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World's First Completely Transparent IC

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 8 years ago | from the other-researchers-will-see-right-through-this dept.

225

An anonymous reader writes "DeviceForge is reporting that researchers at Oregon State University claim to have created the worlds first 'completely transparent' ICs (integrated circuit) from inorganic compounds. From the article: 'The technology can enable extremely inexpensive electronics for use in "throw away" devices, and is expected to be used in automobile windshields, cell phones, TVs, games, and toys, among other applications, OSU said. OSU also believes that the technology might result in more efficient solar cells or improvements and LCD displays (liquid crystal displays), it said.'"

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225 comments

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Whoa (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961249)

I didn't see that coming.

Re:Whoa (0, Redundant)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961351)

I still can't see it.

Re:Whoa (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961566)

Why not? It was clear as day.

Re:Whoa (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961593)

I hear you get the Special Edition Transparent edition of Duke Nukem Forever with the purchase of 6 transparent chips....

Re:Whoa (2, Informative)

bosabilene (655365) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961762)

This is an old story being rehashed. The story broke at least 6 months ago. They use aluminum oxide to print the circuit boards. It can be done at near room temperatures, thus dramatically reducing the cost of making the integrated circuits. Aluminum oxide is one the cheapest materials available.

Cool (1, Funny)

Eightyford (893696) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961252)

Cool, an icy IC.

Re:Cool (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961466)

I see...

Can I eat them? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961254)

How do they taste with salsa?

Obligatory slashdot meme post (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961256)

Nothing to see here, please move along

They are not Integrated Circuits (1)

suso (153703) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961260)

They are Isolinear Chips. :-D

Re:They are not Integrated Circuits (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961334)

Woot! Isolinear Chips Here We Come!!!

IC or !IC (1)

SpectralDesign (921309) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961779)

You say IC, but I say !IC

The king is naked! (0)

KiloByte (825081) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961262)

Do we need a child to point out this is a fake? :-p

Re:The king is naked! (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961280)

It's "The Emperor is naked"... you slack-jawed junkslut.

Eye IC (3, Funny)

x2A (858210) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961263)

tiny little display in my contact lenses would be cool! Could be powered by tears...

Re:Eye IC (1)

ToasterofDOOM (878240) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961551)

Lucky for emo children I guess

Re:Eye IC -- hrmmm (1)

Zantetsuken (935350) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961712)

maybe it seriously could if the power requirements of the particular chip are low enough, maybe the salt/other minerals could make the liquid acidic or whatever like regular batteries and provide just enough power...

Fun (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961264)

If this becomes mainstream, auctioners are going to have a field day auctioning off completely transparent hardware. Complete with a completely transparent monitor.

Air guitars, for the low price of $500! (1)

r_jensen11 (598210) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961411)

That's right, and if you order within the next ten minutes, we'll send you a second one, absolutely free!

S&H: $24.99

Delivery time: Instantaneous

Utility? (3, Funny)

cataclyst (849310) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961266)

What are the possible... oh, I C...

Next (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961267)

What is next transparent human skin?

ARG!! (2, Interesting)

forand (530402) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961268)

Okay you know that it is Liquid Crystal Display but you say LCD Displays! Come on editors someone should have caught that and changed it so it doesn't look so bad.

Re:ARG!! (5, Funny)

Dachannien (617929) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961310)

One day, you'll find yourself punching your PIN number into a touch-sensitive LCD display at your local ATM machine.

Re:ARG!! (4, Funny)

Aranth Brainfire (905606) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961363)

Still doesn't match a disc case I got for Christmas ages ago... "Compact CD Disc Case"

Mod parent redundant (2, Funny)

dotgain (630123) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961479)

N/T

Re:ARG!! (0, Flamebait)

TummyX (84871) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961661)

I really hate it when people point this out.

The acronym "LCD" can, itself, be used as a noun. And, IMHO, ATM machine and PIN number are equally valid.

Re:ARG!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961732)

You have got to be joking. Just because they're more common (because people don't think before they say/write them) doesn't mean they're valid or acceptable. Anyone who's taken even one technical writing class would tell you that this sort of usage doesn't simplify things for anybody. You define an acronym and then use it consistently. I guess next we'll start hearing arguements for the admission of ain't into standard english.

Re:ARG!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961751)

There ain't no reason not to.

y dont we just dum down english & then lazy ppl can read 2. y r you dissin l8 bloomers?

Re:ARG!! (3, Insightful)

Mahou (873114) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961756)

if it is a noun then don't use it as a qualifying adjective (what kind of display? an lcd display!) just use it as a noun, LCD. it is what it is. and it is a kind of display. so you're completely wrong.
PIN is the word for the number, no need to remind people that it's a number. there's no such thing as a PIN hieroglyph, PIN doodle, or PIN secret handshake
ATM is the word for the machine, no need to remind people it's a machine. there's no such thing as a ATM dog, ATM grocer, or ATM baseball bat
NIC is a type of card, etc.

just because a bunch of people say it doesn't mean it's right.

Re:ARG!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961772)

Hmmm.... I guess I'm lucky I have New NT Technology in my windows machine.

Re:ARG!! (1)

bob122989 (912229) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961724)

I agree. Also anyone who works at a gas station: please oh please change your "ATM Machine" signs...

wahey! (4, Insightful)

Turn-X Alphonse (789240) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961279)

What world are these people living in!? Mobile phones and a TV is not "throw away", a good TV will last 10-20 years if not more. Why would anyone in their right mind pay the price of a TV and considerit disaposable?

Re:wahey! (4, Funny)

x2A (858210) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961287)

...because there's so much crap on tv these days, it's difficult to not throw it away! ;-)

Re:wahey! (3, Informative)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961427)

"a good TV will last 10-20 years if not more"

We should be so lucky. A company that produces TVs that last that long isn't maximizing its profits. My Sharp TV was bought the day of the Challenger explosion, and is on its last legs. I would have been happy if it had lasted 10 years, and would have bought another Sharp, most likely. Anecdotal, sure -- but Sharp lost a sale by making a good TV.

Consumer electronics are engineered to last only a couple/few years past the warranty period -- keep the customer just satisfied enough, while ensuring they are still buying those TVs.

Re: whether people consider them disposable -- well, lots of people are happy to pay $30 a month for their TV. After they've paid it off, they're quite happy to upgrade to a bigger, newer TV for $30 a month. And chances are, they'll need to within a year or two.

Re:wahey! (1)

Turn-X Alphonse (789240) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961645)

I know what you're saying and it's a shame.

The lady who used to live nextdoor to me died about ten years ago, she gave me her TV in her will. It lasted me untill last year and I'll be damned if it wasn't 20 years old by then.

So not all TV's die fast.. We just forgot about quality when we mass produced crap and charged 4 times more.

Re:wahey! (1)

aelbric (145391) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961764)

Not to be picky but the Challenger disaster ocurred on January 28, 1986 [wikipedia.org] . Ergo your TV has lasted almost 20 years.

Re:wahey! (4, Informative)

scdeimos (632778) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961428)

You've never worked in a repair/servicing industry, have you?

Mobile phones and TV's are extremely throw-away nowadays. Have you ever tried to have one repaired? Particularly with "name brand" TV's like Somy (typo intended) the cost of spare parts is so high (read: whole boards/modules, not single components) that it is generally cheaper to throw the product away and replace it with a cheaper up-to-date version. Common thought seems to be that spare parts prices are artificially inflated to improve new sales turnover.

Funny as it seems, the cheaper TV's coming from Chinese manufacturers are much more repairable because (a) schematic diagrams are more available *and* cheaper, and (b) they use less proprietary components which are easier to obtain.

Re:wahey! (1)

kimvette (919543) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961512)

. . . which is why I replaced my $350 Sony DVD player with a cheap made-in-Taiwan player which actually turned out to be a better player. Why? Sony wanted $120 for a replacement optical sled. WTF?! It wasn't until AFTER I tossed it that I found the exact same sled under a different part number/different brand from one of my distributors. :( Fuck Sony, preferably with an old, cracked and splintered, creosote-soaked telephone pole. Repeatedly.

Re:wahey! (3, Insightful)

kebes (861706) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961532)

Well the idea with disposable electronics/devices is that the manufacturing is cheaper and the end devices cost so little that they are disposable. The 'dream' of those working on these devices is that they become so cheap that they replace things like billboards and flyers and so forth. Basically you can hand out "disposable paper-thin TVs" on the street as advertising. Many consumers like the idea of being able to easily replace their devices. (TV doesn't quite fit the new decor of your living room? Just throw it out and buy a new one...) I think it's pretty obvious that there will be a consumer demand for cheaper, disposable devices.

What worries me much more is the obvious environmental impact. Society has made some progress over the last decade to be more "environmentally friendly" yet new directions like this one just push us ever further towards a fully "disposable society."

Re:wahey! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961673)

The 'dream' of those working on these devices is that they become so cheap that they replace things like billboards and flyers and so forth. Basically you can hand out "disposable paper-thin TVs" on the street as advertising.

Well... I guess the set of nightmares is a subset of the set of dreams.

Re:wahey! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961556)

Some companies today will do this to just about every industry possible. It's brilliant - figure out a way to make customers pay for the same product more than once, and already you've got a lot more money coming in. So let's add a few cheap parts here and there, lower the cost to make the product appealing.. and it breaks down soon after. But that's okay! We can just go out and buy a new one!

the whole "we can just buy a new one!" attitude that is so prevalent where I grew up is kind of disgusting. So much wasted money.

Re:wahey! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961649)

Anything you buy that you do not expect to pass on to your children is disposable, reusable adult novelties excepted.

Damn fools... (1)

1tsm3 (754925) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961286)

Don't they know that this will cause photon leak when the optical ICs finally come out! Then they are going to spend more $$$ all over again to figure out how to prevent the photon leak! :P

See through .. (4, Interesting)

karvind (833059) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961288)

Very cool indeed. I have worked on glass substrates for TFT related applications in my grad studies. I tell you one thing, it is very hard to tell which side is up and which side is down. Many times in the beginning I had put the wafer upside down just to find out it didn't deposit certain thing or etch on the right side. Finally I managed to put a visible mark which would only read correct from one side and got around. Now if you make transparent ICs, how do you go about aligning one layer to another in lithography (common step in IC fabrication). I hope they don't make transparent ICs on transparent substrates - that would be quite a fun.

That along with... (1)

AltGrendel (175092) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961294)

transparent aluminum. Eventually, we'll be able to build Wonder Woman's invisible airplane.

Weeeee!

Re:That along with... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961482)

transparent aluminum already exists...

http://beverlytang.com/archives/materials/transpar ent_aluminum.html [beverlytang.com]

Duh! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961577)

He never said that it didn't.

Transparent? (4, Interesting)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961296)

They looked translucent to me (of course, I have no idea how the slides were prepared in the pics, and whether they indicate the working product).

I'm also curious as to

I'm curious as to how much heat these suckers will generate -- the obvious 'transparent' uses would, I imagine, need them to be encased in glass or protective transparent cases. The windshield mentioned, for example -- how quickly would heat build to the point of damaging the IC?

My second question is why these ICs would be any better than opaque ICs for throwaway use? Are they cheaper to manufacture, even scaled to billions of chips? Aren't normal ICs pretty maskable with film coverings?

Don't get me wrong, I'm sure there are applications where this could be very useful, but I'm not sure that even if development is completed, there would ever be enough demand to make these useful for anything other than niche applications.

Then again, 512k should be enough memory for anyone, and there will never be a market for more than five computers in the US.

Re:Transparent? (2, Insightful)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961395)

I'm curious as to how much heat these suckers will generate -- the obvious 'transparent' uses would, I imagine, need them to be encased in glass or protective transparent cases. The windshield mentioned, for example -- how quickly would heat build to the point of damaging the IC?
If they're using it in windshields, the chip's heat output is the last thing they have to worry about.

The very first thing that they're going to have to engineer around is the chip's ability to withstand a constant barrage of UV radiation & high temps. If it can't handle summer time, it's heat output is irrelevant for automotive (and potentially other) use.

Re:Transparent? (1)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961448)

The heat output of the chips is very relevant -- glass isn't the best conductor, and heat output will exacerbate ambient heat problems.

How about freezing in the winter? How will the chips deal with expansion and contraction, will they do so at the same rate as the glass, or are you asking for seasonal degradation of the chips?

Re:Transparent? (1)

Tx (96709) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961496)

Automotive safey glass is a laminate with a layer of flexible plastic in the middle. The plastic is designed to stretch so placing an IC in that layer shouldn't present any problem. Can't say about the heat issue though.

Re:Transparent? (1)

Sqwubbsy (723014) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961561)

Something tells me that putting an IC in between two pieces of clear, non-breathable laminate will result in toasted ICs.
I'm no engineer, but that one seems fairly obvious.

Re:Transparent? (1)

chris_eineke (634570) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961397)

Then again, 512k should be enough memory for anyone, and there will never be a market for more than five computers in the US.
What's with this obsession about mispredictions of the past? 500 gig hard-drives go for $450 and my family owns at least 5 personal computers (Wintel, Lintel, and Mac).

Don't underestimate the future. If you do, hindsight will catch up to you. It's your job then to keep it. Last time I checked IBM and Microsoft are doing quite well.

Re:Transparent? (1)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961435)

I stated in my OP that I couldn't see a huge demand for these things except for niche products -- I referenced the past mispredictions in order to state that I could very well be wrong, and these things might be ubiquitous in a generation.

Re:Transparent? (1)

chris_eineke (634570) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961483)

I wasn't attacking you or your opinion. It won't take as long as a generation for those things to become ubiquitous, because progress progresses exponentionally. I'm pretty sure we'll see things like the first TB HDD this year.

Re:Transparent? (2, Funny)

fyngyrz (762201) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961541)

Progress progresses progressively?

Re:Transparent? (1)

sdnoob (917382) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961597)

soon as the p0rn industry figures out how to use these things, they'll blow right off the shelves.

Re:Transparent? (1)

nick_davison (217681) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961525)

The windshield mentioned, for example -- how quickly would heat build to the point of damaging the IC?

I wasn't speeding officer. I was "air cooling" my windshield IC.

Of course the far more l33t Brits and folks from the state of Washington would all have watercooled versions but we can't all be that l33t.

3-D ICs? (1)

Dr. Eggman (932300) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961302)

Could transparent ICs be stacked, using a form of optics to communicate between the layers, to create 3-D arrays of ICs? Heat might be too much of a problem, I don't know I'm no engineer, but perhaps it could be emmersed in some sort of coolant. Anyone know if this kind of thing could be done or if there is something far more sophisticated that they could link?

Re:3-D ICs? (1)

kb1ikn (866009) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961560)

They are 3D, but I know what you mean. No. The logic does not exist. A classic example is computer processors, why dont they have processors that are stackable? I have plenty of more examples if you'd like to hear them...

rad (0, Offtopic)

lav-chan (815252) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961325)

Kick-ass, maybe now we can finally get some of those neato power-meter thingies like in Dragon Ball Z!

Invisable (1, Funny)

NoMorePoints.com (930644) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961328)

And I have this inorganic [read transparent] Ferrari. I know it looks like I am walking, but really, you just can't see it! NoMorePoints.com

Re:Invisable (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961471)

I can just envision free iPods for everybody!

Espionage Applications (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961353)

My first thought on reading this is that there might be significant espionage applications for this kind of thing.

Does everything! (2, Funny)

SEWilco (27983) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961359)

the technology might result in more efficient solar cells or improvements and LCD displays

...and fusion power within ten years.

"Completely transparent"? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961361)

So then... why exactly is it not only *visible* in the photos, but *strongly colored*? When I think of the words "completely transparent" I don't think "colored plastic you can kind of see through if you squint".

Also: What does being transparent have to do with being throw-away? Or are they just stating "transparent" and "cheap/disposable" as two positive qualities of their creation?

Re:"Completely transparent"? (1)

HermanAB (661181) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961571)

Depends on the angle. It does reflect some light. It has a gold hue where there are conductors and a green hue where not. If viewed head on, you can see through it. Though it is somewhat less transparant than cheap home window glass, it is more transparant than gold flashed office window glass.

Give me my HUD (2, Interesting)

amliebsch (724858) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961372)

I'm crossing my fingers that this might eventually result in a transparent LED. Think of the display possibilities!

Re:Give me my HUD (1)

Jace of Fuse! (72042) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961450)

You probably have several in your house right now. If you look into them they show you an exact representation of the world outside.

Can you imagine, though... (1)

Tavor (845700) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961744)

If your windows also displayed your Windows?

(or your Mac or Linux, for that matter?)

Young Rick Presley: In the Image of Jack Kilby (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961383)

Read the full story about this amazing team of researchers at Oregon State University (OSU) [oregonstate.edu] . What is even more amazing than the invention itself is that researchers of modest backgrounds (i.e. no Ivy-League or Stanford pedigree) at a modest university (i.e. no MIT or UC-Berkeley) developed an awesome breakthrough, leapfrogging the teams of foreign-educated foreign students at UCLA.

Note that the brains behind the invention was born into a rural, farming community. Young Rick Presley spent more time rearing pigs and goats than building the latest high-tech PC from parts purchased at Fry's Electronics.

Folks, what we have here is a fine example of Yankee ingenuity and the makings of another Jack Kilby [wikipedia.org] . Kilby also grew up in a rural community and attended a modest university. He went on to invent the transistor.

The lesson here is that a quality environment with good people who have a good set of values is much more conducive to creating a 1st-world society than a high-tech environment with very-bright but dishonest people who lack any moral values. Taiwan may be the high-tech capital of the world with the highest density of high-performance notebook computers, but the quality of life in Taiwan is substantially below that in Sweden.

Beans (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961387)

"Jack, what do mean you sold our cow for a handful of invisible electronics?!?"

In a related news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961393)

It has been reported that OSU has not been able to find the groundbreaking IC. Due to complete transperancy, its has been exteremely difficult to locate it.

Finally (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961403)

Throw-away windshields!

Pictures Attached (4, Funny)

StikyPad (445176) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961406)


 


 

Re:Pictures Attached (1)

markusbkoch (909876) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961694)

I don't see a thing

Re:Pictures Attached (1)

rohlfinator (888775) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961776)

Are those pictures to scale?

Government use (1)

Yoik (955095) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961407)

These will be great for automated decision making systems used by regulatory agencies.

True transparency in government !

This isnt the first by a long shot. (4, Informative)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961417)

Sharp did this a while ago with a Z80 core.

http://www.z80.info/sharp/z80_glas.htm [z80.info]

Re:This isnt the first by a long shot. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961493)

Well, if u compare the pictures, the Sharp one has got black lines on it.

Re:This isnt the first by a long shot. (2, Informative)

strider44 (650833) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961542)

That doesn't look completely transparent! What's with all the black lines up and down the chip? In this story it's all transparent (well translucent at least) so there's no black lines.

Re:This isnt the first by a long shot. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961666)

That's on a glass substrate. TFA has actual transparent transistors. The circuitry itself is transparent (mostly).

Terminology (1)

Transcendent (204992) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961434)

It's "translucent", not transparent.

Anyway, the base of the circuitry (what it's printed on), is simply glass. No big deal there (they've been doing that for a while). The circuitry itself isn't tranparent anyway.

Re:Terminology (5, Informative)

Kennric (22093) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961707)

No, it's transparent. The circuitry itself is transparent - a lot of research has gone into developing semiconductors with the correct band structure to pass most of the visible spectrum but still act as semiconductors. Translucency generally refers to materials that disperse light, rendering images blurry or unrecognisable, while transparent materials maintain the integrity of the transmitted image, even if dimmed or colored. (Your semantics may vary.)

These circuits are indeed made from transparent (over a wide range of the visible spectrum) semiconductors, and they are indeed printed on glass. I am not involved with the research, but I know Dr. Wager, whose team developed the circuits, and I know a few of the physicists who developed the actual materials used. Very neat stuff.
 

Re:Terminology (1)

Transcendent (204992) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961768)

Thanks for the info, actually. I was reading the article looking for more technical details about the actual material used (assuming some amorphous compound since its printed on glass), doping techniques, and how it stacks up physically against other semiconductor materials. Or maybe they don't want to say what it is since it's part of their secret, heh. Would be cool if they could make it a crystalline compound (again, wanted to know that from the article if that's even possible with what they're using) and have a full wafer.

Since they didn't mention the actual material, I had to go off the pictures (which didn't look to transparent to me, guess it was just the angle).

RAS Syndrome (1)

Ancil (622971) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961456)

LCD displays (liquid crystal displays)
So much redundant, repeated information in one redundant, repetitive place.

Please, ScuttleMonkey, just say no to RAS Syndrome [wikipedia.org] !

"LCD displays" (2, Funny)

Hao Wu (652581) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961713)

Is that like an "SUV vehicle"?

Summary (3, Funny)

MANYplaces84 (853635) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961460)

Nothing to see here please move along...

transparent chips? (1)

atarione (601740) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961475)

could this mean M$ windows for windows is on the horizon??

ok admit it ... that was the best joke you've read in the last .5 seconds????

The empire's new circuitry. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961490)

Anyone who can't see them is a fool or is not fit for his job.

Imagine. . . (1)

PeeZee (962502) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961511)

A beowulf cluster of those!

Skeptical (4, Insightful)

JBEdgeworth (962496) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961527)

I, for one, am skeptical about OSU's research with regards to the IC's utility in the field of conventional electron-beam lithography. To engrave features onto the IC at a sub-micrometre level, how would the substrate of the IC, with its importunate properties of inelasticity, respond to the photomasks at 193nm? What would become of the mass production of these compounds? I'm not saying the article is wholly without merit, but I remain a little skeptical about the IC's practical uses in production.

sorry, had to do it (1)

Sathias (884801) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961585)

If thats his pizza, I'm IC Whatever!

Offtopic - but interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961596)

What moron at Lane Bryant thought Slashdot would be a good target audience for advertising? Clothes for hefty girls... Please.

More efficient solar cells (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14961662)

They didn't say how much more efficient the solar cells would be. I can see at least one way this technology would make solar cells more efficient but it would only multiply the present output by maybe 1.2 or so. I haven't been paying close attention lately but it seems to me that solar cells need to be 60% efficient before they become really attractive for general use and they're no where close yet. A small increase in efficiency really isn't that exciting.

Nothing (1, Redundant)

Doytch (950946) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961688)

Nothing to see here...

Maybe it's just me (1)

Omega Blue (220968) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961709)

I can see them "completely" transparent ICs.

Gotta check my eyes. Seeing things I shouldn't have.

Solar cells? Uh... (1)

charlesbakerharris (623282) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961711)

Yes, exactly what we need: a solar cell that actually absorbs *none* of the light that hits it.

Do the solar cells we have right now suck that badly that a 0% efficient cell would be better?

Hot! (1)

Kafteinn (542563) | more than 8 years ago | (#14961760)

Doesn't this affect heat release and tolerance?
Real time [hydra.is]
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