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It Does Little and Not Very Well

Hemos posted more than 8 years ago | from the unfortunante-path dept.

318

wiredog writes "A Washington Post (frryyy) review of the Nokia 770 Internet Tablet, a handheld Linux device. The reviewer complains about the lack of keyboard, poor WiFi implementation, outdated software, non-standard memory card, and almost as many crashes as an unpatched Win98 install."

cancel ×

318 comments

The Input/Output Hurdle (3, Insightful)

TripMaster Monkey (862126) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142332)



From TFA:
Its biggest flaw is the keyboard that Nokia left out. You can enter text only by tapping a tightly packed on-screen keyboard, with help from an automatic word-completion option, or by taking your chances with handwriting recognition that's either ploddingly slow or wildly inaccurate. That alone should sink anything built for constant Web and e-mail use.
This latest failure underscores once again the main problem with miniaturization...that while we can continue to make things smaller and smaller, their interfaces (input - keyboard/mouse, output - screen/speakers) must remain large enough to be useful, and the larger, the better. Even if you totally discount other problems like removable data storage, the main problem of user interfaces will continue to stand in the way of true miniaturization.

I'm still wondering why we haven't seen a personal data device marketed with either a roll-up or projected keyboard, fingertip mouse, and VR glasses? Freed of these constraints, the device itself could easily be made small enough to be wearable.

Re:The Input/Output Hurdle (5, Insightful)

monoqlith (610041) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142433)

Miniaturization is a problem, but it seems mostly for people trying to make many-purpose devices like these ones. It's not as difficult to build a very usable, very tiny interface on something that only performs one or a few specialized functions, such as the iPod or a cell phone. Trying to make a productivity tool, however, requires some ingenious compromise of size and functionality. Make it too small with two few buttons, it's too hard and not worthwhile for people to pick it up and learn. Make it too big with too many and it ceases to be truly portable.

I've thought about this for awhile and for the life of me I can't seem to come up with a compelling way of making a small, multi-purpose interface with a dealable learning curve. For these devices to succeed they have to be amenable to absolute manipulation in the same way that standard, non-digital physical objects are, and that's a mighty challenge that I don't think anyone has been able to succeed at to date.

Re:The Input/Output Hurdle (4, Interesting)

jalefkowit (101585) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142783)

It's not as difficult to build a very usable, very tiny interface on something that only performs one or a few specialized functions, such as the iPod or a cell phone.

I don't even know about that -- there's definitely a non-trivial market for cellphones with big, big buttons, for example, which implies that cellphones haven't exactly nailed the UI thing even for single task devices. Nokia has even started making this an explicit part of their marketing; see their new "Buttons for Humans" campaign [nokia.com] for an example.

Re:The Input/Output Hurdle (2, Interesting)

Jac_no_k (5957) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142455)

Inputs like this? Bluetooth Laser Virtual Keyboard [thinkgeek.com] .

Re:The Input/Output Hurdle (1)

Mathiasdm (803983) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142479)

I wish cell phones would use such a keyboard! It's so annoying to type text messages on a cell phone key board (slow as hell!).

Why don't more companies utilise this technology?

Re:The Input/Output Hurdle (1)

johnfink (810028) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142609)

Why don't more companies utilise this technology?
Probably the $179.99 price tag [blogspot.com] , which would surely be increased by reducing the size to small enough to fit in a modern phone.

Re:The Input/Output Hurdle (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15142621)

Because they are vaporware or (if they do exist) don't work.

Re:The Input/Output Hurdle (1)

everphilski (877346) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142729)

price tag and lack of tactile feedback.

Easy to fix (2, Insightful)

perdelucena (455667) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142467)

Just plugin a thin USB or bluetooth keyboard and the problem is solved. Next question, please.

Re:Easy to fix (4, Insightful)

MankyD (567984) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142556)

Just plugin a thin USB or bluetooth keyboard and the problem is solved. Next question, please.
That completely defeats the purpose of having a single portable device that you can carry with you. Next thing, you'll be telling me I have to carry a keyboard, mouse, printer, speakers, ethernet cable, portable optical drive, usb hard drive and a power cord. This is one of those things that is supposed to "just work".

Re:Easy to fix (1)

perdelucena (455667) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142584)

People who use Palms use to carry keyboards like
this on their wallets.

Re:Easy to fix (2, Informative)

perdelucena (455667) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142607)

Re:Easy to fix (1)

MankyD (567984) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142716)

People who use Palms use to carry keyboards like this on their wallets.
http://www.the-gadgeteer.com/stowaway-xt-review.ht ml
Wonderful but I don't buy products like this just so that I have to go buy something else to make it useful. That should be choice not a requirement.

Re:Easy to fix (1)

TheLongshot (919014) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142829)

Wonderful but I don't buy products like this just so that I have to go buy something else to make it useful. That should be choice not a requirement.

Well, you either buy is seperately, or you pay for it as part of the cost for the product. Either way, you'd pay for it.

Re:The Input/Output Hurdle (1)

IntlHarvester (11985) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142474)

The MS Origami devices coming out have a novel onscreen keyboard interface. Who knows how well it works, but at least it's a different appraoch than the traditional "picture of a keyboard" approach.

Pix here:
http://www.engadget.com/2006/03/08/cebit-web-site- shows-origami-ui/ [engadget.com]

Re:The Input/Output Hurdle (1)

Aumaden (598628) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142495)

You mean like this [virtual-la...yboard.com] ?

It's useable, barely. A nightmare for a touch typist as there's nothing to tell you whether you're finger is on a key or smack in the middle of 3 keys.

I predict you won't see real miniturization until implants are available. Wait til you see what your grandkids can do!

Re:The Input/Output Hurdle (2, Insightful)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142504)

What I want to know is why nobody has made a 1-2lb, 8-12" screen, convertible tablet with the power of a PDA instead of a laptop (and the cost to match). Not everyone who wants a portable tablet needs it to be fast too, or has $3000 to spend on it!

Well deserved first post! (1)

ILKO_deresolution (352578) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142576)

Ive been winein about pda's for years...You just hit it on the head with a jack hammer!

It still is pretty kewl (5, Informative)

kurt555gs (309278) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142606)

I have a Nokia 770, and I love it. Yes, wiFi drops out, but I have installed ssh, telnet, gaim, gnumeric, joe, and a whole bunch of other things. It will axtually work as a remote X terminal, (gnome proggies, not kde ( it crashes)).

Despite the shortcommings, it is a great way to ssh into my server(s) and fix things.

The browser also works with my online banking, which is rare in portable devices.

It may not be the best consumer device, but if you know what you are doing, then it has a lot more usefullness than many, if not all of the other micro-portables.

It is well worth the $359.00 it takes to buy one.

Cheers

Morse Code or Speech Recognition? (1)

drewzhrodague (606182) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142707)

Thanks, TMM! Another thing to note, however, is that there are *MANY* interfaces that can be used in-place of a keyboard. We have buttons, microphones, and other devices. We have accelerometers, infrared, ultrasound, and frickin lasers.

Devices designed by committee are generally stupid. If Apple had an iPhone that worked properly, I'd be all over that. As it is, I haven't found a phone I like better than my old Nokia 3650, and it's of poor design!

Re:The Input/Output Hurdle (1)

MickDownUnder (627418) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142778)

This is a stupid argument. If it were true, the pocket pc market would have died long ago. Alot of people love pocket pc's so, no my friend I'd say the biggest problem is really the crappy handwritting recognition on this device. I bet those poor buggers had to write their own support for it. If they weren't nokia and could use Windows CE I'm sure this wouldn't have featured as an issue.

And... (-1, Flamebait)

kc0re (739168) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142335)

And we are suprised why? Did anyone expect this thing to be cool?

But... (1)

Andy Gardner (850877) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142385)

it runs Linux!

Re:But... (1)

kc0re (739168) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142437)

Oh yeah! Okay, it's cool then ;)

"Review" misses the point. (4, Insightful)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142337)

For those who were wondering - yes, the summary is a troll. For those who missed it:
and almost as many crashes as an unpatched Win98 install.
1) Since when was their a patch for Win98 that stopped it from crashing? (apart from this patch) [ubuntu.com]

2) And - the review did not mention the O/S crashing - just applications crashing. Linux is not the problem here.

Anyway, on to the meat:

Nokia's 770 platform is only just starting. [newsforge.com] The 770 is available for retail sale, but not really intended for the general public.

There's an upcoming release [nokia.com] of the linux derived O/S it runs (in 2006) and Nokia are actively courting developers. (including discounts for gnome hackers) [linuxdevices.com]

I say kudos to nokia - they're (as the review shows) releasing a cool bit of hardware kit and they're going to let the software developement community (both free, open & proprietary) fill in lots of gaps. I hope it works out.

Oh - and rereading the review - it appears the reviewer's "biggest complaint" was the lack of keyboard. That's what seperates a tablet from a tiny laptop retard

Re:"Review" misses the point. (4, Insightful)

garcia (6573) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142423)

Oh - and rereading the review - it appears the reviewer's "biggest complaint" was the lack of keyboard.

I'll tell you what -- I use a fairly excellent mobile device for my daily needs (it has basically replaced my need for a laptop and I rarely use my desktop). The biggest draw is that it has a full Qwerty keyboard that, while being very small, I can easily use to communicate easily.

If I'm going to move to a device like the Nokia 770, I would *expect* that it have a hidden/retractable keyboard that I could easily use when I wasn't just pointing and clicking on links or scribbling a quick note.

If no keyboard is what seperates a tablet from the rest of the exceptional mobile devices out there these days (including my Sidekick) then I'll stick with what I have and wait for EDGE/wifi support.

Re:"Review" misses the point. (4, Insightful)

spiritraveller (641174) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142431)

The 770 is available for retail sale, but not really intended for the general public.

If you sell it to the general public, then you are intending that they will buy it.

The fact that it is open source should NEVER be an excuse for putting out a buggy retail product.

Re:"Review" misses the point. (1)

Lord_Pain (165272) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142441)

Oh - and rereading the review - it appears the reviewer's "biggest complaint" was the lack of keyboard. That's what seperates a tablet from a tiny laptop retard

And maybe that is really the problem. The industry keeps pushing tablets and no one really wants one.

Nokia's 770 platform is only just starting. The 770 is available for retail sale, but not really intended for the general public.

This is just funny. If it is Retail then it is for the General public. So Nokia will have to deal with negative response. Nokia does not make cool hardware anymore. They make blunders. If you need convincing look at both N-Gage designs.

I note the irony of your Handle.

Re:"Review" misses the point. (1)

denmarkw00t (892627) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142443)

Oh - and rereading the review - it appears the reviewer's "biggest complaint" was the lack of keyboard. That's what seperates a tablet from a tiny laptop retard

Correct you are, but it should also be noted that a well-done tablet shouldn't make the user feel the need for a keyboard. IF a tablet PC is developed with good software and a good interface, then one wouldn't generally think to need a keyboard for input, rather the user would find the handwriting input system suitable and easy-to-use, which apparently isn't the case for the 770. If I were using the 770, I shoudln't expect to need a keyboard, but if the device's input system sucks then I'm going to hope that there is some alternative which, aside from the 'cramped onscreen keyboard,' there isn't. If your product leaves users clammoring for a keyboard device then you should probably reconsider 1) your available acessories or 2) your user input interface.

Re:"Review" misses the point. (3, Informative)

Jaffa (7714) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142462)

It also seems he was switching it on and off every time he wanted to use it, rather than using the rather nifty built-in power management. Either leave it alone (or give it a clue by sliding its cover on) and it'll slow the processor, shut down devices and the screen and save battery.

In this "close to standby" it awakes instantly and lasts a week or so between recharges.

Re:"Review" misses the point. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15142475)

Linux sucks. Get a Mac ...

Re:"Review" misses the point. (0, Flamebait)

TripMaster Monkey (862126) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142478)


Need to set a few things straight, it appears...

1) Since when was their a patch for Win98 that stopped it from crashing? (apart from this patch)

It's bad enough that the submitter is guilty of pointless M$-bashing...you jumping on the bandwagon isn't really all that helpful....what madt you think it would be?

2) And - the review did not mention the O/S crashing - just applications crashing. Linux is not the problem here.

From TFA:

In two weeks of testing, it locked up and spontaneously rebooted more often than any computer I've used in that time.
You receive an F for reading comprehension, Whiney (assuming you actually took the trouble to read the entire article).

Oh - and rereading the review - it appears the reviewer's "biggest complaint" was the lack of keyboard. That's what seperates a tablet from a tiny laptop retard

Disregarding for just a moment what a 'tiny laptop retard' might me, two things:
  1. That was hardly the reviewer's 'biggest complaint'. The lack of a viable input option was just one of a whole laundry list you would have seen if you had done more than skim the article (again, F for reading comprehension).

  2. The lack of a viable input option is a valid complaint, regardless of whether or not you want to classify this device as a 'laptop' or a 'tablet'. It doesn't matter what you call it...if you can't use it effectively, I call it a paperweight.

Re:"Review" misses the point. (0, Offtopic)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142641)

Disregarding for just a moment what a 'tiny laptop retard' might me, two things:

I find it mildly amusing that you point out my lack of comma and in the same sentence make a far larger mistake.

You receive an F for reading comprehension, Whiney

Call me whiney all you like - at least I don't flame people for a simple mistake.

Re:"Review" misses the point. (-1, Troll)

TripMaster Monkey (862126) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142731)


My pointing out your lack of comma was an attempt at humor that has, rather predictably, been lost on you.

As for me 'flaming' you for a 'simple mistake', exactly which mistake are you referencing? Your lack of comma, or your inability to extract information from an article?

I find it more than mildly amusing that I write a screen-length reply to your original post, refuting all your 'points', and all you seem to be able to do is point out a typo and blast me for 'flaming' you. If you perceive my refutation of your original points (including your pointless Microsoft trolling) as 'flaming', then it's obvious you haven't been here very long.

If you want to discuss the topic, please do so. If you don't (or can't), save the bandwidth for those of us who do.

And one more thing...

Call me whiney all you like

Since that's what you've chosen to call yourself [slashdot.org] , I will, thanks.

Re:"Review" misses the point. (4, Insightful)

Otter (3800) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142488)

And - the review did not mention the O/S crashing - just applications crashing. Linux is not the problem here.

Read down to:

The Nokia 770 takes longer to boot up than some desktop computers (nearly a minute) and offers battery life no longer than that of many laptops (4 1/4 hours of nearly continuous browsing). In two weeks of testing, it locked up and spontaneously rebooted more often than any computer I've used in that time.
Admittedly, that comes after multiple problems of applications crashing separately, which is why you may have missed it.

I say kudos to nokia - they're (as the review shows) releasing a cool bit of hardware kit and they're going to let the software developement community (both free, open & proprietary) fill in lots of gaps. I hope it works out.

Oh, yeah -- this is fantastic! It may be buggy and useless as it's currently sold, but the important thing is that they're giving discounts to GNOME developers who will hopefully then fix it for them! I'd better buy one right now!

Re:"Review" misses the point. (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142534)

Oh - and rereading the review - it appears the reviewer's "biggest complaint" was the lack of keyboard. That's what seperates a tablet from a tiny laptop retard
No, the digitizer screen that you can write on is what separates a tablet from a tiny laptop. It can still have a keyboard and be a tablet!

And believe me, the difference matters -- there's many "tiny laptops" around, but almost zero tiny tablets, especially ones with keyboards!

Tiny tablets with keyboards (3, Informative)

SlashChick (544252) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142638)

You must not have looked very hard; there are plenty of tiny tablets with keyboards. The tiny Thinkpad X41 tablet [ibm.com] weighs less than 3 pounds. I didn't want a 1024x768 screen, so I went with the Toshiba Portege M200 [toshibadirect.com] , which is 4 pounds and offers a 1400x1050 resolution. Both are convertible tablet PCs with keyboards. After a year of owning the Toshiba, I'm quite happy and have recommended Tablet PCs to many other people.

I have to agree (2, Interesting)

porkThreeWays (895269) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142591)

I agree. I have one and hack on it all day. It's a fun little beast. It's basically the only device of its kind available in the states. It's a next gen Zaurus, except Nokia is sponsoring development of lot's of 3rd party apps. However, I wouldn't buy one for my mom right now. A lot of apps are still being ported and are buggy. I think the first generation of the 770 will probably fail. But once maemo has lot's of apps ported (actually, it already has a shitload, but not so much "business apps" and many aren't hildonized) and Nokia learns some lessons of the 770, it will be a success. The base install is VERY limited and that's what they review it based on. I think the potential for the 770 is in 3rd party support. How much fun is a windows install with no 3rd party apps? I'm working on porting my home automation app to the 770 (perfect example). It's a hell of a lot easier to port to the 770 than blackberry or symbian. There are some hardware issues to address (battery life, gprs, storage), but once Nokia starts including more software and has a second iteration of hardware, this line is going to be a beast. If you want an expensive lame windows box, buy an orgami. If you want another lame calendaring and email device, buy a blackberry. If you want something different all together, buy the 770.

Re:I have to agree (1)

rjstanford (69735) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142713)

There are some hardware issues to address (battery life, gprs, storage),

Oh, is that all? Well, sign me up. But add the wi-fi drops to that list.

Hmm. Not too compelling. Maybe v3 will be a great product - if they allow it to get that far. But I fear that the problems with v1 leave them wide open to even a slightly better (if much less expandable) product shutting them down.

Re:"Review" misses the point. (1)

arcdx (302794) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142655)

Nokia's 770 platform is only just starting. The 770 is available for retail sale, but not really intended for the general public.

I guess other people have mentioned it's weird to say something is for sale but not intended for the general public. I mean, if you had to go to some special website or a fringe store and give a secret password, maybe I'd understand, but a quick look shows that it's on the shelves at 4 of the 5 CompUSA [compusa.com] stores near where I live. A friend notes that it's also on the shelves at Fry's.

If a product isn't intended for the general public, maybe they should, like, make it harder for the general public to get. All they've done on that front is make it cost $400 (which I must admit is pretty effective to keep me away).

Re:"Review" misses the point. (1)

smitty_one_each (243267) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142743)

Hopefully Nokia execs will read this.

Bundle the 770 with that E61 [nokia.com] , and you will have a dynamic duo.

You are blind (2, Interesting)

Shohat (959481) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142784)

It did reboot and crash . The whole piece . Not just the Apps . You are blindly defending it just because it's Linux . The product is not something of quality any of us would actually pay for.
Not everyone that says MS products are good or Linux sucks are posting flamebait/trolling . Plenty of people actually hold this opinion .
"unpatched win 98" . Oh no ! He said MS doesnt suck enough ! OMG ! Kill him !111!!!!11!!one!

Who are you calling a troll? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15142796)

I ran Win98 on over 100 machines with countless screaming kids trying to break them on a regular basis with no problems. Patched or not. Now granted, all of these machines had been policy edited, were behind an OBSD firewall, ran Litestep, and had been stripped down to run just what I needed and nothing else, but crashing? Not likely. Not often. When a machine crashed I forked over a free hour (this was a game center, btw). Not something I liked to do and not something I did often.

So here I'm lost as to where your information comes from for Win98 crashing. Sure, it takes some skill on the admin's part, but not much. And much less work/skill needed to do squat on a *nix machine. I know it's customary fanboyness to call MS products crap, but you really should think before you post out troll dung calling something troll dung.

I hate MS, too. I just hate mouth-running fanatics more.

Re:"Review" misses the point. (1)

rizzle (848961) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142812)

I haven't tried out the 770 but I've been a long time fan of Nokia and their products. However I currently have the Nokia 9300 (usa version here [nokiausa.com] ), and it suffers the *exact* problem which TFA describes with regards to Opera crashing. Granted my nokia does not run Linux (it's series 80 symbian software), but I find it interesting that Opera crashes on both systems with moderatly complex website or if you have multiple windows open for a long time. I thought it was because of the flaky EDGE signal I am getting (and it still could be that), but I think Opera is partially to blame for the lackluster internet browsing experience.

Re:"Review" misses the point. (2, Interesting)

MCraigW (110179) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142830)

2) And - the review did not mention the O/S crashing - just applications crashing. Linux is not the problem here.

Here is what the article did say: "In two weeks of testing, it locked up and spontaneously rebooted more often than any computer I've used in that time."

In my opinion, if a computer locks up, or spontaneously reboots, or crashes, it is indeed the fault of the operating system.

Saying that it is not the fault of the O/S is like Microsoft saying that bluescreens aren't the fault of the O/S, they are the fault of those nasty third party applications and drivers.

A good O/S shouldn't dump or hang, no matter what the applications do. It should just allow the application to blow up, and protect other running applications.

Give me a fucking keyboard (0, Flamebait)

Nicolas MONNET (4727) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142348)

If it had a keyboard, I'd buy one right away. Without keyboard, what's it good for?

The rest of the specs are weird, too; as the WaPo points out, why use RS-MMC? Full-sized MMC fit in my 6230i phone, why could'nt they fit in a device 4 times bigger? It's like chewbacca: it does -NOT- make sense!

Re:Give me a fucking keyboard (1)

jrockway (229604) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142420)

> Without keyboard, what's it good for?

Web browsing, making phone calls, checking your cases in RT, checking in on your servers, pinging machines from the field, etc., etc.

Re:Give me a fucking keyboard (1)

onecheapgeek (964280) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142580)

> Without keyboard, what's it good for?

Web browsing, making phone calls, checking your cases in RT, checking in on your servers, pinging machines from the field, etc., etc.

So basically.... Everything you can do on a normal cellphone or TREO, except you can say it runs Linux, even though there ien't a single application you've cited that requires it. Now I understand.

Re:Give me a fucking keyboard (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15142809)

"Everything you can do on a normal cellphone or TREO"

Uh, have you ever tried to actually view real websites on your phone? I've got a Treo right here and I wouldn't wish the task of extracting information from a site like slashdot or cnn.com on a monkey on a rock. 320x320 is just not enough pixels. Besides that, Blazer is kind of shitty.

Re:Give me a fucking keyboard (1)

mikeisme77 (938209) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142825)

Correct on all accounts EXCEPT making phone calls. Despite being made by Nokia, their tablet is not a phone--nor would I want it to be... Personally, I would buy it too if it had a keyboard (more storage would be nice too, but really the biggest drawback is no keyboard--some things are just easier with a keyboard and I'm a big proponent of tablet/pen technologies).

F*** the Keyboard ! give me STRONG IR ! (1)

da5idnetlimit.com (410908) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142540)

When I first saw the 770, I was thinking how great it would be as a "One Stop Ultimate Full Home Remote with web capability"

Wireless and all is top, but what I really wanted was a 10 meters IR in addition to the wifi and ethernet.

A nice homy tablet, allowing me to indulge in a "potato-couch" lifestyle. I could manage my VCD/DVD/TV/Video Projector, possibly some home automation tools, etc + web browsing, possibly some mail, etc.

Some remotes offer such capabilities, strong IR, web access : Phillips Pronto, around 600-800 bucks.

Now give me a Nokia 770, add a 10-15 meters IR receptor/emitter with a nice learning soft and it could become the standard gadget in most geeks houses.

Of course, stable applications, possibly a tool to automatically compile what I want (Hello Gentoo emerge !) or even better a full apt-like system, and it's golden.

Now, I didn't find a strong RS-MMC IR addon that fits the 770, so I'm nicely waiting for the "771" to be more "home centric". (yes, I know it is a "digital lyfestyle, outdoor tool", but hell, it's a GEEK tool, and we mostly spend our time indoors).

Also, give me a "waterproof" model (100% humidity, not a 2 meters deep case) with a good and intelligent media player (or something that can grab frames already decompressed by the powerfull home server and just put them on the screen from wifi) and stream MP3/ogg/Flac in addition to web-browsing and you'll have the perfect jacuzzi/hot tub companion for nerds.

Hello Mr Nokia. My consultant fee starts @ 1000$/day, and I'll be happy to cater to your needs.

Re:Give me a fucking keyboard (3, Informative)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142558)

1. Get a bluetooth keyboard.
2. RS-MMC? I found a 2 gig one for under $100 so that doesnt seem to bad.

Actually this could make a LOT of sense. It has bluetooth. Combine it with your cell and you have internet access everywhere.
It has WiFi. I go to a few places that have free wifi but I never use it. I do have a notebook but it is too heavy to carry with me every where. I could see me using this at those locations.

This could be a very nice little device. I could see it as an ideal car computer. What it does seem to lack is a USB host port :( If I could get one of those then all sorts of interesting uses pop to mind.

But does it run... (-1, Redundant)

gravyface (592485) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142349)

errr. umm.

Windows user reviews Linux (0, Flamebait)

babbling (952366) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142371)

This review sounds a bit like a Windows user reviewing Linux. This Nokia 770 device [wikipedia.org] runs a modified version of Debian, and is an ARM architecture. While Nokia couldn't bundle something like MPlayer with it, there is nothing stopping anyone from getting a copy of MPlayer and using it to play all of the different formats/codecs that the reviewer has had a whinge about it not being able to play.

For geeks, this seems to be a good device! For Rob Pegoraro, it sucks, because it won't run Windows Media Player. Poor baby.

Re:Windows user reviews Linux (0, Troll)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142471)

I use Windows mostly, I've played with Linux. The 770 still doesn't work for "me". Yup, you can play around and install many Linux apps, however, over at maemo [maemo.org] you can get a choice of a couple of old games and command line linux apps. W00t! Shiny!

His complaints about battery life, screen size and wierd wireless behavior are pretty spot on. Unless you want to buy a little tiny computerlet to hack Linux (which is why I bought it), it's a pretty lame little device.

I doubt there are enough Linux geeks with good eyesight and a couple of hundred dollars in disposable cash to make the 770 a commercial success.

Re:Windows user reviews Linux (1)

TheJediGeek (903350) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142494)

That's a good point. It's VERY unclear about how easy it is to install other software. The tone in TFA made it sound like you had to use whatever it came with, but it would seem that the whole point of running some type of linux would be to allow other software to be loaded on it. The dude complains about being unable to open Word or Excel files. Wouldn't it be possible to load OpenOffice onto it? If it's possible to load SW packages, or even compile from source, then it would be a VERY useful device for geeks.

Re:Windows user reviews Linux (1, Interesting)

nacturation (646836) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142503)

Not that I'd expect you to read the article, but the criticisms he has against it are far more than it just won't play Windows Media Player formats:

"The Nokia 770 takes longer to boot up than some desktop computers (nearly a minute) and offers battery life no longer than that of many laptops (4 1/4 hours of nearly continuous browsing). In two weeks of testing, it locked up and spontaneously rebooted more often than any computer I've used in that time."

The "unpatched Windows 98" jab must be from some Linux fanboy who inserted that. It doesn't appear in the article. The only mention of Windows Media Player is in a one sentence paragraph:

"You won't have much better luck with streaming media online because of the lack of playback software for Windows Media and QuickTime formats."

He also mentions the lack of a decent Flash player and comments that it won't play a lot of Flash content that's commonly out there. Maybe it is a good device for geeks who don't mind overlooking its myriad problems and coping with the challenges, incompatibilities, and crashes. And maybe some kernel developer will take a look at the code and work out the reliability issues. However, for the intended audience of that article -- consumers -- the review was spot on.
 

misleading title (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15142378)

On reading the title I thought it was a story about the MS security dept.

Hemos, no respect. (-1, Offtopic)

Capt'n Hector (650760) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142382)

I wish you and the other editors would stop posting such blatant slashvertisements. It's insulting, really.

Oh, and that's a joke by the way...

More uses for 770 (3, Informative)

dotslasher_sri (762515) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142386)

Someone has ported GPS over to 770 and now combined with a bluetooth GPS receiver it acts as a gps decive showing maps etc. There are plans for VOIP support soon. Combine this with FON router and you are on online at many places and make free calls, check email etc. I was thinking on the lines of hacking this into a car. There is already GPS available, so why not hook it up with car stereo and double it as an mp3 player. And if you have a FON account every time you drive by a FON location it downloads your email.. missed calls etc. This can be pretty interesting. Any thoughts ?

Re:More uses for 770 (1)

dotslasher_sri (762515) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142405)

OOps forgot to add the links
Porting GPS to 770 [nokia770.com]
FON [fon.com]

Re:More uses for 770 (2, Insightful)

un1xl0ser (575642) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142561)

This is really cool, but to quote one of your links -- "Until a vector map solution is available, GPS use on the Nokia 770 tablet will be recreatonal at best." That about sums it up. The size is right for that, the on-screen keyboard can be changed, lots of things can be fixed ... but until there is either a free or non-free vector based GPS solution, it will just be a toy.

This is worth looking at:
http://linuxadvocate.org/projects/roadster [linuxadvocate.org]

Re:More uses for 770 (1)

RosenSama (836736) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142643)

How will it do VOIP w/o a microphone?

Re:More uses for 770 (1)

dotslasher_sri (762515) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142747)

we will attach a head set to it.. just like a computer

passwords, courtesy of bugmenot (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15142399)

Username: mobb@deep.com
password: mobbdeep

http://bugmenot.com/view.php?url=washingtonpost.co m [bugmenot.com]

if those don't work

Bugmenot Firefox Extension (1)

SteveFoerster (136027) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142675)

Don't forget, there's a supercool BugMeNot Firefox extension [roachfiend.com] .

Re:passwords, courtesy of bugmenot (1)

couchslug (175151) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142681)

Bugmenot is blocked by the USAF as a "Criminal Skills" site, while the Washington Post is just blocked.
Thank goodness I can still get Fox News.

youu dont know how to use one (4, Informative)

xshader (201678) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142419)

keyboard? get a bluetooth keyboard.

crashing? dont load mega-websites on a machine with sixty-four megs of ram. lots of sites work fine.

does little? there are tons of emerging third party apps emerging... did that guy even check the maemo wiki page?

most useful third party app on the seven-seventy is fbreader. lets you read any txt files rotated or not, large/small fonts and so on. most of your standard ebook features are there.

another useful app is the xterminal. if you ever use ssh to connect to remote sites to do stuff, you'll find this xterm-in-your-pocket highly useful.

Re:youu dont know how to use one (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15142573)

It's fairly obvious that he didn't check the maemo site.

Why would he?

Is he a tinkerer? Is he trying to review the thing for Joe Average or for happy hackers?

Re:youu dont know how to use one (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15142656)

keyboard? get a bluetooth keyboard.

Doesn't that defeat the whole portability thing?

crashing? dont load mega-websites on a machine with sixty-four megs of ram. lots of sites work fine.

You have to be kidding me. If this were a review for a pc running windoze, you'd be all "that os sucks". How about the manufacturer creating a device that can gracefully handle situations that exceed it's capacity. Not loading (or fully loading) web pages is one thing, crashing and locking up are totally unacceptable when you are using the device for it's main purpose.

does little? there are tons of emerging third party apps emerging...

That's nice, one day it may have useful stuff. I hear M$ has tons of security enhancements to Windoze emerging too.

most useful third party app on the seven-seventy is fbreader.

That's great if you want, yet another, portable ebook reader. Pretty useless if not.

another useful app is the xterminal.

Now there is something that is useful. Though with the lack of kb, it's true usefulness is lacking. That and other products do the exact same thing.

Re:youu dont know how to use one (0)

Skuld-Chan (302449) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142735)

Oddly enough none of these issues are problems with Windows mobile 2003, and WM5...

Re:youu dont know how to use one (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15142801)

Or get a Treo and not have any of these problems to begin with. Small screen, yes, but it works, and works now/tomorrow/for the past year...

Different strokes for different folks (4, Insightful)

N7DR (536428) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142429)

I have seen several reviews of the N770 that for the most part come down "this device is no goo because it doesn't do X", for some value of X that the reviewer seemed to think vital.

All I can say is that I finally saw one of these about three weeks ago, and immediately (as in, next day) went to CompUSA and bought one. I love it. It does exactly what I want, and the only complaint I have is the lack of software -- but that will be quickly solved as the community ports apps to it. www.maemo.org is very active.

So it does what I want, and I think it's great. Obviously, if it doesn't do what you want, you'll think it's awful/pointless/a waste of money.

It has replaced my Zaurus (and has the added benefit that the form factor is almost identical to the Zaurus, so I can even use the same case for the N770).

Re:Different strokes for different folks (2, Funny)

Jaffa (7714) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142506)

Of course, one of the ironies is that it *does* do X (including acting as an X server for remote apps ;-))

Re:Different strokes for different folks (1)

ztella (961766) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142701)

Yea this is not a PDA, it is an internet tablet and it performs merely as such. It is limited to that aspect. Some of these reviewers expect this to be something like a Origami computer. Instead this is something that does one thing and it does it pretty well (sometimes a little slowly). If you want to surf the net on the toilet or while chilling watching TV too lazy to change the TV to HTPC, this is a great device because it lets you get to the net quickly and if thats all you want to do then you'll be satisfied.

what do you expect? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15142448)



What do you expect -- Linux is for servers, not for users. duh! The typical user will input untypical data, and that always crashes Linux.

It's the old catch 22 (-1, Offtopic)

MickDownUnder (627418) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142464)

We all know linux sux on anything but stock standard vanilla hardware. Ive yet to find a linux distro that will work with my matrox g500 tv card. In windows no probs.....

Mac generally gets it right but only because they totally control and limit what hardware you can connect to their stuff. I think this is the major problem with most non-windows solutions... and that is windows just works with alot more stuff than other platforms.

I don't think this has anything to do with windows having a superior architecture.... it's really about superior market share, and hence driver support as vendors manufacturing hardware aimed at the consumer market always provide support for windows and then once then after thats perfect they'll think about other OS's.

That doesn't make any sense (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15142608)

First, you have no idea what a catch-22 is.

Second, "Mac generally gets it right but only because they totally control and limit what hardware you can connect to their stuff." doesn't make any sense here.

This article is the perfect example of why Mac stability is really quite remarkable. We have here hardware controlled entirely by the manufacturer, Nokia. It's *less* expandable than most Macs. You can pretty much guarantee nobody's hooking anything up to it, and if they do it's something non critical like a bluetooth device.

Why is this Linux phone crashing all the time? It's not because of hardware unpredictability.

Re:It's the old catch 22 (1)

MickDownUnder (627418) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142647)

Ah to the modder... it's not off topic. If Nokia chose windows CE and not linux it would have a wealth of work already done for it. Most hardware drivers would already be written for it. It'd be simply a job of gluing all the pieces together , as opposed to making half of them.

This sort of device is alot harder to do with Linux than it is in windows CE... Nokia has basically doubled or trippled the amount of work to deliver such a device to market

I'm sure their choice of platform was not based on technical considerations. Where would they be if they chose windows CE ? Answer: No where in the market they'd be just making up the numbers.

Could be worse.... (1, Funny)

ShyGuy91284 (701108) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142477)

Could have as many crashes as an unpatched Win95 install....

I have to agree (4, Interesting)

mehip2001 (600856) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142480)

Excited, I picked one of these up about two months ago. But, I found it extremely lacking and returned it for an ipaq. Why didn't I like it? The email app almost always crashed when accessing my imap accounts. The browser (opera if I remember correctly) had real issues with moderately complex websites. The wifi seemed very slow when using encryption. In general, it wasn't much of a pda. On a positive note, the screen was beautiful and the movie playback was fantastic.

Should Work Great At Borders... (1)

creimer (824291) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142481)

I think this would be a wonderful replacement for the search computers at the local Borders store. Every now and then, a computer would either be stuck on the Windows 98 logo screen or a blue screen. Of course, they would have to chain them to the wall so no one walks out with one or shelved them in the "when technology goes bad" section.

It is just baaaaad (2, Interesting)

MikeRT (947531) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142509)

I bought one and had to return it after a week of various things. First it was the flaky battery, then the flaky software that ended up becoming all but unusable. To put it nicely, the software is crap. Not only that, but it's incredibly slow. I would gladly have paid an extra $150 for a system based on embedded Qt with 128MB of RAM, a better processor and a real, fast SD card system. Basically, it is a short cut looking for a quality product. They cut so many corners that's nearly a perfect circle.

Re:It is just baaaaad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15142762)

They cut so many corners that's nearly a perfect circle.
"There are no sharp corners on the human body. So there are none on our products. We call it human technology"

they need to stick with it (1)

penguin-collective (932038) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142521)

Nokia is very new at this and it will take the organization several years until they get the hang of it; that's the same whenever a new platform is introduced into an organization and has nothing to do with Linux. Look at Motorola's iTunes phone to see how even adding a single new capability to a phone is non-trivial. Thousands of highly reliable embedded Linux devices show that embedded Linux itself is very much up to the task.

As for the 770, the hardware is nice, kind of like a big Palm; it's the UI that needs several more iterations--but that's OK if they stick with it.

For the time being, the Palm Tungsten X is probably the most mature device in this space--if you want something that "just works" get it. But don't be smug about it: the Palm T|X software platform is beyond obsolete, and Palm is in deep trouble since they still haven't figured out what to replace it with.

What i want in a PDA (1)

CdBee (742846) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142529)

Seems to me the big makers don't always listen, so here goes:

Keyboard and IBM-style nipple-mouse instead of a wand and touchscreen.
Foldover format like a Psion 5 - should fit inside a suit inner pocket
Inbuilt Bluetooth and WiFi
Proper POP/IMAP client that handles SSL and StarTLS
office-style apps that read either MS formats or Opendocument
web browser than handles AJAX properly
ability to either add a SD card or similar for storage

O/S irrelevant. I just need the features, I don't think anyone offers this. the nearest I could find was various HP Jornadas which don't have WiFi or Bluetooth by default and because they rely on PCMCIA expension cards, can only have one or the other at a time.

I'm happy with mine (1)

i.r.id10t (595143) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142531)

I just got one a week or so ago, and it does everything I expected it to do and it does it well. It even serves as a nice walkman type device for when I'm mowing the lawn...

My Nokia 770 is great (4, Interesting)

Dynamoo (527749) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142536)

My Nokia 770 is great - it does exactly what it's designed to do. It's a great, portable way to access the web via WiFi or Bluetooth, *much* more convenient to carry around than a laptop and the great thing is that it's really an accessory to your phone, so you don't have to have a cellphone as big as a housebrick.

What the Nokia 770 *is* - it's an internet tablet with an very high-resolution 800 pixel wide display, with a basic email client, RSS reader, multimedia support and some apps thrown in. It does come with expandable memory, and there are other apps you can load onto it for free.

It *isn't* a laptop replacement, nor a PDA, nor a phone, nor is it a games machine or a personal multimedia player although it can do all of these to an extent. Primarily, it's designed to give you a much better web experience than you would get from a cellphone while it fits in your pocket. If you choose to extend it with keyboards, new applications and even things like GPS then it's up to you.

Two words of warning - I bought mine directly from Nokia (I had one of the first) and the first unit was faulty, at which point I discovered that Nokia's customer service is not great. And to get the best out of the N770, some work is required in terms of patching and loading on apps.

One last thing - it's great value. In the UK it works out as £250 including tax and shipping which is cheaper than many mobile phones.

"Laptop Replacement" is a misnomer (1)

Bombula (670389) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142808)

I'm not sure I fully understand the logic of "laptop replacements" or even "desktop replacements" (referring to laptops) for that matter. Since technology continues to progress exponentially, there will - at any given time - always be things a desktop can do that cannot be 'replaced' by a concurrent laptop. And similarly, there are always things a laptop can do that cannot be 'replaced' by a concurrent handheld device.

The only exception to this fairly self-evident situation is one of marketing: an older, cheaper laptop can in some - and only some - ways be 'replaced' by a bleeding-edge laptop, etc, etc.

So really, it is a matter of deciding for yourself what functionality you want from a device and determining if the technology and/or market are available for that functionality. If all you want a computer for is word processing, spreadsheets, and solitaire on a 15 inch screen (like the majority of people, say, 10 years ago), then even the cheapest current laptop will fulfill those functional requirements. But if you want 3D gaming, wireless internet access, 5.1 surround sound, and dual-head 22" displays, well you're not going to get that on anything but a desktop for the time being.

The problem is that handheld devices still cannot really fulfill the lowest-common-denominator functional requirements (office apps, simple games, music, telephony, internet, and email) adequately for 2 main reasons: display size and input quality (ie: keyboard and mouse).

Personally, I have no interest in editing text documents or spreadsheets, playing games, or watching movies with a stylus on a 2" x 3" touchscreen. I might read (but not write) email and check RSS newsfeeds, but that's all I'm comfortable doing without a large screen and a keyboard and mouse, or equally functional input devices (ie: voice recognition and pupil-driven pointing device).

I'm sure the technology will bring the functionality I need to handheld devices quite soon, but we're definitely not there yet. So for the time being, when I'm on the move it makes more sense for me to have a phone I can check email with and/or a laptop to actually do work on.

very pleased with mine. (2, Informative)

mikeee (137160) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142572)

It's not a PDA or a teeny laptop. It's a handheld webbrowser.

I can read news sites, RSS feeds, check my Gmail, all works just fine. It's also servicable as a MP3 or video player - certainly not as good as an ipod, and reformatting videos to appropriate resolutions/framerates/formats can be a PITA...

I think of it as more a compact second (ok, in my house it would be 4th) computer that I can pick up and check my mail and a few news sites without wandering off to another room to log in. I don't generally respond to mails on it - it's bad at that, but that's not the point.

Does Little, But Does (1)

simpl3x (238301) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142625)

This little device changed my perspective on the mobile web. As the owner of a SE P910, I think that the device is trying to do too much. Imagine a small mobile that simply makes calls, but now add a tablet such as this. I can call, access network apps like gmail or the new calendar. Does it play flash slow as hell? Yep! Device makers totally under-estimate the needs of tablets...

I have to admit that the thing is a gimmick today. But real soon, a platform like this will be indespensable. The hundred dollar laptop is here today at $349! Add keyboard... Something like those rollup things I've seen for the MS device would be great. The thing has not crashed on me yet, though as mentioned running Flash is not recommended. I do need to try some Widgets!

Re:Does Little, But Does (1)

pimpimpim (811140) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142846)

Flash is developed to be slow as hell on everything. Actually people that use flash for their websites should be sued because they eat the time (=money) away of people that have better things to do than to look at fancy moving menus, "loading..." status meters, etc. etc. for half a minute when they just quickly want to check something on the interweb. What good is a 20 mbit dsl connection and a 3 Ghz processor, when the website interface is deliberately slowed down???

He doesn't get it, which isn't a surprise. (4, Interesting)

n6mod (17734) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142669)

I got one a few months ago, spurred on by the port of Einstein. If *something* could finally replace the Newton, this might be it. The truth is that Einstein is too slow for normal use, but I fell in love with the 770.

I use it *constantly*, because it's has a real web browser (Opera w/Flash) and is pretty easy to connect over WiFi. It fits nicely in my coat pocket, and has a glorious, bright display. And it's an open and well-supported platform for development.

The reviewer makes some good points for his world. It doesn't play well with Microsoft. That's not a factor in my world. Sure, it doesn't play WMV9. But it does play MPEG-4.
It could use some additional memory. I moved the root fs onto a card to deal with that, and it's much more stable now.
The network messages are a little obtuse. Basically if any connection has reached a timeout (why there's a timeout for WiFi I'll never know), it says "Network Connection Error" when you try to send a packet. So you click 'Connect', pick a network, and you're off.
It uses RS-MMC because that's what the rest of Nokia's products use now.
It works flawlessly with my RAZR on Cingular, and the thought of EV-DO has me looking at the Sprint/Samsung RAZR clone.

Make no mistake, this is a 1.0 product, and not really ready for prime time. But it *is* ready for the /. crowd, IMO.

Hack it!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15142763)

http://maemo.org/ [maemo.org]

Anyone have any idea when Nokia will refresh OS? (1)

firestarter (35059) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142767)

I bought one of these last October when they first came out.

The form factor is great, battery life is good, and I don't miss a keyboard. The web browser is OK, but the Mail app does suck (very very slow with a reasonable sized imap mailbox).

The bigger problems are the lack of memory and processor speed. If you're running the mail app, you can only open a couple of web windows too before everything comes to a standstill.

I'm hoping that Nokia are going to do something with memory and speed optimisation with the next software release - but haven't seen anything from them since December. A new rev was due end of Q1, but that's been and gone. Anyone have any inside information on when a rev might be made?

Thanks!

Input & OCR (1)

cutterjohn (34042) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142794)

geez, from the sounds of things Nokia should have licensed Calligrapher or whatever it's called these days. (Russian company originally, IIRC, at one time owned by SGI, then either spunoff or otherwise became independent... They used to sell OCR software for wince machines that was pretty good, but not appreciably better than M$'s transcribe(? or whatever it's called...). They also produced the original cursive OCR for the Newton which was fairly decent with a good sized dictionary, pretty much a must for decent OCR. (Printed text should work better, but it's slower inputting info, and if you can't even print decently, well... and spacing of characters can be problematic...)

Had they done this at least the keyboard part would have gone away, as this device shouldn't even really expect to have a keyboard excepting in rare situations as it's a TABLET! otherwise it'd be a funky NOTEBOOK!

Still sounds sort of nifty, esp. at the price, but overall I'd still think that I'd rather go with a Tabletpc or an origami device with a full windows install, etc. They're not that much more expensive and offer greater(if not notebook class) performance and capabilities, plus on the Tabletpcs there do exist linux distros that support them to an extent, but then you'd be back to crappy OCR again. Hmm... so, I guess I'd be much happier with either a full notebook with some decent horsepower or an origami as the Tabletpcs are even more stunted now v. when they first appeared they weren't that much more poorly off than current notebooks...

Wifi (2, Funny)

kryten_nl (863119) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142813)

From TFA:
WiFi on the 770, however, may not work much better. The review model I tested frequently failed to log on to my home network's wireless signal for no apparent reason; uselessly vague error messages such as "network problem" left me guessing about the cause.

Now, don't go blaiming his home wifi setup. There's nothing wrong with it, I haven't had any problems over the last two months, and I'm two miles away using a Pringles box as an antenna.

Well (1)

Drakin030 (949484) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142816)

Its Linux what can you expect...Yeah troll I know.

"Does little and not very well" for $200, Alex! (3, Funny)

jpellino (202698) | more than 8 years ago | (#15142841)

Ooh Ohh I know this one!

What is "Apple ///"?
What is "Karl Rove"?
What is "Windows 1.0"?
What is "Windows ME"?
What is "Microsoft Bob"?
What is "Moeller SkyCar"?
What is "3DO"?
What is "Buran"?
And the Daily Double,
What is "FEMA"?
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