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Google Slips Talk of Online Storage Service

Zonk posted more than 8 years ago | from the ambitious-google-never dept.

266

sonsonete writes "Reuters reports that Google is preparing to offer online storage, according to company documents that were mistakenly released on the Web. From the piece: 'The existence of the previously rumored GDrive online storage service surfaced after a blogger discovered apparent notes in a slide presentation by Google executives published on Google's site after its analysts presentation day last Thursday.'"

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Concept vs. Reality (5, Insightful)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867592)

In principle, not a bad thing, considering Jane & Joe CtrlAltDel don't usually make backups and probably hardly come close to the actual capacity of their hard drives. Not likely to be a realistic consideration for Slashdotters who count their media, development tools, etc in the terabytes, though.

But there's the worry that if Google did this, how long before the Bureau of National Security Over Privacy and All Else presses Google to make content of this online storage available to the FBI? RIAA? MPAA? Cheney Department of Vindictive Leaks?

Google recently squared up against the U.S. Justice Department which has subpoenaed a limited set of data on Google search habits, drawing an outcry from privacy advocates.
It's thought provoking, certainly. Then there's the inevitable:
Google, Inc.
1600 Ampitheatre Parkway
Mountain View, CA 94043

Dear GDrive user, we are very concerned about recent activity with regard to your account. Please verify you User ID at the following link. www.google.com/accounts[links to: update.google-account.info/idpasswdstealer.html]

Remember never to give out your User ID or Password to people you don't know, those who spit while talking, people who do not wash their hands after using the lavatory, wombat ranchers, msn fanboys or anyone with the middle initial of J.

Best regards,
Google Internet Security
Google, Inc.

I'll pass.

Encryption (5, Insightful)

Neil Watson (60859) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867608)

Encrypt your files.

Re:Encryption (-1, Troll)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867652)

Encrypt your files.

That would probably only slow them down.

Once they found the consecutive letters A-L Q-A-E-D-A with an ASCII, EBCDIC, RADIX-50 or UNICODE dump you'd find your butt in the cell next to Moussaoui. Never mind it was utter chance. Better to have nothing to look through.

Re:Encryption (1, Insightful)

gkhan1 (886823) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868281)

How the hell would they find those letters in an encrypted file? You realise that modern encryption is (practically, if not theoretically) unbreakable, right?

Re:Encryption (2, Insightful)

krbvroc1 (725200) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868387)

I think he means they would apply a 'text' scanner to a 'binary' encrypted document and there are odds that those letters could be found in many binary document. Thereby you might still be 'flagged' coincidentally.

Re:Encryption (1)

Firehed (942385) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867992)

Maybe it'll be done automatically. I'd imagine (hope) that any uploading is done over a secure connection anyways; might as well just not decrypt it at their end to protect everyone's safety a bit. That way the next time they're subpoenaed, they can hand over a mess of encrypted crap that's utterly useless to anyone without a quantum computer (or the password).

Re:Encryption (1)

Andrzej Sawicki (921100) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868076)

Nothing like letting someone else encrpt my files automagi... err.. automatically. What can stop them from making an unencrypted "backup" copy first? Trust anyone on the Internet, yeah right. /sarcasm

Re:Encryption (1)

gkhan1 (886823) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868341)

Well, assuming that they create a separate app instead of just web-integration, that app could encrypt the files using a supplied password, and transmit just the file, not the password. Smart people would be able to easily use a sniffer to make sure the program behaves and doesn't send the password, and what is sent is encrypted correctly. (one could argue that the app could encrypt the pass with a secret password only known to google, and then transmit it without anybody realising what that blob of seemingly-random data is. However, then the smart people would recognize that something fishy is going on and, presumably, they would not recommend it).

Re:Encryption (5, Insightful)

drgonzo59 (747139) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868169)

Of course, to NSA/FBI/CIA your encrypted GDrive that holds tax documents and family photos will look like it holds al Qaeda training manuals. So when the CIA takes you to Egypt for some fun interrogation and put a knife to your neck, you'll happily give them your passphrase so they can see what's on your GDrive.

Remember, the idea of a honest executive branch that will got to a court to get a permission to spy on you, or that you will get a speedy trial, or even a lawyer is history. Through fear we have allowed the government to become what it is now, blame the neo-conservatives for that if you want. Watch the "Power Of Nightmares" movie [archive.org] , I just saw it two days ago, quite enlightening, not totally objective but nevertheless it was worth my time (3 hours).

Re:Encryption (3, Interesting)

Firehed (942385) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868246)

I never said they couldn't get the password, I just said they'd need it. I'm sure it would be a lot less trouble for them to just take your machine in full due to whatever law that was they put in place, rather than drag you off to Egypt to force out the password. Because if they did that, they'd probably have to kill you - if you're geeky enough to encrypt your files (not especially, but still enough), I'm sure you'd post the incident on every forum you're a member of (or livejournal or whatever, or maybe upload the shot you got off your cameraphone to Flickr). IIRC, they can steal your computer and not even tell you for two months what happened or why (or perhaps longer, but it's not as if you're not going to notice that you're computer's gone missing); you might go on the assumption you've been burgled until it shows up in a battered USPS box on your front steps.

Re:Encryption (4, Interesting)

vhogemann (797994) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868320)

Better yet,

This theoretical GDrive could encrypt your files automagically, this way only YOU from YOUR COMPUTER should be able to view them. Google can skip all these legal problems claiming that they just provide the storage, but doesnt have acess to the contents of the files.

Of couse GDrive will send some meta-information about the files to feed Googles TextAds, probably the same info that GoogleDesktop send, and keep some kind of hash to identify identical files, in order to save server storage.

Just my $0.2

Maybe Google will add encryption (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14868326)

Sure would be convenient if Google just integrated the Encryption right in.

heh.

Mr. and Mrs. Reboot (1)

truthsearch (249536) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867636)

But Mr. & Mrs. Reboot can have their computer automatically upload for backups. Since they're using Windows they'd better back up often.

Re:Mr. and Mrs. Reboot (2, Informative)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867687)

Since they're using Windows they'd better back up often.

Ok, that looks like a swipe at Windows and probably not too justified unless you're insinuating this is a hedge against malicious worms.

I'd be more concerned about hard-drive quality. One of my 80GB drives (yeah, I know it's an antique at that size) is making funny noises so it's probably time to move the contents off to another drive (one of the nearly as antique 160GB drives.)

Re:Mr. and Mrs. Reboot (1, Interesting)

truthsearch (249536) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867809)

Windows [msversus.org] runs the hard drive far more intensely than Unix/Linux on a standard desktop. Unix usually uses free memory for disk caching much more than Windows. So in another swipe at Windows I suggest you ditch it.

That's just what we need! (3, Funny)

dada21 (163177) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867596)


Free online storage from a company that can't keep their documents safe from prying eyes -- including the document that eludes to the fact that they're offering free online storage.

Whoops.

Re:That's just what we need! (2, Insightful)

g0at (135364) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867729)

eludes [sic]

Actually, the article suggests just the opposite!

-b

Re:That's just what we need! (3, Funny)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867799)

Free online storage from a company that can't keep their documents safe from prying eyes -- including the document that eludes to the fact that they're offering free online storage.

Yeah, but just think, your stuff would be blocked from anyone in China.

Re:That's just what we need! (3, Insightful)

fermion (181285) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867848)

It's not so much that Google can't keep documents from prying eyes, it is that they are in the bussiness of selling ads, and one way they get people to look at the ads is to actively prying open documents to index and match to advertisers. For istance, Google mail works by matching ads to the content of the mail. Your privacy is not specifically violated, but googles still gets to index your information and match it ads. Also there is no guarantee that personal information or corporate secrets won't someday be revealed.

Likewise, the storage scheme will be the same thing. Google now gets to look at your entire life, and figure out how which of thier clients can help you with your lifestyle. Again, your privacy may no be specifically violated, at least in the near term, but it is still too much of a price for me to pay, when i can get the same thing without the risks for $10 a month.

Re:That's just what we need! (2, Insightful)

Phishcast (673016) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868425)

Someone has to add the obligitory "They can't look at my encrypted files" comment. This is it. I'd be okay with storing data I cared about on a Google server, it's my option to encrypt it.

Polite reminder from the spelling/grammar police (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14867874)

ELUDES refers to getting away from someone/something. You mean to use ALLUDES as in allusion.

Damn breaks; deludes the countryside (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14868338)

What allusion? I can see just fine.

Re:That's just what we need! (4, Insightful)

iamlucky13 (795185) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867897)

Funny, but also a good point. However, I do have a fair number of relatively low security risk files that it would be handy to access anywhere without carrying them on a flash drive. Flash drives are useable almost everywhere, but not quite, and they can get lost, which makes them as much or more of a security risk as files on a fileserver. I actually save a bunch of miscellaneous bits of information as drafts on my gmail account for convenience, but it would be nice to do so as something other than plain text. I'm pretty sure I'm not alone.

One would also expect that a google online drive would be roughly as secure as their mail account (same username and password, potentially different avenues for hacking, however). Email security is pretty important, so if a person is willing to trust their personal communications to Google, why not a few files? Besides, it's probably a lot more secure than the average user's personal computer.

format G: (-1, Redundant)

ExE122 (954104) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867600)

Google might offer similar services but shift the primary location of user data from the Windows desktop to Google's own computers.

I guess no Linux support? =P

we can house all user files, including emails, web history, pictures, bookmarks, etc and make it accessible from anywhere

Personally, I already sorta do use my 1GB GMail account as an online storage. I keep my resume, some db scripts I use, some code fragments I like to reference... So this sounds like a good idea to me. It's pretty nice to be able to access that stuff from anywhere you have internet.

There was some very informative discussion on an article about real-time network backup systems [slashdot.org] yesterday. I wonder how long before something like this becomes a common online service.

I remember also reading something (it might've been a comment) about the possibility of having an online operating system that people log into (like a vpn) that would be maintained by a service somewhere. The service provider would be the one to take care of virus scanning, upgrading to the latest software, hard disk failures, etc. You'd be able to browse the internet, send email, use word processors, and everything without having to worry about paying a ton of money for hardware upgrades, virus scanners, or something like M$ Vespa (not that there aren't open source alternatives). While I doubt a lot of /.ers would be signing up for that, I'd love to have to stop fixing my sister/mother/father's computer every time they do something dumb =P.

Looks like maybe Google is taking a step toward that direction.

It slipped out (5, Insightful)

truthsearch (249536) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867606)

Let's hope the stuff from your GDrive doesn't end up all over the internet like this presentation!

Re:It slipped out (5, Interesting)

ROOK*CA (703602) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867798)

Personally I'd probably use something like this to backup all my media files (Songs, Movies, Audiobooks, etc.,) In which case who cares if it ends up all over the Internet, Sharing is good, sharing MP3's, well that's even better. :)

Why give everything to google? (4, Insightful)

IntelliAdmin (941633) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867609)

The most interesting part of this story is this line: "With infinite storage, we can house all user files, including emails, web history, pictures, bookmarks, etc and make it accessible from anywhere (any device, any platform, etc)," the notes in the original Google presentation state. Chief Executive Eric Schmidt in his presentation made a cryptic comment that one goal of Google was to "store 100 percent" of consumer information." Now, this service might just be vapor. But if it is real. Why would I want to give all my very personal information to a potential advertiser? It makes me cringe all of the suckers out there that will store their private word, excel or other docs and have no idea how insecure it is.

Questioning Google? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14867698)

Why would I want to give all my very personal information to a potential advertiser?

But isn't Google's assurance about "doing no evil" put your mind at rest. Lord knows it does for a rather large percentage of Google fanboys who feel the company can "do no wrong", commercially, technically, or morally.

This from a company who'se entire business model is based around taking other peoples content and making money from it?!?

Re:Why give everything to google? (4, Interesting)

Reality Master 101 (179095) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867773)

Obviously Paranoids won't bother to use this service.

But for the rest of us, the idea of a cheap online backup (or even free, which would Rock Hard) of our ENTIRE hard drive would be very, very nice. It would be cool if Google provided automatic encryption, but I wouldn't care if they didn't.

Re:Why give everything to google? (4, Insightful)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868029)

Even if they do provide encryption, nothing is stopping a 3rd party from writing up their own encryption overlay.

Your encryption + their encryption = fuck the police

Re:Why give everything to google? (2, Interesting)

Breakfast Pants (323698) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868381)

You know, if you ever get divorced you can at least wipe your porn off of your computers in case that comes up as an issue. It isn't clear that you will be able to do so with such a service from Google. Also, every bit of communication you made with your extra-marital lover over gtalk will be available as well (I know, I know, you can opt out of this bit).

Re:Why give everything to google? (5, Insightful)

Telastyn (206146) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867814)

As opposed to trusting all of the intermediaries between you and google? Personally, I trust google to protect my privacy far more than say... Comcast, who has direct unencrypted access to every non-ssl web browsing session, gmail use, or email sent.

Re:Why give everything to google? (1)

Miraba (846588) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867872)

I certainly wouldn't give them everything I have, but I'd like to have another place (other than cds) for backing up my older .wpds, .docs, .rtfs, .pdfs, etc as well as games saves, bizarrely formatted email archives (Juno, I'm looking at you), and other odds and ends. I wouldn't use it to store anything I could consider sensitive, but when it comes to old data I'd like to keep, I definitely appreciate redundency.

Re:Why give everything to google? (2, Insightful)

garcia (6573) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868049)

Why would I want to give all my very personal information to a potential advertiser? It makes me cringe all of the suckers out there that will store their private word, excel or other docs and have no idea how insecure it is.

Because most people see that getting something "free" in return for giving up their personal information is worth it. Hell, there have been countless "studies" that asked people for their personal identifiable information including mother's maiden name and birthdate with nothing more than a phone call.

TIME article (1)

CrazedWalrus (901897) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868078)

TIME magazine ran Google on their cover, along with the piercing question: "Can we trust Google with our private information?" (or something like that)

I say: NO! NO! A thousand times, NO!

The fact that people would even consider putting their "private information" anywhere on the internet illustrates an epic disconnect between the perception of internet security or privacy with the realities of the same.

This GDrive service strikes me the same way. I suppose I could think of some uses for this service, but certainly, Google's interest here would likely be to index the information stored on your GDrive. With that in mind, I certainly wouldn't be using them for anywhere near 100% of my information storage needs.

Re:Why give everything to google? (1)

Daravon (848487) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868321)

Once you start storing everything on their systems, the next step is made that much easier. GoogleOS! Install this small program onto your computer and never have to worry about security holes in Filthy Microsoft Products(tm). All your information is already there, might as well run your programs off of their computers and "Save big $$$ on electricity!! No need to buy a new version of Windows every two years!!! Save on hardware upgrades!!!"

Didn't we have this in 1997? (4, Informative)

cjsnell (5825) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867619)

XDrive, Yahoo Briefcase, anybody?

Of course, we had Web-based e-mail in '96, too, and look what Google did with that.

Re:Didn't we have this in 1997? (4, Insightful)

hal9000(jr) (316943) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867671)

XDrive, Yahoo Briefcase, anybody?

Dude, get on the fan-boi band wagon. It doesn't matter if anything came before. If google does, it will be "better."

Seriously, this might be useful but I would definently want to encrypt that data. It still doesn't obviate the need for local back-ups. My data back-ups are routinely over 4GB is size. No way am I tranporting that up my stinking little DSL connection. But I could see a use for those few must have docs.

Re:Didn't we have this in 1997? (1)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868023)

Dude, get on the fan-boi band wagon. It doesn't matter if anything came before. If google does, it will be "better."

Without hopping on the "fan-boi band wagon", Google probably will do it better than others. Keep in mind that part of the appeal of GMail was the fact that it was so much faster, easier, and more pleasant to use than any other webmail service. If you remember XDrive and many of their competitors, it's not hard (at all) to imagine that Google could show them up with a better, faster, and easier interface.

That being said, there's still the matter of how useful such services are. We'll have to see if the market actually accepts the service for what it was intended for, or if they decide to host nothing more than massive W4r3Z repositories that they share with their "friends".

Re:Didn't we have this in 1997? (1)

BewireNomali (618969) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868230)

don't forget, however, that despite your assertions of how much better than other webmails gmail is, they still don't have a million users of the service. if they've gone over a million - that's a relatively recent occurrence. I'm too lazy to google up the numbers. gtalk is similar; they have not been widely adopted.

so market acceptance is an interesting term - because the market by and large has only accepted google search and not much else.

Re:Didn't we have this in 1997? (1)

NATIK (836405) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868307)

I am willing to bet google would have more gmail users if they made it possible to make a new account at will. It isnt hard to get a gmail account if you dont have one, but it isnt easy either. You need to know someone who have one or go to one of the websites offering accounts (most people dont know about these). I dont think you can really say how well accepted Gmail, based on people using it, is due to this.

Re:Didn't we have this in 1997? (1)

Otter (3800) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868122)

All those schemes, from XDrive to Eazel, fell down because they made no sense on dial-up. Most customers couldn't easily transfer anything but trivial files. (OK, Eazel had some other major problems...)

Once enough people have broadband connections, and if you could just back up deltas and not transfer your whole drive every time, it might make sense.

Re:Didn't we have this in 1997? (1)

Phishcast (673016) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868301)

My data back-ups are routinely over 4GB is size. No way am I tranporting that up my stinking little DSL connection.

How much of that 4GB do you change every day? Google may offer some sort of service which does a lazy sync of your data over the course of a few days and then only incrementally sync the changes, a la rsync. I could see this working quite well, actually.

This already exists... (1)

dingDaShan (818817) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867623)

There is already an unofficial one available that lets a person use their Gmail space for file storage. https://www.xmailharddrive.com/ [xmailharddrive.com]

Re:This already exists... (2, Insightful)

ZeroExistenZ (721849) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867703)

How come I don't trust signing inthere?

Re:This already exists... (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868139)

Me Either

Fortunately, they have a link to http://www.gmailtools.com/ [gmailtools.com] which has a link to this article : http://www.sheerboredom.net/modules.php?name=News& file=article&sid=72 [sheerboredom.net]

It's a full writeup on how to use the Gmail Drive Shell Extension [viksoe.dk]

Integrates into "My Computer" and works* like a charm.

I dunno if the current version still works with the current Gmail service.

Re:This already exists... (1)

ZeroExistenZ (721849) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868389)

I used to use the Drive shell extention but at a point it stopped working.
It could be they fixed the problem, I should look back into it...

I've adapted to renaming zipfiles and applying labels using filters. eg.
"Matches: from:(myemail@gmail.com) backup has:attachment"
Do this: Apply label "Backups"

Re:This already exists... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14867843)

Yes, there's also one called GMailFS. It seemed to work just fine for me for a while, then I guess Google found out about it and shut that account down.

I don't see what the problem is. If they want to offer me free online storage I'll use it. I already do by attaching files to emails sent to a specific gmail account. The thing for the user to do is to store files that you wouldn't mind being recorded or available to anyone. No problem for me. I keep the good stuff under lock and key anyhow.

Re:This already exists... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14868162)

An unofficial one that is against the terms of service and could get your account shut down (with all the data inside).

HURR!

Re:FF extension (1)

gm0e (872436) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868310)

Gmail Space is a firefox extension that provides a decent interface for storing files as gmail attachments.

Their Objective (5, Insightful)

rolfwind (528248) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867686)

From the article:
"With infinite storage, we can house all user files, including emails, web history, pictures, bookmarks, etc and make it accessible from anywhere (any device, any platform, etc)," the notes in the original Google presentation state.

Chief Executive Eric Schmidt in his presentation made a cryptic comment that one goal of Google was to "store 100 percent" of consumer information.


What is so damned cryptic about that? This has been google's strategy from the beginning, the more info they have about you, the users - the better they can market to you, the users.

I would be worried, of course, about the obvious bad possibilities that can from from this unprecedented access this gives google to our info. But that discussion has been played out with every google took.

Re:Their Objective (1)

IflyRC (956454) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867844)

"With infinite storage, we can house all user files, including emails, web history, pictures, bookmarks, etc and make it accessible from anywhere (any device, any platform, etc)," the notes in the original Google presentation state.

Accessible from anywhere....any device, any platform....and by anyone. Just what I always wanted!

Re:Their Objective (3, Funny)

xiphoris (839465) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867891)

This has been google's strategy from the beginning, the more info they have about you, the users - the better they can market to you, the users.

If you take the pessimistic stance that marketing will always happen, regardless, then at least in this scenario you receive marketing that might actually interest you instead of, oh, I don't know, notification about a new brand of tampon (the sorts of adverts that I always see on TV for some reason).

For example, Google would know that by reading Slashdot, you must be male, and automatically exclude you from receiving such misdirected advertisements. Likewise, if Google were in control of all the advertising, the Slashdot crowd would never get another v14gr4 ad again! (since they have no use for it) :-)

Sounds great for non-sensitive info (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14867690)

I use the ~2.5 GB of storage on my gmail account for this purpose already. I'm sure lots of others do as well. So sounds like a good idea to me.

For anything that has sensitive info...well thats why i have a 2GB thumb drive. Or I guess I could just encrypt it before uploading to my gmail account if I wanted to.

Lets face it mass storage with access from any web terminal is a great convenience, but privacy will always be an issue. How paranoid do you need to be for the data you have???

Google's Plans (5, Interesting)

sepharious (900148) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867700)

I've said it before and I'll continue to say it, Google has BIG plans that everyone is not piecing together. Long story short, I expect to see Google linux sometime within two years (I'd wager this year). This distro will be intimately linked with the online side of Google for storage and software. This will mean that you can go from your PC at home to any webbrowser on the face of the planet and have all of your information as it would be on your own desktop. ALSO, there's a possiblity of seeing something like Sun has where you can have a desktop open with programs, web pages, and files and then go to another PC and have the same desktop open from either a webbrowser or a future version of Google desktop. What do you think all those mobile computing boxes and dark fiber are for? It's all to make Google local to everyone and very very fast. Wait and see.

in addition (2, Interesting)

sepharious (900148) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867782)

dont forget the Google PC rumors with Walmart [slashdot.org] , I'm willing to bet that this will happen or something close to it and what we will see is a computer that boots in less than 30sec (a very stripped down and fast linux distro, perhaps on CF or equivalent) and then jumps onto a highspeed net connection to get on the Google network for software and files. Expect to pay less than $200 for this if they do it, because that will be the way to bring down The Beast. [http]

Gmail Space Firefox Extension (3, Informative)

Slant675 (168902) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867704)

This will be interesting to see if this provides as much space as the Firefox [getfirefox.com] extension [mozilla.org] , Gmail Space [mozilla.org] provides. The way it works, apparently, is to allow access to the file attachment method used by Gmail [google.com] , providing an interface which appears to be like a file management interface. Very useful!

Hopefully Google will be good and provided enough space to make hacks like this obsolete. Not that they are bad, just inconvenient!

Here's the deal (4, Funny)

mslinux (570958) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867705)

As soon as Google gives me all of their data, I'll give them mine.

Re:Here's the deal (4, Funny)

Petronius (515525) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868119)

They already have yours.

We accept. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14868121)

Google accepts your terms. Please start your download Here [sixthform.info] .

Thank you for your cooperation.

Re:Here's the deal (1)

NitsujTPU (19263) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868399)

OK. I'll go enjoy their services, and you can go uhmm, not enjoy them.

Google is already providing one (1)

ravee (201020) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867706)

Isn't google already providing a kind of unlimited storage via gmail ? You can attach a file of upto 10 MB as attachment to an email. And not many word documents are of these sizes.

And if they do provide online storage, I suspect it will be as an extension of gmail rather than a seperate entity.

Let me be the first to say (1)

endrue (927487) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867708)

OMG!!!!!ONEONEONE

They will read all my documents and give them to the government who will throw me in jail and rip off my toenails!!!!!!


If it sounds bad to you then don't use it. How hard is that? People will bemoan this like they did with Gmail and the contextual ads. If they aren't twisting your arm to use it why are you freaking out about it?

And Let me be the first to say (1)

Nursie (632944) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868059)

OMG!!!!!ONEONE

A google service! They can't possibly want it for marketing and no government would ever try to get their hands on that tasty data store!

If it sounds good to you then use it How hard is that?

Don't for a moment pretend that a discussion of the security ramifications of using this sort of thing is somehow wrong though, and a lot of non tech savvy types might not even think about how vulnerable their data could be in the hands of a third party.
 
So basically, piss off mate, we're not all screaming google fanboys and a lot of us do have computer illiterate relatives.

In the meantime (4, Funny)

Johnso (520335) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867711)

Until Google offers this service, feel free to upload all of your confidential files to my server:

66.35.250.150
User: ident
Pass: itytheft

I'm happy to be of service!

Re:In the meantime (3, Informative)

baldass_newbie (136609) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868098)

This [samspade.org] is what makes the parent even funnier.

Re:In the meantime (1)

mmdoogie (767427) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868218)

I tried to upload my secret data, but I couldn't connect...

Re:In the meantime (4, Funny)

mjeppsen (621795) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868293)

I tried to upload my secret data, but I couldn't connect...

Damn, already slashdotted!

-MJ

scary (2, Insightful)

pvt_medic (715692) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867714)

any one find the followig line a little scary.

"one goal of Google was to "store 100 percent" of consumer information."

Im sorry there just some of my info I trust to ME, MYSELF, and I.

Re:scary (1)

JacksBrokenCode (921041) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868166)

any one find the followig line a little scary.

"one goal of Google was to "store 100 percent" of consumer information."

any one find the following line just as scary?


"Google's mission is to organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful."

Google doesn't hide the fact that they want your info. Their publicized goal is to organize the world's information - not to organize the internet, not to organize some information in some contexts - to organize the world's information. This has always been their goal and will always be their goal. Just because they said it in different terms doesn't make the goal any less ambitious/intrusive/scary.

Encryption? (1)

kaleco (801384) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868382)

If you find a need to use this Google storage facility but can't quite take off your tinfoil hat, I suppose you could encrypt your files. It will take even Google a while to have a look inside your 128-bit AES file.

GmailFS (1)

ettlz (639203) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867732)

GmailFS [jones.name] seems to provide a Google-oriented storage solution for anything that supports FUSE-based filesystems.

Zardos... (1)

kainewynd2 (821530) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868405)

"The gun is good. The penis is evil. Go forth... and kill!"

I laugh 'til I cry...

Oh my...
how totally off-topic...

Something just doesn't sit right... (2, Insightful)

Kihaji (612640) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867785)

Google "accidently" leaked information to the world, so, if they cant keep their own documents secure, why should I trust them with mine?

I'm torn (1)

muhgcee (188154) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867788)

See now, if they did come out with this, I think I would be torn between using GDrive and HavenCo [havenco.com] for my off-site backup.

I guess it all depends if I feel particularly tin-foil-hatty that day or not.

Resolving your delemma (1)

wintermute42 (710554) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868072)

Your delemma in choosing between a so far mythical Google offering and HavenCo might be resolved by looking at Haven's monthly prices. They also charge a stiff price for the bandwidth to get your data to HavenCo.

File Backup Service: 20GB of backup server space on Havenco's high capacity backup server. Backup your important files or secure data in our secure facility. Access via SSH or SFTP only to provide encrypted data transfer. Send us a copy of your data and we will upload for you allowing you to synchronise your data on a nightly basis. Bandwidth to be purchased seperately for use with this service. Monthly: USD 500

At $500/month for 20 GB of storage, only people who want to take advantage of the difficulty of serving a sapena to force access of data stored on HavenCo servers are likely to take advantage of this. So if you're Enron and you want to store the records of all of those offshore deals, this is probably a bargain. Of course this still will not do you any good if they throw your ass in jail until you come up with the data they want.

One reason that HavenCo is so expensive is that they are on an old artillary platform anchored offshore on some reef. Power, Internet connections, transport, food, water, are all very expensive. It seems like a simpler solution would be to set up a data haven in a place like Lichtenstein, Andorra or some Caribbean island. Even with the fees that you'd pay to the local government to make a data haven worth their while, it would be way cheaper than HavenCo. And more pleasant to live there too. Being stuck on a rusting artillary platform has got to get old fast.

gdrive.com (2, Informative)

pvt_medic (715692) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867795)

A quick search on gdrive.com comes up with this info.

Registrant:
Data Docket Inc. (DOM-1291683)
391 N Ancestor Pl.
boise ID 83704 US

Domain Name: gdrive.com

Registrar Name: Markmonitor.com
Registrar Whois: whois.markmonitor.com
Registrar Homepage: http://www.markmonitor.com/ [markmonitor.com]

Funny note would be that the markmonitor website is about making the internet safer for your business. I cant see how the proposed gdrive would do such a thing.

GMail is already online storage (2, Interesting)

digitaldc (879047) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867800)

2GB to be exact, the only drawback is that Google can read each and every one of your emails.
When you learn that fact, it makes it less attractive.

Re:GMail is already online storage (1)

kdawgud (915237) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867894)

Unless you're using encryption, anyone can read each and every one of your emails whether your using Gmail or not. Gmail is just very open about that fact and compensates you (with storage space and features) for it. I think its a good thing that people may be more aware about how not-private their email communications really are.

Re:GMail is already online storage (1)

jb.hl.com (782137) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868064)

My ISP can read each and every one of my emails. As can my hosting provider, who I get my email from, or my college, who also give me email...

Not to be a fanboy, but at least Google tells you they're scanning your email for marketing keywords.

Re:GMail is already online storage (4, Insightful)

stunt_penguin (906223) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868149)

So you think that a random Google employee has access to your inbox do you?

No-one at google reads your, mine or anyone else's email.

They're scanned for keywords by a machine and spat out into your browser. The same goes for your search results, too.

There's a big difference between someone reading your emails like some kind of wartime censor and a script running on a machine that adds contextual information. Do you object to Google adding BR tags to your email where it sees a carriage return tag (or whatever) in an incoming email. Are they 'reading' your mail then?

*walks off mumbling about paranoid americans*

Rapid sharing? (5, Interesting)

RyoShin (610051) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867821)

One has to wonder what, if any, restrictions Google has in place to keep GDrive from becoming a file sharing network, assuming it will actually come out.

Even if shares are only 2 GB (about the size of their e-mail accounts), that's still enough for at least one good-quality movie, or 100+ high quality MP3s. All one would need to do is set up a drive and disseminate the login info.

And what about legit use? I rip all my CDs to MP3s (because changing CDs when you get tired of them is a nuisance). My business allows me to store MP3s on my computer for personal use, but I cannot bring a flash drive or other writeable media (including CD-Rs) into the workplace. (Yes, having internet access kind of dilutes this, but I digress.) It would be easier for me to upload as many songs as possible and download them at work instead of trying to convince someone that my flash drive just has MP3s on it.

Maybe they can outright ban certain file types- mp3s, avis, etc. Of course, there's nothing stopping someone from uploading it as spiderman3.doc. And what about the college student that wants to upload a class lecture for later listening or sharing?

If this becomes a reality, it would be interesting to see how they work it.

Re:Rapid sharing? (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868187)

Maybe they can outright ban certain file types- mp3s, avis, etc. Of course, there's nothing stopping someone from uploading it as spiderman3.doc.
They had that problem with Google Video.

People were uploading full length feature films.

I'm not sure how Google still monitors the situation, but they went through and cleaned house after it became widely known.

As apps go online, does plain storage lose value? (2, Interesting)

lux55 (532736) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867884)

Let's see if they add much in the way of web-based features (ie. more than just a download and "email this file" UI), or if it's just like other traditional services. For my opinion of why over time, people will want more than that (although most people will use a service from someone as large as Google anyway):

http://www.putfwd.com/index/news-app/story.35/titl e.an-online-file-storage-manifesto [putfwd.com]

Let's hope for at least a developer API so external apps can integrate with it.

GDrive sounds separate to me (1)

singingjim (957822) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867887)

I doubt it will be "an extension of Gmail" since what's being proposed, and then taken back, is having a mirror of your HDD online for backup purposes and access to your files anywhere you have an internet connection. Has anyone here every heard of encryption? You can encrypt files THEN upload them and if you need them somewhere else you can decrypt them after you've downloaded them. I may be naive, but I seriously doubt that Google has some sort of nefarious plan to use your vacation pix and pixilated pr0n videos in an evil greenmail plot against it's users. Or any other such paranoid and delusional type stuff. That being said, if you still think it's "scary", then don't F'ing use it. I think it's the way of the future and Google just jumped the gun a little bit. Hopefully they'll integrate it with the story yesterday about real-time disk backup. Futuristic for sure, but would be pretty sweet. I can't wait to be able to store all my pr0n away from my girlfriend's wandering suspicion and then have access to it anywhere. Anywhere. Think about it.

Ripe for abuse (1)

tinrobot (314936) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867926)

Even though Google seems to be a decent company, there's so much potential for abusing that data. If this becomes a service, the average non-tech person will probably just back up his/her entire hard drive to Google - including things like credit card numbers and other sensitive data. I'm sure rogue employee could skim out some data. On top of that, the current Attorney general seems hell-bent on data mining and has already hit places like Yahoo and AOL. I'm sure something like GDrive (or whatever it will be called) would be his wet dream. If this becomes a service, the government will be very keen to rifle through all of that data.

Personally, I'm not willing to put my files in anyone else's hands, even Google.

No thanks.

Re:Ripe for abuse (1)

Cheeze (12756) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868058)

encrypt it and forget about the security concerns.

First person to make an easy GDrive encrypt plugin wins!

Family Media (1)

sheared (21404) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867971)

I think this is a great idea. I'd use it to backup my family pictures and video. Actual documents with personal information included? Nope.

Ready to pay if (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14867972)

I'm ready to buy a service like this if 2 conditions are met.

1) I'm a developer and I want to be upload the GDrive what I want. I do not want a copy of my hard drive.
I want to decide what I want to backup.

2) Network bandwidth access should be _always_ good. I can download at 300 KB/sec and updload at 100KB/sec. I don't want to download/upload at less than my capacity.

3) Uptime should be 99.9999%. Don't tell me that I can't access my files now.

I don't think that such a service can be made but I would be ready to paid top dollars for that.
That has a lot a value for me.

Am I the only one ... (1, Redundant)

LaughingCoder (914424) | more than 8 years ago | (#14867982)

... who sees the irony in the fact that Google's plans to offer web-based storage of all of our personal information was accidentally leaked to the web?

GDrive FileSystem (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14867985)

What would be cool is if GDrive could actually be mounted as a filesystem; obviously would require some client installation. So that (say) Windows users would see a Z: that maps to the online storage (and Linux users would be able to mount in any which way). That way, eg., I could have my CVS/SVN repository created on the online filesystem and access it from anywhere. Or maybe install a program on the online filesystem so that it can be accessed from any PC (Windows users would need some way to synch the registry I would imagine).

Leaked.... or Released? (2, Funny)

djsmiley (752149) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868013)

Looked thru a few comments.

1. google desktop search doing the "holding documents for 30 days" told me, as well as the rest of the world (including my mum) that this was comming anyway.

2. was it really leaked? I mean, how many times have google acidentlly realased anything?

3. Was the blogger anon? Hell, i bet its serjy!

Google Cache (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14868041)

What? No Google cache link to the no-longer-available presentation? Come on people!

Previous Solutions (2, Insightful)

Midnight Thunder (17205) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868154)

I have seen a number of companies in the past offer such services and then they either changed so you had to pay for their services or disappeared. Part of the problem was that, while many offered good solutions, they were often plagued by people using them for pr0n or other illigitmate content. This had the effect of using more bandwidth and storage which they could afford.

Another thing is that many of them were purely web based, and did not neccessarily offer anything like WebDAV to make it easier to transfer the files.

This is not to say that Google will go the same way, but that something will have to happen to avoid the same issues.

Misplaced priorities (0, Flamebait)

Oscillaters (921481) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868180)

It's hard to get worked up about the idea of the government snooping through our hard drives if we back them up on Google when they have already asserted the right to break into our houses to access the originals without telling us. And encrypting the contents seems beside the point when they have also asserted the right to torture us to reveal the password. [Fingers are easier to break than PGP.] Besides, it's not as if you even need to have *done* anything to end up on the other end of a feeding tube in Guantanamo. So I respectfully suggest that we have more pressing concerns at the moment than the possibility that Google will make targeted marketing more accurate.

What does Google get out of this? (2, Interesting)

babbling (952366) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868254)

This is a nice idea, and could be a good tool, assuming it is done with Google's usual user-friendly simple UIs.

My only concern is what Google hope to achieve by storing my data. Letting their machines data-mine my email to show ads is fair enough, but what do they hope to get out of providing this service? Unless they intend to do something a bit dodgy (eg. sell it to governments), it's difficult to see many ways in which they could use my data to their benefit.

I suppose they could just see what their advertising engines can do with the data, but I really can't see them mining gigabytes of data for each user! Maybe filenames will be helpful.

Future (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14868349)

I don't see the big deal if Google does read some documents, or information about me. It is an awesome opportunity, to see what they got, and to see if they can offer me products based on information about me. I would much rather have advertisements that attracted me, instead of everyone in the world. No more annoying adds about stuff I don't care about, just things I find relevant. Embrace technology.

Real Thin Clients (1)

lukej (252598) | more than 8 years ago | (#14868406)

I look at this 'put every thing on Google' trend as sort of a unique thin client approach.

At my work we're slowly abandoning Sun Rays, sad to see them go.

But Google could just be a 'SunRay for Home Users' It stores your applications (email, picture editing, productivity?), and your files. All the common user needs to do is have some common hardware and an Internet connection (and bare minimums should suffice). (Also note the above comment about Google Linux.)

Best of all, it's portable, you can take your 'session' with you to any desktop; and loose nothing if your desktop dies. Privacy concerns aside, I'd use it. I'm an above average computer user, but I don't like worrying about redundant disks, and email backup, etc; and my usage (email/real important files, e.g. taxes) is minimal, probably less then 2GB.

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