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What is the Best Calendar?

CmdrTaco posted more than 8 years ago | from the something-to-talk-about dept.

309

An anonymous reader writes "In the flurry of AJAX applications being put to market, Google's new calendar has been getting quite a bit of attention. But being drowned out in this media blitz is Kiko, a startup from Paul Graham's Y Combinator program, along with spongecell, Trumba, Yahoo! calendar, and 30boxes. Which do you prefer?" Update: 04/16 14:55 GMT by Z : YCombinator link fixed.

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309 comments

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Easy... (-1, Offtopic)

Brent Spiner (919505) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137835)

crond, echo, and vi!

Veiled ad for Kiko? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15137863)

seems so to me.

Re:Veiled ad for Kiko? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15138042)

YCombinator is full of ripped-off shit.

http://www.hipcal.com/ [hipcal.com] is the best omline-calendar IMO: 100% AJAX-free, no shittalking developers who think they themselves invented the internet, no Digg-monkeys in the forum, wetting their pants because they think GOOG's calendar is "omg lol so much more better omg lol" while fondling their genitals (without much success, being ADD-morons and such).

Mayan (5, Funny)

bj8rn (583532) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137836)

No doubt about it.

or any other not needing adjustment (1)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137916)

The chinese calendar or other lunar calendar needs no adjustment like our stupid one

Re:or any other not needing adjustment (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15137941)

What about UNIX time?

Re:Mayan (2, Funny)

sunwolf (853208) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137942)

Ours doesn't even predict the end of the world in 6 years. Lame.

Offline (5, Funny)

Mattygfunk1 (596840) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137838)

I've got a sexy Drew Barrymore calander which works for me.

Re:Offline (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15137894)

Intersting choice of words to apply to your original ET merchandise. I hope you don't work with kids.

Re:Offline (1, Funny)

tpgp (48001) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137904)

I've got a sexy Drew Barrymore calander which works for me.

Sorry, it's either a sexy calender or a Drew Barrymore calender - can't be both.

Re:Offline (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15137947)

Unless he has a shiny paper fetish.

Re:Offline (1)

UHBo2 (665759) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137985)

aghh shiny paper......

Re:Offline (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15138060)

Ah, I know what kind of calendar [stade.fr] you must like then, no need to thank me for the link.

WebCalendar (3, Informative)

Masa (74401) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137840)

http://webcalendar.sourceforge.net/ [sourceforge.net] It's stable and it does everything a web calendar should do.

Re:WebCalendar (1)

nottoogeeky (869124) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137931)

it's fugly. i hate fugliness!

Re:WebCalendar (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15138093)

Well, this does not keep you from using Slashdot, obviously.

iCal (5, Insightful)

generic-man (33649) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137841)

I like iCal. Of all the calendars listed, iCal works the best when I'm in an airport and I don't want to spend $8 for Internet access during a 1-hour layover. :)

Re:iCal (1)

KinkoBlast (922676) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137858)

Seconded. Too bad iCal is Mac-Only, eh?

Re:iCal (1)

Fred_A (10934) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137899)

Of course not. ical runs on anything [annexia.org] (well, any Unix at least). And you can use it on any X11 enabled display of course.

Re:iCal (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15137957)

WRONG. iCal is a Mac app you fucking idiot.

Re:iCal (1)

KinkoBlast (922676) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137982)

He said iCal, not ical. iCal is an application, released by Apple, for Mac OS X. ical is some tcl/tk calender. Personaly, I just go with Sunbird everywhere else - it's rough around the edges (OK, the center is rough too :P) but meh.

Julian (2, Funny)

AnalystX (633807) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137842)

Like *NIX, it just works.

That is easy (1)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137843)

Lunar all the way!

Evaluating truth (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15137844)

(Paul Graham (is a ((software patent) troll)) wanabee)

Integration (4, Interesting)

thsths (31372) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137845)

I would prefer any calender that integrates properly with my email client. Why is that so difficult? If I receive an invitation (from Outlook Express or Evolution or what not), I want to be able to accept it right there, without saving it first and then importing it into the calender.

Mozilla Calendar cannot do it, Yahoo Mail fails the test, even Gmail does not integration (or I haven't figure out how to switch it on). The only program that really does this is evolution (and of course Outlook). For all the other, it should be back to the drawing board.

Re:Integration (2, Interesting)

silverdr (779097) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137910)

iCal with Mail.app allows that quite easily, although you have to dobule-click the invitation first.

Re:Integration (1)

Amendt (802679) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137917)

I made a test page at http://hythe.ca/events.html [hythe.ca] and it allows anyone to add the community supper this week to their google calendar. And everything exports from google calendar to my KOrganizer, so I am happy. P.S. If you want to come to our community supper you are welcome :)

Re:Integration (2, Insightful)

gmuslera (3436) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137977)

Integration is the key, and gmail calendar just saw the light. As with gtalk, maybe in few time we could see it integrated in ways we didnt expect into gmail or google services in general.

Is not what actually have what matters me more, is the potential future, so doing raw comparisions right now could be unfair. With future integration in mind, i think that either yahoo or gmail will be the best for their respective mail users.

Re:Integration (1)

Jessta (666101) | more than 8 years ago | (#15138032)

A calendar should also integrate with Instant messaging, PDA, SmartPhone, Watch, Web browser, Email client, Home Phone, as well as integrating with everyone elses calendar.

Re:Integration (1)

Brice21 (763827) | more than 8 years ago | (#15138072)

Just like ContactOffice which integrate webmail and group calendar : http://www.contactoffice.com/ [contactoffice.com]

link (1)

joe 155 (937621) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137846)

fix the link to google calender, its calendar.google.com

Um.. (1)

iamdead (964713) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137948)

Actually it's http://calendar.google.com/ [google.com] :) If you insert just "calendar.google.com" into the anchor tag, then you'll end up with current URL...

Discretion (3, Interesting)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137849)

I prefer a 3-tier calendar, with standard presentation protocols in the UI layer (iCal, vCal, etc), arbitrary logic in the logic layer, and any storage server I want in the storage layer (RDBMS, filesystem, etc). Each in a separate component, with standard interfaces. I like Open-Xchange [open-xchange.org] , open source, Java, Postgres, many APIs. But even OX has problems, like a contacts DB ghettoized in a separate BerkeleyDB storage layer for its OpenLDAP server, rather than storing it in the same Postgres. All these apps should have completely discrete components, with minimum functional redundancy, and easily addable objects (in Java, Perl, C/C++, whatever) that can access every API and dataflow. Since there are so many calendar clients, calendaring needs that utility the most.

I was using Google's until (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15137851)

I discovered some of the months have an extra day! Yes, 31 days! And February only has 28, except for (strangely) some years when it has 29! Sloppy coding on Google's part.

None do what is required to displace Exchange. (5, Insightful)

Shayde (189538) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137852)

I've been hammering through this problem for the last 5 years, trying to find a group scheduling and calendaring application that has the capabilities of Exchange. It's important to note that there is a big difference between 'calendaring' apps (such as 30boxes and Yahoo Calendar and the like), and 'scheduling', where an interactive application can review a persons or groups schedule, and then add things to their calendar.

As far as I've been able to tell, nothing does the group scheduling other than Exchange in any decent form. The best most can do is publish ICS files into a public server, and then make them available for public browsing (say, via phpicalendar), or available for remote subscription (which Evolution, et al supports).

The golden calf for opensource would be an application that supports client-server group calendaring and scheduling, with PDA synchronizing, and multi-platform support. The only thing even remotely moving in this direction is CalDAV, which AFAICT, is moving at a glacial pace.

Until this problem is resolved, there is no defense against "Why don't we just use Exchange for this?"

Re:None do what is required to displace Exchange. (1)

Dibble203 (604928) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137878)

I've found that using Kontact, you can use group scheduling without an exchange server. It just sends emails for any of the changes made to the event.

Re:None do what is required to displace Exchange. (1)

generic-man (33649) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137937)

Does Kontact support free-busy sharing? Outlook/Exchange does and Outlook will also publish free-busy times to a WebDAV server without an Exchange server. Free-busy sharing lets you say "I want to meet with John, Mike, and Mary... when are they all free tomorrow?"

Re:None do what is required to displace Exchange. (1)

Shayde (189538) | more than 8 years ago | (#15138038)

Kontact does this, however Kontact cannot in fact edit anyone elses calendar but your own. It can send out meeting updates, which the remote client needs to interpret as a schedule change (this is actually how Exchange works under the covers).

I actually use Kontact for all my work, publishing an iCal ICS file up to a phpiCalendar server where my family and workmates can browse and see my schedule combined with others. However, the only one that can actually alter my calendar is me, so this comes under 'calendaring', rather than 'group scheduling.

Re:None do what is required to displace Exchange. (1)

ScottyH (791307) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137961)

I'm pretty sure Airset does most of this. http://www.airset.com/ [airset.com]

Re:None do what is required to displace Exchange. (1)

Professor_UNIX (867045) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137974)

It's important to note that there is a big difference between 'calendaring' apps (such as 30boxes and Yahoo Calendar and the like), and 'scheduling', where an interactive application can review a persons or groups schedule, and then add things to their calendar.

Why in the heck would I want someone to be able to add a meeting to MY calendar? What, you just come in one day and your day's calendar is automatically populated by luser managers who decide they want you to attend a bunch of worthless meetings? How useless is that? These are the same assholes who set a message's request-read-receipt flag expecting your mail client to send them some kind of acknowledgement that you read it. Sheesh.

Re:None do what is required to displace Exchange. (3, Funny)

Anne_Nonymous (313852) | more than 8 years ago | (#15138024)

>> Why in the heck would I want someone to be able to add a meeting to MY calendar?

I see your point, but consider how fun it would be to schedule the entire marketing department for prostate exams on April 1st. Including the women.

Re:None do what is required to displace Exchange. (1)

Rich0 (548339) | more than 8 years ago | (#15138028)

What, you just come in one day and your day's calendar is automatically populated by luser managers who decide they want you to attend a bunch of worthless meetings?

Yeah, the same luser managers who decide on what groupware package to standardize on...

Seriously though, it isn't just luser managers. You need to sit down for 30 minutes to talk to 3 customers about your latest problem/issue/prototype/requirements/whatever. You could call them on the phone and leave voicemails asking for 3 suggested times to meet from each of them, and play phone-tag for 3 days. You could use a more limited free/busy publishing app and view their calendars and start searching for a time to meet. Or, you could use exchange and tell outlook to find the next time you and the three customers are free, and while it is at it could it check the conference rooms at the same time.

In my experience the only folks who end up in meetings all day long are the managers. And really, the only meetings that tend to be wastes are standing meetings - if you are calling a meeting to deal with a particular issue then it often tends to be productive (unless you're one of those folks who calls meetings any time a trivial decision needs to be made).

When I find a useless meeting on my calendar the next day, I just call the organizer on the phone and see if it can't be dealt with in 5 minutes. If the issue is serious then the meeting is probably worth attending.

Re:None do what is required to displace Exchange. (2, Insightful)

secolactico (519805) | more than 8 years ago | (#15138031)

Thanks for missing the point, and allowing me to bite on a troll.

Most apps don't simply drop a sched in your calendar. What they do is simplify the process of finding non-conflicting schedules. If someone wants to meet with you, they'll send a request and the calendar app will find a time when everyone invited can attend. If it does, it will ask for confirmation and you can either re-schedule, accept or reject.

Otherwise you would have to respond each request with a time when you are free, that might or might not conflict with somebody elses'.

Re:None do what is required to displace Exchange. (1)

daffmeister (602502) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137996)

Agreed. We've got two core requirements for our calendar app: integration with email and pda sync. Oh, and Windows support; make that three.

Email integration means sending meeting invites that you can accept or decline from within the mail client, and if accepting it automatically gets added to your calendar.

Free/busy scheduling would be nice too.

I've tried Sunbird/Lightning and Evolution in earnest and found them both pretty clunky in this regard. Evolution was a lot slower generally (connecting to an Exchange Server) than I expected so maybe I had some setting incorrect. It would lock up on a regular basis. Something I can't tell my CEO to put up with.

I run a linux desktop in a mostly Windows shop so a non-Outlook/Exchange solution would be a godsend to me but I don't think it exists. Right now I keep a WinXP laptop on my desk just for this purpose.

Re:None do what is required to displace Exchange. (1)

sl3xd (111641) | more than 8 years ago | (#15138007)

As far as I've been able to tell, nothing does the group scheduling other than Exchange in any decent form.

Exchange doesn't do it so great either.

But, ever hear of Novell Groupwise? It's the feature-by-feature competitor to Exchange

Agreed. (1)

gumpish (682245) | more than 8 years ago | (#15138085)

My office has been using MeetingMaker, but PeopleCube refuses to sell us more seats unless we buy the new version of the product along with maintenance. So in all likelihood we'll be migrating to Exchange later this year.

It's really a shame that the FOSS community hasn't offered any viable alternatives - it doesn't seem like such an incredible task to get the most basic scheduling functionality. I'd make a feeble attempt at building the whole thing myself if I had the time...

Re:None do what is required to displace Exchange. (3, Informative)

Brice21 (763827) | more than 8 years ago | (#15138090)

There is an alternative to Exchange, actually it is already used by 350.000 members in europe and accessilbe in the USA on http://www.office.com/ [office.com] . Developped since 1998 in Belgium this web application integrate webmail (with filters, fax/SMS integration), group calendaring (with killing features like display common available time slot in a group, full inviting system with response tracking, iCal export, SMS reminders, ...), document sharing (with webDAV access), address book (with PDF printing, group sharing of contact, vCard export, ...), todos, wikis, notes, chat, forum. Web interface, Pocket PC web interface, WAP interface, ... See http://www.contactoffice.com/ [contactoffice.com] for more information. ContactOffice runs as an ASP with both free (limited) and subscription model (several plans). Jut try it ;-)

Pencil and paper (5, Insightful)

schngrg (590418) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137856)

Pencil and paper :-)

Re:Pencil and paper (5, Interesting)

ChaoticCoyote (195677) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137891)

You beat me to it...

I just spent two weeks working and exploring in São Paulo, Brasil (my home is in Florida). I've never been to São Paulo before, and had a rather complex schedule of work and touristing, all managed with a couple of print-outs and old-fashion pen-and-paper notes. No PDA, no GPS, a borrowed cell phone just for emergencies, my laptop secured at the company offices. I did have a real (and decent quality) magentic compass in my watch, just to make certain I didn't get turned around.

I never worried about finding an internet terminal, or having my tech stolen, or carrying flashy stuff to identify me as a "rich" American. No worries about batteries, either.

I love my tech as much as the next geek, but I'm a believer in the right amount of tech for the job at hand. Sometimes, paper and pen are all that's needed, and the tech just gets cumbersome or disracting.

Re:Pencil and paper (1)

Takumi2501 (728347) | more than 8 years ago | (#15138019)

Agreed. I've had three PDAs now. I've found them to be more time wasters than savers, especially when something breaks down.

I now use pen and paper for scheduling.

Re:Pencil and paper (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15138048)

I'm a recent MBA, and as such have gone through more meetings than I'd care to remember. Scheduling meetings with our advisors had been a monthly/bi-monthly thing, and it has been a nightmare. Imagine this: A group of eight busy MBA students with their own lifestyles (single, married, kids, divorced, full-time, part-time) with three advisors/professors (part-time, full-time).

Requiring to find common schedules amongst all these people had been next to impossible because the professors refused to use the standard Mail/Calendar solution (Lotus Notes - which absolutely sucks in my opinion, but that's another post). We had to resort to paper and pencil and chasing each person and professor down to find a common time that would work.

Technology's great but you MUST HAVE buy-in from all parties involved.

Outlook Web (1)

Zebra_X (13249) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137859)

The original AJAX calendaring tool.

Re:Outlook Web (1)

mporcheron (897755) | more than 8 years ago | (#15138039)

orignal, maybe (i'm not sure on this) but let's face it, Google CL2 is free, MS Exchange Server is not.

Looking for a calendar component (0, Offtopic)

osgeek (239988) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137867)

While the calendar lovers are looking through this thread:

Does anyone know of a free ajaxish calendaring component that I could plug into a web application that I'm developing? I need it to be able to schedule events in a fairly friendly way, but that's about it. So mostly I'm just looking for something that can give me some decent GUI -- display a given time period in month or week format, allow for some click-creating of new events, moving events with drag-n-drop, etc. I'll handle all the back end.

All of the calendars posted in the original article are built into other heavyier web sites. Even the Sourceforge webcalendar is built on top of PHP, which makes it not useful for me.

Thanks for any info

I prefer reading /. articles.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15137869)

...that start with "As our 31337 /. r34d3Rz might know, Google's new XYZ service has caught quite some media attention, but what about the similar services from ABC, DEF, GHI and so on?".

Everything Google, or what???!!

(seriously, stop that darn surreptitious advertising for http://www.google.com/ [google.com] on /.)

Outlook 2003 (1)

1up (968764) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137873)

Even though it has a terrible UI, I find that Outlook 2003 is the best calendar/task manager program I've ever worked with. You can do a lot with it if you know where to look. Plus, it syncs with my Palm, which is an absolute must for my needs. Yahoo! Calendars almost works, but not quite well enough. Besides, desktop apps are faster than AJAX, and you don't have to worry about the server being down when you need to check your schedule. I want to like 30boxes and Google Calendar, but they just aren't powerful enough for my needs.

One more time, but with linebreaks! (1)

1up (968764) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137890)

Even though it has a terrible UI, I find that Outlook 2003 is the best calendar/task manager program I've ever worked with. You can do a lot with it if you know where to look.

Plus, it syncs with my Palm, which is an absolute must for my needs. Yahoo! Calendars almost works, but not quite well enough.

Besides, desktop apps are faster than AJAX, and you don't have to worry about the server being down when you need to check your schedule. I want to like 30boxes and Google Calendar, but they just aren't powerful enough for my needs.

30boxes!! (1)

escay (923320) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137874)

The clear difference between 30boxes and most other calendars - including google calendar, kiko, calendarhub etc is Minimal Clutter. for once, there's an application that's more spartan in UI than google - and functionality is not sacrificed for brevity here - 30boxes has enough options to make it a very easy-and-intuitive-to-use calendar. it may not be as easily integrable as others (yet) but for a calendar that's supposed to be a calendar, it's a very good fit.

Kiko is the only other app that's pretty good from this perspective - it has options to turn off the sidebars and such making it configurable to avoid clutter.

Event calender for a small community (1)

pimpimpim (811140) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137879)

Ah, and while we're at it, I'm looking for an event calender for a small group of people. Currently we're using yahoo groups, but it's calender has troubles with repeating events, randomly it sends or does not send the e-mails for these events, which is pretty disturbing.

Re:Event calender for a small community (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15137988)

Take a look at this:

http://www.skybuilders.com/timelines/ [skybuilders.com]

They will host your calendar and integrate into
their personal worldview of the way calendars
should work.

The best one would be the one that: (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15137882)

- works on my PC
- works on my Phone
- works from my USB stick
- works from any webbrowser
- works on a text console

so front-end is irrelevant, as long as it can read and write iCal

Re:The best one would be the one that: (1)

generic-man (33649) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137945)

Get a PicoPad [picopad.com] and put it in your wallet. Use the miniature pen and pad to manage your calendar. There's no battery to replace or costly per-kilobyte charge for data access, either :)

The command line tool "remind" (4, Interesting)

Florian (2471) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137888)

...is seriously the best calendaring solution I have come across. It provides a mini languages for recording virtually every possible repetition and exception patterns of recurring appointments (next to storing unique appointments of course), prints out reminders or tabular calendars on the terminal or outputs nicely formatted postscript calendars. And all its functionality is packed into a lean 100k executable. If you don't like noting appointments in its markup language, you can use the program "wyrd" as an interactive, terminal-visual frontend. "remind" is a BSD program and part of all free BSD and Linux distributions. If you install it on a server, you use it via ssh. Implementing a web frontend should be trivial, too.

Re:The command line tool "remind" (1)

KingOfGod (884633) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137978)

alive@m00h alive $ man remind
No manual entry for remind
alive@m00h alive $ remind
bash: remind: command not found
alive@m00h alive $ uname -a
FreeBSD m00h.dienub.org 6.0-RELEASE FreeBSD 6.0-RELEASE #0: Thu Nov 3 09:36:13 UTC 2005 root@x64.samsco.home:/usr/obj/usr/src/sys/GENERIC i386
alive@m00h alive $ whereis remind
remind: /usr/ports/deskutils/remind
alive@m00h alive $


Hint: You have to install remind from ports before it's available.

Re:The command line tool "remind" (1)

garcia (6573) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137983)

gopher://cramer.plaintext.cc

Yes, coming from the Slashdot user that still hosts a Gopher server... Why again should I use a "solution" that brings me back into the stone age? I'm sure that remind is fantastic (I would like to see GMail allow me to repeat on Mon/Wed only -- something that wasn't available as of Friday) but I'm sure it also includes archaic commands.

Sorry but PS printing isn't something I need. Sync, group and web access, and sharing without extra coding is what I'm looking for.

Get with the program (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15138036)

  • PINE, mutt or gnus are the only email clients worth considering.
  • Gopherspace is cool.
  • cal, vi, cron, curl/wget and a httpd give a competent user sync, sharing, group and web access.


Sounds to me like your problem is; you can't be bothered learing how to use a computer.

Re:Get with the program (1)

Rich0 (548339) | more than 8 years ago | (#15138057)

cal, vi, cron, curl/wget and a httpd give a competent user sync, sharing, group and web access.

Sounds to me like your problem is; you can't be bothered learing how to use a computer.


And a hack saw provides all the functionality of a band saw.

Need to get from New York to Paris? Ocean liner works just fine. It also has much higher baggage limits than those new-fangled jets.

And who needs gcc? Last time I checked the Athlon/Pentium opcode tables were published standards. Compilers are just for people too stupid to figure out how to follow the instruction pointer...

None (4, Interesting)

Crouty (912387) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137900)

Which do you prefer?
None of them. Calendar entries are by definition personal and I do not trust any company enough, especially ones that offer the service without charge. It would be different if calendar entries were stored in encrypted form (which would require a client, but that could be done with JavaScript, too). Before you call me paranoid: Personal user data gets abused a lot and besides I really have done well without an online calendar until now, so there is no real need to use one for me.

Outlook (1)

wasabii (693236) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137913)

Outlook

This AJAX stuff sucks.

Gregorian (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15137915)

Its not the best but we are pretty much stuck with it in the western world. And its much more accurate than the lunar based calendars like the Islamic and Jewish ones.

One that syncs with my phone (1)

hattig (47930) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137925)

My phone is the device I'll have on me all the time, so it is important that I can get the calendar onto the phone (Symbian based).

Typically this means I enter the details onto the phone, because it's nigh on impossible to sync this phone with my Mac, where I would use iCal (the application, not the protocol) to manage things. Maybe if there was a way to sync the phone over a web connection with any of the online calendaring services ...

Generally though I try and remember the important stuff myself.

Of the web services I've used, none are that good. Google Calendar is very beta. Yahoo!'s is rather basic although I haven't used it recently. None of them really integrate with the other services offered either. It'll probably be a couple of years before any of the companies turns their email + calendar + groups offerings into an integrated web interface.

Flying Spagetti Monster... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15137927)

Holy Day Calender - when is it coming out?

Isn't today the Chianti and Chocolate Rabbit Day?

Incompatible calendars (3, Insightful)

sjbe (173966) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137935)

My opinion is that it doesn't much matter which calendar you you. I've tried a bunch of them (Google Calendar, Palm Desktop, Sunbird, Outlook, Lotus Notes, Groupwise, Plaxo, etc...) and the problem isn't typically with a given calendar's capabilities. The problem is that they don't work with each other, especially if you want to use a PDA. Palm Desktop is incompatible with Outlook which is incompatible with Sunbird, etc... Most third party software seems to be written with Outlook/Exchange in mind. iCal is a nice "standard" but it has a minority of marketshare and hence doesn't get enough developer attention. Furthermore, MS isn't about to open up Outlook or Exchange to help matters. Your employer problably uses a different calendar than mine which makes life difficult if you are a consultant or simply have chosen a different calendar for your own use than your company's standard.

I have a Palm Tungsten T3 but it's not very useful because I have to maintain 2-3 incompatible calendars to keep it useful. Import/Export is simply not a solution unless you are changing calendars and dumping the old one. Google Calendar is nice but it doesn't efficiently exchange data with my desktop calendar, work calendar and pda. It's got potential but but we'll see where it goes. Few/none of the calendar makers have shown any inclination to work together so far (customer lock in and all that) so I'm not optimistic.

nonAjaxPostItLowTech (1)

sammyo (166904) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137943)

For that really important appointment, a yellow sitcker on the edge of the monitor saves the day.

yea (1)

Danzigism (881294) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137946)

i personally like my Sports Illustrated calendar

Airset (1)

ScottyH (791307) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137949)

I've been playing around with Airset lately, and it's not bad.

http://www.airset.com/ [airset.com]

My PDA (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15137953)

Works everywhere without needing to find a hot spot. Gives me notifications when things are due. Integrates with contacts.

AJAX=Bending over backwards (1)

MickDownUnder (627418) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137956)

To me AJAX is just bending over backwards to make a broken architecture seem a little less broken.

It staggers me as to how people can think this stuff is so wonderful. AJAX is the embodiment of everything thats wrong with HTML as an application development medium. It's basically architecture overkill to accomplish the most rudimentary functionality for a more traditional native client side application.

Is this really the way of the future ?! Enourmous amounts of client side javascript, overcomplicated html ? Why ? Just so we can browse to it over the web ? Surely there are better ways.

Re:AJAX=Bending over backwards (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15137986)

As someone who refuses to run remote scripts or bytecode I agree. Browser extensions I wouldn't have a problem with so long as I could audit or recompile them. That breaks down because there is no consistant extension mechanism accross UA's. If forward-thinking companies were prepared to release just web service API's and let user communities build the extensions, it may be possible.

Re:AJAX=Bending over backwards (1)

SwashbucklingCowboy (727629) | more than 8 years ago | (#15138089)

To an extent I agree with you, however consider the following:

  • The browser is the only application platform that is ubiquitous. (One can argue that Flash, via the browser, also is ubiquitous.)
  • The browser enables easy server side installation of an application.
  • The browser thus does not require an explicit client side installation of an application.

The above is very compelling for users. Thus, improving the user experience in that environment is also compelling.

open-xchange.org (2, Informative)

houghi (78078) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137960)

open-xchange.org

Open-Xchange(TM) is an collaboration and integration server enviroment with a continuous right management for modules and objects. The product is based on existing components like a web server, mail server, directory server, database ...

There are several interfaces (like WebDAV/XML interfaces) coming along with this software.
Try it out on http://mirror.open-xchange.org/ox/EN/community/onl ine.htm [open-xchange.org]

Re:open-xchange.org (1)

El_Muerte_TDS (592157) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137998)

But can I sync my Windows Mobile Phone with it?

Offline, with network sync back home. (0, Flamebait)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137963)

That way im not tied to any 'service' being up and alive, be it pay or free.

Gregorian (0, Redundant)

phatslug (878736) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137972)

Well I currently use the Gregorian which seems to be the standard. Anyone care to comment on better options (if there are any)?

Infidel! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15138063)

You will all be killed by the will of all merciful Allah.

What I'd REALLY prefer.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15137973)

would be a simple calendar with ical/webdav/caldav-syncing on desktop mozilla sunbird / calendar plugin and syncml-syncing to my syncml-capable cellphone. Would there happen to be an open-source solution to that? (No, calling open-xchange simple is an insult to us all simpletons.)

Supplementary question (1)

Mostly a lurker (634878) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137975)

Does anyone know a good server based calendar solution that works with smart phones as well as regular computers.

Synchonization is an ugly hack that needs to be retired. It makes shared calendars almost impossible.

Yahoo! is the best option I have found to date, that has a useable smart phone option. They at least provide a WAP interface. Overall, though, I am still looking for something better.

I really like the concepts and general UI in the Google Calendar but, until they have a WAP interface or similar, it does not fit the bill. The same goes for 30boxes and some other promising solutions.

I'll love the one that sync with my palm (1)

fasuin (532942) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137979)

So far, the only one that allows to sync my Palm Calendar is airset (http://www.airset.com/ [airset.com] ). That's the only I love :-)

Gregorian (0, Redundant)

Kuciwalker (891651) | more than 8 years ago | (#15137991)

obviously

It Just Doesn't Matter (1)

InsurgentGeek (926646) | more than 8 years ago | (#15138000)

Beta is better than VHS. Steam was, at one point, better than internal combustion. Notes is better than Exchange. Better and who's going to win are two very very different questions. In a world (calendaring) where interoperability and volume will take the day - where all know whwre this one is going.

features I'm looking for (2, Insightful)

Marsmensch (870400) | more than 8 years ago | (#15138013)

What I want on my webcalendar:

  1. Perfect compatibility on any browser.
  2. A TO-DO list. I'm amazed by how many webcalendars don't have such a feature.
  3. I would really like to see a mature open source app come out that can run on my own server.
  4. I want problem free syncing to any palm or pocket pc device.
  5. Encryption would be really nice.

If anyone knows of a solution out there that fits my needs, let me know. If any developpers are reading this, please take note.

Skybuilders (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15138014)

It's not ajax compliant (yea, maybe a good thing) but take a test drive
of this one:

http://www.skybuilders.com/timelines/ [skybuilders.com]

PocketPC Calendar (1)

mapkinase (958129) | more than 8 years ago | (#15138016)

Yes, cat ate my tongue, "comments.pl"

like there's a difference... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15138017)

hard to tell if there's a real difference between any of them. i am switching to google's version because it integrates with my gmail account. but the rest look great, however it's hard to tell, apart from eyecandy, how they're substantially different. it's a calendar for god's sake!

Um, duh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15138021)

Playboy Calendar [playboy.com]

Undecided :P (2, Insightful)

RealGrouchy (943109) | more than 8 years ago | (#15138033)

Back when my PocketPCs still worked, I'd use Outlook 2002 (or was it 2000?). I liked being able to print out a one-page monthly calendar for my luddite friends. However; I didn't like the lack of control over "hiding" (rather, not hiding) personal or non-important events.

Since my PocketPCs cacked out (the batteries would run out because I primarily used my laptop), I started relying on my previously-misused brain, and countless miscellaneous pieces of scrap paper ("lists") that I kept in my pockets. Now I rely on my cell phone. I may have also used my laptop, but it is now non-mobile.

What I like about my cellphone is that it comes with me everywhere, it is always charged up. However, I like my cell phones to be cell phones, not cameras, video players, or any of that other crap (actually, it does have a flashlight, but I had to transfer all data from my old cell phone to it manually). So the calendar function on my Nokia is limited, and I can only view events one day at a time. However, I know it's always nearby, so I don't have to be at a computer to put something in. Also, I know it will remind me of important events; the PocketPCs were picky when it came to whether they would automatically turn on to remind me of something.

However, I'll be checking out the Google calendar.

- RG>

Spongecell's got read/write API and iPod sync (2, Interesting)

marcgul (239050) | more than 8 years ago | (#15138051)

Spongecell is the only calendar that has a read/write API http://spongecell.com/api_info/ [spongecell.com] and an iPod sync tool http://spongecell.com/info/ipod_sync/ [spongecell.com] . Spongecell's Natural Language engine has fared very well in shootouts against 30 boxes, GCal and Kiko.

Alternative to On-line Calendars: Portable Sunbird (1)

meckardt (113120) | more than 8 years ago | (#15138052)

The major problem that I have with one of the on-line calendars is that your information is stored on someone else's server. Although it is unlikely that anyone would use this information, the potential is there. Not that I'm worried if someone finds out that I'm going to a baseball game next week, but the principal of the thing; I don't want anyone... not some hacker, and not the government... having access to my schedule.

Instead, I am using Portable Sunbird (Portable Sunbird [johnhaller.com] ) on a UBS Drive that goes everywhere I do. I plug the drive into any UBS port, and have instant access to my calendar (not to mention Email and Browser Bookmarks using Portable Thunderbird and Portable Firefox)... all without leaving my personal information on the computer I am using at the time.

Eventsniper.com is da best (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15138061)

Eventsniper.com is da best
check it out its new its fresh its coming the biggest

Don't need one (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15138077)

My schedule isn't busy enough to require one. Either that or my memory is really good.
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