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SCO Offers Up The 'SCAMP' Stack

Zonk posted more than 8 years ago | from the quite-the-little-scamps dept.

97

Robert wrote to mention a Computer Business Review Online article about SCO's newest marketing tactic. They're offering their OS as part of a 'SCAMP' stack, ala the more familiar LAMP setup. From the article: "The Lindon, Utah-based Unix vendor has included the open source Apache web server, MySQL database, and PHP and Perl programming languages with its SCO OpenServer operating system since the launch of OpenServer 6 in June 2005. It is now pitching the technologies as a SCAMP stack, placing it squarely up against the Linux-based LAMP stack. SCO claims that Linux contains Unix code donated to the open source operating system in violation of agreements between it and IBM Corp."

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Great name choice! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14915817)

scamp (skmp)

n.

  1. A rogue; a rascal.
  2. A mischievous youngster.

tr.v

  • To perform in a careless superficial way.

Re:Great name choice! (1)

arivanov (12034) | more than 8 years ago | (#14916132)

Indeed.

Removing a letter here or there would have been even better.

Im actually surprised they didnt do... (1)

keirre23hu (638913) | more than 8 years ago | (#14950801)

SPAM |Sco PHP Apache Mysql| or AMPS |Apache Mysql...| but since it is SCO SCRIPT SCo has Read too many of Its own Press releases Today or something...

Re:Great name choice! (3, Funny)

Zemplar (764598) | more than 8 years ago | (#14916147)

I just prefer the first "SCAM" [google.com] definition name for short.

Yeah, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14920568)

Does it come with the quality we've come to expect from SCO?

You know: a free SCO IP License ($699 value) and a lawsuit over it, anyhow?

Re:Great name choice! (1)

redletterrocko (960983) | more than 8 years ago | (#14927661)

I find it very odd that SCO seems to want to call everyone and now everything SCAMP. Isn't that like the pot calling the kettle black?

rascal? (2)

H4x0r Jim Duggan (757476) | more than 8 years ago | (#14915818)

In Ireland, a "scamp" is like a rascal. Like when a child does something and almost gets away with it, and no one's made, they'd be called a little scamp.

Is it not so in other countries or are SCO just the stupidest company ever to last this long?

Re:rascal? (3, Informative)

Jerf (17166) | more than 8 years ago | (#14916435)

Presumably due to heavy Irish immigration during the Potato famine, that word is definitely in the US vocabulary, too. I have no idea what crack they were smoking for that name, because there's just no way nobody involved knew what it meant.

I honestly said out loud when I saw this story on the frontpage, "Is this a joke?"

Incidentally, a lot of words survive in English primarily as part of a phrase, with their older, original meanings lost. In a way, the phrase is the word. For example, "hither and yon"; neither word is in common or even uncommon use anymore on its own, but the phrase is still used uncommonly. While "scamp" has not descended to this level, there is a phrase associated with it in my mind that may outlast the word itself: 'a scamp and a scoundrel [google.com] ' (and note we don't much use "scoundrel" anymore either), as in "he's a scamp and a scoundrel".

So again, what crack were these people smoking? I mean, I know we like to bag on marketters around here, but there is a certain level of skill involved...

Re:rascal? (1)

creimer (824291) | more than 8 years ago | (#14918058)

Stupidity can happen anywhere, if not more so in the U.S.A. The transit authority in Silicon Valley came up with with this cute acronym: SCAT. Until someone pointed out that one of definitions of the word "scat" is "excrement, especially of an animal; dung." Considering that the city of San Jose spent several million USD on a public art piece that looks like a pile of dog poop, the transit authority didn't want to step into that mess and picked a different acronym.

Re:rascal? (1)

innosent (618233) | more than 8 years ago | (#14940020)

You mean like these: SCAT Sacramento Center for Assistive Technology SCAT Sarasota County Area Transit (Florida) SCAT School & College Ability Test SCAT School and Community Action Team SCAT Scout/Attack SCAT Screen Capture and Transfer SCAT Secure Campus Anonymous Tip SCAT Security Control of Air Traffic SCAT Senior Citizens Against Crime SCAT Senior Citizens Against Telemarketing SCAT Sensor Coverage Analysis Tool SCAT Sewing Circle and Terrorist Society (women's group) SCAT Sheep Cell Agglutination Test SCAT Ship Certification Acceptance Team SCAT Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Team (oil spills) SCAT Shrewsbury College of Arts and Technology SCAT Single Channel Autonomous Trunking SCAT Somerset College of Arts and Technology SCAT Sonar Calibration Alignment Training SCAT South Carolina Association of Taxpayers SCAT South Coast Agility Team (dog agility club; Costa Mesa, CA) SCAT South Coast Aquatic Team SCAT South Coast Area Transit (California) SCAT Space Coast Area Transit (Brevard County, Florida) SCAT Space Coast Area Transit (Florida) SCAT Special Community Action Team SCAT Specialized Community Area Transportation (service) SCAT Sport Competition Anxiety Test SCAT Street Cleansing Ambulance Truck SCAT Street Crime Assertive Team (East Orange, New Jersey) SCAT Street Crimes Arrest Team(s) (police unit) SCAT Student Coalition Against Tobacco SCAT Student Community Action Team SCAT Sub-Category (US Navy system for categorizing test instruments) SCAT Subcategory SCAT Submarine Classification & Tracking SCAT Submersible Cable-Actuated Teleoperator SCAT Submersible Concentric, Axially Traversing SCAT Supersonic Commercial Air Transport SCAT Support Center for Advanced Telecommunications Technology Research, Foundation SCAT Surface Controlled Avalanche Transistor SCAT Suspense Control and Automated Tracking System SCAT Switch Consolidation Action Team (Sprint) SCAT Synchronized COA Authoring Tool SCAT System Calibration and Test SCAT System Commonality Analysis Tool SCAT Systematic Causal Analysis Technique (systematic method of analyzing the basic causes of accidents) SCAT Systems Consolidation of Accessions & Trainees Oddly enough, it doesn't seem like anyone outside of Silicon Valley knows what a dictionary is.

Re:rascal? (1)

Dr.Altaica (200819) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920759)

Is that any stupider than France's Operation SATANIC? [wikipedia.org]

Scamp: From Dictionary.com (0, Redundant)

JSBiff (87824) | more than 8 years ago | (#14915825)

scamp1 Audio pronunciation of "scamp" ( P ) Pronunciation Key (skmp)
n.

      1. A rogue; a rascal.
      2. A mischievous youngster.

How appropriate. . .

Blah, blah, blah (1)

Billosaur (927319) | more than 8 years ago | (#14915831)

It is now pitching the technologies as a SCAMP stack, placing it squarely up against the Linux-based LAMP stack. SCO claims that Linux contains Unix code donated to the open source operating system in violation of agreements between it and IBM Corp.

Big whoop. SCAMP, LAMP... so SCO is trying to compete with Linux. This is hardly news. As a matter of fact, you have to wonder what took them so long. Have they become so lawsuit happy that they've forgotten how to compete?

Re:Blah, blah, blah (4, Informative)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 8 years ago | (#14916114)

Have they become so lawsuit happy that they've forgotten how to compete?

Yes, actually. As soon as Caldera took over the SCO Unix business, they pretty much dropped any real support for the platform and focused their efforts on sueing Linux. If the reports are to be believed, their distributors were about ready to hang them during the various regional meetings. The SCO corporate reps came across as somewhat anxious about all the bad will towards them, but definitely not apologetic.

The fallout of these meetings was expected to be that SCO would lose a lot of their local distributors. The results of which would be catastrophic if SCO were actually trying to do business. Now that they realize that their lawsuit has failed, they've found that they've screwed themselves on being able to do business. In addition, they've burned their OSS bridge (guess we won't be seeing an opensco.org, eh?), leaving them with no real edge in the market. So now they're trying to convince businesses that they can provide OSS support without being an OSS supporter.

My prediction? You're going to be seeing quite a few new Solaris 10/OpenSolaris installations very soon now.

Caldera (1)

Noctrnl (110574) | more than 8 years ago | (#14915863)

I even remember back when they were Caldera. We'd see them at tradeshows all the time and wonder how on earth they planned to make it as a RedHat clone. I never thought they'd go this route. It's pretty sad really.

This is all pretty indicative of the times. A company need not actually make a product people need to use. They just have to either scare people away from competitors, or convince them that a bigger name is actually more important. Of course, bigger name for SCO just means that more people have heard of them due to unfounded lawsuits. Free publicity is good publicity I suppose.

Tetris Installer! (1)

brunes69 (86786) | more than 8 years ago | (#14915961)

The thing I remember about Caldera, was the installer. While it was copying the files to disk (a process which at that time could take 20 minutes or longer - hell actually with today's DVD distros it can still take that long), it let you play a tetris clone.

To this day I miss this feature. I mean, you can only watch the marketing "This OS Rules!" crap all over the screen for so many installs before you want to drill your eyes out.

Can we get this added in to the Ubuntu installer? *PLEASE* ?

Re:Tetris Installer! (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14916028)

Ubuntu tetris installer would also record the highscores to log files, as plain text ofcourse :)

Re:Tetris Installer! (3, Interesting)

realnowhereman (263389) | more than 8 years ago | (#14916420)

I heard that the reason nobody does this is that some evil corp has a patent on mini-games during installers.

I'm not really sure how, I remember playing pac man on my sinclair once while a game was loading from tape, which would surely be prior art.

Re:Tetris Installer! (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 8 years ago | (#14918316)

some evil corp has a patent on mini-games during installers.

Namco, which first used the technique in Ridge Racer.

I remember playing pac man on my sinclair once while a game was loading from tape, which would surely be prior art.

Tape != optical disk.

Re:Tetris Installer! (1)

GuyverDH (232921) | more than 8 years ago | (#14918426)

Loading bytes from storage media - regardless of whether it's tape / floppy (tape flattened out and stretched) / zip / hard disk / optical disk - whatever - it's still the same thing - loading data from media.

Re:Tetris Installer! (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 8 years ago | (#14918468)

Loading bytes from storage media - regardless of whether it's tape / floppy (tape flattened out and stretched) / zip / hard disk / optical disk - whatever - it's still the same thing - loading data from media.

Not to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, and not to Namco, which can afford a more experienced legal team than you can.

Re:Tetris Installer! (1)

Trogre (513942) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919364)

Loading bytes from storage media - regardless of whether it's tape / floppy (tape flattened out and stretched) / zip / hard disk / optical disk - whatever - it's still the same thing - loading data from media.

Not to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, and not to Namco, which can afford a more experienced legal team than you can.


Excellent, so we just install from a 1GB flash drive or NFS mount and everything's cool right?

Not cheap enough (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919728)

Excellent, so we just install from a 1GB flash drive or NFS mount and everything's cool right?

Distribution of console-sized video games or full-sized operating system environments to residential end users on flash memory or network-attached hard disk drives is still uneconomic in 2006 except in the special case of a hard disk drive that comes bundled with a new computer.

Re:Tetris Installer! (1)

lightspawn (155347) | more than 8 years ago | (#14921395)


Namco, which first used the technique in Ridge Racer.
Tape != optical disk.


That's just the first game you remember that uses this technique.

From the Spectrum Games FAQ [nvg.ntnu.no] :
3.4. What was the first game with an on-screen counter while loading?

Technician Ted (Hewson) had a counter that went around on the screen while the game loaded. I think this was the first. The first game to play a game while loading a game was Joe Blade 2 (Players), which had a simple pac-man type game.

Here's an image for you:
ftp://ftp.worldofspectrum.org/pub/sinclair/screens /load/j/gif/JoeBlade2.gif [worldofspectrum.org]

That's prior art from 1988. Can you find an earlier instance?

Claim 12: "As above, using an optical disk" (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 8 years ago | (#14921452)

[Joe Blade 2 is] prior art from 1988.

Joe Blade 2 may be prior art for some of the claims of US Patent 5,718,632 assigned to Namco [uspto.gov] , as may some other games mentioned in this thread on IGDA Forums [igda.org] , but claim 12 refers explicitly to an optical disk. At the time, Spectrum games were distributed on cassette, not Compact Disc Digital Audio. So even if none of the rest of the claims hold up under reexamination, if Namco was the first to do it with a CD, claim 12 may remain valid against Linux distributors.

Re:Tetris Installer! (1)

dbIII (701233) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920907)

a patent on mini-games during installers.
Paticular since it was done by people from another company working in a different country. Wasn't it someone at TrollTech in Norway who wrote the tetris game in the caldera installer? How can you patent something you buy from a contractor? This bunch had IP law abuse problems even before they deliberately drove the company into the IBM wall and employed the brother of the boss to expensively try to straighten out the legal dents.

Re:Tetris Installer! (1)

Bloater (12932) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919219)

The Ubuntu live CD has numerous games installed on its desktop that you can play while the installer is running. I've tried the installer (espresso), and it works, although it is not finished yet, and YMMV.

Re:Tetris Installer! (1)

Trogre (513942) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919344)

Lycoris, I believe it was, had a solitare game you could play while installing.

Lots of fun.

Re:Caldera (1)

drooling-dog (189103) | more than 8 years ago | (#14916046)

Given their history of suing friend and foe alike, were I an IT executive I think I'd be a little nervous about doing business with SCO (or allowing their software on any of my servers)...

Caldera-Back in the day. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14916878)

"A company need not actually make a product people need to use. They just have to either scare people away from competitors, or convince them that a bigger name is actually more important."

Looks like it didn't work. Kind of shoots down that "sign of the times" argument. Which is little different than the "back in the day" argument.

Not safe to use (4, Insightful)

Guspaz (556486) | more than 8 years ago | (#14915925)

It isn't safe to use SCAMP. SCO's corporate future is uncertain. They've based their entire company around a lawsuit that it looks like they will probably lose. It would be a bad idea to use SCAMP for a production system only to have SCO go bankrupt a year or two later.

Sure, you could convert your SCAMP-based application to LAMP if that happens, but doing that on a production system is very costly due to all the manpower to switch platforms and all the testing to make sure everything works.

You should ask yourself, what advantages does SCAMP offer over LAMP that warrants the risk of using a platform from a dying company? Are there even any such advantages at all?

Re:Not safe to use (4, Insightful)

dougmc (70836) | more than 8 years ago | (#14916062)

It would be a bad idea to use SCAMP for a production system only to have SCO go bankrupt a year or two later.
I wouldn't say that.

SCAMP is short on details, but it sounds like it's exactly the same tools as in LAMP ... but in SCO. Except that you could just drop your application back into Linux, and it would just work there too. You could also move it to FreeBSD, Solaris, OpenBSD ... probably even Windows (most of the LAMP stuff runs under cygwin at least, and there's probably native Windows versions of most of it) and it would even work there with minimal work.

I don't see much danger here. (Of course, I don't see much benefit in going with SCO in the first place, and so I certainly wouldn't do so.)

As far as I can tell, it's just a marketing ploy. `Look! We can do the same thing as Linux, but we have a cuter name for it! So use us!'. There's little danger, as your application would probably port right back to a LAMP system with little effort, but there's no benefit either, because a LAMP system would work just as well from the beginning.

Re:Not safe to use (3, Informative)

jaseuk (217780) | more than 8 years ago | (#14916910)

XAMPP and other similar projects make it really easy to install all that stuff under windows. It's easier in some respects to install XAMPP under windows than it is for Linux, particulary for someone with out any Linux experience.

"The distribution for Windows 98, NT, 2000 and XP. This version contains: Apache, MySQL, PHP + PEAR, Perl, mod_php, mod_perl, mod_ssl, OpenSSL, phpMyAdmin, Webalizer, Mercury Mail Transport System for Win32 and NetWare Systems v3.32, JpGraph, FileZilla FTP Server, mcrypt, eAccelerator, SQLite, and WEB-DAV + mod_auth_mysql. "

Jason

Re:Not safe to use (1)

Guspaz (556486) | more than 8 years ago | (#14917330)

You're missing my point. You still need to replace all your servers, port your content (which could be as simple as copying it over), and test it.

Replacing production servers either means downtime for a production system, or new hardware to be purchased. Setting up the new servers is time consuming. Testing HAS to be done any time you change config, let alone re-installing the OS.

So the potential danger is there, I think. Either you're going to spend a lot of money on the changeover buying new hardware to replace the old one with no downtime, or you're going to pay a still hefty chunk of change in labour, and accept the downtime, of migrating the existing servers.

Re:Not safe to use (1)

dougmc (70836) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920292)

You're missing my point. You still need to replace all your servers, port your content (which could be as simple as copying it over), and test it.

Replacing production servers either means downtime for a production system, or new hardware to be purchased. Setting up the new servers is time consuming. Testing HAS to be done any time you change config, let alone re-installing the OS.

Yes, and I agree. But you're missing my point ...

The amount of work and testing required will be approximately the same going from SCO to RHES4 (a Linux distribution) (or whatever) will be similar to the amount of work going from Suse (another Linux distribution) to RHES4, or even from RHES3 to RHES4, or from RHES3 to Solaris, etc. That's the beauty of *AMP stuff -- once you get the AMP (Apache, Mysql, Perl or Python) stuff set up, it all pretty much works the same, and you can just copy your application over -- you don't even need to recompile, unless your application does more than just the typical *AMP stuff.

Granted, I see little benefit in using SCO at all, but claiming that you're just setting yourself up for a painful/expensive migration by using them is just F.U.D. (Fear, Uncertainty, Doubt.) Even if SCO the company utterly folded tomorrow (which is unlikely, though I see little future for them), the OS wouldn't just stop working, and it's quite likely that support for OpenServer would still be available. When SCO finally does go under (it's hard to make a successful business model out of suing those who will 1) fight you and 2) win), OpenServer will probably be bought up by somebody who will continue to support it, and so it's likely to be supported for as approximately as long as RHES4 will be, for example.

As much as I dislike SCO's current business plan, I dislike unwarranted F.U.D. more, no matter who or what the target is. The ends (putting SCO out of business) do not justify the means (spreading F.U.D.).

Re:Not safe to use (1)

Shishberg (819760) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920653)

SCAMP is short on details, but it sounds like it's exactly the same tools as in LAMP ... but in SCO. Except that you could just drop your application back into Linux, and it would just work there too. You could also move it to FreeBSD, Solaris, OpenBSD ... probably even Windows (most of the LAMP stuff runs under cygwin at least, and there's probably native Windows versions of most of it) and it would even work there with minimal work.

So the best thing they offer over the competition is the ease with which you can switch to the competition when they go out of business?

...

Profit!

Re:Not safe to use (1)

dougmc (70836) | more than 8 years ago | (#14924590)

So the best thing they offer over the competition is the ease with which you can switch to the competition when they go out of business?
No, because the competition offers that too!

Really, they offer one thing -- a cooler acronym, SCAMP vs. LAMP. And while I'm not sure about this, it would also appear that they offer support for this, things that generally aren't supported, but it wouldn't surprise me if Redhat and other vendors also offer similar support. If so, then the big benefit is the better acronym.

Re:Not safe to use (1)

JediTrainer (314273) | more than 8 years ago | (#14916067)

It isn't safe to use SCAMP. SCO's corporate future is uncertain. They've based their entire company around a lawsuit that it looks like they will probably lose. It would be a bad idea to use SCAMP for a production system only to have SCO go bankrupt a year or two later.

It's not safe to not use [cio-today.com] SCO, at least if you used to be a customer at some point. It's sad, but I think that they actually have customers that are hoping they'll go bust, in order to cease being their customer without risking getting sued.

Probably Not, But it's Still Pointless (1)

Greyfox (87712) | more than 8 years ago | (#14916081)

Once IBM gets done eviscerating SCO in court, they'll probably end up owning all SCO's IP and assets. Which means at that point you'll be working with an IBM shop. No doubt IBM will provide a migration path to AIX or Linux, so if you go the SCO route now you'll be back on a LAMP or AAMP platform in a couple of years anyway. The only reason to go with them now is that you feel more comfortable on SCO's UNIX platform. That thing has always felt awkward and clunky to me, from the first time I used it in '89 until the last time I used it in '99. It didn't seem like they improve the user interface at all in a decade.

Still, there might be a few folks out there who've been using it for a while and feel more comfortable in it than in Linux or AIX. True, they're only delaying the inevitable, but it would give them a couple of years to get used to the operating system they'll be using after IBM gets done pounding SCO like a cheap side of flank steak.

Re:Probably Not, But it's Still Pointless (1)

gormanly (134067) | more than 8 years ago | (#14916606)

Once IBM gets done eviscerating SCO in court, they'll probably end up owning all SCO's IP and assets

Forgetting the $34,000,000 plus interest that the SCO Group owes Novell [groklaw.net] from the M$ and Sun license fees? Or the fact that Novell still own the UNIX copyrights, that tSCOg has no trade secrets or patents? Or the Red Hat suit?

A happy thought is these 3 passing round the hot, smoking corpse of Cald^H^H^H^H^H tSCOg: "Here, take it", "No, it's yours", "We insist" while trying to ignore the stench of napalm-burnt turd ...

Re:Probably Not, But it's Still Pointless (1)

Guspaz (556486) | more than 8 years ago | (#14917376)

IBM can't obtain IP that SCO doesn't own. SCO doesn't even own the Unix copyrights that they're claiming, Novell does.

So, there is a small chance that IBM would feel bad for SCO customers and offer to support them, but that is unlikely.

Besides, SCO is sueing IBM, not the other way around. I don't think IBM can claim damages when they're the defendant. I think the best they can do (and what they want to do) is have the lawsuit dismissed.

Another danger is that SCO will go bankrupt before the court case even ends. They've got enormous losses every quarter, and those losses are skyrocketing every quarter. Just a few days ago they announced a record loss.

IBM's countersuit (2, Informative)

LightSail (682738) | more than 8 years ago | (#14917648)

IBM has a counterclaim for damages. Read Groklaw.net.

Re:Not safe to use (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14916269)

Clearly, they intend to claim ownership of Apache, MySQL, and PHP at some point in the next few months.

Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt (1)

Wolfger (96957) | more than 8 years ago | (#14918914)

FUD... It's not just for SCO anymore. Seriously, while your post may be genuinely well-intentioned, it is a rather blatant load of FUD. It is entirely possible that SCO will continue to exist after they lose this lawsuit.

Re:Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt (1)

Guspaz (556486) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919169)

Is it possible? Yes. Is it worth the risk? No. This isn't FUD.

Want proof? SCO just announced a few days ago that their net loss for the last quarter of $4.58 million dollars. That is up from the year ago quarter's net loss of $2.96 million. Their profits are also down, going from the year ago quarter's $8.86 million to the current quarter's $7.34 million.

This is a company that, even if they don't get destroyed by IBM, will probably collapse under their own debt. They can't keep losing millions of dollars every quarter. Most of the investments they're getting are investors hoping they win the lawsuit. If they were to lose the suit, most of those investors would try to pull out, and they'd have a great deal of problem finding new ones.

Do some googling if you want to verify my numbers. It was a public conference call.

Re:Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt (1)

stanmann (602645) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919204)

There will be NOTHING left of SCOs, There is no basis to there lawsuit. IBM spends more on Coffee in a quarter than SCOX is worth. IBM could have bought SCOX out and ended this 2 years ago. THEY DIDN'T This means that they intend to Burn SCOX down, stomp the ashes, Salt the earth, burn the Salty ashy earth, and flush it into a refuse dump.

Re:Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt (1)

Wolfger (96957) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920731)

Well alrighty then. Can't argue with facts like those...

Re:Not safe to use (3, Funny)

Kaenneth (82978) | more than 8 years ago | (#14922161)

It isn't safe to use LAMP. GNU's fiscal future is certain. They've based their entire organization around giving software away for free. It would be a bad idea to use LAMP for a production system only to have the developers get 'real jobs'.

Sure, you could convert your LAMP-based application to SCAMP if that happens, but doing that on a production system is very costly due to all the manpower to document the old system and all the conversions from unsupported formats.

You should ask yourself, what advantages does LAMP offer over SCAMP that warrants the risk of using a platform from a bunch of communist hippies? Are there even any such advantages at all?

Re:Not safe to use (1)

Schraegstrichpunkt (931443) | more than 8 years ago | (#14922489)

Heh!

The 1990s called. They want their arguments back. :)

SCAMP? (1)

zaguar (881743) | more than 8 years ago | (#14915940)

All right, lets get the jokes about SCO, SCAMP, scams and irony out here right now.

It will save a lot of viewing time for those readers who actually want to find out about how SCAMP measures up to LAMP, LAPP, WAMP etc.

Re:SCAMP? (1)

Vlad_the_Inhaler (32958) | more than 8 years ago | (#14916963)

It will save a lot of viewing time for those readers who actually want to find out about how SCAMP measures up to LAMP, LAPP, WAMP etc.

Why should anyone care? SCO are attempting to copy something which exists already while charging more for it. The reason they went the 'sue IBM and Linux' way in the first place was that they could not compete. A couple of years down the track, their lawsuit is on the rocks, they have seriously annoyed everyone (except Microsoft), they have neglected their main product which was not competing in the first place. Why *should* anyone care how SCAMP matches up?

how fitting (0, Redundant)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | more than 8 years ago | (#14915949)

From the OED:

scamp, n. A good-for-nothing, worthless person, a ne'er-do-well, 'waster'; a rascal. Also playfully as a mild term of reproof.

scamp, v. To do (work, a task, etc.) negligently or hurriedly.

Am I the only one? (1)

erroneus (253617) | more than 8 years ago | (#14916038)

Am I the only one who read that first as "...SCAMP Attack"?

Re:Am I the only one? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14926387)

When I was a little boy, the neighbour's dog would terrorize me when it got loose. It's name happened to be SCAMP.

wink-and-nod (5, Funny)

zero time ghost (699927) | more than 8 years ago | (#14916068)

Somewhere in the dank basement levels far below Darl McBride's office, SCO's only remaining systems engineer is laughing wildly. They actually went with "SCAMP"! The fools!

Pay more for less! (4, Informative)

mwvdlee (775178) | more than 8 years ago | (#14916077)

LAMP isn't so much a literal acronym as much as is stands for the concept of all the components being open source. I doubt many people would stop calling it LAMP if it included FreeBSD instead of Linux, nor would replacing MySQL with ProgreSQL suddenly turn it into something completely different. Hell, the P can mean PHP, Perl or Python, and I think even Ruby would count as a LAMP language.

So how this SCAMP thing is supposed to be anything special, is completely beyond my comprehention.

However, I for one would be VERY curious as to how SCO is treating all the different FOSS licenses which apply. As far as I know, Apache's license has a mutual patent annihilation clause, and I'm pretty sure the other licenses have their own set of rules too. It would be all too funny if one of them found a reason to sue SCO over their prepackaged SCAMP solution.

Re:Pay more for less! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14916298)

That's not it - they just can't pronounce UAMP.

Re:Pay more for less! (1)

stanmann (602645) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919233)

UAMP is Pronounced Whomp, which is what IBM is just starting to do to SCOX.

Re:Pay more for less! (4, Interesting)

shish (588640) | more than 8 years ago | (#14916483)

I doubt many people would stop calling it LAMP if it included FreeBSD instead of Linux

I've seen "FLPR" (FreeBSD / LigHTTPd / Postgres / Ruby (on Rails)) gaining popularity...

Re:Pay more for less! (1)

mapnjd (92353) | more than 8 years ago | (#14917692)

As someone currently using AMP on Solaris, I view myself as a LAMP developer with expensive purple hardware :-)

Winamp? (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 8 years ago | (#14918357)

So if I were to develop or deploy a web app on a Windows server using Apache, MySQL, and one of the P* languages, would it really whip the llama's ass?

Re:Pay more for less! (1)

Darby (84953) | more than 8 years ago | (#14924495)

I doubt many people would stop calling it LAMP if it included FreeBSD instead of Linux,

Oh come on, that would be BS-DAMP. Amusingly enough, it would also demonstrate that the "BSD is dying" trolls are all wet.

SCAMP : Dogfood or Dogshit? (3, Informative)

NZheretic (23872) | more than 8 years ago | (#14916198)

Darl can't even eat his own dogfood ...
http://www.sco.com [sco.com] was running Apache on Linux [netcraft.com] when last queried at 9-Mar-2006 20:57:45 GMT
Worse still ...
http://www.edgeclickpark.com [edgeclickpark.com] was running Apache on Windows 2000 [netcraft.com] when last queried at 14-Mar-2006 14:43:14 GMT

Microsoft Windows 2000 Server with all vendor patches installed and all vendor workarounds applied, is currently affected by 21 Secunia advisories [secunia.com] some of which are rated Highly critical.

Darl owns Linux... (1)

kuwan (443684) | more than 8 years ago | (#14917063)

Darl can't even eat his own dogfood ...
http://www.sco.com/ [sco.com] was running Apache on Linux when last queried at 9-Mar-2006 20:57:45 GMT


Don't you get it, Darl owns Linux - IBM stole his code and put it in Linux therefore Darl owns Linux. So of course it's OK for SCO to run Linux because they own it all.

If that bit of reasoning makes sense to you then I've got a nice bridge in Brooklyn that's for sale.

What? (2, Funny)

tengennewseditor (949731) | more than 8 years ago | (#14916271)

Who is running this stupid company?

Re:What? (1)

gormanly (134067) | more than 8 years ago | (#14916666)

Le éminence grise [microsoft.com] ?

SCAM stack? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14916366)

Freudian marketing department?

Daimler-Chrysler should sue SCO (1)

LightningBolt! (664763) | more than 8 years ago | (#14916412)

Trademark violation. Plymouth owns the "intellectual property rights".

http://www.turbinecar.com/scamp.htm [turbinecar.com]

Re:Daimler-Chrysler should sue SCO (1)

Chmarr (18662) | more than 8 years ago | (#14916508)

But do Plymouth own "Scamp" across ALL categories? I doubt it :)

Oh... you were being facetious... pardon me :)

Trademark dilution (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 8 years ago | (#14918384)

But do Plymouth own "Scamp" across ALL categories? I doubt it :)

Under dilution law [wikipedia.org] , if your trademark becomes famous enough, you do own it across all categories of goods and services.

Re:Daimler-Chrysler should sue SCO (1)

cant_get_a_good_nick (172131) | more than 8 years ago | (#14916564)

If you've ever actually seen a Scamp in real life you'd know that Dodge should be sued for vision damage - it was so ugly you'd poke out your own eyes.

Re:Daimler-Chrysler should sue SCO (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14923212)

Actually, couldn't the owners of LAMP sue for trademark dilution?
After all, SCAMP is just LAMP with a different first character.

Kinda like the Lindows lawsuit.

Tcl (4, Funny)

Snap E Tom (128447) | more than 8 years ago | (#14916482)


And if they replace the PHP package with Tcl, they can call it SCAT.

Re:Tcl (4, Funny)

gbobeck (926553) | more than 8 years ago | (#14916615)

And if SCO moves to Houston and they replace Apache with IIS, it would then be called SHIT. Oh wait, all SCO products (and SCO, too) already are.

Re:Tcl (1)

vleo (7933) | more than 8 years ago | (#14928333)

I'd rate this comment at 50 points! I laughed my pants off! :-) SHIT :-)

Re:Tcl (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14916682)

They have no choice but to include a scripting language, or else it'd be called SCAM.

claim? (2, Funny)

Paradise Pete (33184) | more than 8 years ago | (#14916913)

SCO claims that Linux contains Unix code donated to the open source operating system in violation of agreements between it and IBM Corp."

Wow! That's big news if it's true. Why haven't we heard more about this?

Because.... (1)

Groo Wanderer (180806) | more than 8 years ago | (#14918413)

I think they got hung up on the 'if true' part..... :)

            -Charlie

Re:Because.... (1)

netkid91 (915818) | more than 8 years ago | (#14922664)

You moron, it's not 'if true' any more, now it's 'if (SCO) {
<Code></Code>
};

SCAMP disease (1)

naken (132677) | more than 8 years ago | (#14916991)

Am I the only one who thinks the word SCAMP sounds like a disease? It's like: "I got the SCAMP from a burrito at Taco Bell last night".

1 2 1 2 The Naken Crew

Re:SCAMP disease (1)

wkitchen (581276) | more than 8 years ago | (#14921486)

Am I the only one ....
Yes.

From the Article (1)

Orrin Bloquy (898571) | more than 8 years ago | (#14917191)

'"We decided on SCAMP because it was easier to pronounce than 699LCSTB," McBride was later quoted as saying.'

SCAMP - P = SCAM (0, Redundant)

Sparcler (600274) | more than 8 years ago | (#14917291)

I was wondering what do you get when you subtract a p from SCAMP? SCAMP - P = SCAM oh its SCO's business model.

Re:SCAMP - P = SCAM (1)

Erbo (384) | more than 8 years ago | (#14917469)

Well, I was going to put that as, "Remember, boys and girls, you can't say SCAMP without SCAM," but your way works too.

What really caught my eye here: (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14917415)

While OpenServer 6 was launched in two versions, with the Starter Edition for two users costing $599, and the Enterprise Edition for 10 users costing $1,399, the SCAMP stack is licensed for five users and is available for $999 until July 31.

Now wait, I'd be curious about this. It sounds to me like "SCAMP" is basically four free programs packaged together. Every single one of those four programs is under a different open source license, and the strictest of those licenses-- the GPL [theregister.co.uk] -- SCO is probably not bound by becuase they bought a commercial MySQL license from MySQL AB. But I have to wonder, exactly how are they enforcing this "licensed for five users" bit and are the licenses of all the included softwares okay with this? Perl at least allows closed-source redistribution I think, what about the others?

Re:What really caught my eye here: (1)

Just Some Guy (3352) | more than 8 years ago | (#14918286)

But I have to wonder, exactly how are they enforcing this "licensed for five users" bit

Apache and MySQL could be running wide-open, but if the OS only allows five concurrent inbound connections to port 80, then not much else matters.

Any (minimal) level of tech support? (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 8 years ago | (#14918431)

It sounds to me like "SCAMP" is basically four free programs packaged together.

How much does it cost to support Apache, MySQL, Perl, Python, and PHP?

Re:What really caught my eye here: (2, Insightful)

DavidTC (10147) | more than 8 years ago | (#14918687)

Why the hell would anyone buy a webserver restricted to five users?

Especially considering that some browsers will open two connections to load a page, and most will keep the connection open for a second or so just in case it needs to make more requests. If there are dialup users where each page load takes five seconds, and opens two connections, and users click about once every twenty seconds...you need ten people to render the website unusable, on average. (It can handle less dialup people than normal people, to show how silly this is.)

Does anyone recall when the supposed 'advantage' (The only advantage) of Unix over Linux was that Unix scaled better? Does SCO releasing extremely crippled versions of Unix really help this concept?

And, yes, it appears they are licensing the stack in addition to the OS, which makes no sense, because if you purchase their Unix, you can frickin go and download MySQL, Apache, and PHP/Perl/Python/whatever yourself.

Re:What really caught my eye here: (3, Informative)

duffbeer703 (177751) | more than 8 years ago | (#14918767)

SCO only allows a specific number of login shells to be active at once... it's really obnoxious.

I worked at a place that used SCO OpenServer about 5 years ago... the costs were outrageous. At that time you had to buy additional users in multiples of 25, which cost about $5000 + 20% annual maintenance.

Taking A Risk (0, Redundant)

davidpfarrell (562876) | more than 8 years ago | (#14918136)

Aren't they taking a risk having SCAM in the name of any of their offerings?

SCAMP in 1999 (1)

jbolden (176878) | more than 8 years ago | (#14918342)

I can't comment on what the point is in 2006. Back around 1996-9 when Caldera was doing this the idea was that there were commercial applications which hasn't been ported to Linux. Thus there was a chicken and egg problem for OEMs with LAMP; they depended on other apps or libraries and the libraries needed apps to make it worth the trouble to port.... The Linux abi project pretty much solved this problem. Further the commercial apps on SCO don't really exist anymore.

Anyway, a little irony. Caldera invented the term LAMP as part of their VAR marketing. its ironic that the SCO Group (which is the child of Caldera international) has to mimic a term they in some sense created.

Lets see (2, Informative)

Groo Wanderer (180806) | more than 8 years ago | (#14918458)

Does the lawsuit come for free, or is it extra? SCO sues their customers, so why again would I touch them, 10 foot pole or not?

Then again, lets see about the technical merits. Other than the underlying OS, it is the same as the LAMP package. That means the choice is Linux vs SCO. From what I gather, SCO is:
1) Less secure
2) More expensive
3) Prone to legal attacks toward users
4) Far less supported
5) Far less available software/plugins
6) Has serious questions about the company being there in a year
7) Laughably scalable
8) Drivers?

I could go on, but you get the point. The vultures are circling, and no amount of hand-waving is going to fix things.

              -Charlie

SCAMP (0, Redundant)

elronxenu (117773) | more than 8 years ago | (#14918890)

At least they got the 'SCAM' part right!

oh, the irony (1)

fighthairloss (455826) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919121)

didn't sco executives claim that linux was being used by terrorists? i seem to recall they claimed this in testimony in washington or in a letter to lawmakers.

the claim was too obvious... i'm certain that linux, windows, macs, and all other kinds of OSes and computers are being used by terrorists. (except for Windows Millenium Edition, which Al Qaida's IT department would not support because it sucked so bad).

but sco's suggestion was not the fact that terrorists use all kinds of tools, but rather they slyly implied that linux is a danger to national security.

so... linux is beneficial to terrorists, but open source databases aren't? couldn't be because sco decided they wanted to ship a open source db also, would it?

of all the falsehoods coming out of that company, this one is almost funny.

AMP noises (1)

Kittie Rose (960365) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920216)

I wonder if "WAMP" is the noise made when someone knocks over the LAMP on top of the SCAMP?

Scamp? (1)

brennz (715237) | more than 8 years ago | (#14921236)

Schnorrer sounds better.

So far so good (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14921346)

They have mastered the SCAM portion of it.
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