14834617)

How about discovering themselves in Europe for a year? Or just reading a good book every once in a while. That'll do far more good than anything as worthless as a liberal arts college.

Re:A Joke (1)

LarsWestergren (9033) | more than 8 years ago | (#14834877)

Or just reading a good book every once in a while. That'll do far more good than anything as worthless as a liberal arts college.

A good liberal arts college will actually make you read a lot of really good books, and also discuss them in-depth.

Games are approaching works of art, but face it, it's only pop culture art. I'm hoping one day we might se a game that not only entertains but actually changes the world.

Re:A Joke (1)

American AC in Paris (230456) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835612)

How about discovering themselves in Europe for a year? Or just reading a good book every once in a while. That'll do far more good than anything as worthless as a liberal arts college.

...as somebody who has done all three, I feel that my liberal arts education laid the foundation which made me understand and appreciate the other two far more than I otherwise would have.

Had I not spent the time and energy learning new ways to comprehend the world I live in, I wouldn't have appreciated my time abroad nearly as much as I did. Odds are I would have simply spent the lion's share of my time "finding myself" in bars and clubs with other expats my age, instead of actually launching myself headlong into the foreign culture itself.

Then again, you seem to have some insight into the value of a liberal arts education that I've missed. What is it about a liberal arts education that makes it so worthless, in your view?

Re:A Joke (1)

Henry V .009 (518000) | more than 8 years ago | (#14836051)

A lot of people confuse the benefits of college with the benefits of getting older and more experienced from living on their own for the first time.

Re:A Joke (1)

American AC in Paris (230456) | more than 8 years ago | (#14836163)

...and a lot of people don't. It may be self-flattery, but I believe that I have a reasonably accurate perception of my own life experience.

This is all tangential, though. Again, I ask: what, in your view, makes a liberal arts education "worthless"?

Re:A Joke (1)

Henry V .009 (518000) | more than 8 years ago | (#14836324)

I view it as worthless because there is no positive evidence indicating that it has value. (I would consider positive evidence to be some sort of IQ-normed study that attempts to adjust for the effects of "credentialism.")

Re:A Joke (1)

American AC in Paris (230456) | more than 8 years ago | (#14836741)

What positive evidence do you have to offer to back up your assertion that "finding yourself in Europe" or "reading a good book once in a while" has greater value than a liberal arts education?

As for the value of a liberal arts education, it's well demonstrated that people with bachelor's degrees earn significantly more than people with incomplete or no college education [census.gov] . An individual's income level has a direct bearing on their quality of life, including access to superior healthcare, more flexibility in their jobs, and more free time. How do you figure this is "worthless"?

Re:A Joke (1)

Henry V .009 (518000) | more than 8 years ago | (#14836785)

"it's well demonstrated that people with bachelor's degrees earn significantly more than people with incomplete or no college education"

Until you norm for IQ. You've been lied to about the worth of college.

Re:A Joke (1)

American AC in Paris (230456) | more than 8 years ago | (#14836940)

...your source?

Re:A Joke (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14838431)

Knowledge is its own reward. To put no value on critical thinking and analysis, you must lead a sad life indeed.

Re:A Joke (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14834701)

I don't blame the Germans. I blame David Hasslehoff. Germans spend too much time listening to David Hasslehoff.

Chuck Norris (1)

OK PC (857190) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835106)

They should listen to Chuck Norris instead, he'll roundhouse kick them into shape!

spenT ! Hasselhof is history nowadays (1)

Alphager (957739) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835271)

I blame Bon Jovi. Creepy Dude playing all 9 Versions of "It's my life" behind me: The second you get up to get a coffee i will take your Ipod and flush it down the toilett. I AM NOT JOKING

Re:A Joke (1)

wiggles (30088) | more than 8 years ago | (#14834720)

Can't we just admit that there's been a severe lack of imagination in video game design recently?

It appears you've been heard [google.com] . Help is on the way in Q4 '06.

Re:A Joke (1)

calbanese (169547) | more than 8 years ago | (#14834758)

Yeah, because Black and White was so good the first time.

Re:A Joke (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14834871)

different man and different company

Re:A Joke (2, Interesting)

tukkayoot (528280) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835472)

different man and different company

Also, completely different concept.

Spore isn't exciting to me just because it looks like it'll be a really cool game. It's exciting because the ideas behind it could infuse some new life into the industry as a whole. The idea of giving players very simple, intuitive tools with which to create content, to actual make that content creation part of the game itself (as opposed to something you do externally with modding software) is promising.

Also, nice as the quasi-online element of Spore sounds to be, I long to see how this concept might be applied to more traditional online games, such as MMOs. With just a bit of extension, I could see the technologies being created/exploited in Spore applied to an online version of Starflight [the-underdogs.org] or The Ur-Quan Masters [sourceforge.net] , but with even larger slices of the galaxy and more detailed planet surfaces, life forms, etc. and alien ships that you encounter are not pre-scripted encounters with NPCs (or at least, not all of them) but interactions with other players. Or your more traditional fantasy MMORPG, where instead of fighting the same re-textured orcs and rats for six months, each new area you explore features completely new monsters.

Best of all if they could combine these technologies (easy to use tools for developers and/or players to create stuff, procedural generation to breathe life into these creations and to populate vast landscapes very quickly), with other features and technologies that have been growing in popularity and maturity over the past couple years, such as realistic physics [havok.com] , destructible environments and more robust AI [wikipedia.org] . This could open the door for a persistent world that is truly mutable, where players are free to create, destroy and explore an almost unimaginably vast world. It could be the ultimate sandbox experience that could combine aspects of various beloved genres as well (FPS, RPG, whatever).

If Spore itself doesn't qualify as something awesomely different from everything that has come before, then at least it could be a big step towards a game or games that do qualify as such.

Re:A Joke (1)

nasch (598556) | more than 8 years ago | (#14836030)

Thanks for the link, that looks amazing.

Re:A Joke (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14834841)

You mean the one that's marked as satire, right?

Re:A Joke (1)

rAiNsT0rm (877553) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835053)

And that would be fine except for the fact that it is NOT the developers having mental farts... it is the publishers who won't give any game that is not "safe" a green light. All the big money dictates what see's the light of day, and right now if it doesn't involve some bullshit gangsta simulator, racing on "dubs", Madden 2k23, or FPS clone #87 it ain't getting published.

The whole industry is fucked up chasing the money right now, and most companies have lost all perspective. That's why I'm hoping beyond all hope that Nintendo smacks them with its big red dick and wakes a few people up.

A Complaint Culture. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14835056)

"Can't we just admit that there's been a severe lack of imagination in video game design recently? We have no one to blame but the people who envision the games--and even then, we can't really blame them for not coming up with the latest and greatest concept."

And yet I don't see any "scratch and itch" games on the shelves, or even via popular download. It's easy to diss others, as long as the complainer doesn't have to do any work to correct the situation. Whaa! I hate politics... Whaa! The state of games suck...

Not the developers, the designers... (1)

Drogo007 (923906) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835562)

By and large nowadays the actual programmers aren't making the majority of the big design decisions on any given game. That job belongs to the Lead Designer. Game develpment teams are big enough that the stereotype of 6 coders banging out a game is outdated. It's 6-12 programmers, 6-18 artists/content (including sound, layout, etc), 1-3 designers, and however many testers can be squeezed into the remaining budget.

I've met some Designers who used to be programmers, but the majority weren't. ex-management types or ex-artists seem to be more prevalent.

The programmer gets some say in how individual features work out (since they're actually implementing it), but final say always rests with the Designer and/or Producer (or whatever title the management bloke in charge of the whole shebang gets).

If you want better game design, grumble about the Game Designers, but try not to be so hard on the poor programmers.

For the record, I spent 7 years in the game industry as a tester, so I was even lower on the totem pole than the programmers. In those 7 years I saw it evolve away from the lead programmer having final say on anything related to his project to the Designer and Project Lead having most of the power.

Re:A Joke (4, Insightful)

stonecypher (118140) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835828)

Can't we just admit that there's been a severe lack of imagination in video game design recently?

No. Because there hasn't been. If you go digging through shareware, through PopCap or MiniClip, on sourceforge, et cetera, you'll find quite a bit of novelty. The problem is disasterously risk-averse publishers built on a long-term untenable business model. It's got nothing whatsoever to do with design. A game costs $6-10 million to bring to market at the low end on TV-bound consoles. People don't take risks on DynoBright, Tower of Goo or Pontifex to the tune of $6-10 million. Instead, they release James Bond 27: No Franchise Lives Forever, because it's gonna profit whether or not it's actually a good game.

Bad for games? Yes. Good for business? Yes.

All those people who say things like "businesses are absurd" or "businesses are ignorant" are honestly pretty damned self involved. If people really could just have a great new idea and bring it to market, this business model would be in the process of collapsing right now. I can think of exactly one game which was bootstrapped that way recently: Roller Coaster Tycoon. Chris is the only guy I know who pulled it off lately, and I'm in the industry. Before that, it was Black and White, except Peter was working on money he had left over from previous successful games like Dungeon Keeper, Syndicate, Magic Carpet and so on, plus industry contacts and whatever.

You think it's a lack of creativity? Great, bring me the next big game. Hell, if it's good, I'll even write it for you and get it published for you, and give you a cut.

Until that day comes, and until you've been through the process of trying to convince a publisher that such and such an idea is a great idea that would sell, then you're really not qualified to comment on what the problem actually is.

Re:A Joke (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14840499)

Maybe we should be encouraging developers to think outside the box and have them attend liberal arts colleges instead of 2 year technical colleges where they only learn how to make clones out of already existing games?
 
How is smoking pot and drinking for 5 years going to help them make better games?

Transition Going Bad (4, Insightful)

VanillaBabies (829417) | more than 8 years ago | (#14834542)

It has been said probably a thousand times around why the transition isn't going well, and lack of a must-have title is just part of it. Over the years i've owned probably half a dozen consoles, From the NES to a PS2 and a bunch of stuff in the middle. In that time i've played dozens if not hundreds of games. And while Marios, Final Fantasies, and all the rest of the bunch are fun, how many times can i buy something with the same basic formula doing the same basic things. Its been 20 years, give me something new already, because i'm not paying $400 for a new XBox360 to play the same tired genres. I've shot enough people and jumped over enough stuff, that i want something new, and the developers are refusing to give it to me. So i won't give them my money. End of story. There is a reason the video game industry took a dive once before. Too much crap that no one wanted. Looks like some people never learn.

Re:Transition Going Bad (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14834676)

That's why I'm praying that the revolution can live up to the hype. If the interface works well enough and developers can find new and interesting things to do with it, lot's of games could finally start to go somewhere original. As far as I can tell the PS3 and the Xbox360 are just more polygons and resolution bolted on.

Wait for Nintendo. (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 8 years ago | (#14834736)

Even then you may be disappointed. The truth is that like everything else you reach a point where it is good enough. Improvement in graphics will be relatively minor. Games cost a lot to produce now so no one will want to risk anything too off the wall. And hard core gamers are pushing for games that are too complex. I find most games on the X-Box, PC, and PS2 to just not be that much fun. I don't have hours and hours to dedicate to learning how to play some game. Combine that with the cost of the new consoles and I predict Nintendo as the big winner of this round.
They know how to make games that most people enjoy. Their price point is looking very good. And here is the big one they are making money at it. I doubt that it will make the hard core crowd happy but in marketing the more hard core you go the smaller your market.

Re:Wait for Nintendo. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14834985)

I predict Nintendo as the big winner of this round.

Why? How does one tell who is the winner of any round? Profit? Well then Nintendo is obviously your champion. Console sales? If that's the case then Sony clearly won this round. All we can agree on is that MS did not win the last round and is on its way to failing here too.

And how is the Rev going to change gaming? A new controller? Personally, I've gotten used to the GC controller and like the fact that I'm going to be able to use it with my Revolution. That being said, I'm going to take it with the same skepticism that I would Sony or MS every time that I hear that the Revolution is "going to change the face of gaming" because we saw a demo of a controller that I really don't plan on using.

Re:Wait for Nintendo. (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835309)

For a company there is only one thing that counts profit. I think Apple, Microsoft, and Sony are all really aiming for one thing. They want to be the new TV. I think they all see the end of TV as we know it and a the world going for a pay to view model. Once I got my Replay TV I realised how much TV as we currently know it sucks. With my Replay I watch what shows I want when I want to. TiVO and Replay also make commercials pretty much useless now a days. I tend to skip over most of them. In effect I am freeloading. I wonder if the next step for TV ads will modeled after Google ads. A line of text at the bottom of the screen so you can not skip over them.
Well back to games. It looks like Nintendo is the only one that really seems to care about games anymore. The Gameboy line still doesn't play movies, make phone calls, or do your laundry. The Gamecube doesn't replace your DVD or CD player. All they do is play games. The final battle will be Games vs a replacement for TV. I will bet you money that you will see movie and TV show downloads for the 360 and the PS3.
I will be surprised if more game developers don't target the new Mac mini. It is targeted as a media system. I have to wonder if we will not see a bunch of "casual" games released for it in the near future. I think it would be grand if Apple got Sega to develop for it. Why not since they don't have a stake in the hardware wars anymore.

Re:Wait for Nintendo. (1)

clu76 (620823) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835377)

All we can agree on is that MS did not win the last round and is on its way to failing here too.

While I agree MS lost the last round, I do think they have a great chance of over taking Sony this round. This is just a personal theory, but I think Sony might have bitten off more than they can chew. If the PS3 doesn't ship by Black Friday, Sony will lose much of their user base to MS and Nintendo. Not to mention the negative reactions of fans if Sony has over promised and under delivers. Sony, more than the other two, need a huge user install base. And I stress the word if in all of this.

Re:Wait for Nintendo. (2, Informative)

edwdig (47888) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835619)

Personally, I've gotten used to the GC controller and like the fact that I'm going to be able to use it with my Revolution.

The GameCube controller only works for GameCube games. You have to use the new controller for Revolution games. Some of the new games will use a WaveBird-like shell over the new controller, but for the most part you must use the remote control controller.

Re:Wait for Nintendo. (1)

Seekerofknowledge (134616) | more than 8 years ago | (#14837205)

How do you know? I would think that any Revolution game that supports the wavebird-like shell would also support a regular gamecube controller. The shell may just be offered as an accessory for new customers who don't have gamecube controllers, or for those that just want a wireless GC controller (I don't know if the wavebird receiver attachment will fit the ports on the Revolution.)

Re:Wait for Nintendo. (1)

justchris (802302) | more than 8 years ago | (#14840631)

He knows this because Nintendo has said it. While I don't have the link, either Reggie Fils-Aime, or possibly Perrin Kaplan, has already said that gamecube controllers will only work with gamecube games.

Of course, since the hardware is there, there is nothing stopping developers from utilizing that as an option with new games, but if Nintendo doesn't do it, don't expect 3rd party developers to even consider it.

The recency illusion bites again (2, Informative)

Haeleth (414428) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835496)

Improvement in graphics will be relatively minor.

People have been saying that for as long as I can remember. There was a time when it was possible to describe Doom as "realistic" with a straight face. But even last year's games look artificial. Even Half-Life 2 and Doom 3 are starting to look dated. Trust me... there's plenty of scope for improvement.

Games cost a lot to produce now so no one will want to risk anything too off the wall.

A-list games have cost a lot to produce ever since people found out that spending a lot on a game boosted your profits. And we're still getting off-the-wall titles. Katamari Damacy. Nintendogs. Lumines. None of them sequels, none of them based on expensive licenses, all of them original and addictive. I fail to see the problem.

And hard core gamers are pushing for games that are too complex.

You seriously think games are getting MORE complex? You should go back and replay some of the stuff from the 80s and 90s. Try something like Falcon 4.0, where you literally had to read a brick-like manual just to figure out how to get your plane to take off. Or the Police Quest series, where you had to follow real-life police procedures down to the last form. Or classic text adventures, where you had to wrestle with defective natural-language parsers and draw up your own multi-page maps of worlds that only existed as words.

But there was always Space Invaders too. In other words, there have always been simple games that you can pick up and play, and there have always been complex games that take roughly the same amount of commitment as a full-time degree course to master. Nothing new here. Nothing's changed.

Combine that with the cost of the new consoles... ...which is pretty much the same as (or cheaper than) the price of the old consoles, when you adjust for inflation? Right. Big problem there, clearly.

Sorry, but I don't see a single valid complaint in anything you've said. It's all always been that way. Nothing's changed. Nothing will change. Just carry on choosing the games you like from the vast range available, sit back, and enjoy yourself. Because gaming's always been good, and it's going to stay that way.

Re:The recency illusion bites again (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 8 years ago | (#14838573)

"You seriously think games are getting MORE complex? You should go back and replay some of the stuff from the 80s and 90s. Try something like Falcon 4.0, where you literally had to read a brick-like manual just to figure out how to get your plane to take off. Or the Police Quest series, where you had to follow real-life police procedures down to the last form. Or classic text adventures, where you had to wrestle with defective natural-language parsers and draw up your own multi-page maps of worlds that only existed as words."

Falcon wasn't a game as much as a flight sim. And I loved it. I also loved Harpoon which recommended about $25,000 of extra reference material. Notice that true war games and fight simulators are not big sellers any more. Same for text adventures. or Police Quest. There will be room for hard core games but the majority of games seem to be heading in that direction. I read that simple arcade style games seem to be the big thing on the 360 now. Impressive graphics, gritty realism, and complex stories will never make up for a game that just isn't fun. I showed Harpoon to a friend of mine that wrote video games, loved playing Doom and Quake, and is a general hard core competitive type of guy. He told me that , "it looked too much like work". I look at a lot of games today and say the same thing. They just are not fun and the new consoles cost too much. Maybe that will change when the PS-3 comes out but for now they lack fun.

Re:Transition Going Bad (1)

CsiDano (807071) | more than 8 years ago | (#14834779)

Perhaps people are learning from the past. I remember back in the day, I bought a Nintendo 64 the week it was released, what a mistake, there was very little to play on it. Maybe people remember paying an outrageous fortune and having little to play except Mario and Zelda (yes I am sure there are other titles soome might choose as well) and then I got to see the price drop for the console and then the games,(same principle applies to other consoles)all so I could play it first. Maybe playing it first isn't as important now, when most games also come out with PC versions as well, and until recently ie 360 PC versions had better graphics. This really comes back to release titles I guess.

Re:Transition Going Bad (1)

Echnin (607099) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835069)

Are you remembering that right? There was no Zelda at the N64 launch: only Mario 64 and Pilotwings.

Re:Transition Going Bad (1)

JoeLinux (20366) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835212)

Pilotwings was for SNES [gamespot.com]
Pilotwings 64 was for N64 [nintendo.com]
Nit-picking, but hey....

Re:Transition Going Bad (1)

AnyoneEB (574727) | more than 8 years ago | (#14836409)

And it was "Super Mario 64" not "Mario 64"; if you want to nitpick, at least be complete. :-p

Re:Transition Going Bad (1)

CsiDano (807071) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835663)

Yeah, you could be right that was some time ago. I know I had been anticipating Zelda though. But you see my point, limited selection.

Re:Transition Going Bad (1)

default luser (529332) | more than 8 years ago | (#14837559)

But, it's not like the N64 was the first time Nintendo had done a fairly dry launch. According to Wikipedia's Launch Titles [wikipedia.org] page, the SNES had the same exact launch titles, plus F-Zero. Hell, the Genesis launched in the US with only 5 titles, and half of them were just arcade ports, and the Sega Saturn had only Virtua Fighter.

This is probably due to the fact that the console wars were in full-swing, and Sega and Nintendo figured getting the new console out was top priority. I mean, it took Sega a couple years to get their shit together and release Sonic, along with a slew of excellent first and third-party games. I don't recall the SNES being anything amazing until christmas 1991 and 1992, when we started seeing games like FF2 and Super Ghouls 'n Ghosts.

But console makers have learned, and have improved launch titles. Since the N64, not a single home console has launched with less than a dozen titles, not even the Gamecube. Now that most desireable games are no longer unique to one console, and over half of all games are sequels, they have to provide quantity to please early adopters. Unfortunately, even this is getting old and tired.

If the dozen and a half games from the Xbox 360 launch are not enough to spark interest, then we very well may see problems in this generation's transition.

Re:Transition Going Bad (1)

casemon (448599) | more than 8 years ago | (#14834943)

Don't give up just yet... there are good things coming. Sure a load of tripe as well (cough cough EA's Black cough) but it just says you might have to search a little to find the goodness.

Start here:
http://media.cube.ign.com/articles/651/651334/vid_ 1260570.html [ign.com]
Could be fun and they're not even showing any game graphics.

The big N is not the only one, try this:
http://media.ps3.ign.com/media/748/748484/vid_1196 815.html [ign.com]
Though, we'll see if they deliver.

And from MS, well there is always Live! where you can voice chat with other hardcor... Zzzzzz...
(just kidding)

Point is, there is an upsurge right now on new ideas... just not from MS and unfotunately the same ol' crap gets the most media $$ / attention.

Don't fret and support new game ideas by buying the games you like!

Re:Transition Going Bad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14835032)

Just like the pron industry, there are always new consumers eager for the same old thing.

Re:Transition Going Bad (2, Interesting)

shawb (16347) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835747)

Taking a look at the past console transitions [wikipedia.org] you see that, of consoles released in the U.S. for the last two transitions the early bird gets squashed. In fact, it appears that any console released significantly before the rest of the generation spelled death for the console.

Current Gen: Dreamcast released a full year before most competitors, over half a year before PS2. Status: Sega no longer making consoles
64 bit era: Atari Jaguar released over a year before ANY other console, a full TWO years before N64. Status: Atari has not made a console since then.
16/32 bit era: Genesis released insignificantly ahead of Turbografx 16. Status: Turbografx dead, Genesis did survive.
8 bit era: Colecovision released over a year before any competition. Status: Colecowhat?
The generation before that, we have the Atari 2600 which was released significantly (about a half year) before the other consoles, and had pretty much the longest stretch of any console (even beating out the Atari 5200, which I assume was an improvement somehow. This is the only example I see of this happening

My guess? The first console of a given generation is rushed out the door, not given that killer must have feature. Meanwhile the other console makers are working either in house or with game developers to have that killer app (game) avaiable on or near release. They are also making sure that the new console is indeed enough of an improvement over the previous gen to justify the price.

The 360? Plagued with design problems (the giant brick of a power supply that overheats if not put on the perfect surface being the best known) HUGE supply problems, many people who preordered STILL do not have their 360. Just read the comments of a supplier [eastluna.com] to see how bad it is. New Games? Well, the closest thing I can see is to an interesting non-sequel is GUN: yet another FPS, this time in the old west. And you get to ride a horse. There's Kameo, elements of power, and I see that is already for sale in the used bin at video game stores. King Kong? Yet another movie franchise tie-in. Full Auto, another combat racing game. Condemned: Gosh, it's dark in here! Then there's supposedly the killer app: Halo 2. You can get... umm... the t-shirt if you want. You actually want the video game? It's gonna be a bit. Toss in a couple sequels and a few online only games. So, about 4 or 5 original games, most of which are of pretty dubious quality. Sequels. Sequels. Did I say sequels? And a few games which are nowhere near release... I know I'm not going to throw down a minimum of $600.00 on it. (Yeah, places LIST it for less, but those places simply don't have it. And those prices don't include the accessories needed to actually make the whole thing fun.) Ohh... but it plays movies off my computer!!! For that price, I could just go get a Mac Mini. What's that you say? The Mini doesn't include a monitor? Neither does the 360.

So yes, I think the 360 is a waste of money. But if you look at previous generations every console released without competition on the first christmas sales season tanked, except for the Atari 2600. And that was over 25 years ago, the market is surely changed. I predict that Microsoft does have deep enough pockets to keep the 360 going for a little longer than previous early adopter consoles, but will not be able to compete long term with Sony and Nintendo. Sony because their pockets are just as deep as microsoft, and they actually have experience designing consumer electronics and producing entertainment media (although not necesarilly video games, but that's not necessary to become a succesful console if you can get others to do it for you.) And Nintendo will plug along exploiting the niche of people who actually like to play FUN games rather than watch some eye candy. Even though many of Nintendo's titles SEEM to be rehashes of old games, it's just that they keep using familiar characters in games with drastically different gameplay mechanics than before. I also predict that a new player will make a surprise entry into the market, probably someone with deep pockets and manufacturing experience. Mitsubishi would be a good candidate. Or who knows, maybe even the Phantom will be released with Duke Nukem Forever.

Re:Transition Going Bad (1)

dulsi (10696) | more than 8 years ago | (#14837108)

Your explaination of the first console of a generation failing is flawed. The Dreamcast failed more due to third-party developer refusing to commit to the system because of all the screwups with the Saturn, 32X, and Sega CD. Atari Jaguar was released at an incrediably expensive price point.

Re:Transition Going Bad (2, Insightful)

kingsmedley (796795) | more than 8 years ago | (#14837496)

16/32 bit era: Genesis released insignificantly ahead of Turbografx 16. Status: Turbografx dead, Genesis did survive.
8 bit era: Colecovision released over a year before any competition. Status: Colecowhat?
The generation before that, we have the Atari 2600 which was released significantly (about a half year) before the other consoles, and had pretty much the longest stretch of any console (even beating out the Atari 5200, which I assume was an improvement somehow.


[Historical nit-pick mode on]

  1. The TG-16 was actually launched in the USA a few months prior to the Genesis.

  2. The ColecoVision was hardly the first console of the 8-bit era. While you could argue the ColecoVision was the first of a new generation of game console capability, it was hardly a colossal failure. The so-called "Crash of '84" shook out nearly ALL console manufacturers in the North American market; Coleco's troubles at this time had a lot more to do with the Adam computer then ColecoVision sales, which were actually fairly good for the time.

  3. The Atari 2600 was not the first of it's generation either. The early cartridge based consoles, in order of North American launch, were:

    • Magnavox Odyssey, 1972
    • Fairchild Video Entertainment System (A.K.A. Channel F), 1976
    • RCA Studio II, January 1977
    • Bally Professional Arcade (A.K.A. Astrocade), September 1977
    • Atari 2600, November 1977


  4. The Atari 5200 was actually part of the ColecoVision generation, and was not in any way an enhanced 2600 model. However a later console, the Atari 7800, did feature 2600 hardware coupled with an advanced graphics chip.


[Historical nit-pick mode off]

OK, sorry about that, I'm a bit fussy about the history of the industry. Back on topic now, I promise.

Basically, I think your theory that "the first console out the door will always fail" to be about as valid as the absurd theory that "black consoles always fail." The successful platform will be the one to offer good hardware and great games at an acceptable price. That's all there is to it. And for the most part, any look at history will bear this out. The exceptions are pretty scarce, personally I'd say there is only one exception - the death of the Dreamcast had as much (if not more more) to do with PS2 hype and Sega's financial woes than any shortcomings in the system's library.

Re:Transition Going Bad (1)

shawb (16347) | more than 8 years ago | (#14840886)

Yeah, I realize it's a cheesy analysis based on a graph off wikipedia. I think it's just more predictive than anything. Honestly, I wasn't trying to say that any first console would lose, I was more trying to comment that a failure of the first console released in a generation does not mean the whole generation is doomed to failure. I probably just got carried away. But you must admit, it's an entertaining (although very flawed, I know) concept if you are at all intrigued by the industry. And about as accurate as the metrics most pundits use.

Perceived Lack of Improvement (1)

laxcat (600727) | more than 8 years ago | (#14834822)

Quite simply put the visual leap from say the N64 to the Gamecube, or the PS1 to the PS2, was much, much greater than the visual leap we are seeing from the original XBOX to the 360. While us techies might be able to see a big difference, many people can't. It doesn't help that nearly every 360 title thus far was either a port, was originally developed for a "lesser" console, or the same title (or a similar one) is also available on current gen consoles where they don't really look that much worse.

More power is great, but so far it hasn't translated into anything so astonishing that invokes the "I have GOT to have that" response from the general public. But the last console transition was unique like that. It was the first time we were really getting into realistic looking 3D graphics and that astounded response drove alot of console sales.

Re:Perceived Lack of Improvement (1)

Aagfed (958473) | more than 8 years ago | (#14836312)

No no no no no. You're wrong. All of you, all wrong. All y'all of you, all all wrong! Part of the problem always has been that when a next-gen console comes out, it takes years for the game developers to catch on to the capabilities of the new system. Especially, now with three players in the console market, whereas last time there were only two, it seems like there was an absolute rush on getting that damned 360 out. Some of the games are already on the XBox a/o PS2 themselves, and the rest are sort of, well, bleech, no thanks to designers hurrying to put out a product, and screw your Quality! Not only that, but how much BETTER can graphics get? Better graphics now just mean tweaking and fine-tuning your details. Different lengths of hair-more destructible environments-etc. In fact, some games are going back to the older styles of gaming, such as side-scrollers, etc. There is no great leap from 2-D to 3-D or to true 3-D.

Quality drop (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14834827)

I don't own a console, so I may be wrong, but from where I'm standing it seems like the next generation of consoles have dropped a bit in quality and polish. Perhaps I'm bordering on flamebait here, but it seems both PS3 and 360xbox are rushed to market, together with the first wave of games (at least for the 360, the PS3 remains to be seen, not to mention Nintendo). Competition on the market gets fiercer and the "market window" keeps getting smaller.

Perhaps my beloved PC stands a chance after all. Though it would have been nicer if the field had levelled by the stability and polish of PC games had increased rather than consoles decline.

Re:Quality drop (1)

Tenric (953434) | more than 8 years ago | (#14834989)

It would also help if I didn't have to worry about spending hundreds of dollars on my pc to play the latest games, or worry about the configuration of my system to get them to work. I think everyone's expectation about what a console has supposed to be has gone way up the older we have gotten. Remember when they were basically toys? I mean, the N.E.S. wasn't very sophisticated or polished. You put games in them, played them, perhaps had to "blow on them" to get them to work, but you had a lot of fun. I for one, miss those days.

Re:Quality drop (1)

ElleyKitten (715519) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835404)

If you miss the simplicity of consoles, then why do you have an elaborate gaming PC instead? Consoles, even the 360, are still pretty much on the level of 'put game in. play'. Sure, you've got some more stuff you could do with it, but if that really turns you off, then just buy a gameboy and support the company that makes simple hardware.

Re:Quality drop (1)

Tenric (953434) | more than 8 years ago | (#14838246)

I guess I should have been more specific. The original poster addressed what would help pc gaming. The things I mentioned are things I have to worry about if I used my PC for games, which I rarely do. As far as missing the way things used to be, I was being nostalgic. I do love my gameboy for the exact reason you brought up!

Re:Quality drop (1)

DrSkwid (118965) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835360)

How can you say a console you can't buy has been "rushed to market"
  ?

Re:Quality drop (1)

LightningBolt! (664763) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835849)

How can you say a console you can't buy has been "rushed to market" ?
Sorry, sir, but you are in a no-thinking zone. If you continue to think, you may be asked to leave.

GNU/Linux - a printer driver gone horribly wrong
Nice sig. Made me lol.

Re:Quality drop (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14841160)

How can you say a console you can't buy has been "rushed to market"

Because they are missing the promised release date? Because some of the specs are not finished? Because many developers are complaining that it is difficult to program for?

Re:Quality drop (1)

DrSkwid (118965) | more than 8 years ago | (#14849336)

Has Duke Nukem Forever been rushed to market then ?

-Crash Zone Ahead- (1)

jshackles (957031) | more than 8 years ago | (#14834849)

I think that if things don't turn around this year with the new console launches, we may be looking at another video game industry-wide crash.

I think this would be just fine, because it would force companies to be innovative with their titles. I think Nintendo is headed in the right direction with the Revolution, because they know we're *ALL* tired of playing the same old games over and over again.

Re:-Crash Zone Ahead- (1)

boldtbanan (905468) | more than 8 years ago | (#14834879)

As long as a crash doesn't result in EA buying out every other developer in the world. (Or even half of them)

Re:-Crash Zone Ahead- (1)

jshackles (957031) | more than 8 years ago | (#14834975)

I would like to think that if that were to happen, I would discontinue purchasing new games. I already have a loathing for EA games and their business practices, etc, but also don't care for any of their sports games franchises or the way they milk the masses "upgrading" from Madden '05 to Madden '06 every year.

It's deplorable, that's not what this industry should be about. Rather than making the same game as last year with upgraded visuals, why not make something that's actually fun, new, and exciting to play?

Jumping the gun (1)

guspasho (941623) | more than 8 years ago | (#14834881)

Only one console it out yet, it's only been out for three months, and the other two aren't due to be out for several months more, most likely not even until Christmas 2006. How can they prejudge the "next-gen" launch based on the early results from ONE console? That should tell you right there that the article is a bunch of bullshit anyway. No one knows what killer games will be available for the PS3 or Revolution release. Did anyone anticipate GTA3 for the PS2 a year in advance of the console's release? Did Microsoft even start flogging Halo that early?

Re:Jumping the gun (1)

guspasho (941623) | more than 8 years ago | (#14834913)

In other news, next-next-gen already predetermined to be an abysmal failure by "forecasters". Damn me for not using preview.

Re:Jumping the gun (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14835166)

I think the article summary is mis-leading and jumping the gun while the article itself is just a report on what is actually happening.

The report is calling this period the "console transition" period because that is exactly what this is. The period between the old consoles being pretty much outdated and the new consoles about to hit or be adopted.

The article isn't saying the next gen consoles (or their games) are failures. Instead it is saying that if you look at the last transition period, and compare it to this transition period, video game sales are down. And markedly down.

They list several possible reasons, others can probably come up with their own. But the main point is this: video game sales are down.

That's all. And that assessment is based on measurements that I will assume are correct.

Maybe the speculation as to why is jumping the gun, but the figures are true.

Analyse this... (2, Insightful)

nologin (256407) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835000)

From the Gamasutra article...

... due to a lack of installed users for the impending next generation of consoles.

Does it really take an analyst to realize that "impending" means that the next generation of consoles isn't out yet. Of course there won't be a base of users installed with the next generation of gear...

Maybe these analysts should wait for the PS3 and the Revolution to come out before they make these reports.

No, the transition is going great (3, Interesting)

UES (655257) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835006)

For Nintendo.

I see a lot of interest in the DS and DS Lite. I see record sales in Japan (SOLD OUT- something that almost never happens) and increasing sales in the USA and Europe.

It's a handheld? So what?

When a market is really changing, the old models don't work so well any more. Sony and Microsoft are utterly convinced that convergence will happen in your living room. That's because they sell things that go in a living room- Televisions, Stereos, Home Computer OSes, etc. Sony's fantasy is that you will pay them an enormous sum of money and subscription fees to install very complicated equipment so you can spend a lot of time at home. Microsoft thinks you are willing to spend $400+ on a console to play the $5 Geometry Wars (perfectly playable on Game Boy) or Paperboy.

Apple and Nintendo both understand that convergence is happening IN YOUR POCKET.
iPod, Cellphone Television, Handheld consoles. What do these all have in common?

A home theater experience is very nice, but a device that shows movies, plays music and games, and allows phone calls is totally convergent, and cheap by comparison, which allows a much larger market. Simpler games also allow market expansion by appealing to nontraditional gamers (Women and Seniors, mostly).

Sony has delays on PS3 because they are feverishly working to make it the all-in-one living room box. Does anyone actually WANT an all-in-one? Also notice that the PSP section of your local store has 2x the movies as games. PSP is a very expensive portable DVD player that plays some games.

I would love to know what the U.S. XBox360 sales would look like if they could actually produce some of the things. "Sold Out" is meaningless when you can only allocate a dozen units per store. For months at a time. It's March, where the hell are the things already?

In Japan, where XBox360 stock is plentiful, games are important, and home theater convergence is desired to to lack of space, no one is buying them. But there are lines around the block for the DS.

If your model of transition is upgrading consumers from FooBox 2 to FooBox 3 (with slightly better graphics and a modem at double the price), the transition has been a failure.

If your model of transition is selling more units to more customers no matter what new product you offer (from FooBox to PortaFoo), this is one of the best transitions ever...for Nintendo.

Re:No, the transition is going great (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14836447)

Sony and Microsoft are utterly convinced that convergence will happen in your living room.
[...]
Apple and Nintendo both understand that convergence is happening IN YOUR POCKET.

Sony hasn't missed the boat as far as in-pocket convergence is concerned. They have the PSP, which isn't doing so hot. Meanwhile, Microsoft is working on the Origami project (although it's rather questionable if this qualifies as a portable device or as an extension to the PC).

Re:No, the transition is going great (1)

kingsmedley (796795) | more than 8 years ago | (#14837002)

My view has been that a big part of why this transition is hitting publishers so hard is because these new home consoles are so damn expensive. A proper 360 is $400, while rumors abound that the PS3 could be $500 or more. So new adopters and prospective buyers alike are saving their nickels and dimes to buy these big expensive boxes. Which means many hardcore gamers are not spending money on software.

I see a lot of interest in the DS and DS Lite.

People looking at the DS, however, find they still have a few bucks in their pocket. And most games are only $30. Not only has the DS proven to be a breath of fresh air, people can actually afford to buy the damn thing. I'm not trying to imply that the handheld market and home console market are the same, but there are similair economic forces at work.

We know from the Gamecube's life that it takes more than a low price to gain market penetration. Good hardware and attractive game titles matter as well. But if the hardware purchase completely taps you out, you clearly cannot buy more games for a while.

Re:No, the transition is going great (1)

daniel422 (905483) | more than 8 years ago | (#14837195)

What you're talking about are two seperate markets. There certainly is a demand for home-theater style gaming, but there also is a demand for more portable entertainment as well.

I'm sorry, but there definitely appears to be a Microsoft bias in Japan -- the primary reason the units sell so poorly there. It also doensn't help that the 360 doesn't have a killer app yet. The popularity of the Nintendo DS in Japan can be traced to the popularity of portable gaming in general in Japan. Far, far more popular than it has EVER been in the US. This is also evidenced by the cell phones available in Asia and the content available for them (much more games, video services, and advanced feature phones).

I blame this on the more suburban to rural nature of the US: due to our lower population density we spend less time in areas where portable gaming/media would be used -- like public transportation (which I see as the #1 place for portable entertainment).

Oh, and convergence? It's coming -- everywhere. CES this last year had more companies making HTPCs than ever, and they were commanding ungodly prices ($7-10k). Oh and selling as fast as these companies could make them. Microsofts 360 is a great convergence device -- if you also happen to own a XP Media Center PC in your home. Otherwise it's somewhat crippled as a convergence device. It's a shame, really, but it WILL happen -- the costs of hardware and software will dictate it. Cell phones are following a similar path -- they are frankly converging at a far faster pace than either Apple or Nintendo. Both of these companies have enjoyed success not because they make convergence devices, but becasue they make a device that does one thing well -- music for the ipod and games for the DS -- and does it with style.

Also, Nintendo is not transitioning from settop box to portable. They have entries in BOTH those markets (just like Sony).

Gimme a break.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14835073)

This article is a joke. "Oh this transition is the worst" has been said everytime we go through one and you know what? Each time they base it on current thinking, not remembering accurately what the past was like.

This transition is actually pretty smooth, and while there are no huge games out for the XB360 they are coming.. which was quite similiar to launches of the Jaguar, the PS2, the Xbox (none of the games for Xbox were "huge" until they became popular.

I hate when alarmist shit is greenlighted.

Re:Gimme a break.. (2)

stonecypher (118140) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835871)

Yeah, and this would be insightful if that's what the article actually said.

What the article does say is that there's due to be a year and a half slump to the tune of almost 20%. The previous console slump was about 7%. So, it's prospectively gone up by triple. That is far worse than the previous one. Nobody said worst ever. Just worse than last time.

Satire yes (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14835075)

But it also holds the best comment I've ever seen regarding this "nex-gen console war".
Nintendo will, in theory, show the way by pricing competitively, eschewing technology machismo and offering stuff that's never been seen before. If that doesn't work, we should all go home.
Emphasis mine.

Re:Satire yes (1)

kingsmedley (796795) | more than 8 years ago | (#14837524)

If that doesn't work, we should all go home.

On the contrary - we should all go outside!

Bad? Maybe. Different? No. (1)

ivan256 (17499) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835102)

Things may not be great for the industry right now, but it's the same as the period between the release of the Dreamcast and the PS2. Why Microsoft chose to do what Sega did is beyond me, but the similarities are amazing.

Re:Bad? Maybe. Different? No. (0, Flamebait)

xombo (628858) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835753)

Most of the Xbox team was hired right out of Sega after the demise of the Dreamcast. It's no coincidence, it's history repeating--and by the same morons that did it the first go-around. It's like Hitler coming out of hiding and saying, "You know what, I should try to take over the world and simultaneously ruin my image by frying minorities." Oh wait... Didn't you know George W. Bush's grandfather helped fund the Nazi party?

Lack of originality is nothing new. (2, Interesting)

hal2814 (725639) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835116)

Can we please stop bickering about the lack of originality like it's something new? Who remembers the arcade space shooter? Who remembers the coutless Double Dragon clones? What about the 2D platformer? Who remembers 1-on-1 fighting games flooding the market? There are several genres of gaming right now that are getting spread thin. They will die out when consumer support for them fades. Then we'll finally get to a bunch of new types of games come in and try to win the honor of being cloned to death. We are in a phase of utter lack of originality but it will pass and we will get a brief span of original games coming out. Just make sure to enjoy the next wave of originals while it lasts.

This article should be tagged as (1)

seann (307009) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835139)

"Halo Sucks".

Seriously, is this the only thing that determines the launch success of microsofts console?

There wasn't a Halo or GTA in the last transition (2, Insightful)

superultra (670002) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835183)

The PS2 came out in the US in October 2000. GTA3 did not come out until the October after the PS2 launched, in 2001. Of course, neither did Halo, which came out with the Xbox November of 2001. But for nearly an entire the year, the bright shining stars of the lot were Onimusha (oooo!) and Madden (yawn). The PS2 was plagued with hardware shortages, then memory card shortages, and then people realized that setting the PS2 on its side and leaving the disc in scratched the disc to hell.

This is March, a mere 5 months after the so-called transition to the next generation, and they're calling it?

it's the visuals (1)

nomadic (141991) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835189)

Maybe it's the obsession with visuals. Reminds me of in the 90s when you started getting superstar artists in the comics world, who got so much clout they were allowed to start writing their own comics too. Some of them could write, but most of them couldn't.

The problem is clear. (3, Insightful)

MaWeiTao (908546) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835222)

Business people turn everything into shit. We've got people who don't understand a thing about what they're selling making all the decisions. They're not engineers or designer who rose through the ranks, having intimate knowledge of what the company does. They're a bunch of suits with MBA degrees hired specifically to run the company. They're driven by one thing and its not producing a quality product, nor is it changing the market, nor is it innovation; they're driven by money.

And if they don't show healthy growth within the next few months the stock market reacts negatively. All these jerks want money in their pockets right now, instead of looking at the long-term health of a company.

Certainly the reality is a lot more complicated than that, but I think this is one of the core problems. It's why we see garbage coming from the game industry, and this problem is reflected in other industries.

As a Gamestop Employee (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14835280)

I can tell you that the average consumer is the problem. If they're a vet all they'll play is war games, if they're into rap music all they play is GTA-clones, if they're a nerd all they play is RPG, if they're a half-nerd all they play is FPS, if they're not a nerd at all then all they play is sports games.

When people tell me they want something new and original I point out Killer7 and go into a long spiel about how great it is and just because it's on rails no one buys it. Most games that are "original" are really just gimicky, so when an original and good game - like Killer7 - comes out, everyone assumes it'll be bad without even trying it. They buy Dynasty Warriors 5billion Xtreme Kill Empires Legends and complain about how games are all the same. . .

If you like innovative games here's a hint: if it's developed in America it's probably not that good. Metal Gear, Resident Evil, Tekken, Gran Turismo, Indigo Prophecy, Marc Ecko, Grand Theft Auto, Farcry - none of these are American. The really good games come from Japan and France.

Blurb nailed it (1)

Lord_Dweomer (648696) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835353)

The story blurb nails it right on the head.

Online games, MMORPGs in particular are sweeping the world by storm, and lets face it...the computer is a much better tool for playing these than consoles. Then lets take a look at blockbuster titles...there are none, or if they do exist, they are sequels which don't justify spending $400 just to play.

The biggest issue by far though is innovative gameplay. I have a sneaking suspicion that if the Revolution can come out with one or two innovative games that focus on the new gameplay enhancements of the system...they will sweep the console market.

In this day and age gamers are NOT just satisfied with better graphics. Its become expected that graphics power will increase, and yes....eventually they must upgrade to accommodate, but there are two areas of gaming that have also become very important as of late, and thats where the real room for growth is.

These two areas are physics engines and input devices. Gamers are quick realizing after HL2 was released that one of the best ways to creative fresh gameplay every time and to be able to constantly surprise yourself is to be able to do cool things with physics. Games can look as pretty as they can make them, but all that is useless if it doesn't FEEL like real life. And that's where the input devices come in. Nintendo is bridging the gap between how you play the game, and what happens in the game. Suddenly you don't push a button to swing your sword, you actually swing it. And yes, this isn't exactly an earth-shattering concept...but pulling it off successfully enough and having enough market share to actually make people develop for it is fairly new...and something that Nintendo is uniquely positioned to do at this point.

I'm personally holding out for a Revolution. And no, I don't work for Nintendo, in fact I camped out in front of Target to get a PS2 when it came out...but Sony has lost my trust, and my praise. And MS never had it to begin with.

Re:Blurb nailed it (1)

maumedia (951250) | more than 8 years ago | (#14836985)

Why are PC's better suited to MMO's?

I've played World of Warcraft for a year. If I could play it on the 360, from my comfy couch, on my 54-inch DLP, with a real game controller, and built-in voice chat support, I'd be right back on the money train in a second. Less than a second, I'd be offering to pay early to support the beta.

I don't see any reason why MMO's on the 360 shouldn't be as good as, or better than MMOs on a PC.

Death to the mouse and keyboard games. I use a mouse and a keyboard for work 18 hours a day, 6 days a week. On game night, I want to relax and leave the computer in the dark.

Re:Blurb nailed it (1)

Lord_Dweomer (648696) | more than 8 years ago | (#14842117)

The reason why is because of the keyboard and mouse. While I can definitely sympathize with you...unfortunately you are in the VAST minority.

To your point about built in voice chat...I wonder if that may indeed help turn the tide to the console. One of the main reason for using MMORPGs on the PC now is all of the auxilliary software people tend to run with it....voice chat...map overlays.....mods.....etc. But I don't foresee the keyboard and mouse going away anytime in the immediate future. They simply offer WAY more input options than the Xbox controller.

I would buy a next gen console... (1)

RexRhino (769423) | more than 8 years ago | (#14835457)

I would buy a next gen console if I could. No place near me is selling just an Xbox 360 and accessories I want. All the places either don't have the Xbox 360, or are selling it as a $1000 package along with 10 games and 4 controllers and a bunch of crap that I don't really want.

Seriously, when are these companies gonna learn that the vast majority of people aren't going to go on a waiting list, camp out in front of the store, or purchase a bunch of crap we don't need just to help you beta test your product? If you want us to give you our money, then make it easy for us to give you our money.

Don't expect us to think it is some sort of privledge or gift from god to buy your product. It is a console, not antibiotics. There are any number of leisure and entertainment items I could spend my money on instead.

When was (1)

Brownstar (139242) | more than 8 years ago | (#14836109)

any version of GTA part of the intial batch of games available for at the launch of a console.

And for that matter, most consoles do not have any break-out games as release.

Those tend to take at least 6 months to a year to start showing up.

Desire (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14836118)

Unlike my NES when the SNES was coming... And unlike my SNES when the N64 was coming... My existing consoles and games are still looking damn good and still entertaining me. I am NOT salivating for anything new or "better". Hell, look at how gorgeous Burnout Revenge is. You can't really get better graphics than that without going HD. Bottom line, I don't need a new console.
Check for New Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>