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Claria Leaves Adware Business

CowboyNeal posted more than 8 years ago | from the bowing-out dept.

149

Alex Stern writes "In an attempt to clean up its tarnished name, Claria has hired Deutsche Bank to help them sell off the software tools that were previously supported by their adware. Claria says they are unwilling to sell the software for the GAIN ad network, or the data they have collected from their users. Claria is also holding on to their eWallet software that manages passwords. On July 1, Claria will shutdown the GAIN network and inform their users they can either uninstall their software or pay for it. Claria's new business model is 'a new platform designed to provide consumers with a personalized Internet experience.'"

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MS antispyware (1, Insightful)

The Lerneaen Hydra (885793) | more than 8 years ago | (#14993947)

Now that (officially) they wont log data, does this mean MS antispyware will be set to default remove?

Tarnished name. (4, Insightful)

Poromenos1 (830658) | more than 8 years ago | (#14993961)

I don't think you can clear a name that has been into spyware. I know I won't trust them for anything else they might do...

Re:Tarnished name. (4, Funny)

the-amazing-blob (917722) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994045)

Don't immediatly say that. They might have actualy decided to change their evil ways. They could create something extremely useful.

Glasses (0)

Darkman, Walkin Dude (707389) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994446)

Did anyone else read the summary as this...?

Claria has hired Douche Bag to help them sell off the software tools that were previously supported by their adware.

Re:Glasses (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14994725)

No

Re:Tarnished name. (4, Insightful)

Reziac (43301) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994206)

I translated the move to mean "our adware product is now so ubiquitously blocked that it's become hard to make money with it, so we're selling it to some other sucker and finding a new area to sleeze in."

People forgive/forget (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14994212)

George W Bush lied about WMD during his first term in office, but people forgot/forgave him and voted him in for a second term.

A lot of people hated the Vietnam war and the soldiers who fought there, but now most have come to terms that the soldiers did what the country asked them to do, and had to go through hell and back.

George S Patton was sometimes a really mean guy, but most people remember him as an excellent general.

Microsoft has a terrible track record when it comes to security, but people still install their software.

Union Carbide was responsible for 15,000 people's deaths in India, but the company is still alive and well.

History tends to be nice to folks/corporations.

Re:People forgive/forget (2, Insightful)

Guppy06 (410832) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994507)

"George W Bush lied about WMD during his first term in office, but people forgot/forgave him and voted him in for a second term."

That was less about forgiving him and more about people being terrified of terrorists and/or gay marriage.

"A lot of people hated the Vietnam war and the soldiers who fought there, but now most have come to terms that the soldiers did what the country asked them to do, and had to go through hell and back."

It only took 10-15 years.

"Microsoft has a terrible track record when it comes to security, but people still install their software."

It's called a "monopoly" for a reason.

"Union Carbide was responsible for 15,000 people's deaths in India, but the company is still alive and well."

Few people in the US know, let alone care. Fewer still know how their purchaes support UC.

Re:People forgive/forget (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14994527)

George W Bush lied about WMD during his first term in office, but people forgot/forgave him and voted him in for a second term.

And so another ignorant dumbshit liberal speaks when he should be silent. Every intelligence agency in the world agreed Sadaam had WMD you moron. Just because he got them out to Syria or burried them somewhere in the desert and haven't been found yet doesn't mean they don't or didn't exist.

Don't let the facts stop you from being a rabid hater though, that's the liberal strong suit.

Re:People forgive/forget (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14994820)

*LOL* Here... have another spoon of GWB propaganda.

Re:People forgive/forget (1)

Killall -9 Bash (622952) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994982)

[blockquote]Every intelligence agency in the world agreed Sadaam had WMD[/blockquote] It must be true because Bush said so on TV.
The reality is that that every intelligence agency in the world agreed that Sadaam was no threat, and that Bush's motives were suspect.

Re:People forgive/forget (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14995091)

Re:Tarnished name. (1)

DrEldarion (114072) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994321)

That's okay, they'll just change it again anyway.

Re:Tarnished name. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14994352)

They don't sound very trustworthy to me.

User data once gathered through that system to target ads in Claria's GAIN and BehaviorLink networks will no longer be used.

If they aren't destroying the data, it's because they think they might want to use the data.

Re:Tarnished name. (1)

Guppy06 (410832) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994465)

Oh, come now, RealMedia "changed their ways" and now everybody loves them! I mean, look at the grassroots campaign they successfully waged against iTunes! Won't it be the same for Claria?

Re:Tarnished name. (1)

Mr. Freeman (933986) | more than 8 years ago | (#14995134)

But at least it's one less piece of crap we all have to put up with.

Some assets! (5, Funny)

Random Q. Hacker (137687) | more than 8 years ago | (#14993963)

Oh boy, a screen saver. Let me whip out my billion dollars in venture capital for that!

Re:Some assets! (1)

Guppy06 (410832) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994515)

Wait at least until they change their name to "eClaira" (or maybe "iClaria"), that's when you know you have a winner.

and Charles Manson... (5, Funny)

Fhqwhgadss (905393) | more than 8 years ago | (#14993967)

is now knitting little sweaters for orphaned puppies.

Re:and Charles Manson... (3, Funny)

Afecks (899057) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994154)

but the sweaters are made from human skin. so it all kind of balances out...

Personalized Internet experience? (4, Interesting)

QuietLagoon (813062) | more than 8 years ago | (#14993968)

In other words, spying on what you do on the 'net....

Re:Personalized Internet experience? (1)

iminplaya (723125) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994827)

Really! Claria's "new business model"?? What did they do? Find a new way around our spyware detection software? Or maybe they figure the FBI or NSA can do the spying for them. And now that your IRS records will be up for sale, they can just buy what they need from H&R Block.

Next story... (2, Insightful)

Luigi30 (656867) | more than 8 years ago | (#14993970)

A new company starts up called Claritor, who restarts the GAIN network...

Re:Next story... (4, Interesting)

Valdrax (32670) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994215)

Actually a quote in the article does raise an interesting question about that:

On July 1, Claria will shutdown the GAIN network and inform their users they can either uninstall their software or pay for it.

So, does that mean that if you installed ad-supported freeware that uses Claria's spyware to help pay for it, that that's what they're talking about when the say "pay off or shut off?" Does that mean that they're going to trip off whatever mechanism prevents you from using such software after Claria's uninstalled without uninstalling the client software? What about software that uses multiple spyware vendors?

Okay, well honestly, I don't really care that much about people careless enough to use programs that install spyware, but it does beg an interesting question of liability if they attempt to technologically enforce their suggestion that one should either pay or uninstall.

Re:Next story... (1)

Mateito (746185) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994647)

More importantly, are they going to provide all the information required to actually uninstall this thing?

Re:Next story... (1)

rhizome (115711) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994815)

Does that mean that they're going to trip off whatever mechanism prevents you from using such software after Claria's uninstalled without uninstalling the client software?

I'm waiting for the date just so we can see how many infected machines break down once the network becomes unavailable. I hope a reporter is on this angle, because I don't think it's beyond the pale that poorly-written spyware has well-written error handling, especially for core functionality.

What really happens next... (3, Funny)

jim_v2000 (818799) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994772)

March 27, 2006, GAIN becomes self aware......

Personalized Internet experience? (4, Insightful)

gluecode (950306) | more than 8 years ago | (#14993971)

>> Claria's new business model is 'a new platform designed to >> provide consumers with a personalized Internet experience.'" To create a personalized Internet experience, don't they have to collect more intimate user information?

That is the brilliant part of it (1)

RedLaggedTeut (216304) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994083)

To create a personalized Internet experience, don't they have to collect more intimate user information?

And the brilliant part of it is that the users will now pay for the privilege.

Conditions of the sale crack me up (5, Funny)

LiftOp (637065) | more than 8 years ago | (#14993975)

A condition of any sale of Claria's consumer software applications will be the requirement that any purchaser agrees to adhere to emerging industry standards outlined by TRUSTe and other industry coalitions.

So what's the going rate for buying a product line and promising not to use it?

Re:Conditions of the sale crack me up (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14994067)

AC bids 0.01 USD.

Re:Conditions of the sale crack me up (1)

Migraineman (632203) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994172)

>AC bids 0.01 USD.

I wouldn't do that before reading the actual sale contract. If there's a clause about "adoping all assets, liabilities, etc." you could be adoping a bucket of debt for your penny. It wouldn't be the first time a scummy company tried to offload it's financial liabilities onto someone else.

Re:Conditions of the sale crack me up (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14994431)

Yes, the case ZiffCorp vs Simpson comes to mind.

Re:Conditions of the sale crack me up (2, Informative)

DSP_Geek (532090) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994904)

Truste? Those douches? They gave Gratis Internet a clean bill of health on privacy while GI sold every email address it could dredge up, not to mention playing nice with any number of mainstream email baggers. A certification from them is just about good enough to wipe your butt with. Nice to see Gator still has the same lofty *ahem* standards it always did.

I'm guessing the VCs realized the IPO would be as popular as shares in Mengele Health Farms, and told manglement to find something else so they could cash out.

So what (2, Funny)

davmoo (63521) | more than 8 years ago | (#14993977)

Pond scum by any other name is still pond scum. And no matter how they change their product line-up, pond scum is still pond scum.

Re:So what (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14994255)

You shouldn't insult Pond scum by comparing it with an adware company.

Re:So what (4, Funny)

Matilda the Hun (861460) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994497)

But now it comes in 6 new flavors!

AmEx? (5, Funny)

Hazy Memory (853133) | more than 8 years ago | (#14993979)

The real question is: can I pay with American Express or will they only take visa and mastercard. Don't take my GATOR away!!!

Yeah. Right. Good luck. (2, Insightful)

ankhcraft (811009) | more than 8 years ago | (#14993981)

Claria's new business model is 'a new platform designed to provide consumers with a personalized Internet experience.'

Sounds like a recipe for failure to me. I doubt the value that they add is going to be enough to make people want to pay for their software. I doubt that very much.

Why would anybody pay for software to pre-populate fields w/ credit cards, addresses, etc. when Internet Explorer and Firefox can already do that for free? (If you're into that sort of thing.)

Hello toilet, goodbye Claria.

Re:Yeah. Right. Good luck. (1)

gbulmash (688770) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994028)

'Claria's new business model is 'a new platform designed to provide consumers with a personalized Internet experience.'

Ooh, like the personalized internet assistant, Bonzi Buddy [pchell.com] ? Or maybe it will be as widely loved as Clippy [theserverside.net] .

Isn't it ironic? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14993988)

Claria's new business model is 'a new platform designed to provide consumers with a personalized Internet experience.'

Yeah, they *would* know what a personalized experience is.

New platform! Yes!!! (-1, Troll)

gluecode (950306) | more than 8 years ago | (#14993993)

Oh I am so looking forward to develop for the new Claria API! I am so excited! It will be the cutting edge platform to steal personal information from grannies and granpas. I can't wait!

Yeah, uh huh. (2, Insightful)

Valar (167606) | more than 8 years ago | (#14993994)

"Claria's new business model is 'a new platform designed to provide consumers with a personalized Internet experience.'"

No doubt by spying on you, showing you ads, AND making you pay for the software that does it.

Thanks, but no thanks.

Re:Yeah, uh huh. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14994402)

Yeah. Kinda' like every website on the Internet does, even our beloved Google. Google spies and shows me ads. Even when I'm visiting M-W.com. Google to me is scarier than a Claria because everyone just accepts whatever Google does. At least people are keeping an eye on Claria.

Time to start investing in anonymizer start-ups for when the revolution hits and people will no longer stand for being tracked at every turn on the Internet.

Translation... (4, Interesting)

AnonymousPrick (956548) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994005)

FTFA: At that time, people currently using any GAIN-related software products will be offered the chance to uninstall them, or continue using them through the new purchaser.

So, some other company is going to continue business as usual? I don't care what sort of agreement the new owners have to abide by, there's always a way around such things. For all we know, the new purchaser could be just another entity that's owned by Claria via several layers of legal entities.

So.. (3, Interesting)

Turn-X Alphonse (789240) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994007)

a new platform designed to provide consumers with a personalized Internet experience

So they'll be releasing a tool bar, which will do all of this again and claim other wise?

The pinstripes make them look reputable like. (1)

twitter (104583) | more than 8 years ago | (#14995112)

So they'll be releasing a tool bar, which will do all of this again and claim other wise?

They will charge you for it this time! Some people might be fooled into trusting them because they are asking for even more.

Heh (2, Interesting)

yamla (136560) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994008)

So, they are going forward to start a legitimate business based on the profits and contacts they've made in the ad-ware (some may say spy-ware) business? If they really wanted to turn over a new leaf, they'd dissolve the corporation and return all the money to the shareholders.

Re:Heh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14994640)

That's just silly. You're asking for Mother Theresa out of a corporation? Name me one business that made money off far worse, say knowingly allowed workers to get black lung, and then shed all money in the bank when they started protecting the workers.

Claria's past is shady, but at least bust them on the valid points.

Why... (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14994012)

"Claria says they are unwilling to sell the software for the GAIN ad network, or the data they have collected from their users."

Uh, why? Did they wake up some morning and magically get some ethics? Or are they afraid of what people will discover?

They should get (another) name change at the same time. Most people know the relationship Claria == Gator == spyware/adware == scum.

Re:Why... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14994118)


why not sell the data ?

because Claria (did)have one of the biggest databases of user information on the planet
http://www.wintercorp.com/vldb/2003_TopTen_Survey/ TopTenWinners.asp [wintercorp.com]

12TB (in 2003) of data isnt something they are wanting to sell

How is Spyware Legal? (3, Insightful)

SisyphusShrugged (728028) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994032)

I have always had trouble understanding how spyware can be legal anyway...

I mean basically the company is spying on you, its similar to if Walmart hired someone to constantly stalk you and take notes on what kind of shampoo you buy...it just does not seem logical.

But then who said laws have to be logical, I mean the RIAA/MPAA DMCA CRAP states that for each movie/song one downloads the loss to the companies is the hundreds of thousands of dollars, doesnt really make sense does it...

Re:How is Spyware Legal? (1)

Turn-X Alphonse (789240) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994077)

The internet spans nations and have no laws, you can't stop things because they will skip places in the real world to avoid your laws.

Re:How is Spyware Legal? (1)

freedom_india (780002) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994113)

Try telling that to China, which has its Great Firewall and a patted-down version of Google.

Re:How is Spyware Legal? (3, Insightful)

It'sYerMam (762418) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994097)

I mean basically the company is spying on you, its similar to if Walmart hired someone to constantly stalk you and take notes on what kind of shampoo you buy...it just does not seem logical.
I'm assuming you don't own any supermarket loyalty cards.

Re:How is Spyware Legal? (1)

thestobor (891237) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994184)

Or pay with credit/debit cards at said supermarket...

Re:How is Spyware Legal? (1)

slavemowgli (585321) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994384)

At least WalMart isn't slipping loyalty cards into your wallet without your knowledge that automatically "phone home" and collect data about all sorts of activities not related to shopping.

Re:How is Spyware Legal? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14994695)

You're wrong again here. The loyalty cards are giving you discounts. Period. And in teeny, tiny print in the agreement, it says they will watch your purchases in legalese. Claria's "assets" do the same thing. They scream, "Free screensaver" and, in tiny print, that they will serve you ads. So both are "slipping their cards into your wallet without your knowledge and phoning home." You just like Wal-Mart more apparently and are willing to accept more of their shit. Claria is no saint, but people's passions drive them to very irrational behavior, as the Gator/Claria name does on Slashdot. You can never have a sane discussion about abortion for the same reason. If Claria did something illegal, they'd get sued, like 180Solutions did. Hate the business model, not the business.

Re:How is Spyware Legal? (3, Insightful)

techno-vampire (666512) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994392)

'm assuming you don't own any supermarket loyalty cards.

There are three differences here. First, you have to specifically request the card and fill out an application. (Most spyware installs itself without telling you.) Second,you are explicitly agreeing to let the market track your purcheses when you get the card. (Spyware doesn't even ask.) Last, you are paid for that by the discounts you get. (Spyware gives back nothing.)

Re:How is Spyware Legal? (1)

Dave2 Wickham (600202) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994590)

Quite a number of GAIN installs are probably from GAIN-supported software, such as DivX Pro (I have no idea if they still bundle GAIN for the free version still, but they used to). Gator itself is a data remembering app. Bonsai Buddy provided a talking ape. Thus yes, spyware does tend to give you something. Whether it's worth it is another matter.

Re:How is Spyware Legal? (1)

Monkelectric (546685) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994155)

Its very simple. At least in the united states, when YOU do it, its a crime. When a company does it, "its just good business."

Re:How is Spyware Legal? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14994178)

Why would a store not have a right to spy on you? They already do this anyway. Heard of security cameras? Someone sits in a dark room in the back looking.

If you have a credit/debit card or a store membership card, they do this too.

Your analogy doesn't really fit.. Spyware is something you generally are tricked into installing, deceived into installing, or it is installed without your permission, period, onto YOUR computer. When you are in someone else's store, you don't get to dictate who can and can't peep around while you're buying shampoo and condoms.

Re:How is Spyware Legal? (1)

netsharc (195805) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994456)

By clicking the "I agree" button, you agree to ____


Feel free to put anything in the blank.

Re:How is Spyware Legal? (1)

GregAndreou (732856) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994781)

I thought most supermarkets done that anyway with a loyalty card or some similar scheme. Not sure about Walmart of course as I don't live in the USA.

No crime is complete (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14994042)

until you get away with it...

EDIII (2, Funny)

chigun (770799) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994079)

It's a trick, get an axe.

What a blow to Deutsche Bank (2, Insightful)

Vadim Makarov (529622) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994110)

If I were Deutsche Bank, I'd run from these guys like hell.

Re:What a blow to Deutsche Bank (1)

Hooya (518216) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994293)

they didn't run from SCO either.

Re:What a blow to Deutsche Bank (1)

maelstrom (638) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994679)

Or VALinux

Re:What a blow to Deutsche Bank (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14994673)

"Deutsche"

Well, that name is a little more telling. Since any spyware company are by default "deutsch-bags."

Tricky description... (2, Interesting)

rscoggin (845029) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994116)

'a new platform designed to provide consumers with a personalized Internet experience.' Sounds like they're going to release a browser with inbuilt spyware, like some preconfigured Firefox or something...

Stop. (0, Redundant)

nastro (32421) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994138)

It's a trick. Get an axe.

The criminal is in hideout. (3, Insightful)

ZoOnI (947423) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994167)

I guess this means they won't be liable for any legal actions. I'd like to see a sopena of their records so we can see whom they sold their illegally gotten data. I wonder how many reputable businesses use this kind of info. They have the tools and infrastructure to start another venture on the lawless wild wild web, so we can expect to see them again when the heat is off, if this is more than postering.

Those orgasmic shampoo and conditioner (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14994179)

comercials by claria suck. Good riddance!

Got enough info already (1)

emo boy (586277) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994197)

I guess they've got enough info to make enough of us uncomfortable.

I'm not that naive. (2, Insightful)

Puls4r (724907) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994210)

Sorry, but businesses don't get out of a market to "clean up their name". Something financial was driving this, though I don't know what. Are they scared of litigation, or did their revenue from ads drop? Was google stealing their market?

Re:I'm not that naive. (1)

BCW2 (168187) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994270)

I still have questions about the ability of a dog to change it's spots. I don't trust them since they have lied and sued about this before. I will continue to tell my customers that they are evil.

Suck my balls, Claria (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14994213)

SUck it, suck it, suck it. Ownage. I will kick you in the groin if I ever see you, so that you may live a shameful existance or no existence at all. SUCK-IT.

SUCK IT. And good riddence

Chalk one up for Microsoft (4, Interesting)

republican gourd (879711) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994235)

At first glance, this move on Claria's part seems nonsensical. They are gutting their business model and walking away from a very lucrative source of revenue, all in the name of (more or less) doing the right thing.

Well, here's the rub.

Vista is coming in 2007. Vista is going to have antispyware built directly into the operating system. By 2009, when XP is going to be a minority OS as people's crummy hardware dies (helped along by spyware infestations), there isn't going to be a market for Claria's BS.

They quite simply have no other choice but to cash out what they can and change their profit model. (Of course, this is assuming that the anti-spyware elements of Vista will work at all... but like it or not, MS *does* have a lot of very bright people, and preventing modifications to critical system files *should* be a bit of a no brainer.)

Here's hoping that the party is over.

I'm not so sure (1)

Infonaut (96956) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994313)

Vista is coming in 2007. Vista is going to have antispyware built directly into the operating system. By 2009, when XP is going to be a minority OS as people's crummy hardware dies

Your comment seems highly specualtive. Vista hasn't even been released yet. We have no idea whether the antispyware components built into the OS will actually work in real world usage. Plus, 2009 is three years down the road. Even if Vista was a spyware killer, that gives Claria at least three years to make money with their current business model.

Re:I'm not so sure (1)

techno-vampire (666512) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994410)

Even if Vista was a spyware killer, that gives Claria at least three years to make money with their current business model.

If Vista's anti-spyware works anywhere near as well as NanoLimp claims, Claria will have nothing to sell when it comes out. Selling now, while their software's still effective is just good business sense. They'll still have the algorithms, and the know-how, so it it turns out to be a false alarm, they can start coding new programs to do the same thing.

Vista adoption rate (1)

Infonaut (96956) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994745)

Claria will have nothing to sell when it comes out.

I wonder how long it will take for Vista to be adopted by the majority of the Windows-using population. According to this article [arstechnica.com] , as of last year at this time, only 40% of corporate users were using Windows XP. It could be several years before Vista reaches the point where even half of the Windows market. According to this graph [pcpitstop.com] , about 15% of Windows users still aren't on XP. Of course, the data could be skewed. Still, it makes me think that spyware will be with at least some Windows users (perhaps the least technically-savvy, and therefore least equipped to deal with spyware) for a long time to come.

Re:Chalk one up for Microsoft (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14994335)

I agree with your post to a degree, but this isn't quite true:

"preventing modifications to critical system files *should* be a bit of a no brainer"

Ultimately, you can make it difficult/convoluted to modify system files, but you can't make it impossible unless the computer is DRM-infested from top to bottom -- i.e., a computer outside of the user's control. Because as long as the computer is in the user's control, you guessed it, the computer is in the user's control.

This is a good thing. It means you actually own the computer you buy, and you have some degree of control over whether it's hijacked and used against you. The disadvantage, however, is that social engineering attacks on you, the owner, are possible.

Fear (2, Funny)

Hikaru79 (832891) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994238)

It's not in their press release, but really their CEO is just afraid he's going to have to box with that crazy Russian guy. ;)

So few here get it (0, Troll)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994304)

They are getting out of the ADWARE business. So read it and understand what that means. It means they are staying in the SPYWARE business.

Guess just showing ads in a program doesn't work anymore. /me looks at the top right corner of his opera browser.

Re:So few here get it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14994730)

Guess just showing ads in a program doesn't work anymore. /me looks at the top right corner of his opera browser.

Are you trying to imply that you haven't upgraded in such a long time that your copy of Opera still has ads, or are you implying that Opera also stopped showing ads.

In either case you're trolling.

Adware == adware (2, Insightful)

dpbsmith (263124) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994383)

"The new system will serve up personalized content and advertising to opt-in users."

In other words, adware... ...which is always (claimed to be) opt-in? Usually in a confusing, most people would feel deceptive way, but at some point in the process you have clicked "yes" on a button, with or without having paid any attention to a complicated notice in obfuscated legalese...

Not safe for work? (1)

phathead296 (461366) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994403)

How about putting a "may not be safe for work" warning on that link? It's borderline, but I'm at work and I don't need the boss seeing me looking at a bunch of busty women, even if they are technically clothed.

"I swear, I was reading the article!"

its (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14994405)

Alex Stern writes "In an attempt to clean up it's tarnished name, Claria has hired Deutsche
s/it's/its

I just got a phone call from Hell... (2, Funny)

FusionDragon2099 (799857) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994422)

They said they would like to order one million space heaters. Or one million Intel PCs, whichever is cheaper.

weasel companies must die, not change direction (1)

swschrad (312009) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994424)

and claria aka gator can just freakin' die.

Still sayin' it... (1)

Down8 (223459) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994518)

I think this is the 3rd of 4th time I'll have said it, and still no law suit:

Claria is spyware!

-bZj

Who the hell do they think they're kidding? (1)

geminidomino (614729) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994651)

We didn't fall for the bullshit namechange (that's right, you cocks, we still remember you as "Gator"), what makes them think anyone's going to buy this?

Regarding privacy and supermarket cards... (1)

i_want_you_to_throw_ (559379) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994663)

Don't use your real name..period. How much longer before single fathers have their supermarket data brought into court by upset mothers seeking retribution. "Obviously your honor he is a bad parent. Look at all the junk food he buys the kids".

I just signed up for a loyalty card this morning under the name Bucky Fuller. Other cards have names like Igor Stravinsky, Carl Yastremsky and of course John Cocktosen.

By the way should your cable company or other non-governmental entity need a SSN, use this.
078-05-1120
It's a specimen number from the Eisenhower era and works 99% of the time.

Re:Regarding privacy and supermarket cards... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14994777)

Loyalty card + credit card = they got'cha. Make sure you pay for all of your purchases in cash if you want to keep your name private.

How to disappear...the whole story (3, Funny)

i_want_you_to_throw_ (559379) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994693)

Your inbox is awash in spam, your boss is chuckling over your credit report, and you've got a sneaking suspicion that Uncle Sam counts how many Löwenbräu you chug. Yes, your privacy's shot to hell, and you're tempted to shrug and settle for an open source life. But privacy isn't like virginity, forever lost after the first trespass. With some work, "reprivatization" is possible. Use this three-tiered guide to pick a level of solitude. But be warned: Going all the way off the grid is more Ted Kaczynski than Howard Hughes.

Going

Diss credit: Want to be hard to find? Start by dashing off stern opt-out letters to the big database companies and credit bureaus - Experian, Acxiom, Equifax. These folks may make a mint peddling personal info, but they can be cajoled into stopping. First, though, they'll make you jump through hoops - like filling out a 1040-sized form or idling in toll-free hell. Junkbusters (www.junkbusters.com) has a good list of opt-out addresses.

Anonymize: Ditch your ISP and sign up with a service that lets you surf by proxy, keeping your IP address concealed. Send email via an anonymous remailer like Mixmaster, a digital middleman that scrambles timestamps and message sizes. And if you're going to be advocating the violent overthrow of the government or bragging about your cool new bong, make sure your remailer routes messages through multiple machines.

Grok the fine print: Boring as it sounds, read the privacy statements that clutter your mailbox around tax time and sever ties with companies that admit, "Our privacy policy may change over time" - industry lingo for "We reserve the right to screw you."

Going Further

Ditch the digits:Want to drop out?Start by rustling up a new Social Security number.

The Social Security Administration doesn't accept paranoia as a criterion for granting a new card, but it recognizes cultural objections and religious pleas. One stratagem: Contend that your credit has been irrevocably damaged by a number-related snafu, or that you live in fear of a stalker who knows your digits. Once you switch your SSN, never use it. Instead, dole out 078-05-1120, an Eisenhower-era card that works 99 percent of the time.

Call cell-free: Use the humble pay phone. Mobile phones are being outfitted with global positioning satellite chips to comply with an FCC mandate. By 2006, all wireless networks must feature 911-friendly tracking technology. Marketers are cooking up ways to capitalize, like zapping burger coupons to your Nokia as you stroll by a fast-food joint.

Pay full price: You may relish saving 10 percent on Prell, but deep-six your buyers' club cards. Supermarkets and pharmacies haven't yet perfected the art of data mining, but it won't be long. "If you're having a child custody fight, they could subpoena your frequent-shopper cards and say, 'Look, he's buying too many potato chips, he's hurting the kids,'" says Robert Gellman, a Washington-based privacy consultant.

Gone

Move: Want to go completely off the grid? Start by moving - address changes bedevil databasers. But don't buy a home. All those loan apps will blow your cover. Residential hotels smell like cheap cigars and urine, but at least you can register under a pseudonym. Give a fake address: 3500 S. Wacker, Chicago, IL, 60616 - the front door for Comiskey Park.

Toss your cards:Pay cash for everything, and don't plan on a life of luxury. Any (legal) cash transaction more than $10,000 triggers government reporting regulations, which means you can forget about that Cadillac Escalade you've had your eye on. Settle for the subway or bus, using coins rather than prepaid fare cards, which keep a record of trips.

Go incognito: Facial-recognition gear will soon be ubiquitous in public spaces. To fool the systems, invest in a pair of bulky aviator sunglasses and a hat. If you fear being tailed, alter your gait every time you hit the street - a pigeon-toed shuffle one day, a bowlegged amble the next. There are also Central American plastic surgery mills, beloved of drug lords, that can alter the loops and whorls on your fingertips. It'll set you back 10 Gs, but then, Costa Rican doctors have been known to accept gold Rolexes in lieu of cash.

Re:How to disappear...the whole story (1)

AndreiK (908718) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994892)

It seemed serious until the end there.

New business model?!? (1)

clevershark (130296) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994748)

*Claria's new business model is 'a new platform designed to provide consumers with a personalized Internet experience.'*

Just like a virus Claria's evil will simply mutate into a more, well, virulent and invasive strain which will require new remedies to eradicate. Yay for malware!

'Personalised internet experience' (1)

payndz (589033) | more than 8 years ago | (#14994995)

I find that Firefox and my own set of bookmarks provides exactly that!
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