Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Iceland To Drill Hole Into Volcano

Hemos posted more than 8 years ago | from the tapping-the-earth-for-energy dept.

275

G3ckoG33k writes "BBC reports that Iceland will drill a hole into a volcano so it can tap heat from it, which eventually is hoped to produce commercially available energy. From the article: "Twenty years ago, geologist Gudmundur Omar Friedleifsson had a surprise when he lowered a thermometer down a borehole. 'We melted the thermometer,' he recalls. 'It was set for 380C; but it just melted.'". Excuse me, Gudmundur, but how could that ever have been a 'surprise'..."

cancel ×

275 comments

Warn Iceland! (5, Funny)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002011)

Don't they realize that Volcanic Energy has directly caused more deaths [pbs.org] than Nuclear Energy?

When will people learn that there is no safe form [phillyburbs.com] of energy?!

The volcano gods are gonna be so angered when they find out Iceland is mooching the heat. If I know my mythology, nothing (and I mean nothing) pisses a god off like free stuff for humans. We should just rename Iceland to New Pompeii right now.

Re:Warn Iceland! (2, Funny)

fatduck (961824) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002044)

Wait till some genius pitches his idea to the board of directors that they could get so much more energy from the volcano if they induced an eruption!

Re:Warn Iceland! (5, Funny)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002077)

Setting: Two men in suits with charts stand before an Icelandic government committee.

Pitch Guy 1: "Boy it sure is cold out today! Now, I know this sounds a little far out there, but we've been studying the volcano over there and we predict that it has energy equivalent to 20 million tons of TNT. Now that energy is, by our god given right, ours. It's just as valuable as the oil underneath the Middle East. So, we induce an eruption."

Pitch Guy 2: "It's that simple. But John, won't the people be mad that the government is getting all this free energy?"

Pitch Guy 1: "No, no, here's the best part. That energy will be distributed ... equally."

Pitch Guy 2: "Gentlemen, I think the real question here today is, 'How can we afford not to induce an eruption?'"

Re:Warn Iceland! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15002502)

Those american style advertisements, really suck.

Re:Warn Iceland! (0)

RicktheBrick (588466) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002749)

Do we know that by drilling a hole in the volcano that we might induce a super explosion that would cover a large part of the world with ash. It has happened several times in Wyoming in the past several million years. What about cooling off the earth's core. Maybe we will lose our magnetic field and be subject to the huge amounts of radiation the sun throws at the Earth every day. I do not believe that by drilling a hundred thousand hole we could cool the Earth's core by even a degree or that we might reduce the pressure and thus avoid a super explosion but than again I am not an expert and I doubt there exist such an expert who could guarantee that a negative effect would not occur.

Re:Warn Iceland! (2, Funny)

maximthemagnificent (847709) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002079)

Of course, so has fossil fuel energy.

Re:Warn Iceland! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15002103)

How do you translate : 'Get a Big Damn Cork first'
into Icelandic ?

Re:Warn Iceland! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15002164)

Journey to the center of the earth !
Using the whole Island as a down only elevator !!

Re:Warn Iceland! (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15002205)

Actually geothermal enery has been used commercially for decades in Italy:
just search for "soffioni boraciferi" and larderello.
They never had any sort of trouble except for the smell in the air (due to the sulfur)
but this was there anyway;)

Re:Warn Iceland! (1)

AviLazar (741826) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002456)

I guess they don't remember that movie (I forget the name actually) where the people tried to drop a nuclear bomb down a long tunnel to crack the earth's core to tap the nuclear energy. All hell broke loose, and all that was left was one guy and one girl. I sure hope the girl is hot and I am the one guy.

Re:Warn Iceland! (0)

Jafafa Hots (580169) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002589)

The real danger is that we become as addicted to geothermal as we are to oil, and use it up like we have used up the oil... the earth's rotating molten iron core cools and freezes, the magnetic field disappears, so the Van Allen belts fade away, and we all fry from cosmic radiation!

Deep Thought by Jack Handy (3, Funny)

The Snowman (116231) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002017)

If you ever drop your car keys in lava, forget it man, they're gone.

Re:Deep Thought by Jack Handy (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15002169)

Giggity Giggity Goo!

Re:Deep Thought by Jack Handy (4, Funny)

KiloByte (825081) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002340)

Worse, I've even heard a story of a guy who had his ring dropped in lava, HE was gone!

Doctor Who (5, Funny)

lisaparratt (752068) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002026)

Do they not watch Doctor Who in Iceland?

It'll be green skinned monsters and parallel universes before you know it!

Re:Doctor Who (5, Informative)

Trestran (715384) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002096)

And for those of you wondering exactly what the hell he is talking about: Inferno [gallifreyone.com] , a Doctor Who story, in the first season of the third Doctor. It's pretty decent Who story, where a similar experiment ends up blowing up the world (they drill completely through to the crust though). Which the Doctor witnesses in a parralel universe, so he can warn his own universe of the dangers of the experiment. Throw some weird green hairy zombies in, to make sure you do not forget it is Doctor Who. :P

After watching Doctor Who for the first time with the new series last year, I've actually started going through all the old Doctor Who stories I never saw in chronological order, and boy is there a lot of (26 seasons, to be precise). And I just happened to have watch Inferno yesterday, so it is fresh on my mind, and was actually the first thing I thought of when I saw this newsbit also. :)

Consequent sartorial change (1)

Burb (620144) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002137)

Wear eyepatches! Remember, UNITY is strength! [bbc.co.uk]

Watch Dr. Who? Sure they do!! (0)

Savage-Rabbit (308260) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002309)

Do they not watch Doctor Who in Iceland?

It'll be green skinned monsters and parallel universes before you know it!


The Icelanders already have both of those, the green skinned monsters work for the local Internal Revenue Service and the Parallel Universe management is handeld by the state Lutheran church.

Geothermal power is really important (5, Interesting)

BadAnalogyGuy (945258) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002027)

I took a field trip once to the local hydroelectric dam and learned all about how hydro is safe and clean and provides a large recreational grounds after the water has accumulated behind the dam. It was pretty cool.

Now if they can build a geothermal plant that actually improves the landscape, I think they are on to something. Free energy ceases to be free when you ruin the surrounding area with ugly power plants.

Re:Geothermal power is really important (4, Insightful)

Overzeetop (214511) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002058)

Yeah, pretty cool until you find out that there are environmental consequnces to dramatically altering a river basin. Not that the drawbacks always outweigh the benefits, but it's not exactly the "free energy and waterskiing nirvana" that the tour promoters would like you to see. Remember - it's in their financial interest to build hydroelectric plants, there's a conflict of interest.

Oh, and if anyone wants to decide to build a dam near me, just make sure that you give me the heads up so that I can buy a few thousand acres of future waterfront before the prices go way up. (Hey, for the kind of money we're talking, I'll play the game, too!)

Re:Geothermal power is really important (2, Interesting)

arivanov (12034) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002208)

I would second that.

Just look at Russia, it has the largest hydro deployment in the world now and the results are not pretty. River deltas are drying, there are massive changes to the environment, climate which was as healthy as a climate can get 100 years ago has become practically lethal in many places. A big hydroelectric tends to keep the river right after it open all winter. As a result the humidity goes into the 100% condensing range which when the outside temperature is around -40 is outright deadly. It is not pretty when the outside temperature is above 25 either.

There are very few places in the world where a hydroelectric is environmentally safe and economically sound.

Re:Geothermal power is really important (1)

BobTheLawyer (692026) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002311)

Out of interest, why is it deadly to have 100% humidity in very cold weather?

Re:Geothermal power is really important (2, Informative)

Dan Ost (415913) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002419)

Humidity raises the specific heat of the air, effectively making it a better heat conductor. 30 degrees with 60% humidity is far more dangerous than 0 degrees with 20% humidity. Combine high humidity with wind chill and things get downright lethal very quickly.

I grew up in North Dakota and have fond memories of scraping ice off my windshield while wearing boxers at below zero (with no wind or humidity). I would never consider doing that here in Tennessee 'cuz 29 degrees with 60% humidity is COLD!

Re:Geothermal power is really important (5, Insightful)

gcranston (901577) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002094)

There's a host of problems with hydroelectric that rarely get talked about. Damming the river slows the water, reducing the size of sediment it can transport. This causes all the sediment from upstream to settle out at the inlet to the dam resevoir, raising the bed level drastically. Changes in the river like this are detrimental to fish and plats in the river, and have also grounded many boats. This is why very few hydroelectric dams have been built in North America and Europe in the past few decades. For these and a host of ethical reasons (like displacing a couple MILLION people), the Three Gorges Dam should never have been built in China.

I'm not aware of any of these kinds of issues with geothermal (I really do support the idea), but then I don't know that much about the technology. Just pointing out that hydroelectric is far from 'free' when you build dams to do it. The thing is not everyone has something the size of Niagara Falls to generate power from. (Even then , Niagara does not acount for very much of Ontario's total power generation.)

Re:Geothermal power is really important (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15002122)

Dear G Cranston:

Nobody gives a fuck what you have to say.

Your big fat opinion is worth nothing.

Seat down and shut up.

With Warmest Regards,
Purina Dog Chow

Re:Geothermal power is really important (1)

jimbolauski (882977) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002259)

The people that get displaced are reimbersed for their properties at or above market value in non dictatorship countries. The reason hydroplants have not been built reciently in the US has less to do with the enviroment and more to do with the money to build one. Buying all the property and paying for all the court costs when some owners do not want to sell means there is a significant overhead before anything gets built, not to mention all the bribes, I mean campain contributions, to politicians to get approvial.

Re:Geothermal power is really important (1)

JollyFinn (267972) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002261)

There's a host of problems with hydroelectric that rarely get talked about. Damming the river slows the water, reducing the size of sediment it can transport. This causes all the sediment from upstream to settle out at the inlet to the dam resevoir, raising the bed level drastically. Changes in the river like this are detrimental to fish and plats in the river, and have also grounded many boats. This is why very few hydroelectric dams have been built in North America and Europe in the past few decades.

As far as europe goes the hydroelectric dams are not build not because enviromental conserns but because all the best locations for them are already taken. There is no point of building one in flat country. And because the land for water reservoir costs a lot in many places.

TANSTAAFL (1)

way2trivial (601132) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002421)

http://www.epa.gov/cleanrgy/renew.htm#geothermal [epa.gov] land can sink in
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0298814/ [imdb.com] the core could stop rotating

Personally, the one lesson I've learned in life, is that NOTHING is without consequences.
Make a simple change to make something easier, you may find you've made something else harder...

The fact is, nothing is 'without' issues.. they just may not be readily apparent before they are present.
and they may be disasters....

Re:Geothermal power is really important (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15002193)

Yep, Hydro power is completely safe!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banqiao_Dam [wikipedia.org]

Re:Geothermal power is really important (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15002195)

The waste heat from one geothermal plant in Iceland goes right next door, to a "hot springs" spa.

Re:Geothermal power is really important (1)

Churla (936633) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002410)

Ah yes... I can see it now.

Come to beautiful Iceland and enjoy jetskiing on our lovely LAKE OF FIERY LAVA!

It works for me, should be a sure fire thing to do.

But what happens when they start exporting this energy and in 20 years we're depleting our planets natrual heat supplies? Will this help counteract the global warming being caused by well... depleting our other natrual resources?

When will a celebrity champion this cause so it can finally make sense to me?!?

Re:Geothermal power is really important (1)

Cat_Byte (621676) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002713)

Will this help counteract the global warming being caused by well... depleting our other natrual resources?
Sure it will. We eventually tilt the balance and a supervolcano covers the world with a cloud of ash inpenetrable by the sun. When it's all over, humans = oil for the dinosaurs ;)

Fire Coming Out Of The Monkey's Head (2, Interesting)

fatduck (961824) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002029)

In other news, Icelandic scientists have set up a network of precisely timed explosive devices in a tunnel into the heart of the volcano in order to harvest billions of dollars worth of "blue diamonds" extremely useful for use in electronics.

Yeah, right...drill a hole in a volcano! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15002036)

hahaha April 1st is a bit early this year, eh?
What's next...send a "man to the moon"
or maybe "cure smallpox"
hahahaha

You technology-worshippers make me laugh.

btw, I'm posting this using Gods own tools: sticks, bits of bone fragments, and moss.

Surprise (4, Funny)

Tibor the Hun (143056) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002037)

It was a surprise because his hypothesis was that they would find thetans living there.

Re:Surprise (2, Insightful)

Bueller_007 (535588) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002265)

I assume you got your information from a recent South Park episode.

FYI, nobody was lowered into a volcano. Nuclear bombs were placed into the volcanoes, 75 million people were placed around the edges of the volcanoes,
and the bombs were subsequently detonated.

The rest of the story is "correct". The disembodied souls (called thetans) were then sucked up into vacuums and forced into cinemas to watch brain-watching movies.

So there you go. I guess you could say that my version of the fake truth is more true than your version of the fake truth.

well hot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15002038)

" Excuse me, Gudmundur, but how could that ever have been a 'surprise'..."

It's quite warm for boiling water...

Tagging is fun (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15002063)

I tagged this as "iceland" and "boring"

Re:Tagging is fun (1)

Nevynxxx (932175) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002136)

Tagged Icaland, the boring becoms redundant. As does "mad". At least judging from the one and only icelandic person I have ever met.

Re:Tagging is fun (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15002396)

They're boring a hole in a volcano, iceland! boring!

Apologies to Futurama... (2, Funny)

mcsestretch (926118) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002067)

Here's a transcript from the experiment:

Leela: OW! Fire hot!

Farnsworth: The professy will help. AAAH! Fire indeed hot.

Re:Apologies to Futurama... (1)

chrismcdirty (677039) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002133)

Professor. Lava. Hot.

Lesson Learned (4, Funny)

Scarletdown (886459) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002089)

"Twenty years ago, geologist Gudmundur Omar Friedleifsson had a surprise when he lowered a thermometer down a borehole. 'We melted the thermometer,' he recalls. 'It was set for 380C; but it just melted.'"


He should have known better than to try to take a volcano god's temperature rectally.

Re:Lesson Learned (1)

spaztik (917859) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002134)

"He should have known better than to try to take a volcano god's temperature rectally." He should have at least warmed up the thermometer beforehand. The volcano god gets very irritated with a cold thermometer up the bum.

RTFA (5, Informative)

Hakubi_Washu (594267) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002354)

The summary is bullshit, even by /. standards. They were drilling for conventional geothermal energy, that is water heated by a lava flow nearby (extremely common in Iceland). Given the high pressure they were expecting high temperatures (the quoted 380) and still liquid water (due to the pressure). What was surprising is the fact that the water was probably more than 500 and actually melted the thermometer. Given this discovery (aka The water in this depth is much hotter than previously calculated) it makes perfect sense to a) explore the reasons for the higher temperature and b) use that for a more efficient power plant. There's no volcanoes involved at all.

Re:RTFA (1)

ozbon (99708) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002488)

I'd suggest RTFA yourself - paragraph 1:

"Geologists in Iceland are drilling directly into the heart of a hot volcano."

Hmmm, I'd say that the story involved a volcano, and thus the summary is fairly well on-target.

Watch Out (-1, Redundant)

Comatose51 (687974) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002100)

"The landscape on the Reykjanes Ridge in southwest Iceland seems like an alien world."

Well duh, it was obviously inhabited by Thetans.

Dr. Evil (2, Funny)

xx_toran_xx (936474) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002105)

Oh, yes, they /say/ that it's for an energy source.

I have a feeling they just want to create an evil lair.

Re:Dr. Evil (1)

BigCheese (47608) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002699)

Oooohhhh. Evil lair with hot chicks in jumpsuits, and guards with machine guns and poor aim. If it's a really good evil lair there will be lava pools with catwalks over them.

Iceland (1)

Oldsmobile (930596) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002106)

Iceland might be a small island with a pithly 200 000 people and super-expensive beer, but they sure have plenty of energy. No wonder they do energy intensive things like process aluminum and grow lots of vegies in greenhouses.

Wouldn't want to live there tho.

Re:Iceland (1)

slavemowgli (585321) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002399)

Iceland might be a small island with a pithly 200 000 people [...]

Actually, the 300,000th Icelander was born not long ago.

Re:Iceland (1)

spellraiser (764337) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002443)

Come on, there's 300 thousand of us now, as of sometime earlier this year. This was a huge national event that was celebrated, well, not by drinking beer, since you're right about that - beer is more expensive than energy here. Gas prices are also about three times higher than in America, so as you'd imagine the cost of living is quite high - I mean, you have to pay through your nose to fuel your car, AND to fuel yourself. *Rim shot*

But seriously, most of our energy comes from dams, which are getting bigger and more numerous, much to the dismay of many environmentalists here. As you point out, a lot of the energy goes into aluminum processing - in fact, all of the energy from the dam at Kárahnjúkar [karahnjukar.is] will be used for yet another aluminum smelter. Now that the Americans are closing down their Navy Base [navy.mil] at Keflavík, there is discussion over planting a new smelter there or expanding the one that's there already to generate jobs instead of the ones that will be lost in that area. This seems to be the goverment's standard solution for any employment problems, anywhere - just build an aluminum smelter. But now I risk sounding overly political, so I'll stop. Regional politics in Iceland are probably not something that interest a lot of people.

Re:Iceland (1)

aztec rain god (827341) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002691)

Ever wonder if beer were cheaper, there would be more of you? (Ugly people need love, too)

Umm volcanic eduptions anyone? (2, Funny)

fernandoh26 (963204) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002112)

Ok so how long before the volcano erupts and utterly destroys a multi million dollar power plant built on its side with earthquake action/lava flow/pyroclastic flow? Even if this were an inactive volcano, those things can randomly become active, spelling doom for the poor saps who would be staffing the power plant (not to mention the millions of dollars down the drain when your spiffy new power plant goes up in smoke, literally). This is your power plant *shows picture of power plant* This is your power plant on a volcano *shows picture of puff of smoke* Questions?

Re:Umm volcanic eduptions anyone? (1)

fusto99 (939313) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002242)

That's easy, go go gadget lava legs!

Re:Umm volcanic eduptions anyone? (1)

Drakonite (523948) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002382)

Even if this were an inactive volcano, those things can randomly become active

Especially when you go messing with it's stability by drilling holes in it and altering it's integrity by drawing energy from it...

Re:Umm volcanic eduptions anyone? (2, Insightful)

milosoftware (654147) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002487)

This is your power plant on a safe distance of a volcano *shows picture of obviously long ago abandoned plant* Questions?

Simple math.

People build a plant there because multiplying the chance of total disaster with the cost of such disaster comes out much smaller than the expected revenue.

Shocking discovery! (3, Funny)

10Ghz (453478) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002115)

Nation to drill a hole in a volcano. Lava discovered. News at eleven!

Re:Shocking discovery! (1)

mikeage (119105) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002366)

Nation to drill a hole in a volcano. Lava discovered. News at eleven!

You left off the best part. Next day: "Nation drills hole in volcano. Nation disappears. Lots of new lava found."

I've seen this movie... (0)

afernie (915570) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002121)

Doctor Evil did it.

Re:I've seen this movie... (1)

unuselessj (686973) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002146)

This just in: World being held for ten million dollar ransom.

Re:I've seen this movie... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15002531)

And they did it:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crack_in_the_world [wikipedia.org]

fun and games (1)

AcidLacedPenguiN (835552) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002127)

Yeah, its all fun and games until somebody loses an eye! to searing hot magma no less.

Rock is a good insulator (4, Interesting)

gregor-e (136142) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002155)

Trouble with extracting geothermal energy is that rock is a pretty good insulator. Once you get the first enthusiastic bout of steam and have cooled a few feet of rock around your pipe, the heat leaches back in very slowly. Unless they can create and sustain a lava tube that is constantly eroding in the presence of circulating magma, (or use a heat exchanger in constantly circulating hot water), this is unlikely to be successful.

Re:Rock is a good insulator (1)

jgc7 (910200) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002348)

You are forgetting that lava rock is very porous.

Thanks! (1)

p3d0 (42270) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002350)

Thanks for bringing this up. I'm sure they never thought of any of these points.

Re:Rock is a good insulator (1)

hublan (197388) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002590)

You, sir, have obviously no idea what you're talking about.

A volcano erupted on an island off the south coast of Iceland [wikipedia.org] in 1973. After the eruption, they drilled several holes in lava and have been heating up the town, and providing hot water, ever since by that exact same method.

Re:Rock is a good insulator (2, Informative)

Nafets (776888) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002724)

You seem to assume that the rock down there is dry. The fact of the matter is that the rock has lots and lots of fractures and tiny tunnels through which water flows. The water, or steam, flows to the surface and there the energy is extracted from it. Like the article says they have already gone down to 3,082m and are now conducting flow tests, which means they are seeing how much water is coming up the hole. Of course there is the possibility that the waterflow is below a certain threshold which would render the hole economically unviable, but there is certainly no magma being moved or circulated anywhere either. More information about IDDP : http://jardhitafelag.is.nyud.net:8080/papers/PDF_S ession_06/S06Paper122.pdf [nyud.net]

Water wet (2, Funny)

smoor (961352) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002171)

In other news, scientists in New Zealand were surprised to discover that a moisture probe the had developed capable of measuring humidity from 0-90% malfunctioned after being lowered into a mysterious salty substance found at the edge of the island.

Due to the malfunctioning instrument, scientists are still unsure about what this salty liquid mixture could be.

Re:Water wet (1)

BigCheese (47608) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002720)

Ummm, could it be Peter Jackson?

Wind Turbine replacement? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15002177)

If they perfect this in Iceland, perhaps the UK government could look into converting some mountains into Volcano's... it may be a solution to keep all those mountain folk who don't want Wind Turbines in their back yard off their backs!

Sulfer is good... (1)

ShyGuy91284 (701108) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002185)

I can attest to this..... Growing up, I didn't take the best care of my teeth, but lived on an older house with a well system that didn't have the best water softener system (tubs had rust caked on, the water smelt like sulfer). The thing is, I never got a single cavity. With how I ate, that is the only way I can explain my lack of cavities.

Re:Sulfer is good... (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002316)

A lot of stuff to do with cavities has nothing to do with how well you brush your teeth. I also took pretty bad care of my teeth as a child, but my water was regular city water, low in sulphur. I take better care of my teeth now, but I still find it amazing that I got by without any cavities. Other people I know took very meticulous care of their teeth, flossing, and did all the right stuff. They still get regular cavities. I'm not sure of the cause, as IANADentist, but it may have something to do with genetics, or something else, who knows...

Re:Sulfer is good... (1)

AngelofDeath-02 (550129) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002722)

Possibly flouride suppliments they put into drinking water?

Your friend may be drinking less water, or bottled.

Iceland To Drill Hole Into Volcano, to be Renamed (1)

digitaldc (879047) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002186)

...Waterland

Lead scientist Dr. Tom Hanks (2, Funny)

Rob T Firefly (844560) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002188)

volunteered to lead the team for personal reasons. [imdb.com]

What....? (1)

anupamsr (910397) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002197)

Volcano in Iceland?... sorry... Drill in Volcano?

Re:What....? (1)

Hakubi_Washu (594267) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002319)

Iceland is green, Greenland is ice...

Re:What....? (1)

BigCheese (47608) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002744)

Yes, and that made elementary school geography that much harder.
Then there was that Mr. Spock - Dr. Spock thing...

Ahhhh! I'm going back to my happy place.

Entrance to Hell (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15002203)

If they dig deeper they can find http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diablo_(computer_game ) [wikipedia.org] Diablos lair

+6 energy and minerals! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15002214)

This reminds me of the Sid Meier's Alpha Centauri improvement of similar name. The idea for that was to drill a hole deep into the earth and harvest the metals and massive heat energy.

Re:+6 energy and minerals! (1)

Wise Dragon (71071) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002408)

In the borehole pressure mines 100km beneath Planetsurface, at the Mohorovicic Discontinuity where crust gives way to mantle, temperatures often reach levels well in excess of 1000 degrees Celsius. Exploitation of Planet's resources under such brutal conditions has required quantum advances in robotic and teleoperational technology.

Morgan Industries, Ltd.
"Annual Report"

Funny story (0)

LoonyMike (917095) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002221)

Anyone else noticed how most comments posted are modded Funny?

I guess I'll keep in the mood then:
The thermometer must have tickled the gods

Funnys (1)

irimi_00 (962766) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002229)

Does anyone else notice that there is a unusually high proportion of funny comments to not funny comments at 5:30 in the morning? Correlation? Coincedence? ??? Maybe I'm tired.

Journey to the center of the earth (1)

xynopsis (224788) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002240)

Finally scientists prove that drilling a hole inside the volcano might somehow get us to the center of the earth!

"Surprise" easy to explain... (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15002244)

Okay. Everybody's joking about it, but here's the solution to the puzzle of the "surprising" heat: that's 380+ Celcius *WATER*, not lava. The area being studied is on the sea floor or kilometres beneath the land surface, and the water is under great pressure. As a result, it gets much hotter than surface water, without boiling. Sometimes the "water" in the sea floor close to these volcanic areas is a supercritical fluid -- beyond the temperature-pressure conditions for distinct gaseous and liquid phases.

Supercritical water is pretty exotic stuff in power systems. There are some advanced fossil-fuel power stations that use it, and supercritical nuclear power systems are being developed. They offer higher thermal efficiencies. In Iceland, they might be able to get the same thing going, but with renewable geothermal sources, which would be great, but first they have to tame some pretty extreme conditions in the boreholes.

Re:"Surprise" easy to explain... (2, Funny)

Antifuse (651387) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002637)

The term "supercritical nuclear power" scares me.

I've read this book (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15002288)

Someone should tell them, Jules Verne wrote fiction...

Mad scientists drill hole in side of volcano (1)

Centurix (249778) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002292)

What could possibly go wrong?

There must be loads of energy inside a black hole, we just need to send in a spaceship to go get it.

Stop me, please... (0, Offtopic)

smoor (961352) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002326)

In Soviet Russia, temperature measures YOU...

Yellowstone park (2, Interesting)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002417)

Hopefully, if this works, we will start more taps in wyoming/montana around Yellowstone park. I realize that some will worry that we would tap too much heat out, but if we work from the outside, it is doubtful that we could change Old Faithful. It is time that we take advantage of none destuctive alternatives such as this (as well as nukes).

Re:Yellowstone park (3, Informative)

Bob3141592 (225638) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002585)

Hopefully, if this works, we will start more taps in wyoming/montana around Yellowstone park. I realize that some will worry that we would tap too much heat out, but if we work from the outside, it is doubtful that we could change Old Faithful. It is time that we take advantage of none destuctive alternatives such as this (as well as nukes).

It is a good idea, and of less concern than you think. Geothermal energy should be exploited more, but it's uncommon to find a good natural source with a configuration that makes it economically feasible to exploit.

However, your comment about geysers is incorrect. Geysers form under very peculiar circumstances, needing long vertical shafts with interveening chambers of a certain geometry. Under more common conditions you only get hot springs or boiling mud pots. Geysers are spectacular and rare for a reason. Also, Old Faithful hasn't been since an earthquake in 1998. Faithful, that is. It used to go off like regular clockwork, but now it's much more sporatic. In general, geysers often simply stop erupting, most commonly because mineral deposits change their geometry or choke off their vents. Earthquakes, ubiquitous in regions with geysers, are another major factor. Fascinating objects, really, and worth a closer look.

Re:Yellowstone park (2, Interesting)

Eccles (932) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002591)

Given that Yellowstone is a potential supervolcano, one wonders if tapping the energy there would reduce or increase the chances of it becoming one. It might work as a safety valve, or might trigger changes that accelerate the process -- or might just be like a match in an already raging forest fire.

Don't drill there!!! (1)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002426)

Foolish scientists! Don't they understand what sort of fury they'll unleash?!? [amightywind.com]

Thats really very cool (1)

jerryodom (904532) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002431)

I wasn't aware that people were running geothermal power stations but I guess I don't spend quite enough time reading popular science or watching Discovery. Up into this article I thought Geothermal energy use was just something they did on one Stargate Atlantis episode. *sigh* I need to catch up.

Names! (2, Funny)

slavemowgli (585321) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002439)

Feel free to mod this off-topic, but... can't we *please* try to get the names right? The man's called Guðmundur Ómar Friðleifsson, not Gudmundur Omar Friedleifsson. (I've written about this before [slashdot.org] , too.)

Yeah, I know, the summary's just copied from the BBC article, and the BBC makes the same mistake (and even calls him "Friedleifsson" instead of "Fridleifsson"), but shouldn't Slashdot try to maintain a higher standard of quality than the BBC? ...OK, I give up, I can't say that last line without laughing. But jokes aside, it still would be nice if the editors actually took the 30 seconds it takes to, y'know, *edit* a story.

Beware the wrath of Xenu the Scientology god. (1, Funny)

Joh_Fredersen (883311) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002460)

As is clearly shown here... all who dare to defy Xenu shall be subsumed by a wave of his volcanic wrath.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xenu [wikipedia.org]

Tom Cruise respects the power of Xenu.
John Travolta respects the power of Xenu.
Sonny Bono respects the power of Xenu.

http://www.adherents.com/largecom/fam_scientologis t.html [adherents.com]

Björk also shall join this venerated list....

It is only a matter of time.

Re:Beware the wrath of Xenu the Scientology god. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15002631)

Sony Bono respected the power of Xenu until a tree killed him. FEAR THE TREES!

High Temp Drills (1)

olddotter (638430) | more than 8 years ago | (#15002636)

I wonder if they will be surprised when the drill begins to melt? :-)

Seriously this just sounds like a bad idea if there is significant population anywhere near there. I'm not a geologist, but I'm not impressed that they were suprised by the thermometer melting either. (Perhaps thats just bad reporting/translation.)

power stations (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15002641)

Iceland is already littered with geothermal power stations, producing most of the country's electricity from steam at around 240C, extracted from boreholes between 600 and 1,000m deep.
That's not correct. Actually there's only one (I think) power station producing electricity from steam. Most of the countrys electricity comes from water power in ordinary dams. There are geothermal stations in a lot of places, but these use the hot water to heat houses.

Gudmundur

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...