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Gnome 2.14 Released

Zonk posted more than 8 years ago | from the hooray-for-shortiez dept.

348

joe_bruin writes "Beware the Ides of March... the Gnome people have announced the release of Gnome 2.14, right on time to meet their 6 month release schedule. See what's new in this release, as well as the release notes. New features include many more searching options, fast user switching, and speed increases to all the apps you know and love." From the release notes: "Just as you would tune your car, our skilled engineers have strived to tune many parts of GNOME to be as fast as possible. Several important components of the GNOME desktop are now measurably faster, including text rendering, memory allocation, and numerous individual applications. Faster font rendering and memory allocation benefit all GNOME and GTK+ based applications without the need for recompilation. Some applications have received special attention to make sure they are performing at their peak."

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Great...Hopefully they fixed some bugs too... (1, Interesting)

woolio (927141) | more than 8 years ago | (#14932679)

Like the way wnck-applet ties up my system every few days.

Ah well, I guess I could always go back to icewm.

DRM to be used in GNOME's multimedia backend (-1, Flamebait)

billybob2 (755512) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933515)

Ever since a company called Fluendo joined the GNOME Foundation's Advisory Board, GNOME is obligated to use GStreamer (a software product sponsored by Fluendo) as its audio and video backend. This wouldn't be bad, if it weren't for the fact that GStreamer uses Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) [gnome.org] to handcuff users [eff.org] and leave them at the mercy of the entertainment cartel [downhillbattle.org] . In order to do this, GStreamer is denying its developers the right to license their constribution under the GPL [slashdot.org] , so that Fluendo can sell closed-source, proprietary DRM plugins that let the MPAA and RIAA control the users' viewing habits.

GStreamer has hurt the multimedia effort on Linux and the Free Desktop because they stole talented developers from mature mutimedia projects such as Xine [xinehq.de] , MPlayer [mplayerhq.hu] , and VideoLAN [videolan.org] , all of which were started before GStreamer and all of which have strong copyleft protection [gnu.org] by being licensed under the GPL. In other words, GStreamer further fragmented the Linux multimedia developer base purely for the selfish, immoral purpose of ramming DRM down Linux users' throats.

Ximian, a company instrumental in founding GNOME, sold out to big business in 2002 by switching Mono's license from the GPL to the weaker MIT X11 license. Instead of helping out the myriad of established multimedia apps such as Kaffeine [sourceforge.net] , AmaroK [kde.org] , and KMPlayer [kde-apps.org] , Ximian started a whole new app called Banshee, whose only claim to fame is that its license (MIT X11) allows linking to proprietary DRM plugins.

These are just some example of an increasing problem GNOME is experiencing: it is pandering (and in some cases outright selling out) to companies that don't necessarily have the users' best interest in mind. One can say that the whole reason GNOME was started was to allow proprietary software (including draconian DRM) to use the hard work of open source developers.

KDE [kde.org] , on the other hand, is licensed solely under the GPL because the toolkit it is based on (Qt [trolltech.com] ) is also GPL. KDE is also committed to preventing DRM from infesting their user's computers: for KDE4, they are building a multimedia framework called Phonon [kde.org] that does not depend on GStreamer, but which can use any number of backends, including DRM-free ones.

Eye Candy (0, Flamebait)

alchemistkevin (763955) | more than 8 years ago | (#14932690)

So, does eye candy get any closer to Mac OS looks?

Re:Eye Candy (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14932774)

Why would it? Mac OS looks like shit.

Re:Eye Candy (5, Informative)

tpgp (48001) | more than 8 years ago | (#14932905)

So, does eye candy get any closer to Mac OS looks?

No.

1) You're thinking of the new gl effects in xorg x clients. This is a desktop environment release.

2) Gnome is not attempting to copy os x, but create a new desktop environment. So your metric (closer to Mac OS) is a false one.

Re:Eye Candy (1)

Dr_LHA (30754) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933110)

2) Gnome is not attempting to copy os x, but create a new desktop environment. So your metric (closer to Mac OS) is a false one.

Well they're certainly doing a good job of copying stuff out of OS X, even if they're not trying to! ;)

Re:Eye Candy (1)

Lussarn (105276) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933180)

OS X is in big parts a straight "code copy" from lots and lots of open source projects. It's hard to not be like OS X when OS X copied all the code in the first place. Bash on OS X feels very much like the Bash I use on Linux. So please, stop this "OSS is copying OS X" because there is way more code and ideas going in the other direction.

Re:Eye Candy (2)

mabinogi (74033) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933274)

...that's because bash on OS X is the bash on Linux, not a copy.

however, I believe the grandparent post was talking about the graphical user interface, not the command line interface...

Re:Eye Candy (1)

tpgp (48001) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933408)

Well they're certainly doing a good job of copying stuff out of OS X, even if they're not trying to! ;)

I'm not too sure what you mean.

Do you mean a GUI on top of a unix kernel? (Gnome did that before os x)

Do you mean transparancy (existed in gnome before os x existed - even if it was an ugly hack)

Do you mean using common Open Source tools like apache & ssh? (These are tools that os x has copied from the open source community)

os x is cool, but much of what it does not particularly new or revolutionary, just polished. It would be more accurate to say gnome & os x share alot due to their common unix heritage.

Re:Eye Candy (1)

Greyfox (87712) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933137)

Yah. If you want an OSX level of desktop bling, E17 is probably as close as you're going to get. Install one of the quietly animated background images and prepare to watch the Apple guys drool. Unfortunately they're still a bit behind Apple in actual usability, but I've got high hopes that I can ditch Gnome completely and have a desktop system that isn't completely put to shame by my powerbook once E17 comes out of beta.

Re:Eye Candy (2, Interesting)

TheSenori (947444) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933144)

Actually, Metacity has an OpenGL compositor with libcm now- it's only really working on Fedora, but it has wobbly windows and a minimize effect and whatnot.

Re:Eye Candy (1)

ziggamon2.0 (796017) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933179)

Will it be on by default or easily configurable in FC5?
Haven't managed to find any info on that...

Re:Eye Candy (2, Funny)

Matt Clare (692178) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933242)

Well, to 2.14 is closer to 10.4 than 2.13. I wouldn't say the metric is false.

Re:Eye Candy ..like KDE? (3, Interesting)

vdboor (827057) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933357)

What I noticed is GNOME 2.14 took a lot of features that are already in KDE, or got into one of the recent releases of KDE:

* the search bars in all applications, like Thunderbird also has.
* viewing man/info pages from the GUI.
* magnetic window borders.
* fast user switching menu.
* switch users from a locked session.
* editor with sftp/ftp/webdav support.
* editor plugins, for running "make" etc..
* preferred application defaults
* sound preferences.
* user lock-down editor for administrators
* terminal speed.. Konsole already knows how to speed up output like "ls -lR". Konsole with a transparent background beats a plain blank xterm.

So much for screaming how KDE suffers from the "not invented here" syndrome.. :-p

yeah but (3, Funny)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | more than 8 years ago | (#14932695)

Yeah, but can I run it under Cygwin on XP on an Intel iMac?

Re:yeah but (1)

kseskisator (961604) | more than 8 years ago | (#14932784)

You forgot to add VMWare to your mix :-)

Re:yeah but (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14933047)

...imagine a beowulf cluster of those babies

Re:yeah but (1)

xtracto (837672) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933397)

Nope, everybody understood that WinXP would be under VMWare running in a FreeBSD box with linux compatibility... you were the only one that did not get it.

=oP

Re:yeah but (1)

Bill Hayden (649193) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933384)

Actually, I don't see why you couldn't.

GNOME? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14932704)

GNOME? Is that still around? Didn't development on it shut down recently? I recall hearing about the use of mono creating legal problems or something.

So What's Next? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14932711)

So what's next for the GNOME developers? Gnome 2.16 or Gnome 3.0?

2.16 (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14932790)

I really don't understand why people are so obsessed with a 3.0 release.

As many gnome devs have argued, changing to 3.0 and breaking compatability would only make sense if there are things that can't be done within the current code base.
Frankly, I have yet to see a reason why breaking compatability would be needed.

Oh, and from using gnome2.14 on dapper I'll have to say that this is a great release. Very polished and some exciting new things, like deskbar with beagle integration. Combine that with the new XGL and AIGLX eye-candy and you really have a winner. ;-D

Beware ... (5, Funny)

Random BedHead Ed (602081) | more than 8 years ago | (#14932732)

Dude, the Ides of March is, like, so yesterday.

Re:Beware ... (-1, Offtopic)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | more than 8 years ago | (#14932768)

No kidding. Maybe the submitter got hit by something and was knocked out overnight, so he thinks it's still the Ides of March. Or more likely, the "editor" is so fucking clueless that he doesn't even know what that phrase means and didn't, you know, edit it out.

Re:Beware ... (2, Funny)

generic-man (33649) | more than 8 years ago | (#14932935)

SPONSORED POST

GNOME 2.14 was released on the ides of March [gnomedesktop.org] , but the editors were all out enjoying the new grilled chicken Caesar burrito at Taco Bell to post the story in a timely fashion. And who can blame them -- the new grilled chicken Caesar burrito at Taco Bell is just $1.99 for a limited time when you mention this post. Take your $2 bills down to Taco Bell and get ready for a feast that will make you wish you had a Caesaerian of your own!

SPONSORED POST

Memory Improvements (5, Informative)

ramrom (934556) | more than 8 years ago | (#14932744)

The new Dapper Drake with Gnome 2.4 use 179 MB of RAM (Less than default Win XP) for the default system, which is way better than the previous versions and all the applications seem more responsive too.

Nautilus Woes (1)

Daengbo (523424) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933358)

I, too, have been running the Dapper pre-release for some time now and have recently begun having severe problems with Nautilus over an smb connection: when a folder containing videos is open, Nautilus zooms to 100% CPU usage, even though preview is set to ignore remote files over 5MB. It cripples the machine and even logging out often hangs unresponsively, I asume waiting for Nautilus to be killed properly.

Re:Memory Improvements (1)

cybrthng (22291) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933365)

The power of computing and the utility of the OS has absolutely nothing to do with the ram it consumes on bootup.

Launch a word processor, web browser, email client, desktop chat, shared drives to a server and then let me know how much memory is used. (real world scenerios)

Also let me know which one is more responsive, easier to use and integrated the best.

defaults... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14932750)

Does it still have the menu on top and taskbar on the bottom?
Takes up too much screen real estate.

I'm sure its great for some people, but I've grown used to just having a single taskbar on the bottom. I don't see how splitting things up into two sections helps anyone.

Re:defaults... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14932904)

So... remove the top panel and add the menu applet to the bottom panel. Ooh, difficult.

Re:defaults... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14932990)

Apparently you don't know the meaning of the word "defaults".
Gnome picked what in my opinion is a bad default.

Wouldn't it make more sense to do what 99 percent of other OSs and window managers do?
Or is it somehow more innovative of a user interface to arrange things contrary to almost 15 years of what people are used to?

Re:defaults... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14933028)

"Wouldn't it make more sense to do what 99 percent of other OSs and window managers do? Or is it somehow more innovative of a user interface to arrange things contrary to almost 15 years of what people are used to?"

No, it makes more sense to be unique and have your own identity.

If everyone you knew decided to jump off of a cliff to their deaths, should you?

Re:defaults... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14933161)

If everyone you knew decided to jump off of a cliff to their deaths, should you?

Stupid analogy. The taskbar/menu at the bottom doesn't kill anyone. And the menu moved to the top doesn't help anyone. In the case of something with a functional purpose like a window manager, being unique simply for the sake of being unique is a waste of time.

Just because no one gets you, doesn't mean you're an artist.

Re:defaults... (0, Flamebait)

advocate_one (662832) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933199)

oh piss off wintroll... defaults are defaults... if you don't like them, well at least you can change them... unlike windows where you're stuck with one size fits all

Re:defaults... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14933072)

it's innovative if contrary actually is better....

try to do some user-testing on a large base of new computer users, and see which way the like best and find most intuitive.

an experienced user will also benefit from this, unless she's extremely opposed to change at all costs just because "it's different"

Re:defaults... (1)

metamatic (202216) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933023)

Read up on "Fitt's Law" and basic HCI design.

The menu bar is very important, so it deserves an edge of the screen, so that it's as fast as possible to use. Apple got it right back in 1984.

Re:defaults... (1)

Rydia (556444) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933035)

Large taskbar for my 12+ open windows at the bottom for when I stack windows so high that mouseover focus can no longer save me. Taskbar on the top for dictionary, weather and clock applets, along with the menu and my 20+ application launchers.

It's useful.

Re:defaults... (4, Funny)

InfiniteWisdom (530090) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933268)

Does it still have the menu on top and taskbar on the bottom?
Takes up too much screen real estate.

You wouldn't have ever right clicked on the panel and seen an items marked "New Panel" and "Delete this panel", would you? You can have as few (say, zero) or as many panels as you like, drag them to any edge you like, stack more than one on any edge too if you like.

I personally like to take advantage of my large 800x600 monitors and have panels stacked five deep on every edge of my two monitors, so I can have one widget per panel. BTW has anyone else noticed how unusable slashdot is when the browser window is 300x200? You'd think they'd be more careful to test it on typical configurations like mine.

Yes!! (1)

vishbar (862440) | more than 8 years ago | (#14932773)

I have really started to take a liking to GNOME. I only wish it would get a bit snappier. Sometimes, it seems that, graphically, it's slower than Windows XP...

Main point of this release (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14932857)

It looks like the biggest achievement in this release is their speed up of memory allocations. Looking at their charts, it appear that they have even outpace straight mallocs.

That should make things much snappier.

Re:Main point of this release (4, Informative)

Gopal.V (532678) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933057)

Malloc() is written for generic memory allocation for all programs with no bias towards larger sizes (or smaller) or allowing fragmentation rates which in the past would've been a kill-all for most applications.


Given a particular usage pattern, for example majority allocation of blocks > 512 bytes with a higher fragmentation ratio than would be acceptable in a server, you could technically outpace the malloc which would waste more time to find a best fit versus an algorithm that just finds you 512 byte blocks when you needed 4 bytes of memory.


Assumptions simplify algorithms, so is it a surprise ?

Re:Main point of this release (1)

Tweekster (949766) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933219)

Actually what you said was a suprise cause a lot of us never even thought of it that way, so it was an interesting read but it brings up this possibility. Why not design malloc with different implementations designed for server vs desktop (two very different uses). The interfaces would be the same, and it could be kept that it would behave the same way however it would just be more efficient based on what you are doing.

Re:Main point of this release (1)

Kunta Kinte (323399) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933088)

It looks like the biggest achievement in this release is their speed up of memory allocations. Looking at their charts, it appear that they have even outpace straight mallocs.

Not trying to belittle their achievement, but it's not that hard run faster than straight malloc if you use a memory pool, eg. http://www.boost.org/libs/pool/doc/index.html [boost.org] . In fact, for most applications doing a lot of allocation, you better be doing better than malloc/free as those a very slow.

Re:Main point of this release (1)

_|()|\| (159991) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933105)

I timed a little (single-threaded) utility that makes extensive use of GList, GQueue, and GHashTable. It was measurably, but not significantly, slower with GLib 2.10.1 than with 2.8.5. Those charts show impressive gains for multi-threaded apps., though.

Can I be bothered... (0, Redundant)

deletedaccount (835797) | more than 8 years ago | (#14932775)

...to install it? Nah, not really.
*waits for gnome 3*

Easiest way to check it out.... (3, Informative)

tpgp (48001) | more than 8 years ago | (#14932782)

Is to grab an Ubuntu Dapper preview live CD [ubuntu.com] (and best of all, it's not an install CD, so ubuntu won't email your cleartext password to world + dog [joke])

It's pretty nice! I've been using the pre-releases for a while....

Re:Easiest way to check it out.... (1)

leonmergen (807379) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933206)

Yeah, I've been using dapper for around 3 weeks now and can say that as i experience it, it's pretty much stable... no crashes at all, just a helluva lot of updates all the time :-)

Gnome 2.14 (5, Informative)

rcmiv (68991) | more than 8 years ago | (#14932806)

A good overview:
http://www.gnome.org/~davyd/gnome-2-14/ [gnome.org]

If you're running ubuntu dapper, it updated to 2.14 wednesday. It isn't really immediately distinguishable from the previous version but then, if you are also running xgl/compiz, who the hell cares?

http://www.tectonic.co.za/view.php?id=916 [tectonic.co.za]

-rcmiv

HA! HA! I have the cube!

Gnome Terminal speed improvements (1)

suso (153703) | more than 8 years ago | (#14932815)

The 3x speed improvement along would be worth the upgrade. I still am using aterm because Gnome Terminal is SOOOOO SLOW!!! Besides that, its always had trouble displaying my mutt sessions.

Re:Gnome Terminal speed improvements (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14932898)

The 3x speed improvement along would be worth the upgrade. I still am using aterm because Gnome Terminal is SOOOOO SLOW!!!

Try Konsole instead. Not only does the text scroll faster and smoother, but the interface just feels better than Gnome Terminal.

Re:Gnome Terminal speed improvements (1)

ender- (42944) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933497)

Try Konsole instead. Not only does the text scroll faster and smoother, but the interface just feels better than Gnome Terminal.

Or better yet use a nice slim term like rxvt. I've found that no matter what desktop environment/window manager I'm using, rxvt always seems to work better than the native terminal. My current setup of XFCE4 [4.2.2] and rxvt [rxvt -fg black -bg green] works like a charm. I can't stand the xfce-terminal, or gnome-terminal or the WORST of the bunch, Konsole.

Although I don't use Gnome, I'm happy to hear of any performance improvements they pull off as I do use Nautilus for my Desktop icons and filemanager as well as gnome-volume-manager with XFCE. It works pretty well but any performance increase is certainly welcome.

GLib == good (5, Informative)

tcopeland (32225) | more than 8 years ago | (#14932829)

Gnome's got a great library in GLib. I wrote a tutorial for IBM [ibm.com] last year on the GLib collections; there are so many useful utilities and data structures in there. If you're writing a C app on Linux it's definitely worth a look, and if you're already using the GLib collections, take a look at that tutorial to see if you can optimize anything, like using g_list_prepend vs g_list_append.

And if it helps you, please buy my completely unrelated book [pmdapplied.com] !

Re:GLib == good (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14933377)

Please, don't. I'm sure Glib is a great library with lots of useful utitlities in it, but I wish people would stop using it as anything other than a GNOME library. Glib might seem like a great idea if you're developing for Linux, but if at a later date I want to build your code on a platform that isn't supported, Glib is yet another unusual dependency I have to satisfy, and it adds ~3MB of additional code when it gets linked (statically!) to the application, which might only be a couple of hundred K itself.

The worst Glib offence is the duplipcation of existing standards E.g. the g_int types (Use C99 types!), GThread (Use PThreads!) or even GObject (Use C++ or ObjC!) Really; if the stuff in Glib were really that useful, it'd be part of the C library or SuS.

Is there a Gconf setting for.. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14932853)

"no longer relevant"?

Viva XFCE!

Glad to see menu editing has been fixed (1, Insightful)

wowbagger (69688) | more than 8 years ago | (#14932873)

I am so glad to see that Gnome 2.14 has fixed menu editing, so that ordinary users can add applications to the Gnome menu rather than having to clutter up the desktop with icons that will inevitably be hidden by windows.

After all, such a simple feature being missing really made Gnome look bad compared to Windows ....

Wait, I am being handed a message.... ....

Menu editing *hasn't* been fixed? Users still cannot edit the application menus in a sane, convenient fashion? ....

Never mind.

Re:Glad to see menu editing has been fixed (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 8 years ago | (#14932988)

Just wait until the status changes to "WONTFIX". I mean that's way too complicated for most users. On a more serious note, some of the less clueful people could actually manage to delete the shortcuts, which in their world view means the application is gone- It should also include a "fail-safe" that lets you add back any installed application...

Re:Glad to see menu editing has been fixed (2, Informative)

modmans2ndcoming (929661) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933005)

WTF are you talking about? Im running 2.14 on dapper and I can edit themenu by selecting "edit menu" and I get a cool little window that lets me remove current applications or add an application to a categoriy.

*Sigh* (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14933012)

What is so terrible about installing a menu editor like alacarte, which let's you do exactly what you want and is available for about every distribution and is even default in ubuntu?

Really, I fail to see where the problem is and I'm really getting tired of people like you who act like the ability to add applications to the menu by default is really important for most users just to troll on sides like /.
Boring and irrelevant.

Re:Glad to see menu editing has been fixed (1)

woolio (927141) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933021)

That is one thing that has always pissed me off.

If someone took a window manager like IceWM (very light-weight and does allow menu editing), and added the ability to put files/folders on the "desktop" [I like to put active stuff there], that would be my window manager.

Re:Glad to see menu editing has been fixed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14933262)

I'm using IceWM at home and I have noticed a strange behaviour... when I launch Nautilus (Gnome's file manager), the icons from my Gnome desktop appear on my IceWM desktop... so now I always launch Nautilus ;)

Re:Glad to see menu editing has been fixed (2, Informative)

tpgp (48001) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933101)

I am so glad to see that Gnome 2.14 has fixed menu editing,

Wait - I'm being handed a message Parent must be trolling [gnome.org] as a menu editor has been included since Gnome 2.12

Oh - and that page includes the line:
including users who manage their own computers.

Re:Glad to see menu editing has been fixed (1)

stinky wizzleteats (552063) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933366)

uh, that's cool and all, but how do I add an application icon using that editor?

Re:Glad to see menu editing has been fixed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14933106)

so that ordinary users can add applications to the Gnome menu

Ordinary users problably don't install Gnome by themselves. They probably use a distro such as Ubuntu which has menu editing out of the box.

Menu editing *hasn't* been fixed? Users still cannot edit the application menus in a sane, convenient fashion?

If your distro don't have a menu editing app (Which is a freedsektop spec btw) you can install any third party app for it. How about this one [realistanew.com]

Sure. It would be nice to have as default in gnome, and probably will be at some point in the future. Until then, it's probably already included as default in your distro.

Re:Glad to see menu editing has been fixed (1)

Mike Savior (802573) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933265)

That's one of the biggest problems IMO for GNOME, in terms of interaction, not mechanical underpinnings. Maybe they think that the method they instilled with us on organizing menus is convenient or easy, but it's not. It's horrible, and slow to the point that it drives me insane. I don't want a whole damn dialog window with all this crap to organize my programs or add something, I want to simply drag, or delete, or whatever straight from a context menu or something of that sort.

Canadian English is now supported, eh ;) (5, Funny)

norskeld (947658) | more than 8 years ago | (#14932886)

Just look at the bottom of this http://www.gnome.org/start/2.14/notes/en/rni18.htm l [gnome.org] page:
...Also noteworthy are that British and Canadian English are supported.
It must have been a really hard work to add trailing ",eh"...

Re:Canadian English is now supported, eh ;) (4, Funny)

twoshortplanks (124523) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933506)

Colour me surprised at the quality of this joke.

2.14? (2, Informative)

ArcherB (796902) | more than 8 years ago | (#14932889)

When is that going to be approved for Gentoo and be available in Portage?

I just upgraded to 2.12.2. I have to admit that I have noticed a significant performance improvement, especially when compared to KDE.

I look forward to this release.

Re:2.14? (1)

petabyte (238821) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933243)

Looking at packages.gentoo.org activity, it looks like 2.14 is being added to the portage tree though is currently masked. I would imagine it'll stay masked until everything is in and generally works.

Re:2.14? (1)

stinky wizzleteats (552063) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933261)

I just synced. Not there yet.

Re:2.14? (3, Informative)

tetromino (807969) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933352)

Most of the 2.14 packages are already in the official portage tree (and, at the moment, hardmasked). According to posts by gentoo devs in the forums, gnome-2.14 will be in ~arch by the end of the week.

And if you can't wait for two days and don't mind a few bugs, you could emerge 2.13.92 from the breakmygentoo overlay...

Re:2.14? (1)

marco_craveiro (551065) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933389)

mate, i've been using gnome since pre 1.0 days and i haven't really used kde since 1.x days but i'll tell you this for free: if gnome 2.12.* is significantly faster than current kde then we better forget about world domination plans! :-D at least for those parts of the world with less than 1024MB of ram. i use breezy at home and its pretty sluggish with 512MB. granted, there's 3 of us on one box :-) but nevertheless, we're all using gnome so a lot of memory should be shared. but i have faith and i know dapper will sort all of us out!! :-D i'm really impressed with the work on performance that has been done of late. if you wanna follow it, just go to planet gnome [gnome.org] , people blog daily about performance.

"I Like Your Old Stuff Better Than Your New Stuff" (3, Interesting)

Simon (S2) (600188) | more than 8 years ago | (#14932895)

You have to read this [livejournal.com] as well.

Re:"I Like Your Old Stuff Better Than Your New Stu (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14933305)

Tha journal entry contains some excellent points that are well made.

But I am in a childish mood so must point out that you seem to be missing the entire raison d'etre of the GNOME desktop.

That is that a user should be able to control their entire computer simply by allowing a large drop of drool to fall from their mouth onto a special pressure sensitive pad. By allowing drool to fall from the left side of their mouth they will have "left drooled" on the selected object. Similarly by allowing drool to fall from the right side of their mouth they will have "right drooled" on the selected object

This will provide all the feature they need to work with the single file held in their home directory (further subdirectories and fiels having been banned as it "breaks the spatial paradigm" and "causes the user confusion")

Can you tell I'm not a fan?

Re:"I Like Your Old Stuff Better Than Your New Stu (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14933447)

If you read carefully the post talks about 2.13, the development version. The icon theme problem pointed out in that entry, for example, is fixed in 2.14.0.

de/up/grade (3, Insightful)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 8 years ago | (#14932908)

I'm glad they fixed some text rendering. Because after the last upgrade, my Ubuntu 5.10 renders text illegibly (some weird garbage font that does display properly after being selected with the cursor) in some apps, including Firefox and Evolution (but not Mozilla). I never even got a response to my discussions in the GNOME bug forums.

I'm hoping a reinstall of Ubuntu's next release, now delayed, will return the lost quality of the previous version with the promised speed of the next version.

And I'm hoping that biannual OS reinstalls aren't the price of a feature-complete OS, as Microsoft would have me believe.

Re:de/up/grade (1)

metamatic (202216) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933107)

I used to get annoyed by the OS reinstalls. Then I switched from GNOME to KDE.

Seriously, I had similar problems--a GNOME library broke and all my text disappeared. I decided that was it, and switched. No problems since, in spite of going through two major KDE point releases.

Re:de/up/grade (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933309)

I prefer the GNOME applications, especially Evolution. And GNOME's overall integration tech is more complete under the supposedly joint GNOME/KDE/etc desktop alliance specs. So I put up with the noncritical bugs, while friendly KDE users gently remind me that they don't have them. Of course, there are probably noncritical KDE bugs to annoy, but mainly I stay because the pros outweigh the cons.

And GNOME really loves me, and always apologizes so nice when the bruises really show :(.

great, (1)

maGiC_RS (946022) | more than 8 years ago | (#14932912)

but where's the tarball?

mo3 up (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14932919)

Some pronunciation for the newbies (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14932942)

Off topic I know, but a friend of mine reminded me of this recently...

It's pronounced "nome". Not "guh-nome". Likewise, GNU is pronounced "new" or "Gee Inn Ewe", not "guh-new". We don't pronounce GIMP as "guh-imp", Gnumeric as "guh-numeric", or grip as "guh-rip".

Yes, there are some things that are not phoenetic, like gxine, which would be sensically pronounced as "gee-zine", or gcalc which could be pronounced as "gee-calc", though it would be better served to just say "Gnome Calculator" instead.

Pronouncing "guh-nome" in front of people that you're trying to convince to try Linux makes you look dorky, and it hurts your argument in trying to convince them.

Re:Some pronunciation for the newbies (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14933050)

> gxine, which would be sensically pronounced as "gee-zine"

I always thought it was cine except spelt with an X, you know... as in the Windowing system that xine runs on? That would mean that Gxine would be pronounced "Guh-zinny", not simply "zinny" with a silent G as that doesn't distinguish it from the standard GUI application. Besides which, I thought the Gnome media player was called Totem?

Ready? (1, Funny)

Godji (957148) | more than 8 years ago | (#14932944)

Gnome vs KDE flamewar starting in... 5...4...3...2...1...GO!!!

Re:Ready? (1)

HaydnH (877214) | more than 8 years ago | (#14932996)

"Gnome vs KDE flamewar starting in... 5...4...3...2...1...GO!!!"

Yup... and then you get the intelligent users who use something light like WindowMaker piping in with their zealot stories (or did I just do that?)

Re:Ready? (1)

srpatterson (515721) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933055)

nope, just going to leave a link quietly scratched in the dust http://fluxbox.sf.net/ [sf.net]

Re:Ready? (4, Funny)

Mjlner (609829) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933119)

"Gnome vs KDE flamewar starting in... 5...4...3...2...1...GO!!!"

That's "5...4...3...2...1...KO!!!", which you would've known if you'd stop worshipping the HIG for a while and start listening to the users!

Re:Ready? (1)

alchemistkevin (763955) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933215)

I wish I could contribute to this but this release of gnome makes it so much better than kde that....
oh, wait!

(clicks submit rather than cancel) - doomsday!

Multiprocessing (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 8 years ago | (#14932969)

Will the new version move most rendering operations into the GL hardware on my Inspiron8000's GeForce2Go? Without crashing my desktop like CompMgr does?

Faster, slicker (5, Interesting)

fak3r (917687) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933031)

I always had one foot (*pun intended*) in Gnome and one in E17/Openbox/Xfce4 - but recently I've installed Ubuntu Dapper, and then Compwiz/XGL - holy cow! Yes, you need good graphics card, but my nVidia 6600GT is up to the task. The desktop is now totally snappy - even things like Firefox seem faster - feels like the graphics really fly on the screen now. As promised everything is faster, especially the startup of the main desktop. Apps are quicker, and even the menus just pop up (no annoying delay waiting for the icons to catch up on the menus). Oh and all of a sudden Gnome-terminal is just about as fast to launch and respond as Xterm! Woo-hoo! Considering that's what I use the most, this is a welcome improvement.

After reading the review from yesterday I tried out Epipany, and it's come a long way. There are only a couple of more config options I need, but if I get those I'll start running that in place of Firefox. For all of it's percieved 'heavy-ness' it feels nice and snappy now, and I think I'll be sticking more with Gnome for quite some time. Nice job.

Can't Gnome just die? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14933032)

Gnome2 was an act of utter contempt against end users, it's still better than KDE but that's not exactly saying much is it? fluxbox, icewm & xfce4 are where it's at.

What's new for users? (4, Interesting)

jejones (115979) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933066)

GNOME now features an integrated screensaver. GNOME Screensaver is compatible with the "hacks" popular in Xscreensaver, but also has lots of new features unavailable in Xscreensaver, like being essentially unconfigurable by the user, who can't be trusted not to put rude messages in GLtext.

Figure 16. Configuring the few GNOME Screensaver properties we deign to let the user control

Re:What's new for users? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14933163)

so what's your problem? just keep using xscreensaver if you like that god awful ui so well, and so desperately need to configure your *screensaver* which only pops up when you're not around anyway. you know that you have a choice of options, right.

also you can actually configure screensavers-hacks using xscreensaver, and then use them in gnome-screensaver. for most users configurable screensaver-hacks is just something that will twist their minds.

Re:What's new for users? (1)

Slashcrap (869349) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933236)

for most users configurable screensaver-hacks is just something that will twist their minds.

Ah, so you're a GNOME developer then?

FC5's release pushed back 5 days (2, Informative)

erroneus (253617) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933076)

Fedora Core 5 was supposed to have been released yesterday as well but for reasons having to do with the 64bit version, it was delayed. Perhaps, then the new GNOME package will be included in the release. Here's to hoping!

Re:FC5's release pushed back 5 days (2, Informative)

stinerman (812158) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933270)

Yes, they will [redhat.com] .

Epiphany improvments ! (4, Interesting)

Ploum (632141) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933123)

BFD (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14933218)

gnome is teh suck... who cares? spatial file management? pshaw! netcraft confirms that with this latest release of diarrheal vomitous "software," gnome is dead! now when kde 4 comes out, that will be newsworthy!

The Gnome way (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14933240)

I think the major problem with Gnome is that it relies on C as a base rather than an object-oriented language like C++ (like KDE). With an OO framework, a single behavioral modification can propagate to all window or widget classes without having to update any other existing code. The ramifications of this are that 1) code reuse is very high so LOC can remain very low and 2) features like skinning become a simple matter of loading an XML config file.

But in a procedural language like C, this kind of action results in reams of code being changed. It's no wonder it's such a difficult project to adapt for release.

While more powerful at a basic functional level than it's successors, C lacks the powerful language features that more mature languages like VC++ and Java provide, which for developers is a double edged sword.

Button order... (3, Insightful)

bstocker (886888) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933288)

Please do not take me wrong, I like GNOME very much and i see it as a superior Desktop for UNIX Systems and the most important competitor to KDE.

The problem I have is the button order on dialogboxes, which can - AFAIK - not be changed. GNOME adopts the same schema used by Apple. It is based on a study which says that the readers eye starts searching for a information on the lower right corner of the screen (I did not read the study, so my description may not be accurate). As a result, a typical button order looks like this:

(Cancel) (Save)

On KDE, Windows and many other Desktops, a "most important first" scheme is used. The promoters of this scheme state, that people (in the western world) read from left to right and expect the most important information to come first. therefore, the order looks like:

(Save) (Cancel)

In principle, the button order is not a problem, if all of the applications use the same schema. For example, if You use a Mac, you may expect consistent order. And there is no "right" or "wrong" order, there are just different philosophies.

The only problem I see is the consistency. If you are a GNOME user and also use KDE Apps (or vice versa), you may find the different order disturbing. Of course, if You use Firefox and Kate every day, you can get over this. As for me, I work with a swiss/german keyboard in the office and with a US-keyboard at home. After having problems in the first days, I now switch intuitively between the keyboard schemas.

But anyway, it would be nice to see GNOME and KDE apps adopt the sema Interface guidelines or let the user choose which one he likes.

And so, (1)

Hi-Nu (532202) | more than 8 years ago | (#14933416)

will G-Streamer be finally usable this time? When I tried Ubuntu 5.10 which defaulted to using G-Streamer, it was so horribly broken (skip, random crash, not playing even when plugins were installed) that after fooling around with it for 30 minutes, I just removed it and installed xine-backend instead.
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