Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Internet Searches Reveal CIA's Secrets

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the those-pesky-interwebs dept.

284

GabrielF writes "In another blow to the reputation of the agency that just can't seem to get anything right, the Chicago Tribune used web searches and various commercial online databases to uncover a treasure trove of information about the CIA. The Tribune found the identities of over 2600 CIA employees (including an undisclosed number of covert operatives) as well as the locations of over two dozen CIA facilities across the U.S., internal telephone numbers, and information on 17 aircraft."

cancel ×

284 comments

Nothing To See Here (5, Funny)

mysticwhiskey (569750) | more than 7 years ago | (#14901857)

Don't worry, damage control is by default in effect as most people won't bother registering with the Chicago Tribune's website to read the story. ;)

Re:Nothing To See Here (5, Informative)

forgotten_my_nick (802929) | more than 7 years ago | (#14901861)

I was about to say the same thing. But try this link its via google.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi -060311ciamain-story,1,123362.story?coll=chi-news- hed [chicagotribune.com]

This one was interesting too.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi -0512250424dec25,1,7168647.story [chicagotribune.com]

Nice to see no expenses spared for kidnapping someone.

Re:Nothing To See Here (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14901872)

No dice. None of the bugmenots work either. I'm suspecting that all non-US IPs are blocked. Welcome to the aparthied internet. Someone care to post the text?

Question for editors: Why the hell do you insist on posting links to content which ordinary folk can't access?

Re:Nothing To See Here (4, Informative)

mysticwhiskey (569750) | more than 7 years ago | (#14901885)

Hmmm, worked for me (me being in Australia). I used double@mailinator.com with the password 123456.

Re:Nothing To See Here (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14901887)

Bug Me Not worked fine for me.

Re:Nothing To See Here (4, Informative)

krunk4ever (856261) | more than 7 years ago | (#14901926)

Text:

  TRIBUNE INVESTIGATION
Internet blows CIA cover
It's easy to track America's covert operatives. All you need to know is how to navigate the Internet.

By John Crewdson
Tribune senior correspondent
Published March 11, 2006, 12:00 PM CST

WASHINGTON -- She is 52 years old, married, grew up in the Kansas City suburbs and now lives in Virginia, in a new three-bedroom house.

Anyone who can qualify for a subscription to one of the online services that compile public information also can learn that she is a CIA employee who, over the past decade, has been assigned to several American embassies in Europe.

The CIA asked the Tribune not to publish her name because she is a covert operative, and the newspaper agreed. But unbeknown to the CIA, her affiliation and those of hundreds of men and women like her have somehow become a matter of public record, thanks to the Internet.

When the Tribune searched a commercial online data service, the result was a virtual directory of more than 2,600 CIA employees, 50 internal agency telephone numbers and the locations of some two dozen secret CIA facilities around the United States.

Only recently has the CIA recognized that in the Internet age its traditional system of providing cover for clandestine employees working overseas is fraught with holes, a discovery that is said to have "horrified" CIA Director Porter Goss.

"Cover is a complex issue that is more complex in the Internet age," said the CIA's chief spokeswoman, Jennifer Dyck. "There are things that worked previously that no longer work. Director Goss is committed to modernizing the way the agency does cover in order to protect our officers who are doing dangerous work."

Dyck declined to detail the remedies "since we don't want the bad guys to know what we're fixing."

Several "front companies" set up to provide cover for CIA operatives and its small fleet of aircraft recently began disappearing from the Internet, following the Tribune's disclosures that some of the planes were used to transport suspected terrorists to countries where they claimed to have been tortured.

Although finding and repairing the vulnerabilities in the CIA's cover system was not a priority under Goss' predecessor, George Tenet, one senior U.S. official observed that "the Internet age didn't get here in 2004," the year Goss took over at the CIA.

CIA names not disclosed

The Tribune is not disclosing the identities of any of the CIA employees uncovered in its database searches, the searching techniques used or other details that might put agency employees or operatives at risk. The CIA apparently was unaware of the extent to which its employees were in the public domain until being provided with a partial list of names by the Tribune.'

At a minimum, the CIA's seeming inability to keep its own secrets invites questions about whether the Bush administration is doing enough to shield its covert CIA operations from public scrutiny, even as the Justice Department focuses resources on a two-year investigation into whether someone in the administration broke the law by disclosing to reporters the identity of clandestine CIA operative Valerie Plame.

Not all of the 2,653 employees whose names were produced by the Tribune search are supposed to be working under cover. More than 160 are intelligence analysts, an occupation that is not considered a covert position, and senior CIA executives such as Tenet are included on the list.

Covert employees discovered

But an undisclosed number of those on the list--the CIA would not say how many--are covert employees, and some are known to hold jobs that could make them terrorist targets.

Other potential targets include at least some of the two dozen CIA facilities uncovered by the Tribune search. Most are in northern Virginia, within a few miles of the agency's headquarters. Several are in Florida, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Utah and Washington state. There is one in Chicago.

Some are heavily guarded. Others appear to be unguarded private residences that bear no outward indication of any affiliation with the CIA.

A senior U.S. official, reacting to the computer searches that produced the names and addresses, said, "I don't know whether Al Qaeda could do this, but the Chinese could."

Down on "The Farm"

For decades the CIA's training facility at Camp Peary, Va., near historic Williamsburg, remained the deepest of secrets. Even after former CIA personnel confirmed its existence in the 1980s the agency never acknowledged the facility publicly, and CIA personnel persisted in referring to it in conversation only as "The Farm."

But an online search for the term "Camp Peary" produced the names and other details of 26 individuals who according to the data are employed there. Searching aviation databases for flights landing or taking off from Camp Peary's small airstrip revealed 17 aircraft whose ownership and flight histories could also be traced.

Although the Tribune's initial search for "Central Intelligence Agency" employees turned up only work-related addresses and phone numbers, other Internet-based services provide, usually for a fee but sometimes for free, the home addresses and telephone numbers of U.S. residents, as well as satellite photographs of the locations where they live and work.

Asked how so many personal details of CIA employees had found their way into the public domain, the senior U.S. intelligence official replied that "I don't have a great explanation, quite frankly."

The official noted, however, that the CIA's credo has always been that "individuals are the first person responsible for their cover. If they can't keep their cover, then it's hard for anyone else to keep it. If someone filled out a credit report and put that down, that's just stupid."

One senior U.S. official used a barnyard epithet to describe the agency's traditional system of providing many of its foreign operatives with easily decipherable covers that include little more than a post office box for an address and a non-existent company as an employer.

Coverts especially important

And yet, experts say, covert operatives who pose as something other than diplomats are becoming increasingly important in the global war on terror.

"In certain areas you just can't collect the kind of information you need in the 21st Century by working out of the embassy. They're just not going to meet the kind of people they need to meet," said Melvin Goodman, who was a senior Soviet affairs analyst at the CIA for more than 20 years before he retired.

The problem, Goodman said, is that transforming a CIA officer who has worked under "diplomatic cover" into a "non-official cover" operator, or NOC--as was attempted with Valerie Plame--creates vulnerabilities that are not difficult to spot later on.

The CIA's challenge, in Goodman's view, is, "How do you establish a cover for them in a day and age when you can Google a name . . . and find out all sorts of holes?"

In Plame's case, online computer searches would have turned up her tenure as a junior diplomat in the U.S. Embassy in Athens even after she began passing herself off as a privately employed "energy consultant."

The solution, Goodman suggested, is to create NOCs at the very outset of their careers, "taking risks with younger people, worrying about the reputation of people before they have one. Or create one."

Shortage of `mentors'

But that approach also has a downside, in that "you're getting into the problem of very junior, inexperienced people, which a lot of veteran CIA people feel now is part of the problem. Porter Goss has to double the number of operational people in an environment where there are no mentors. Who's going to train these people?"

In addition to stepping up recruiting, Goss has ordered a "top-down" review of the agency's "tradecraft" following the disclosure that several supposedly covert operatives involved in the 2003 abduction of a radical Muslim preacher in Milan, Italy, had registered at hotels under their true names and committed other amateurish procedural violations that made it relatively easy for the Italian police to identify them and for Italian prosecutors to charge them with kidnapping.

Lost in Translation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14902002)

Dyck

Now...

Is that pronounced 'dyke' or 'dick'?

Re:Nothing To See Here (1)

h4rm0ny (722443) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902185)


What is a "barnyard epithet" ?

Re:Nothing To See Here (1)

AussieVamp2 (636560) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902196)

I suspect they may mean bovine, equine or even porcine faecal matter.

Re:Nothing To See Here (1)

gritdog (941913) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902383)

refering to individual(s) as a jackass

Re:Nothing To See Here (4, Funny)

mysticgoat (582871) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902464)

What is a "barnyard epithet" ?

That would be an epithet most commonly heard in a barnyard, like "Moo!" or perhaps "Bah!"

h4rm0ny, these would be more familiar to you as "m00" and "B44", as said by 1337 c0w5 and 5h33p.

It is important in understanding the CIA to recognize that they use barnyard epithets like "bah" where other professionals would be more open in their communications and just say "bullsh*t".

Re:Nothing To See Here (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14901992)

Works here, non-US IP and all.

Re:Nothing To See Here (1)

Elixon (832904) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902075)

Google reveals its own secrets through the search "military automated":
http://video.google.com/videosearch?q=military+aut omated [google.com]

What does the "Google Factory" have to do with military? :-)

google knows everything - ask him? (1)

Elixon (832904) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902132)

Do you want to know the nearest military facitlity?

search: "secret military factory near me"
url: http://video.google.com/videosearch?q=secret+milit ary+factory+near+me [google.com]
result: is probably different based on your current location and language settings

Interesting! (1)

forgotten_my_nick (802929) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902385)

Appears the newspaper is a bit anal when it comes to displaying the news. Do a google search as follows. First link is the story. Works fine that way.

http://news.google.com/news?q=cia%20chicago%20trib une&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-a&rls=org.moz illa:en-US:official&percentage_served=100&sa=N&tab =wn [google.com]

Re:Nothing To See Here (5, Informative)

rbarreira (836272) | more than 7 years ago | (#14901869)

BugMeNot [bugmenot.com] rules! If you install the firefox extension (I think there's also an IE one), all you have to do is right click on one of the authentication text boxes and press "Login with BugMeNot"...

Re:Nothing To See Here (1)

mysticwhiskey (569750) | more than 7 years ago | (#14901879)

That is very useful information. Thanks!

Re:Nothing To See Here (5, Funny)

Dante Shamest (813622) | more than 7 years ago | (#14901906)

Does it work for pr0n sites?

Er, I'm just asking for a friend.

^_^

Re:Nothing To See Here (5, Funny)

Asztal_ (914605) | more than 7 years ago | (#14901931)

Actually, yes...

Uhm... apparently, anyway >_>

Re:Nothing To See Here (1)

Acid-Duck (228035) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902347)

Actually, users can use the bugme not service [bugmenot.com] [bugmenot.com] to get a free login/pass for chicagotribune. The first one off the top of the list worked for me.

Disinformation (5, Insightful)

SkankinMonkey (528381) | more than 7 years ago | (#14901862)

But how are they sure it's not disinformation setup by these organizations to throw people off the trail? I don't have much faith in our government, but I don't think the Intelligence Agencies are that stupid.

Re:Disinformation (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14901886)

After further thinking, you might realize that it is no better if your statement is true because innocents might get into trouble by being falsely identified as CIA agents. In one way or another, it is stupid.

Re:Disinformation (4, Informative)

Gori (526248) | more than 7 years ago | (#14901911)

Indeed, check this story out : http://archives.cnn.com/2002/US/02/19/gen.strategi c.influence/ [cnn.com] They explicitly say :
Although "information deception" -- deliberately spreading false or misleading information -- is a part of information warfare policy and doctrine, the Pentagon has no specific plans to undertake deceptive operations using the international news media, the official said.
riight....

Re:Disinformation (1)

TapeCutter (624760) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902006)

The Italian police [bbc.co.uk] discovered they are either stupid or arrogant.

Re:Disinformation (1)

rolfwind (528248) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902032)

I can't make up my mind. If the recent years has shown me anything - yes, people in large groups are that stupid. But they shouldn't be.

Since I can't make up my mind, I'm glad that, ultimately, I simply don't care either way. Funny what disillusionment/disaffection does to a person.

Re:Disinformation (2)

Threni (635302) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902036)

> I don't think the Intelligence Agencies are that stupid.

Why not?

www.cryptome.org is full of this sort of thing. They've missed a lot of stuff abroad that really they should have known about, given their immense budget and powers.

Re:Disinformation (1)

SkankinMonkey (528381) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902349)

Why not? Because I want to have the warm blanket of safety around me, even if the blanket isn't real. I want to believe that my tax dollars aren't completely wasted on incompetence, so if I believe that the CIA and FBI are actually somehow protecting us, then that's something....right?

Re:Disinformation (3, Informative)

aussersterne (212916) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902479)

They are. Where do you think they get their people? I have at least four friends who "interned" in the CIA, FBI, and/or NSA or related DC-based fed bodies while or immediately after working on their B.S or B.A. in political science, criminology, or similar fields, going on to become defense analysts or operatives. And they talk openly about their careers. I've been to their weddings where half of the smalltalk was federal shoptalk.

These aren't exactly the brightest bulbs in the world either, mind you. My filmmaker and physicist friends certainly have them beat for smarts. These are average kids with good grades who went to reasonably big schools like GWU or Penn after high school and went into a federal internship as a B.S./B.A. level scholar at 20 or 21 years old.

They're just not tight packages of great judgment and discretion at that age and level of education, regardless of what the government would tell us and/or like to think. One of them in particular, who works at the Pentagon now, is about the biggest ditz/boof I've ever met, but is a great climber and perky enough to get promotions just on her smile.

The point: these agencies have to draw their people from the same population that shells out $10.00 to see Adam Sandler flicks and that things "Digital Rights Management" is there to protect their rights.

Red Herrings (4, Insightful)

TFGeditor (737839) | more than 7 years ago | (#14901863)

How do we know that all that info is not just a bunch of red herrings to throw us off the track and keep us distracted?

Re:Red Herrings (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14901894)

How do you know it's not a clever double-bluff and really it's true information disguized as a clumsy disinformation campaign?

Just a minute - there's a knocking on the door I have to answer...

Any mirrors welcome... (0, Troll)

Patchw0rk F0g (663145) | more than 7 years ago | (#14901873)

... cause I don't want something like the Chicago Tribune knowing who the heck I am. I already did the NYT thingy... and spam came out the wing-wang! I'll do the spam-email thingy with the CT if I have to, but a mirror would be so much less hassle. On-line links to newspapers are getting like porn sites: make sure you have a ditch account somewhere, your firewall up, and your virus scans active. News stories are the porn of the 21st century... except that they screw you. Open up wide, peeps, and drink it down.

Boy, are they in trouble.... (5, Funny)

David Hume (200499) | more than 7 years ago | (#14901876)

the Chicago Tribune used web searches and various commercial online databases to uncover a treasure trove of information about the CIA.
And by doing so violated both the Patriot Act and the DMCA.

"the locations of over two dozen CIA facilities" (3, Interesting)

kfg (145172) | more than 7 years ago | (#14901880)

You would prefer that they were really a completely secret police?

KFG

Re:"the locations of over two dozen CIA facilities (4, Insightful)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | more than 7 years ago | (#14901943)

The Gestapo was a secret police and its facilities were perfectly well known (and feared).

(Damn, I just broke Godwin's law...)

Re:"the locations of over two dozen CIA facilities (4, Informative)

cliffy2000 (185461) | more than 7 years ago | (#14901970)

Actually, you fulfilled Godwin's Law. (To paraphrase -- the number of posts in any given thread approaches infinity, the probability of an analogy to Nazism being mentioned approaches 1.) The only way that you may have, in fact, violated Godwin's Law is in your very mention of it, which may negate any "thread-ending" characteristics that an invocation of said law possesses.

Re:"the locations of over two dozen CIA facilities (5, Informative)

kfg (145172) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902271)

The Gestapo had a secret branch whose facilities were not well known. They were, in fact, secret.

There was also a secret police not allied with the Gestapo, because the watchers needed to be afraid of someone as well. These were completely secret police who answered only to Hitler and/or Goering.

Yes, the Gestapo also had a public facing branch, if only because in order to rat out your neighbor you needed someplace to go to do it.

Perhaps the CIA, rather than being remiss in their duties for having a publicly accessable branch, actually have some clue as to what they are doing by having offices and phones that the general public are perfectly aware of.

And, of course, in America, the people watching the watchers are supposed to be "The People."

KFG

Covert Agency? (5, Interesting)

thedletterman (926787) | more than 7 years ago | (#14901890)

What the hell happened to the spy agency? CIA Agents now chat away on unsecure cell phones, check into foreign hotels using GSAs (US gov't issued credit cards), and leak every other intelligence briefing to the press. They might as well start a group on MySpace and issue bumper stickers and T shirts. The fact that Google can catch sensitive information means these guys have failed the test of keeping our government's secrets secure.

Re:Covert Agency? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14901918)

Haha, that is freakin awesome... I second the myspace thing.
Mod parent up

Re:Covert Agency? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14901966)

then again, ever think that maybe these are the decoy agents? ones that governments and others will watch instead of the real agents going in?

Re:Covert Agency? (0, Troll)

TripMaster Monkey (862126) | more than 7 years ago | (#14901995)


If they weren't 'decoys' before, they sure as hell are now...

Re:Covert Agency? (3, Insightful)

nx (194271) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902020)

I don't think they ever were the super heroes they're portrayed as in the movies. As far as I can tell using public information, they've had some successful missions, and some very unsuccessful. And they've probably always been chatting away on unsecured telephones and using government issued credit cards. The difference is the global informational infrastructure, which is available to the general public. My guess is that a decent 'social engineer' probably could've gotten this information even before the Internet.

Re:Covert Agency? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14902044)

Reminds me of when Homer was wearing a "Witness Protection Program" t-shirt, when he was hiding from sideshow bob.

Re:Covert Agency? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14902188)

The fact that Google can catch sensitive information means these guys have failed the test of keeping our government's secrets secure.
 
Sounds like its about time to shut this Google thing down, eh?

Re:Covert Agency? (2, Funny)

MK_CSGuy (953563) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902397)

They might as well start a group on MySpace and issue bumper stickers and T shirts.

Something like this T-Shirt [thinkgeek.com] and this bumper sticker [thinkgeek.com] ?

I'm the gingerbread man (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14901921)

and they'll never catch me! I've left posts all over this site and heaps of others. My proliferation is so wide that there's _too_ much out there for them to find. PSNR, meet my friend, ZERO.

The CIA trained Arabs to be terrorists. (4, Interesting)

Futurepower(R) (558542) | more than 7 years ago | (#14901933)

Quote from the Slashdot story: "In another blow to the reputation of the agency that just can't seem to get anything right..."

That depends on the definition of "right". CIA employees get more money and promotions if there is more trouble in the world. So, they make trouble. For example, the CIA trained Osama bin Laden and other Arabs in the techniques of terrorism. [futurepower.org]

U.S. citizens should not expect that ANY U.S. government secret agency actually does what it is supposed to do. The secrecy allows the purpose to drift off course, until it is the employees who determine what happens, not the policy makers.

Government leaders, such as U.S. congressmen and women, are allowed to know only the public relations information about the secret agencies, not what is really happening. In the name of secrecy and covert operation, the secret U.S. government agencies are allowed to lie. They place lies in newspapers and magazines the same way other P.R. is placed.

A government that sometimes acts in secret cannot be said to be a democratic government, because the citizens cannot supervise what they don't know.

--
Before, Saddam got Iraq oil profits & paid part to kill Iraqis. Now a few Americans share Iraq oil profits, & U.S. citizens pay to kill Iraqis. Improvement?

Re:The CIA trained Arabs to be terrorists. (3, Insightful)

Grumpy Troll (790026) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902022)

FOXNews.com has published an article which may be of interest: Dispelling the CIA-Bin Laden Myth [foxnews.com] .

Re:The CIA trained Arabs to be terrorists. (2, Informative)

Troed (102527) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902054)

FOXNews.com

So, the official US propaganda machine says CIA hasn't trained bin Laden.

So. Nice.

What do they have to say about the financing for 9/11 (part of it - Mohammed Atta) coming from CIA through Pakistan (ISI)?

(And what about the CIA meetings with bin Laden at a Dubai hospital a few months before 9/11 - when bin Laden allegedly was one of the world's most wanted men?)

Maybe there's enough there for a Fox News reality show even?

Three excuses. . . (3, Insightful)

Fantastic Lad (198284) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902149)

FOXNews.com has published an article which may be of interest: Dispelling the CIA-Bin Laden Myth .

Of interest to who?

Those who forgot that FOX persecuted its own journalists for trying to expose Monsanto's BGH artificial hormone scam? That Fox fought against the whisltleblowers by arguing that FOX was not obligated under freedom of speech to tell the truth? --And won! And that they continue to persecute the journalists? Those guys?

That's just one instance of FOX's bald faced lying and villainy. They are committed to lying for corporate and government interests. NOTHING they report is worth the spit it's sent on.

There are SO many gaping holes in FOX's integrity that I can only see three excuses for anybody buying into their propaganda. 1. Laziness, 2. Foolishness, or 3. Being Evil.


-FL

Re:The CIA trained Arabs to be terrorists. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14902051)

Well, I'm not much of a fan of the CIA, but the US government was not exactly secret about its support for the Afghan mujahideen. Reagan publicly praised the mujahideen, comparing them to the American revolutionaries over 200 years prior. There are much better examples of CIA secrecy, like the overthrow of Allende in 1973.

Re:The CIA trained Arabs to be terrorists. (0, Troll)

N8F8 (4562) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902071)

A government that sometimes acts in secret cannot be said to be a democratic government, because the citizens cannot supervise what they don't know.
Actually, the US is a Constitution-based federal republic; strong democratic tradition [cia.gov] . And actually those "secret" things are actually done with oversight by the people's elected representatives. But I'm sure you're too stupid or brainwashed to bother learning that.

Re:The CIA trained Arabs to be terrorists. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14902101)

So, if Congress is in the dark about the CIA, are you seriously implying that they would manage it better than the executive branch?

Re:The CIA trained Arabs to be terrorists. (5, Interesting)

tenchiken (22661) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902396)

The above link is just plain wrong. If you bother to do your homework, and look at the recent book "The osama Bin Ladin I know" which was hardly written by a friend of the Bush administration the leading authority on Bin Ladin, Peter Bergan, completly debunks this particular liberal wet dream.

Not that they guy we ended up supporting (because the pakastani's supported him) was that much better, but please remember that Bin Ladin was first and foremost a financer during the Afgani conflict... He was there because he had jihad money in the first place.

You may now return to your regularly scheduled group-think

feh, meh, geh... (2, Interesting)

soren (37670) | more than 7 years ago | (#14901936)

Top Secret Confidential
Preface
Conspiracy theories are nothing new to history. Plots to kill Caesar and overthrow Rome abounded, for instance. However, it is seldom that concrete clues to such plots come to light, and are generally known.
The document you are about to read is real. It is no forgery, as alleged of "The Protocols of the Learned Elders of Zion." or actual forgeries such as those of Anne Frank, or (more recently) Hitler's diary.

"TOP SECRET: Silent Weapons for Quiet Wars, An introductory Programming Manual" was uncovered quite by accident on July 7th, 1986 when an employee of Boeing Aircraft Co. purchased a surplus IBM copier for scrap parts at a sale, and discovered inside details of a plan, hatched in embryonic days of the "Cold War" which called for control of the masses through manipulation of Industry, peoples' pastimes, education and political learning's. It called for a quite revolution, putting brother against brother, and diverting the public's attention from what is really going on.

For all intents and purposes, this document has "come to pass," much as Henry Ford, Sr. said the Protocols (regardless of their veracity) applied to the events of his day.

It is reprinted in its virgin form, with diagrams, as a touch of reality.

{Note; I removed the diagrams for reasons of ease of getting the information onto the internet.}

It is heavy reading, but it will (as it well should) spur you to read further, keep your eyes and ears open, and sound an alarm in Zion, for though she presently dwells with Babylon's daughter (Micah 4), her redemption draweth nigh.

Truth bears no fear.

--- TOP SECRET ---
SILENT WEAPONS FOR QUITE WARS
An introductory programing manual.
OPERATORS RESEARCH TECHNICAL MANUAL
TM-SW7905.1
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Security

Historical Introduction

Political Introduction

Energy

Descriptive Introduction of the Silent Weapon ... only url I can link ... http://soren.org/gov/money.html [soren.org] ... feel free to contact for ... \/\/hatever ... ;-)

Re:feh, meh, geh... (1)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902060)

It called for a quite revolution, putting brother against brother, and diverting the public's attention from what is really going on.

This has been the standard operating proceedure for the united states handling of it's citizens for decades now.

This is nothing new, look at how the Tv show 24 is mostly a pile of current administration propaganda keeping the american public scared of TERRORISM at every turn even though you have a better chance of getting struck by lightning on a sunny day than being hurt in a terrorist act on american soil.

Keeping the public afraid is very useful. it keeps them motivated as well as distracted.

Re:feh, meh, geh... (1)

November 1, 2005 (927710) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902150)

Well look at the big brain on Tim. Don't you know everything!

Go ahead and add this to your knowledge base: your wife is a whore, you are poor, and someone at work doesn't like you at all and thinks you're a prick.

I hope that at this point you've already learned that you're not British.

Re:feh, meh, geh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14902446)

So I'm supposed to believe someone who uses apostrophes to make plurals and can't spell "quiet"?

honey pot? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14901941)

lets put mis information out there so we can track who is trying to gather information

How do they know it's reliable info? (3, Insightful)

noidentity (188756) | more than 7 years ago | (#14901945)

Is the information is correct or just bogus data planted?

Is this "story" itself planted by the CIA? (not that we'd care either way)

2600 [2600.com] ? Funny number there.

Following the money (3, Insightful)

Hao Wu (652581) | more than 7 years ago | (#14901947)

IIRC, over half the CIA budget is spent on counter-intelligence, which includes programs of disinformation.

Whatever the Chicago Tribune has uncovered, one might presume that they were expected to.

Re:Following the money (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14902038)

IIRC, over half the CIA budget is spent on counter-intelligence, which includes programs of disinformation.

Perhaps that figure is part of the disinformation.

Re:Following the money (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14902285)

RC, over half the CIA budget is spent on counter-intelligence, which includes programs of disinformation.


Speaking of counter-intel, we had a 1st Sgt in our electronic warfare maintenance unit who came from a "counter-intel" background. Firstly, since we were techs we weren't impressed (now a new high speed demultiplexer, THAT would be impressive). Secondly, he was such an idiot we redubbed "counter-intel" as "anti-intel".

Re:Following the money (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14902321)

That's what he wanted you to think!

Re:Following the money (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14902336)

That's what he wanted you to think!


ROTFL Classic!

Col Flagg, is that you?

Equal opportunities employer (3, Funny)

15Bit (940730) | more than 7 years ago | (#14901951)

This is the problem with equal opportunities employment - you can't turn someone away for being stupid or incompetent (or just plain unsuitable). In the old days incompetent spies got shot and no-one knew or cared (And frankly, any "covert operative" who books into a hotel in their real name when on "company business" deserves to get shot.). Now they have to receive 5 verbal warnings, 3 written warnings and a final interview with their line management to "clarify their career objectives".

And even after all that they can probably sue for unfair dismissal.

Re:Equal opportunities employer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14902180)

How do dead people sue?

what this likely means, is justification.... (1)

toomanyhandles (809578) | more than 7 years ago | (#14901956)

..justification for even more restricive measures and uncontrolled gov't access and powers without any oversight than already exists.

Which would be easier for the CIA- to really fix and address a problem, or to make talking about problems a crime, necessitating secret interrogaton and incarceration of those who talk about what they see as concerns?

feh, meh, geh... (0, Troll)

soren (37670) | more than 7 years ago | (#14901959)

inspired to ... http://soren.org/gov/silent.html [soren.org]

Re:feh, meh, geh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14901972)

You already spammed once above.

So what were the search techniques? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14901976)

They said that they won't disclose the search teqhniques they used, so can anyone take a crack at guessing? Do we have any google-fu masters here?

Thoughts and feelings (4, Funny)

babbling (952366) | more than 7 years ago | (#14901982)

I'm not too sure this article should be posted under "your rights online". It should be more like "the CIA's rights online".

... look, the poor CIA are getting their privacy invaded because people are looking at what they've been searching for!! :-(

Maybe the CIA could get a blanket, some hot chocolate, and sit down with the DOJ to share their thoughts and feelings about this invasion of their privacy. Perhaps then the DOJ might stop trying to demand search data from Google.

What a waste (1, Interesting)

toupsie (88295) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902010)

How much time, money and news cycles did we waste with Valerie Plame? Google would have told you she was working undercover at Nathan's [nathanslunch.com] . They even knew about it in Duluth [duluthsuperior.com] . Well, I guess "Scooter" deserves to prosecuted not for revealing a known "secret" but for being a grown man named "Scooter".

Certainly someone wants you to believe that... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14902062)

I believe this was all leaked to the papers. But look at what it's done. Now they're uncovering info on LOTS of other agents and exposing them (and this is done by the papers....the intelligence community did this back when it was first brought to light).

This is why you don't reveal the identities of intelligence officers.

Re:What a waste (3, Interesting)

encopitt (902910) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902102)

Ummm.. you're muddling information like a regular Rush Limbaugh. Look at the date under the picture: Valerie Plame, February 14, 2006 That's about 4 weeks ago... exactly how does that prove that her identity as a covert operative was widely known? And Scooter deservers to be prosecuted for LEAKING CLASSIFIED INFORMATION. That is a crime after all. I wonder what it would take for you sheep to start coming to your own conclusions based on available evidence, rather than spouting off inconsistent, incorrect, and irrelevent bullshit from the Rove spin machine?

Re:What a waste (2, Informative)

skillet-thief (622320) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902257)

Scooter is being prosecuted for lying to the Grand Jury, and that is all.

Even if Valerie Plame turns out just to have been a McDonald's cashier all along, Scooter has to deal with the fact that he lied to the grand jury.

Re:What a waste (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14902187)

Scooter is being prosecuted not for revealing her name, but for lying about having done so to the FBI and the grand jury.

Give him time (5, Interesting)

randyjg2 (772752) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902026)

The CIA is changing. Give them time.

The following article explains some of the issues behind the Tribune article
http://www.tpmcafe.com/node/26366 [tpmcafe.com]

The agency is ... complicated, and often the left hand doesn't know what the left hand is doing. Its the nature of the beast it's riding. (well, technically, it's in the belly of the beast, or perhaps the cloaca if you are HQ)

I have no doubt Goss is horrified. He just took over the CIA, and what GS manager would enjoy an outsider showing him a clear look at his department? And Goss hasn't had a chance ot fix things yet. THat is, if that's his goal...with the CIA, who knows?

By the way, didn't Goss inherit an agency that was once run by George Bush? It would explain a lot.

The CIA has other problems as well. The worse is that it facing some competition from private firms like StratFor(sorta like the US Post Office and Federal Express). It can't be much fun to be a world famous secret agency and having to explain to the Intelligence committee why you are being scooped by some small company in Austin,

For those of you who haven't heard of it, StratFor (http://www.stratfor.com/ [stratfor.com] ) is a private intelligence firm, with several hundred thousand customers, that is the CIA for multinationals and private individuals. It is considered somewhat more accurate than the CIA. http://seekerblog.com/archives/20050313/is-stratfo r-credible/ [seekerblog.com]

Hmm.. if the CIA is getting rid of people, that means they are hiring. I would like to apply as an intelligence analyst, or maybe an In Tel Q VC... (There is a rumor the easiest way to apply for a job with the CIA is write in on your computer and wait for ADVISE to pick it up. http://www.csmonitor.com/2006/0209/p01s02-uspo.htm l [csmonitor.com] ).

Re:Give him time (2, Interesting)

tenchiken (22661) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902425)

Wow. That is the first time ever I have seen someone buy so completly into StratFor... You are aware that StratFor like the CIA and every other intellegence agency on the face of the planet was convienced that Saddam had WMD? Or that the Iranian's were behind the insurgancy in Iraq? Or that the isrealli's know everything about Iranian WMD?

As far as your George H Bush cheap shot, remember that the CIA was built to take on and stop the Ruskies. Not terrorism. In comparison, foreign power survallience is a hell of a lot easier then tracking down guys that no one has ever heard of who like to blow themselves up where they can kill the maximal number of jews, christians, hindus, women and children.

Frankly, this is a much harder question. And as much as we have heard critics of the administration blast them for every single decision, I have yet to see a workable plan from anyone on how we (as Americans) handle this problem long term other then capitulate or nuke them all.

In Other News... (5, Funny)

Crisses (776475) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902027)

... The Tribune has suddenly vanished without a trace. The offices are scrubbed clean, the files are empty, and there's a For Lease sign up by the building management company.

... Hundreds of families across Illinois have filed new missing persons reports this month, a drastic rise from the usual numbers. Oddly, a high percentage of the newly missing persons seem to have worked for the Chicago Tribune.

Breaking development. (1)

deep44 (891922) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902486)

.. ironically, details of what happened along with the whereabouts of each missing person have turned up on Google. CIA unavailable for comment.

Next: Google founders kidnapped in broad daylight.

Is the Chicago Tribune really that naive? (0, Redundant)

CableModemSniper (556285) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902033)

Come on guys, as this information has obviously been fabricated by the CIA in order to smoke out anyone trying to find info about them via the internet. Are the tin foil hats not tight enough today? This is the freaking CIA, they invented the mind-control ray! (No matter what the NSA would like you to believe).

The Company (1)

Chatmag (646500) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902035)

We used to refer to the CIA as "The Company"

Now, when saying "The Company", we'll be referring to Google.

Re:The Company (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14902202)

We used to refer to the CIA as "The Company"

Funny, I thought people used to refer to the CIA as "the CIA"...

Re:The Company (1)

Liam Slider (908600) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902279)

We've been saying that "Google knows all" for years....but nobody really believed us until now.

For the Clueless (1)

N8F8 (4562) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902057)

Ok, so like 90% of what CIA does is not covert operations. They actually employ secretaries and useless middle management folks like other organizations. Not everyone is a uber kool secret agent. In fact, that secret agent role is a tiny portion of what they do. see for yourselves [cia.gov] .

what the CIA really doesn't want you to know (2, Insightful)

way2trivial (601132) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902090)

Re:what the CIA really doesn't want you to know (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14902363)

Booooring!

what about the .secretStuff/ and the .pr0n/ folders?

wonder how long.. (1)

mliikset (869292) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902104)

..that has been possible, and if it has been only recently, whether the white house rat can use it as a defense.

As I get older, I become more gullible from seeing the most outrageous stuff become commonplace. And all too often, acceptable.

slashdot = digg, but delayed? (-1, Offtopic)

emx (186289) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902158)

People, try http://digg.com/ [digg.com]
You'll get the articles before they appear on Slashdot

Slashdot: you were cool when you started, but now it's been years, time to evolve or suck

Re:slashdot = digg, but delayed? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14902320)

Real men use yigg [www.yigg.de]

Data mining (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14902165)

Seems like they discovered all the identities by using data mining techniques on publicly (for a small fee or free) accessable databases.

A senior U.S. official, reacting to the computer searches that produced the names and addresses, said, "I don't know whether Al Qaeda could do this, but the Chinese could."
... remember, we were never at war with Eurasia, we are in war with Oceania.

You know what this means don't you?.... (2, Insightful)

3seas (184403) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902183)

.... it means they are trying to take more of our rights away.

whether or not the story is true, it is in fact presenting the public with this idea that the freedom of research and press are dangerious to the government that is suppose to be protecting these rights.

There seems to be another story on slashdot at the moment along this same line.

Next thing you know we won't be allowed to talk to our neighbors without government approval.

When are enough people going to wake up and realize 9/11 was a direct result of US wrongful manipulation of world economy.

Do a search on "Trillion dollar bet" Read the transcript and realize that much money doesn't just appear or vanish into nowhere.

CIA employee information????? Huh? What?

Don't do others wrong and you won't have reason to be parionoid of retaliation.

Sneaky Plan (2, Funny)

nicolastheadept (930317) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902292)

You know, it could just be a really clever diversion.

Oh boy. . . (1)

Fantastic Lad (198284) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902313)

1. The CIA is stupid. They make mistakes and show themselves.

2. The CIA is extremely smart. They know how to manipulate media and public opinion, they know how to create operatives who have no identity whatsoever and keep them secret.

3. The Chicago Tribune employs zealous reporters eager to uncover and share the truth.

4. The Chicago Tirbune employs cowardly scum willing to do the bidding of whoever has a big stick or a deep pocket, (usually both).

Each is a collection of people. The problem is that the good-intentioned guys (who are aware enough to do any good), are few in number and are actively opposed by the bad elements from holding positions of power.

It's a logic circuit; power only moves in one direction. The Good Americans at the CIA and the Chicago Tribune by virtue of being Good, do not harass and terrorize and subvert the Bad Americans working at the CIA and the Chicago Tribune. The same cannot be said in the reverse. Thus, the Bad Americans rise in power while the Good Americans remain stationary or are pressed out. Allow enough time to pass, and the whole structure starts to stink.


-FL

tinfoil hat time (2, Interesting)

zuluechopapa (919551) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902315)

what if all the leaked info is just a cover to make a cuase for the justic dept to be able to get access to search engine data and delete/change ndexes and data as needed to protect covert operations? In related news, I've spent several hours playing splintercell... does this qualify me as a CIA agent, now?

Consolidate funding sources for intelligence (1)

puzzled (12525) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902376)



    Right now the U.S. intelligence community is hamstrung by having to deal with something like 80 congressional committees for its funding. It is a national priority, the failure of which got 3,000+ civilians killed, but its not enough of a priority that we actually DO something about it.

    Call or write your Senator today and indicate your support for streamlining their funding.

All this from a Credit Report? (1)

xoip (920266) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902420)

I understand how they can get employer and address information from a credit report...feed that to a telephone directory search...check out the location with Google Maps but...Where did the list of employees come from in the first place... Karl Rove?

Corrections (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14902441)

.. to the first paragraph. Some of you are going to want to call this a biased opinion, I suggest you check the dictionary on the terms I'm using.

MILAN, Italy -- When the CIA decides to "kidnap" a terrorism suspect living abroad for torture in Egypt or another friendly Middle East nation, it spares no expense.

Vaildity questioned, but protection more important (1)

failedlogic (627314) | more than 7 years ago | (#14902481)

I think the CIA would make us think they're not stupid enough to post this kind of information on the Internet. At least that's what I think...! I would realy question the validity of the information posted there.

Granted, the reporter found the information on the internet in publicly available information. Even if this information is not true, I think its more important to take steps not to publish this information found. The people that work for these agencies risk their lives to do what they do.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...