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Seven-Ounce Linux 'Wrist PC'

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 8 years ago | from the sweet-now-can-I-get-it-implanted dept.

250

An anonymous reader writes "A European research and development firm has announced a seven-ounce, wrist-worn wearable computer with a 2.2 x 2.8-inch color touchscreen. Eurotech's WWPC (wrist-worn PC) runs Linux or Windows, offers a wealth of standard PC interfaces (WLAN, Bluetooth, IrDA, USB, SD-card, etc), and has patented technology that puts the device to sleep when the user drops their arm. It can detect motionless user states, and serve as a location-transmitting beacon, thanks to a built-in GPS receiver and 'dead reckoning' technology. The company also claims six hours of battery life under 'fully operational' conditions."

cancel ×

250 comments

Cool Beans (5, Funny)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919700)


It targets emergency rescue, security, healthcare, maintenance, logistics, and "many other" applications.

Many other==geeking which may be further qualified as: Listening to you MP3s, watching videos, playing games, wandering around various cons talking to it and having it respond "by your command", "I can't do that, Dave", "danger, Will Robinson", or actually trying to impress the heck out of that jerk executive with his Ferrari laptop that he's not such hot stuff anymore. Alas, ...

Availability

Eurotech describes the WWPC as a "user-centric, ubiquitous computing" concept, suggesting that the device is not yet available in product form. The company did not respond to availability enquires by publication time.

Re:Cool Beans (2, Insightful)

PFI_Optix (936301) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919847)

The application I'd like to see it in is IT. With wifi, that thing could replace the tech's laptop and greatly reduce their load.

Re:Cool Beans (1)

rm69990 (885744) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919923)

I move, on average, by hand, over 3000 gallons of liquid each day. I'm sure the tech will be just fine carrying around his laptop :-P

Re:Cool Beans (5, Funny)

Fred_A (10934) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920031)

Moving it from the bar to your mouth doesn't count !

Re:Cool Beans (1)

rm69990 (885744) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920111)

You ever tried moving 3000+ gallons of dairy products, every single day? And that's just part of my job. Not all Slashdotters work behind a computer all day, just to let you know.

Re:Cool Beans (1)

richdun (672214) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919849)

So what if it is available in "product form" yet? It's not like a company [infiniumlabs.com] would talk about something and never release it.

Re:Cool Beans (3, Funny)

robbkidd (154298) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920194)

The "product form" is much too heavy for the mobility needs of the modern user. The "vapor form" is substantially lighter.

But wait, there's more ! (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14919702)


A European research and development firm has announced a seven-ounce, wrist-worn wearable computer concept with the possibility of a 2.2 x 2.8-inch color touchscreen. Eurotech's WWPC (wrist-worn PC) would run Linux or Windows, offer a wealth of standard PC interfaces (WLAN, Bluetooth, IrDA, USB, SD-card, etc), and has patented technology that could put the device to sleep when the user drops their arm. It would be able to detect motionless user states, and serve as a location-transmitting beacon, thanks to a built-in GPS receiver and 'dead reckoning' technology. The company also claims six hours of battery life under 'fully operational' conditions."

there we go, fixed that summary for you

FTA:
Eurotech describes the WWPC as a "user-centric, ubiquitous computing" concept, suggesting that the device is not yet available in product form. The company did not respond to availability enquires by publication time.


so stick this on the Duke Nukem wish list

Heavier Wrists! (2, Funny)

Philip K Dickhead (906971) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919819)

That's what we need, for the geeken to build up their biceps - if you know what I mean! ;-)

Re:Heavier Wrists! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14919906)

learn english you fuck

Re:Heavier Wrists! (0, Troll)

electrichamster (703053) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919946)

Learn to capitalise and use punctuation, you fuck.

Why mod troll? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14920033)

When you feed the trolls you become one.

Not vaporware (5, Informative)

apharov (598871) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920029)

Having worked part-time at Eurotech I've seen a working version of this device and it seemed to have all the external features claimed in the article. It was running Linux and I used it with the touchscreen. It also had an USB connector and a memory card slot.

I was not working on the device so I do have any exact information about the project or its status. However, it is definately not vaporware as in Duke Nukem Forever, but rather a working physical device.


Disclaimer: all views and observations are mine and not representative of Eurotech.

Re:Not vaporware (1)

Rac3r5 (804639) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920093)

good to know :)

Slashdot: Vaporware for Idiots. (-1, Troll)

TripMaster Monkey (862126) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919707)


Sounds great...where can I get one? And how much will it set me back?

From TFA:
Availability

Eurotech describes the WWPC as a "user-centric, ubiquitous computing" concept, suggesting that the device is not yet available in product form. The company did not respond to availability enquires by publication time.
Oh yeah...that's right. Slashdot.

Wake me when the seven-ounce wrist PC that runs Linux actually exists. Kthx.

Re:Slashdot: Vaporware for Idiots. (1)

110010001000 (697113) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919810)

Trip, why can't you be a nice person? And how idiotic are you to actually PAY FOR A SUBSCRIPTION to Slashdot???

Hmmm... (4, Funny)

croddy (659025) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919708)

Hmmm... This thing i wear on my wrist says they're not poisonous!

All features tell me one thing.. (2, Insightful)

mayhemt (915489) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919715)

Defnite ban from using in flights, & @workplaces.

Neat! (2, Insightful)

corychristison (951993) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919717)

I think this could go far... but I suppose that is my opinion.

I actually had a thought of a miniature wrist-type PC with bluetooth. Transmit between your watch and a "full" system and be able to share documents, etc. That'd be neat. :-)

Re:Neat! (3, Interesting)

jacksonj04 (800021) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919932)

I want a watch with Bluetooth which syncs my appointments and automatically sets alarms. I always have my watch, I don't always have my PDA.

Re:Neat! (2, Interesting)

electrichamster (703053) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919967)

My dream for a long time has been a dumb-terminal bluetooth watch - Normally it acts as a watch, but when your bluetooth enabled mp3 player/laptop/phone connect, it acts as a dumb display/controller for them.

I can but dream.

yeah but (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14919721)

does it run linux?

Re:yeah but (0, Troll)

Kwiik (655591) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919921)

Well, who cares!?.. it supports Vista!

Or supposedly, if they plan to market this saying it runs "Windows" over the next couple of years.

The best feature of course (2, Funny)

Rude Turnip (49495) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919730)

From the article:
"It...has flexible left- or right-handed straps"

That, or add-in another $500 for image stabilisation. Pencils down.

From the Article (5, Funny)

Orrin Bloquy (898571) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919732)

"Through reuse of the popular Faraday Flashlight mechanism, as long as you keep surfing porn, the battery remains charged."

Looks, well... (4, Funny)

DancesWithBlowTorch (809750) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919735)

Who would ever wear such a thing? It looks ridiculous. Completely style-free. The girls would laugh at you.

Oh wait...

Strap on PDA. (1)

AnonymousPrick (956548) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919805)

Who would ever wear such a thing? It looks ridiculous. Completely style-free. The girls would laugh at you.

That's what it looks like to me. I was thinking it was maybe the size of one those diver's watches or something that big, but NOT as big as it is! I guess I've been slanted by "Dick Tracy". I guess that dates me too.

Re:Looks, well... (2, Funny)

Tweekster (949766) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920025)

Thats what they said about bluetooth earpieces... oh wait, i still laugh at those people.

DUH? (0)

Savage-Rabbit (308260) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920044)

Who would ever wear such a thing? It looks ridiculous. Completely style-free. The girls would laugh at you.

Everybody here is a nerd, girls are already laughing at us so why should we care what kind of a fashion statement that thing makes? Now take your beer and go back to the sports forum....

Re:DUH? (1)

Zarel (900479) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920090)

I believe that's what the grandparent post was implying with its "Oh wait..." comment.

I'm waiting for the iwrist (1)

mrraven (129238) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920234)

Then chicks will love me.

Oh wait...

Hmmm...motion detection? (4, Funny)

maillemaker (924053) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919738)

...it can detect motionless user states...

But can it detect fap-fap-fap-fap-fap motion?

Perhaps it will usher in a new era of pr0n?

Steve

Nice Wrist thingy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14919745)

But can you tell me what time it is?

Re:Nice Wrist thingy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14919796)

It's time to get a Linux wristwatch.

Watch that supports wifi? (4, Funny)

farker haiku (883529) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919753)



According to its website, Eurotech's corporate strategy is to "define and penetrate new and emerging markets."

I didn't realize that my neighbor's WEP encrypted access point qualified as an emerging market, but hey.

Nerdy response (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14919797)

According to its website, Eurotech's corporate strategy is to "define and penetrate new and emerging markets." I didn't realize that my neighbor's WEP encrypted access point qualified as an emerging market, but hey.

Spoken like a true nerd. Most individuals of the male persuasion would have said "I didn't realize that my neighbors wife qualified as an emerging market". This being /., we get the nerd version. Oh well, more neighbor's wives for the rest of us, w00t!

Featured on "What not to wear..." (2, Funny)

rainman_bc (735332) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919764)

Stuff to wear to guarantee you'll not get laid if going to a bar.

This must be something that tops that list haha...

Pocket PC in a new Shape (1)

Vapon (740778) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919774)

Isn't this just a Pocket PC strapped onto a wrist, with some extra outlets and GPS built in?

More Like ArmWatch (1)

supra (888583) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919825)

More like an ArmWatch (C) than a WristWatch. First thing I thought of was: this has nothing to do w/ my wrist.

Re:More Like ArmWatch (1)

winse (39597) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920077)

yeah it's like "Star Command this is Buzz Lightyear... do you read me?"

Re:More Like ArmWatch (1)

jimwelch (309748) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920236)

Argg! Run for your life! It's Battlestar Galactica 1980!!!!

Re:Pocket PC in a new Shape (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14920073)

Whilst it may be an obvious pun, the only chip that the could consider for this has got to be an ARM:http://www.arm.com

Not comfortable... (4, Funny)

onthefenceman (640213) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919800)

This device does not look comfortable at all - from the artist's rendition it wraps around at least 1/3 of the forearm and half the length from the wrist to the elbow.

I would imagine it feels similar to wearing a cast...or maybe an arm-mounted chastity belt.

Re:Not comfortable... (4, Funny)

op12 (830015) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919915)

...or maybe an arm-mounted chastity belt.

And somehow creates an identical effect!

Re:Not comfortable... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14919938)

>...or maybe an arm-mounted chastity belt.

I expect it will be extremely effective in this function.

Re:Not comfortable... (3, Funny)

ArikTheRed (865776) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920225)

Just don't do any heavy processing. I can just imagine the seering heat causing the device to fuse to my wrist. I always wanted to be a cyborg, but not that way, man.

Why always on the back of the wrist? (4, Insightful)

PFI_Optix (936301) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919806)

Reference picture [linuxdevices.com]

I don't understand why they always insist on designing wearable computers like this to work from the back of the wrist the same way a wristwatch is worn. It would be far more ergonomic to turn your hand palm-up, and it would have the added benefit of giving the screen a measure of protection as it wouldn't be sticking out from your arm.

This is a very cool device, though. I'd buy one if I had the money and could see a practical use for it.

Re:Why always on the back of the wrist? (3, Funny)

AnonymousPrick (956548) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919848)

I don't understand why they always insist on designing wearable computers like this to work from the back of the wrist the same way a wristwatch is worn.

That's interesting. For me, the best place would be strapped to my penis.

You can pee and check email, it'll make it look bigger ( and square), and it's the best place for viewing porn!

Re:Why always on the back of the wrist? (0)

PFI_Optix (936301) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919860)

Yeah, but I'm not sure they make straps that big. :D (hey, if we're gonna be juvenile, we might as well do it right!) Besides, I don't know about you, but I don't like to stare at my...uhh...self...while viewing porn.

Re:Why always on the back of the wrist? (1)

AnonymousPrick (956548) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919913)

Besides, I don't know about you, but I don't like to stare at my...uhh...self...while viewing porn.

Yeah, I see your point and it would get in the way, now, wouldn't it? Ok, scratch that product idea off.

I'm going to work on my anal TV now.

In the dictionary, under juvenile, you'll see my picture!

Re:Why always on the back of the wrist? (1)

RyoShin (610051) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919865)

Another benefit for having it face palm-up would be that something could stick out the side that would use the fingers on that arm. You wouldn't have a lot of maneuvarability; mainly just a button for up and one for down, but it would be useful to leave the other hand free for other stuff.

You could make a cloth thing that would be worn around the palm that would interact with the fingers and send signals (using something not made of cloth, obviously).

Now I'm getting mental images of someone wearing one of these, and then stick their hand in the air and making the "Spiderman shooting web" gesture and it plays the Spider-man theme.

(Or some sort of devil music. To each their own.)

Re:Why always on the back of the wrist? (1)

tradiuz (926664) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919957)

All I can think of now is the POWERGLOVE!

Re:Why always on the back of the wrist? (1)

PFI_Optix (936301) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920003)

With the way technology is going I'd guess that pretty soon we wouldn't need any additional physical interface: the device could use imaging, or perhaps even read the movement of muscles in the forearm.

Re:Why always on the back of the wrist? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14919885)

I don't think that is true. People originally wore their watches on the top of their wrist because they are comfortable that way. Hold your arm against your body with the wrist facing up, then turn it over. You can feel it takes more effort to do it upside down with palm up.

Re:Why always on the back of the wrist? (1)

PFI_Optix (936301) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919977)

Against my body, yes. But with a touch screen you'll need to hold it away from your body...and to do that palm-down, you have to lift your elbow and hold your entire arm up. Doing it palm-up would just require you to lift your forearm, reducing fatigue.

I find palm-up more comfortable, so there :p

Re:Why always on the back of the wrist? (1)

TheSkyIsPurple (901118) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920258)

> and it would have the added benefit of giving the screen a measure of protection as it wouldn't be sticking out from your arm.

I've tried both ways with my watches, and I get more scratches with the top towards me.
I guess I'm just not as careful bumping against my cell phone, belt, reacking in pocket, etc. as I should be.
(And I like not having to move my watch in order to handle something large.)

Touch Screen? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14919807)

So with a 2" touch screen, and roughly .5 sq inch finger tip, that gives me 16 touch recognition points on the screen? :-)

Re:Touch Screen? (2, Funny)

eclectro (227083) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920131)

So with a 2" touch screen, and roughly .5 sq inch finger tip, that gives me 16 touch recognition points on the screen? :-)

Dufus, that's why it comes with the toothpick.

Any alarms? (2, Funny)

jmartens (721229) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919812)

"puts the device to sleep when the user drops their arm."
Hmmmm, will it detect if the user raises his arms to defend himself from people who are trying to steel his lunch money?

Re:Any alarms? (2, Funny)

Zerbs (898056) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920226)

I'm more concerned about the Italians... they won't get nearly as long of battery life the way they talk with their hands.

Re:Any alarms? (1)

Rob T Firefly (844560) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920254)

N, by that point it would be detecting the position of the mugger's arm, which it would find itself strapped around and loaded with.. er... mugger stuff.

gay (1)

ILKO_deresolution (352578) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919817)

luckily (in a chinese sense) I broke my hp ipaq 4150 and have a
small computer board to work with to show these retard designers
how its done... probably using a folding ir keyboard, optically coupling it to the board.
small pans under each half, one for circuit, other for pop out screen...
yeah a computer that fits in my pocket finally...can't wait till my 624 mhz
dell x51v breaks...

Reminds me of an old show (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919824)

I think it was called ARK2? Back in the early 80's... They ran around in this cool looking Mobile Home thing with an observation bubble on top.., and had a little car like thing to 'scout' about..

Show sucked, but the 'stuff' was cool.

Always wanted to build one of those 'scout cars' :)

Re:Reminds me of an old show (1)

LunaticTippy (872397) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919985)

Wow, I remember that show. It was 1978, Ark II [imdb.com]

The main actor, Terry Lester, had a depressing career. He moved on from Ark II to do single appearances in Eight is Enough, Dallas, Santa Barbara, Voyager, JAG, Walker Texas Ranger, and Diagnosis Murder.

Oh, and he was in KISS meets the Phantom of the Park.

He died a couple years ago, and now I'm sad.

A computer can function on 7 ounces??? (0, Offtopic)

LeonGeeste (917243) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919827)

How is that possible? Word processing takes 30 megs of RAM, minimum. Access the internet? That'll be a 100, plus maybe 50 megs of storage space.

Wait, you mean there was a time when word processing didn't require that much computational power? I'll be damned!

Re:A computer can function on 7 ounces??? (4, Insightful)

Marxist Hacker 42 (638312) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919889)

Note- EMBEDDED LINUX or WINDOWS CE. These are operating systems designed to work in minimum memory. For instance, unlike Microsoft Word 2003, Pocket Word 2002 is perfectly capable of editing a document IN PLACE on the virutal disk without making a second copy in memory, and executing entirely out of ROM, thus using almost no Program Memory at all.

It does other things! (1)

clamantis (708173) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919833)

obligatory Seinfeld [seinfeldscripts.com] quote:

Jerry: "Dad, I'm sorry."
Morty: "You should be! How could you spend two hundred dollars on a tip calculator?!"
Jerry: "It does other things!"

Not new (1)

marshallh (947020) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919841)

1. This is a concept. A neat one at that, but a concept.
2. This has been tried before, called the onHand Wrist PC. It was developed by Seiko and released in Japan, and later in USA to less fanfare. It was ultimately a failure, little more than a novelty. Fossil also tried a Palm-based watch. It flopped. 3. What is the benefit of clamping a PC to your wrist, risking damage to it when you can put a Palm/Pocket PC in your shirt / pants pocket? Lots of neat ideas but little practicality. How does this offer a huge leap forward past Palm/Pocket PCs?

Re:Not new (1)

Marxist Hacker 42 (638312) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919903)

It doesn't. You really want this product now? Get some glue and straps and make yourself one out of a PocketPC. In fact, I might just try that. It wouldn't take too much to do so.

Re:Not new (1)

IWorkForMorons (679120) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920169)

What is the benefit of clamping a PC to your wrist...

Well, I'd assume that it's been made rugged enough to withstand most torture. But the biggest benefit...the medical field. Or any field that requires you to use both hands a lot. But especially the medical field if you could also cram some diagnostic equipment into the thing at the same time. Think about the glove device used in Earth2 [imdb.com] that you waved over a body and got instant vitals, xray images, and whatever else a field medic would need. Ok, all that will take a while to cram in there, but imagine a nurse in a hospital being able to walk up to a patient's bed, having instant access to their medical information, be able to take their vitals without a whole slew of equipment to drag around, and still have both hands free at all times. That could be feasible now. Wearable computers are a geek's dream, but the practical applications are far more reaching then just out-geeking the guy in the next cube...

I get laughed at (1)

bunbuntheminilop (935594) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919864)

when I wear a wireless headset for my phone. Well, I hope that's what they're laughing at.

why Why WhY WHY WHY... (2, Insightful)

spagetti_code (773137) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919871)

802.11b

Chips are readily available for g and that support WPA. Really - imagine walking around the city wearing one a wireless device that is trivially crackable - you are just asking for trouble.

At least with a g chip that supports WPA, you can downgrade to WEP if you *really* want to run around with your pants down.

Re:why Why WhY WHY WHY... (1)

soloha (545393) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919961)

what does the chipset have to do with the encryption method? i have a Linksys "b" router thats over four years old. A firmware upgrade gave me the ability to use WPA (and more). not to mention that on Linux, the encryption is provided by the driver or even third party software.

pants down? (2, Funny)

Roadkills-R-Us (122219) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920072)

At least with a g chip that supports WPA, you can downgrade to WEP

At last! A serious post unrelated to porn jokes, I think!

if you *really* want to run around with your pants down.

Alas. No such luck.

Open Source MI5 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14919874)

When will they release the homing beacon add-on and the remote detonators?

Oh, yeah... and the frickin laser beam?

Futurama cosplayers rejoice.. (4, Funny)

NekoXP (67564) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919878)

Now you can have the best Leela costume ever!

Sweaty forearm (1)

Weaselmancer (533834) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919892)

The thing is half the length of the display dummy's forearm. And it holds 6 hours worth of battery power, most of which is going to be turned into heat.

This couldn't be comfortable.

wow, this is awesome (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14919917)

I had no idea I could just draw shit in 3DSMax, make up things it might do and get it posted on Slashdot like it's some kind of actual product.

I'm goin' home and drawing up my new hovercar. It may have top speeds of up to 300mph, and will be able to run on hydrogen, propane or the laughter of children.

Dead reckoning? (1)

Itninja (937614) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919931)

How could 'dead reckoning' even be possible with a computer? It would have to know if you were walking, running, walking backwards, turning left/right, etc.
A car nav system can do it, but only because it's wired into the vechicle inself.

I guess you could tell the computer what your doing:
"KITT! I need ya' buddy! I'm walking 45 feet forward at 3 fps. Calculate where I'll be when I get there!"

Re:Dead reckoning? (1)

PunkOfLinux (870955) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920095)

DIdn't you know that electronic motion sensors capable of estimating speed, direction, etc, are in production?

Flagrant false advertising... (1)

link_mmc (880707) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919951)

From the article, "weighs seven ounces (200 grams) without straps/batteries." What's the point of spec'ing the weight of this thing without batteries?

Re:Flagrant false advertising... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14920185)

what's the point spec'ing the weight when it doesn't even actually physically exist in any form?

Pr0n usage? (4, Funny)

Jtheletter (686279) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919952)

Having this thing attached to your wrist is gonna make it really hard to look at the screen while you're... oh wait, I can just put it on my other arm. Nevermind.

Patented? (2, Insightful)

ozbird (127571) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919993)

... and has patented technology that puts the device to sleep when the user drops their arm.

In other words, a mercury switch.

Xybernaut will sue them into oblivion (2, Interesting)

eronysis (928181) | more than 8 years ago | (#14919995)

Doesn't Xybernaut still have submarine patents on near every wearable computin device? I know one of thier submarines technically covered digital wristwatches...

2 problems (1)

IflyRC (956454) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920019)

I already wear glasses - this will just make my eye sight that much worse. Also, I think my fingers are too big for the keyboard

But... (1)

Kittie Rose (960365) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920036)

Does it have a built in laser-wrist watch?

wearable? (2)

rhesuspieces00 (804354) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920041)

ok, we need to have a discussion on the meaning of "wearable." i could put backpack straps on any dell at best buy and it would be "wearable." the question is whether i am willing to wear it, not whether i am capable of wearing it.

Re:wearable? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14920156)

Since when does Best Buy sell Dell?

Noy only that... (1)

fimion (890504) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920061)

... but it can tell time too!

Wrist Computer? (1)

cve (181337) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920064)

Looking at the illustration of the device in use, I'd say 'Forearm Computer' is more appropriate.

Well how about... (1)

frostilucus (961205) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920070)

An add on of a thermo-nuclear device so we _all_ can be the Predator! Fat chance for Arnold to save the day then.

Cool use (if this thing actually gets made) (1)

biendamon (723952) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920123)

Ultra-mobile storage! Think about it... You carry around, on your wrist, all your most important files and a (presumably secured) file server to serve them up. Just walk into a room with Bluetooth-enabled computers, and you've got all your files (OK, pr0n) right there!

not that big - not for a dive watch (1)

dindi (78034) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920140)

Once you start diving you realize, that your motocross gearbag is not heavy, your paintball gear bag is not that big and heavy at all, even with the backup gun.

With the recognition of how much stuff you can/have to hang on yourself, you also tend to wear bigger and bigger watches and computers ....

That device does not seem to be bigger than your modern dive computer (e.g. Uwatec smart) , and yes, people wear things that size, and there are screen protectors that cost a few bucks to save a few hundred (many times $1k) ..

Nowadays i find myself wearing the Polar 710i heart rate monitor as a watch. Beleive me it is not a little watch but after my dive watch it feels like a light wrist-wrap... Maybe some more diving with a compass, a backup timer, a dive computer, all strapped to my arm and i won't notice something like a wrist computer added to my bracelet collection on the land part of the earth.

Oh well, but do I need one? I doubt. My pda barely gets any use, my laptop is permanently on my wife's table. I guess i do not want to mobile compute as much as I thought before. Usually a GPS and a phone in my pocket does satisfy my background radiation.

Today's elaborately useless product award (1)

netsavior (627338) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920142)

winn4r!

Only 6 Hours !!! (1)

paco3791 (786431) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920191)

I know that this sounds pretty good for a device like this but I see a couple problems:

1. Like the rest of the specs on this device, this battery life figure is probably pure vapor.

2. Mobile power technology (battery's/fuel cells, and lower power consumption by the device) is going to have to advance by a couple orders of magnitude before "ubuiquitous computing" can really come into its own.

The idea is interesting, but I have a hard enough time keeping my cell phone and MP3 player charged as it is. When we can have "full function" use times in days or weeks, instead of hours, then I'll get excited.

missing required features (2, Funny)

Tumbleweed (3706) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920209)

If I'm going to wear something that big and geeky on my wrist (I don't even wear a watch anymore, since the advent of the cellphone), it'd better have two features I'm used to wrist cuffs having from tv shows:

1) make me invisible (Galactica 1980)
2) deflect bullets (Wonder Woman)

Why specifically a linux wrist pc? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14920232)

The summary itself says "windows or linux". Is it not newsworthy if it's open-ended?

Spyware popups on Slashdot? (0, Offtopic)

jb.hl.com (782137) | more than 8 years ago | (#14920266)

Offtopic I know, but anyway...

I just opened up this article in Opera (for the record, I have no other tabs open) and immediately I got a popup window, which in itself had a JavaScript prompt for WinFixer. WinFixer, for those who don't know, is a horrible spyware program which pretends to be a system tune-up program but is really fucking annoying malware that likes to pop up in your system tray every 3 seconds and demand you pay for it. This gets really annoying, really fast, and cleaning it up is a task in and of itself (I tried once but gave up after 3 hours and just reinstalled Windows 2000, then XP after many complaints with a warning that any more problems would get the person concerned straight back down to 2K...nothing since :)

Anyway, I digress. I guess the main point is: why does Slashdot have popup ads for known spyware? I would have expected this on many other websites, but Slashdot? No way.
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