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Golden Age of Arcade Games

Zonk posted more than 8 years ago | from the please-keep-comebacks-away-from-fashion dept.

58

jayintune writes "2old2play has an article about the resurgence of arcade games in the living room. The article shows that while large companies like MS and Nintendo can make a nice dollar, small developers can now make money off of low budget arcade games with far less monetary risk. Just like fashion, what was once cool is now cool again." That, combined with the Xbox Live arcade rollouts, do seem to be bringing back the oldies but goldies.

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58 comments

Even game like Hearts and whatnot... (1)

tcopeland (32225) | more than 8 years ago | (#14836956)

...are interesting to folks.

We put Hearts and a couple of version of Solitaire in the first beta of indi [getindi.com] and that was the thing that got the most "wow" - not the instant messaging, not the calendar stuff we'd labored over, but the multiplayer Hearts. Ah well.

Arcade (1)

engagebot (941678) | more than 8 years ago | (#14836984)

There (used to be before Katrina) a 'penny' arcade in New Orleans that we went to all the time. It was full of pretty current games, all in good shape. The trick was, every game was *actually* still a quarter. They were open until 3am on weekends too. Needless to say the place was always full of people. I understand that the newest games are mad expensive (>$10k), but still. $1.25 in an arcade game just wasn't destined to last.

Re:Arcade (1)

ender- (42944) | more than 8 years ago | (#14837588)

There is [or was?] an arcade in San Jose, CA called Nickel City. As you would expect, the games take nickels instead of quarters. And along the back wall was a line of classic arcade games [Defender, Galaga, Pac Man etc] that was totally free.

I miss that place [I'm in Tx now :( ]

Re:Arcade (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14839131)

Well, if you're in the northeast Dallas area, there's a place called Nickelrama [google.com]. It's a Nickel arcade, with the most expensive game costing 6 nickels. Chances are you'll find yourself running out of time to play games before you find yourself running out of 10 bucks worth of nickles. It's not all old stuff, but don't expect to get a brand-new game in there. All in all, a great place to go. Only catch is you have to pay $2 to get in, which is the cost of a game or two at other arcades.

Re:Arcade (1)

Damvan (824570) | more than 8 years ago | (#14843682)

Nickel City is actually a chain. There is one here in So Cal where I live. $5 to get in the door, then all games are a nickel.

Re:Arcade (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14838106)

Go to Brooklyn and check out the Barcade. It's in Billyburg, and they've got a ton of excellent vintage arcade games to play for just a quarter, AND they've got some excellent micro-brews on tap to boot. Lots of good places to put your pint while you play Tapper, too!

http://barcadebrooklyn.com/ [barcadebrooklyn.com]

Re:Arcade (1)

cayenne8 (626475) | more than 8 years ago | (#14838173)

"There (used to be before Katrina) a 'penny' arcade in New Orleans that we went to all the time. It was full of pretty current games, all in good shape."

Not sure where this one was that you refer to, but, if you like the older games, go try the bar "The Goldmine" down in the quarter. They have a pretty good collection of old games an pinball machines.

I hang and work with a friend of mine on restoring old pins, and building MAME cabinets out of old arcade cabs we pickup. These old games are a blast to play, and I do sense a slight resurgance....

Hehehe...my friend's wife is a patient one tho...I mean, collecting old pins can arcade cabs is a hobby that takes up a LOT of room.

:-)

Re:Arcade (1)

engagebot (941678) | more than 8 years ago | (#14838240)

Gotcha. The one we went to was actually in Metairie on Veterans. Just a few blocks from Clearview. I live in Baton Rouge actually.

I've got an old Atari Star Wars game myself. Had it since i was about 7 years old (i'm 24 now). My grandfather was a pharmacist and had a drug store and movie theatre back in the 50's. I've got an old pinball game from his store that's so old it doesn't have flippers. Just a whole bunch of holes for the ball to fall in once you launch it. Also an old slot machine that gives out rolls of mints. Pretty cool stuff.

Re:Arcade (1)

cayenne8 (626475) | more than 8 years ago | (#14842235)

Very interesting..yes, I think I remember that one in Metairie. I myself right now am living in Baton Rouge (after staying on the dining room floor of a friend in Prairieville for awhile). I've got an old Tempest cab. that I have a 4 player custom station on for MAME games.

I also recently bought an old Playboy pinball machine that I hope to find time in the near future to start restoring...hehehe...maybe by then I'll be in a house again with a place to put it.

My friend that does most of the restoration, etc...is wanting to open some kind of retro-arcade....I told him we'd need a bar in there too, to make it a little more profitable, but, sure would be fun to hang at the arcade like the old days...

Re:Arcade (1)

Hoi Polloi (522990) | more than 8 years ago | (#14844503)

Since we're on the topic of arcades, anyone in New England should check out the arcade on Old Orchard Beach Maine. It is like a big refuge for pinball, classic arcade games, and carnival type games (i.e. skee ball). Loads o' fun.

Xbox 360 Arcade (1)

Pyrowolf (877012) | more than 8 years ago | (#14837011)

Russell Carroll has been talking about [gametunnel.com] and predicting on "Attack of the Show" that Indy Gaming would get a boost thanks to the Live Arcade. The idea that you can sit down at a console and snag a game for $5 is the largest part of it, regardless if it's an Indy release, or an Arcade Classic. Most everyday Joe's aren't dedicated enough to build a MAME cabnet, but drop a few bucks on some Midway classics and get the instant gratification of playing immediately instead of getting a game at a retail outlet is an easy choice for most.

Re:Xbox 360 Arcade (1)

docdude316 (836485) | more than 8 years ago | (#14837830)

I can see the Revolution bringing a bigger boost to Indy gaming, as long as Nintendo allows new downloadable games on their virtual console. Think about it, when a developer makes a game for Xbox Live Arcadem they still have to develop it for the Xbox 360. However, with the Revolution you could develop for the NES, SNES or N64 and still be able to run it on the Revolution. I would think that it would be a lot easier (and cheaper) to develop a new NES game than a Xbox 360 game.

Re:Xbox 360 Arcade (1)

codemonkey420 (958546) | more than 8 years ago | (#14837896)

I believe developing for the NES isn't as easy as it sounds. Many of those developer packages were probably primative compared to the software packages, libraries, and API's you get today. And if you end up with a software issue or glitch I doubt your going to get too much support from Nintendo when it comes to trouble shooting.

Public Domain (4, Interesting)

Alaren (682568) | more than 8 years ago | (#14837036)

Isn't it amazing, the levels of entertainment and enjoyment we can have by looking into our past? We're reaching a point in history where the past catalog of games is big enough and rich enough that, even focusing only on the really, really great ones, literally hundreds of stories are waiting to be retold.

It's a fun and in many ways rare opportunity to watch new mediums enter this phase (and to be sure, gaming is only just arriving here). All the bad stuff remains more or less buried while a veritable trove of glittering jewels of culture are dusted off and appreciated anew.

Now, as great as it is, just imagine how much better it would be if our out-of-control IP laws, instead of lining already well-lined corporate pockets, instead returned any idea more than 10 years old to the public domain.

It's interesting to me that vintage gaming became so huge (emulators etc.) before someone thought to turn a profit from it. While part of me is glad someone (MS) is finally providing "legal" ways to enjoy past productions, part of me is sad that they are effectively subverting a natural cultural process to instead make it a matter of corporate profits. Personally I will not be participating in this sell-out, but will conitnue lobbying to have most of this IP freed to the public that so generously allowed its creators a profit in the first place.

Re:Public Domain (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14837267)

...but will conitnue lobbying to have most of this IP freed to the public...

I.P. Freely?

Re:Public Domain (3, Interesting)

rewinn (647614) | more than 8 years ago | (#14837520)

>All the bad stuff remains more or less buried while a veritable trove of glittering jewels of culture are dusted off and appreciated anew.

We can compare the realm of games to those of music and literature. For every Mozart there was probably a hundred hack composers; for every Shakespeare, a hundred dreadful playwrights, churning out whatever might make them a living. Art & technology has progressed far in the centuries since, but the best work survives because, for all their technological limits (...from our standpoint ...) they hit something really, really important.

I'm not going to claim that Pac-Man or Hearts are comparable to Hamlet or to Mozart's Requiem, but in their own realm they appeal to our need for play in a way that transcends technology; while their numberless contemporary competitors have all but disappeared because they just didn't quite hit it.

Re:Public Domain (1)

just_another_sean (919159) | more than 8 years ago | (#14837627)

You make a good point in support of the parent post. You mentioned Hearts as a great game. Well the only reason so many people can put out Hearts, Mahjong, etc. is that these are public domain. Either they were never "protected" in the first place or have slipped into PD becuase they are so old.

Imagine if someone owned a copyright/patent on the rules for chess. We'd have never been able to enjoy all the hundreds, if not thousands of "implentations" that are chess (E.g. classic board, computer chess, online chess, travel chess with little boards and magnetic pieces).

Re:Public Domain (4, Insightful)

drsquare (530038) | more than 8 years ago | (#14837672)

Only on Slashdot could a completely unrelated article about arcade games turn into a rant about copyright. Get over it, there are millions of articles where you can get on your hobby horse, I'm here to read about arcade games.

Re:Public Domain (1)

Hoi Polloi (522990) | more than 8 years ago | (#14844449)

As Zippy the Pinhead once said "Utopia isn't all it is cracked up to be, there isn't anything to complain about."

Re:Public Domain (1)

Eightyford (893696) | more than 8 years ago | (#14838108)

Personally I will not be participating in this sell-out, but will conitnue lobbying to have most of this IP freed to the public that so generously allowed its creators a profit in the first place.

It's not illegal to copy the idea for a game. Go nuts.

Re:Public Domain (1)

C0rinthian (770164) | more than 8 years ago | (#14838254)

You realize that public domain != Free, don't you?

Last time I bought a CD of Mozart sonatas, which are public domain, I still had to purchase the recording. The difference, is that whoever made the recording did not have to pay royalties to the original copyright holder.

Even if these games were public domain, the company providing them would be completely entitled to ask a fee for that service.

Copyright means I can restrict who profits from my work. Public Domain means ANYONE can profit from my work.

You're Only Half Right (1)

Alaren (682568) | more than 8 years ago | (#14838589)

"You realize that public domain != Free, don't you?"

Well, I realize that public domain does not necessarily mean free, but I think you're missing the point.

"Last time I bought a CD of Mozart sonatas, which are public domain, I still had to purchase the recording. The difference, is that whoever made the recording did not have to pay royalties to the original copyright holder."

Right. What's more, unless you are a serious Mozart die-hard who only listens to the finest quality recordings, you probably paid a lot less for those recordings than for, say, your Britney Spears CDs. Even better, if you want to get a band together and play those smae Mozart songs and make your own recording, you can do that too. And if you want to tweak that music and make something new and original on top of Mozart's work... well, the possibilities are endless.

"Even if these games were public domain, the company providing them would be completely entitled to ask a fee for that service."

Sure. But it could be anyone. Imagine you invest in some ROM dumping equpiment and start charging $.50 per game, selling ROMs over the web--charging for the bandwidth, effectively. You could do that and make a profit. You could have done it 8-10 years ago and made a profit, and the cultural impact of truly inexpensive entertainment would be (I believe) significant.

"Copyright means I can restrict who profits from my work. Public Domain means ANYONE can profit from my work.

But it also means that, depending on the form it takes, even though it might still cost money, it might also be free. And even when it does cost money, it will be cheaper overall. These games could and should be selling, at a profit, for $1.00 or $.50 apiece, not $5.00. They could even be profitable if they were completely free, depending on your business model.

Re:You're Only Half Right (1)

C0rinthian (770164) | more than 8 years ago | (#14838681)

The point is: Live! would operate exactly the same if the games were Public Domain. You say that Microsoft is subverting the system, but I fail to see how what they do on Live! affects copyright and Public Domain at all.

Hell, I'm sure Microsoft would be thrilled if all the games they're pushing on Live! were PD, because it means they wouldn't have to pay anyone for the right to sell them.

Re:You're Only Half Right (1)

Alaren (682568) | more than 8 years ago | (#14838938)

And my point is, Live! would be obsolete, overpriced, and late to the game. Actually, it is obsolete, overpriced, and late to the game, compared with the emulation scene... but it's one of the first strictly legal vintage gaming download alternatives available. (Yes, there have been other efforts, sort of, but they failed for various reasons that were in many cases tied to IP).

Re:You're Only Half Right (1)

C0rinthian (770164) | more than 8 years ago | (#14839099)

Here's what you're ignoring: MICROSOFT IS NOT THE IP HOLDER.
They are up against the same IP restrictions as anyone else trying to set up a similar service. Microsoft is just the first to set up a working business model DESPITE the IP restrictions. Just because noone got it working before doesn't mean Microsoft is 'bad' for pulling it off.

I'm up for Microsoft bashing as much as the next guy, but you're not making sense here.

Read What I'm Saying (1)

Alaren (682568) | more than 8 years ago | (#14839912)

I've said several times that this is, generally speaking, a good thing! I'm not bashing Microsoft. I know they're not the IP holder, and indeed I never suggested that they were. I know what public domain means. You're so busy being "smarter" than me that you are completely missing my point.

My point is, if IP laws were better, this could have happened years ago. If IP laws were better, an already good thing would actually be even better. If IP laws were better, it wouldn't require a behemoth like MS (who can afford leasing other people's IP, or bully them into giving it up) to put something like this together legally. What I am trying to communicate--and what other users and moderators clearly understood which you clearly did not--is that while it is cool to see how "retro gaming" or "vintage gaming" is affecting us culturally, it is upsetting that IP laws forced such a development to start underground, delayed its emergence into the mainstream, and made it part of an already expensive hobby instead of part of our free or virtually-free cultural heritage--the valuable and meaningful Public Domain.

Now, go back and read my posts, but instead of looking for ways to "correct" me to make yourself look "knowledgable," seek to understand. You might not like what I have to say, but at the very least please try to critique what I am actually saying.

Re:You're Only Half Right (1)

irablum (914844) | more than 8 years ago | (#14838726)

Yep, me and the boys are going to pull out the electric guitars and start jamming to Eine Kleine Nachtmusik. I can see it.

Ira

Re:You're Only Half Right (1)

C0rinthian (770164) | more than 8 years ago | (#14838769)

Bach's Tocatta and Fugue in D Minor would sound damn cool on electric guitar/bass. Of course, that piece sounds damn cool on ANYTHING. (Heard a recording of a kazoo ensemble play it once)

Re:You're Only Half Right (1)

suraklin (28841) | more than 8 years ago | (#14839740)

When mp3.com was around in its original incarnation there was an instrumental rock group that did Fugue and Tocatta in D minor along with a bunch of other Bach compositions. They sound great. I think they were calling themselves the JS bach experience.

Re:You're Only Half Right (1)

RexxFiend (261662) | more than 8 years ago | (#14849635)

there was this lot [allofmp3.com].

They were pretty popular in the 80's. A lot of their music was used for TV shows and documentaries. It had a sort of futuristic, electronic feel to it, even though they were all classically trained musicians. They did a great tocatta on the electric guitar.

Re:You're Only Half Right (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14839150)

Yep, me and the boys are going to pull out the electric guitars and start jamming to Eine Kleine Nachtmusik. I can see it.

You are Nigel Tufnel and I claim my Five Pounds.

Re:Public Domain (1)

writermike (57327) | more than 8 years ago | (#14839411)

I'm not going to claim that Pac-Man or Hearts are comparable to Hamlet or to Mozart's Requiem

Go ahead. It's okay. No one here is going to fault you for it.

Ahh the golden age of the arcades (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14837050)

Many slashdotters are too young to have even seen an arcade, but let me tell you it was a magical place. Rows of Pac Mans, Donkey Kongs, Dig Dugs and even a Turbo or II lined up calling young pimply faced nerds with their 8 bit siren song and flashing lights. Yup, we were God(s) back then! And no chick could resist us ... in fact they intentionally shunned our wing of the mall for fear of being seduced by our musk.

I truly feel sorry for today's youth, that they'll never know the feeling of playing with a greasy joy stick.

Re:Ahh the golden age of the arcades (1)

Lord Kano (13027) | more than 8 years ago | (#14837300)

I'd say that there were two golden ages. One being the one you mentioned with Pac Man, Donkey Kong, Dig Dug, Bump n Jump, Xevious, Sinistar, Rally-X, and Publius(ok, that one's a joke).

But there was a second golden age. Mortal Kombat/MKII, Killer Instinct, Tekken and the early SFII games. I dropped many an allowance on those games.

My rise to stardom at the local Mall began when the resident Asian kid was afraid to play against me.

That's not intended to be a racist statement, but every mall that I ever played at had one asian kid who would kick everyone's ass when they plunked their 50 cents into the machine. Ours was "Ming", he worked at the food court at the Manchu Wok. On his breaks he would come up to the arcade and play. He's spend 50 cents and beat people until his dad made him go back to work. When I got good, he had to bring up more than 50 cents when his break began.

One more session at KI? Where, oh where are you Ming Doggy Dogg?

LK

Re:Ahh the golden age of the arcades (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14837528)

Hey Kano!

I'm now your CIO. Get back to work!

-Ming

Re:Ahh the golden age of the arcades (1)

vertinox (846076) | more than 8 years ago | (#14838044)

Ours was "Ming", he worked at the food court at the Manchu Wok. On his breaks he would come up to the arcade and play. He's spend 50 cents and beat people until his dad made him go back to work. When I got good, he had to bring up more than 50 cents when his break began.

Ah the old days on the mall. You know... When every mall in the states had an arcade, Babbage's, comic book store, and that hobby shop (which I can't remember)

I think the golden age of arcades for me was when Street Fighter II hit the shelves and went from that to Mortal Kombat, Mortal Kombat II, and Killer Instinct, and then went downhill about the time of Mortal Kombat III.

Throw in all the Neo Geo games at the time and it was damn fun.

I remember the days of Street Fighter II Championship edition in which we would wait in lines to challenge the current player. If you were good you could basically stay up there for a while til someone beat you.

Of course if no one was there and it was me and my friends we'd just put quarters in for both of us and let the first player play against the CPU and then if we were about to loose the second player would jump in and repeat the process.

Honorable mentions would be King of the Monsters, Operation Wolf, Double Dragon, NBA Jam, and Virtua Fighter.

Re:Ahh the golden age of the arcades (1)

Hoi Polloi (522990) | more than 8 years ago | (#14845266)

I remember getting into arcade games later in college in the mid 80s. There was a section of the student center you walked through on your way across campus that had 10-15 games. I got into some of them, sometimes too much making me late for class!

Xybots: Fun maze games that was great with a partner for teamwork due to the split screen

Xenophobe: Fun cartoonish graphics and with good controls. One of my favs!

Smash TV: One of my all time favs. Great with a partner. Sort of like Bezerk meets The Running Man. "Total Carnage!"

Road Blasters: Got boring after a while but a good fast shoot-em up

Black Tiger: I didn't get into this until MAME came along because it was a real quarter eater. Lots of guys I saw were obsessed with it. Closest thing to arcade D&D we had.

Gondomania: Fun shootem up with nice graphics and lots of cool weapons.

Gauntlet: A quarter eater that could get annoying fast. I still find myself saying "Warrior needs food, badly" under my breath when I'm hungry like a total nerd.

APB: A real blast driving all over the place while the Sergeant chews you out in his "grumble grumble" talk

Heavy Barrel: Scrolling top-down shootem up that was fun just because of the big fat bullets your guy shot and the shrapnel from the grenades.

???: I can't remember the name of this tank game for the life of me. You had the two stick style tank controller with a top down angled view and a rotating turret for Doom-like strafing. I became VERY good at this and finished it a few times on one quarter each time. It may have been an Atari game because it used some of the Atari fonts and sounds.

Re:Ahh the golden age of the arcades (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14846083)

Vindicators. It's on the Midway Classics disc for the XBox or PS2.

Re:Ahh the golden age of the arcades (1)

Lord Kano (13027) | more than 8 years ago | (#14846962)

I had completely forgotton APB until your post. I miss those damned games. It's too hard to find a good source for MAME ROMS.

I picked up a several GB archive once, but only about half of the games worked and of those only about half were any good.

LK

Re:Ahh the golden age of the arcades (1)

Zardus (464755) | more than 8 years ago | (#14837368)

Well, according to this [bash.org], kids today do know the feeling of playing with a greasy joy stick.

Re:Ahh the golden age of the arcades (1)

boy_afraid (234774) | more than 8 years ago | (#14837904)

Yes, hours playing Asteroids. I was the master of RASTAN!

Let us not forget Joust, Goonies, Double Dragon, Karate. I'm getting very very nastolgic all of a sudden.

P.S. I'm in an 80s timewarp, I'm also listening to Cindy Lauper and Crowded House (Don't Dream It's Over) as I type this.

Re:Ahh the golden age of the arcades (3, Interesting)

hal2814 (725639) | more than 8 years ago | (#14837955)

You must be quite the youngster yourself if you don't remember girls at the arcade. I remember back when arcades were where teenagers hung out. And I don't just mean the nerds. I mean all of them. The ones who weren't into video games could try their hand at any of the redemtion-style games available like Skee Ball, Skeet Shooting, or any number of machines that measure your strength. It was like a carnival without all the rides and that's the type of audience it attracted.

Re:Ahh the golden age of the arcades (2)

ShortBeard (740119) | more than 8 years ago | (#14839869)

Your Arcade was in the Mall?
Man, I can't count the times I trudged out route 50 to the small building next to the eletric station. No sidewalks. This was in northern Virginia, so it could be raining and usually was.
Zaxxon, Donkey Kong, Joust, Dig Dug, Centipede. Whew! take me back.

Then Tron and Spy hunter came out. I worked at a drug store and they had Spy Hunter. After my shift I would spend a couple of quarters. Would have spent more but I was at work.

It's been many years since I have played Air Hockey but I reckon I'm still a mean player.

Re:Ahh the golden age of the arcades (1)

lupinstel (792700) | more than 8 years ago | (#14843607)

Ohh don't worry; the excitment of playing with a greasy joystick within the comfort of your own basement is familiar to all Slashdotters young and old.

Gaming Roots (1)

keldog42 (956510) | more than 8 years ago | (#14837137)

I find myself playing the $5 - $10 Xbox Live arcade games more often and for longer stretches of time that the triple A titles that I paid $60 for. I hope that the big money publishers (EA, MS Game Studio, Activision, etc.) will learn that isn't uber graphics, well known voice actor, Hollywood titles, and endless sequals that make good games. It is fun and creative gameplay.

Now if you will excuse me, I'm going to go play Zuma on my $400 console.

Even the lottery is in on it (3, Interesting)

vasqzr (619165) | more than 8 years ago | (#14837183)

The Michigan Lottery has a Pac-Man instant ticket, along with the regular cash prizes you can win 1 of 30 PacMan arcade games.

http://www.michigan.gov/lottery/0,1607,7-110-821-1 35347--,00.html [michigan.gov]

Re:Even the lottery is in on it - a tip and rant (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14853298)

If your choice matters, give the game a try if you want.

Otherwise lump the game with other 'amusements' like slot machines where your decisionmaking is at the absolute minimum.... :p

'tis a shame to see PAC-MAN become a shill for the lottery... :p

Does this have Namco's blessing?

It was because of all the Pac-Man 'knockoffs' that Midway put out that Namco parted ways with Midway. This whole mess started with MS. PAC-MAN, a bootleg PAC-MAN game that came out that Midway (somehow) got the rights to.

Too bad. Midway made some *GREAT* (albeit pattern-driven) games in their heyday.... =/

Read the story on Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pac-Man [wikipedia.org]

I feel it (1)

fak3r (917687) | more than 8 years ago | (#14837218)

as a teenager who grew up (age wise) in the 80s, I thought of this yesterday when I was talking to a contractor on building a room in my basement. I could just see a couple of machines side by side with a barstool nearby to sit on, and a load of quarters (you know, to complete the experience). I'm sure I want the ones that are in demand, and thus expensive, but Donkey Kong, Defender and Centipede would be oh-so sweet!

Re:I feel it (1)

steveo777 (183629) | more than 8 years ago | (#14837538)

It's not the games themselves that are expensive. It's the chassis that runs the bucks. Check out e-bay and you'll find the game boards for relatively cheap. You can even get multiple cart boards for old Atari games like you're thinking of. The Chassis can run upwards of 400 bucks (with the original images, but that can be painted too).

I bought an original Centipede (1)

Anonymous Crowhead (577505) | more than 8 years ago | (#14837364)

It's in perfect condition and now I see them going for 3-4 times what I paid for in 7 years ago. I never thought of it as an investment. A word to the wise for anyone considering buy an arcade game, espescially an older upright - these things are monsters. They are big and heavy. They are hard to move around, especially up/down stairs and they take up a lot of space. They are loads of fun though and anytime someone new sees it in my house they are always in awe. It takes them back.

Oh, and if you buy a game with a trackball, make sure you maintain the berrings regularly even if your not using it.

I concur (2, Funny)

mgabrys_sf (951552) | more than 8 years ago | (#14839453)

I've got a Donkey Kong and Two Pac-Man machines taking up space in my living room right now. I've always prided myself on being ahead of the trend-curve - and dammit - I still gots it baby!

Now I can justify getting 4 more machines to my sig-other. Oh honey? We need to remodel the living room some more - I'm thinking Sinistar and Robotron. Whaddya think? Honey?....Honey?

Its not the same without an aracde stick (1)

jonwil (467024) | more than 8 years ago | (#14839668)

Which is why I love my OzStick :)
It has a joystick and 9(!) buttons.

gametap anyone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14842641)

errr .. anyone heard of gametap ...
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