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Apple Releases Bonjour for Windows 1.0.3

ScuttleMonkey posted about 8 years ago | from the your-transformation-is-complete dept.

195

MacDailyNews is reporting that Apple has released Bonjour for Windows 1.0.3. From the article: "Bonjour, also known as zero-configuration networking, enables automatic discovery of computers, devices, and services on IP networks. Bonjour uses industry standard IP protocols to allow devices to automatically discover each other without the need to enter IP addresses or configure DNS servers."

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195 comments

Gosh (5, Funny)

amazon10x (737466) | about 8 years ago | (#15159632)

I didn't know anyone still used Windows 1.0

Re:Gosh (1, Interesting)

ciroknight (601098) | about 8 years ago | (#15159735)

That joke seems oddly.. familiar [digg.com]

Re:Gosh (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15159745)

Eww, you're one of those gay Digg-monkeys.

Well duh. (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15160105)

That joke seems oddly.. familiar

You actually believe that a thousand Slashdotters didn't have the same idea once they read the headline?

Sheesh, even I was going to post that joke.

Re:Gosh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15159758)

perhaps they meant windows 3.1

Re:Gosh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15159797)

I didn't know it was out of beta yet.

Re:Gosh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15159907)

I didn't know that Windows 1.0 had networking!

Re:Gosh (1)

IAmTheDave (746256) | about 8 years ago | (#15159964)

Most people use Windows 1.0.2 Poodle. I personally have a box running Windows 1.0.1 Mexican Hairless, but very few people still run Windows 1.0 Terrior. I'm personally looking forward to the release of Windows 1.0.4 Basset Hound.

Re:Gosh (1)

tverbeek (457094) | about 8 years ago | (#15160047)

Most people I know have upgraded to Windows 1.04. That's the version that supports the new IBM PS/2s, after all.

Re:Gosh (1)

filesiteguy (695431) | about 8 years ago | (#15160287)

I sold a copy of it - in the original box - for over $100 on Ebay. I hope I didn't violate the EULA. =O

Amazing that the thing still was able to load. Didn't do much, though....come to think of it Windows still doesn't do much.

Umm, wow? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15159670)

Thank you, Apple, for bringing the poor poor users of Windows the wonder and majesty that is DHCP.

Umm, wow. (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15159932)

You're a moron. Read about ZeroConf a little bit before you troll, kay?

Re: Umm, wow. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15160470)

You're a moron. Read about ZeroConf a little bit before you troll, kay?

You're a bigger moron. Rendezvous, ZeroConf, Bonjour, or whatever they are calling it this week, is a useless solution that is looking for a problem and Apple is trying hard to shove it down everyone's throats. It has no purpose beyond pandering to Mac hippies when they congregate at Starbucks. Apple is simply reinventing NetBEUI.

Windows 1.0.3? (0, Redundant)

nsanders (208050) | about 8 years ago | (#15159675)

Doesn't Apple know that Windows 1.x is 20 years old?

Re:Windows 1.0.3? (1)

redletterrocko (960983) | about 8 years ago | (#15159719)

Bonjour for Windows 1.0.3 requires Windows 2000/2003 or Windows XP. Make sure you have the latest Service Pack installed for your computer using Windows Update.

The title is taken out of context. The program is called "Bonjour for Windows" and the version is 1.0.3

As far as the product, hasn't Microsoft, Novell, and an ungodly amount of other smaller companies tried to do this before? Has anyone used Bonjour? What's network traffic like? ActiveDirectory and Novell are both rather chatty applications when it comes to the network. If we can find a way to keep things quiet, this is a great idea. However, there's the challenge.

Re:Windows 1.0.3? (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15159827)

Are you fucking kidding? Mac users have been using this without even knowing it for over four years. They don't have to know about it because it just works. Go home, pop your PowerBook open, Command-P, and bam, document comes out of your home printer. Go to school or the office, hit Command-P, and you can choose from a human-readable list of every printer available to you. No configuration, no wizards. It's less chatty than Windows' so-called Simple Service Discovery Protocol, and more importantly, it actually functions.

You Windows and Linux users are so cute, still living in the '90s, so accustomed to mediocrity. "Has anyone used Bonjour" indeed.

Re:Windows 1.0.3? (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15160152)

Gratified as I am that my little rant above got modded up to +3 Informative, I don't really think it represents the best of the Mac community. The truth is, we Mac users feel deep pity for those to whom Rendezvous/Bonjour (ZeroConf by any other name) seems like some kind of magical future technology. No one deserves to be trapped in the configuration hell that is Windows or Linux. Even worse is that you people have come to expect such utter user-unfriendliness, and so you sneer at those whose work would improve your lives. You are the most pathetic of them all, and we Mac users shed a collective tear in sympathy for you.

Therefore, please mod my above comment down to troll where it belongs.

Re:Windows 1.0.3? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15159857)

Tivo uses it. Works perfectly and it's not "chatty" at all...

Challenge? (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15160514)

As far as the product, hasn't Microsoft, Novell, and an ungodly amount of other smaller companies tried to do this before?

Novell has historically not been strong on IP networking; more recently they've figured out that IP is the way to go, but I haven't heard of any cross-platform, open-standard, widely-supported IP-network technology from them. Or from Microsoft, for that matter. (How many UPNP printers can you name?)

Has anyone used Bonjour?

Only pretty much every Mac [apple.com] user (Safari, iTunes, iPhoto, iChat, ...). Oh, and lots of GNOME [gnomejournal.org] users. And maybe a few Windows iTunes [apple.com] users.

What's network traffic like? ActiveDirectory and Novell are both rather chatty applications when it comes to the network.

It uses caching, duplicate message suppression, and exponential backoff. Traffic is unnoticably light.

If we can find a way to keep things quiet, this is a great idea. However, there's the challenge.

Good thing those engineers at Apple figured it out 5 years ago, then!

Zeroconf is the only service of its type that I've heard of. It's certainly the only one that runs on pure-IP networks, whose standard is open [zeroconf.org] , which has multiple independent implementations [wikipedia.org] , which has support from both proprietary [apple.com] and open-source [avahi.org] camps, and is supported out-of-the-box by many major hardware manufacturers [apple.com] . If there's any competition in this area, I don't know what it is.

so what? (-1, Offtopic)

larry bagina (561269) | about 8 years ago | (#15159688)

seriously, this isn't news for nerds or stuff that matters. If slashdot wants to increase pageviews, posting digg stories a day later isn't the answer.

Re:so what? (1)

mtxf (948276) | about 8 years ago | (#15159762)

maybe its because apple are actually releasing this on windows

seems an odd move by apple, surely they could have used this as another reason to switch to mac...

Re:so what? (1)

larry bagina (561269) | about 8 years ago | (#15159902)

It's been available for windows for a while. I have v 1.0.1.2 (march 23, 2005) installed on my computer.

Hey slashdot, I hear Apple will be releasing iTunes 6.0.5 for Windows any day now!!!!

Re:so what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15160684)

It's not exactly odd. With Apple's planned move to Windows Vista, they want the transition to be as smooth as possible, with Mac users seeing the same plug-and-play technologies they're used to in the new platform as much as the old. From that point of view, it's in Apple's best interests to enhance and improve Windows.

Inside source: this happened on the morning Microsoft announced delays to Vista.

The board meeting

So it's Tuesday morning at Apple. The boardroom is having another meeting about the future of the Macintosh. They're perusing the feedback over the unofficial port of Windows to the Mac, and considering the consequences. There's a whole bunch of things on the agenda. OS development is hard, and it's expensive. Their competitors, Sony and Lenevo, doesn't need to do it, and they're doing pretty well all in all. Plus, there's the whole break up plan. When Apple separates into Apple Macintosh Inc and iTunes Corp, how attractive will Apple Macintosh be as a take-over target? The whole move to Intel will be for naught if it hasn't made Dell and friends just a little more excited and comfortable they could fit the Macintosh into their lines.

Apple has some little development projects on the boil and has for some time. To begin with, it's pretty much completely reimplemented the Carbon APIs under Windows. Indeed, that's how iTunes and Quicktime are implemented. But, interestingly, so are the Cocoa APIs. They're all there, Apple never stopped developing them, even after it nixed WebObjects for that platform. It's also in need of certain features that would help it with the future. Apple has no "managed code" environment - it supported Java to a certain extent, but Cocoa never was a perfect fit for that. Apple's progress with .NET, unofficially, under Windows and OS X, is coming along surprisingly well.

As time has gone on, the notion of switching to Windows as the base platform really has gotten more and more plausable. There are still roadblocks, Apple needs Microsoft to provide them with a little more customizability of the UI. A switch to Windows without providing the essential Macintosh experience just wouldn't do. But, well, .NET, and Aero, are Microsoft's attempts to break with the past. Perhaps an OS built upon these APIs could, with Microsoft's help, look entirely like a Mac environment - with the right code, obviously. You don't want a Dell user flipping a registry switch and getting a Mac.

It's clear that whatever happens, OS X is doomed. Postings by MacRumors alumni arguing that the porting of Windows to the Mac spells disaster are read out, and largely agreed with. But the question then is - does Apple continue to pour money into OS X, or could Gates and Ballmer be ameanable to making the modifications needed to make Windows Vista the next Macintosh OS?

The phone call

Jobs picks up the phone and calls Gates. There's a brief discussion, and then the phone's put down. A few minutes later, the phone rings. It's Ballmer, Gates, and Allchin.

"We think we can do it, Steve" says Bill Gates. "I mean, this is a major thing for us. It's a coup, and I know you know we're thinking it. So we're going to help in any way we can."

Allchin interjects: "Funnily enough, from our end, the code's largely there. We need a bit more time. WinFS needs some work - we'd put it on hold, but if you're going to want Spotlight on this OS, we'll need to finish it. Sticking menus at the top of the screen and reordering them... that's easy stuff. We'd appreciate it if you ported your own Dock and Finder, you can keep that proprietary if you want."

Jobs smiles. "That's perfect for us. Means we keep control over the so-called Macintosh experience. That's really the only reason we've stuck with our own operating systems for so long."

Ballmer speaks next. "Well, I'm looking at the timings, we can probably get things to you in a service pack for Vista, perhaps in April or May of 2007?"

"January", says Jobs. "It's got to be January. I want to go to MacWorld, and announce a new operating system, Mac OS W, that brings the best of the Mac, and the best of Microsoft. And I want to tell people "It's shipping today.", it's important, for our credibility and everything."

There's silence on the other end. Allchin chirps up next.

"Y'know. Y'know, it really is possible. Let's forget about the November release date. Let's go full steam ahead, and time the release for January. An early release is just going to trip us up."

"I have to agree with Jim there", says Gates. "It's not going to be pretty, but we can do this if we delay the OS. Especially if a lot of this stuff's done, or you're going to do it, and all we have to do is add a few missing features like WinFS. About time we implemented that anyway."

Ballmer sighs. "Ok Steve. Our people will talk to your people. January it is. I'm going to announce the delay right now, no use keeping this a secret. The delay, that is."

The conversation continues constructively, and the phone is hung up.

"They're good people, at Microsoft, I mean" says Jobs. There are nods and mutters of agreement from the others present. "I think this is a great partnership. It's going to be great for Apple. Great for our customers, I think. No more incompabilities. Things are going to "just work". Strange, somehow, that Microsoft would be giving us the last piece to make the Macintosh the computer for the rest of us."

Postscript

What we're seeing, at last, is the final stage of Windows. It's going to become a mature, stable, secure platform, benefiting everyone. The last vestages of so-called "competition" (actually the division of development resources, pit against one another instead of working hand in hand) are crumbling. This is only one of the resources Apple is porting to make Windows Vista (ultimately) "Mac OS W". Expect to see the Cocoa APIs available (again, remember OpenStep and WebObjects?) for Windows in the next few months, with Mac developers able to port their apps to Windows from within Xcode, as easily as compiling a universal binary. You want Carbon? It's already there. Take a look at the Quicktime development libraries for Windows.

iTunes? Quicktime? Already there. They were going to be anyway, but development at Apple is now focussing exclusively on the Windows versions.

It's going to be a great year for Windows. Vista will come out January. We're going to see the best of Apple and the best of Microsoft. Everyone will benefit.

How is this different than... (1, Interesting)

amazon10x (737466) | about 8 years ago | (#15159689)

How is this any different than the Wireless Zero configuration that comes with Windows XP? It seems that they all offer the same thing except the Windows Wireless Zero is already on the machine.

Re:How is this different than... (3, Informative)

mysqlrocks (783488) | about 8 years ago | (#15159725)

You could always Google "Bonjour" and find this link:
http://www.apple.com/macosx/features/bonjour/ [apple.com]

Bonjour is more than just wireless and DHCP. It automatically discovers and configures printers and other network devices without even needing to use a wizard.

Re:How is this different than... (4, Informative)

MyDixieWrecked (548719) | about 8 years ago | (#15160266)

Bonjour is also more than just named machines on a CIFS/samba network, too.

for those that don't know, bonjour enables a machine to not only broadcast a DNS name for itself ("hey everyone, I'm alberto.local!), but it also the services it offers ("hey, I do ftp, http, and jabber!").

When it first became available I was pretty vocal about how I could get the same thing done with host files... but as I've gotten older and the number of machines on my network have grown, it's become a lot easier to access the OSX machines without needing to know their IPs, and configuring the host files of my 4 linux servers is a pain in the ASS.

This is also available for linux, but I haven't gotten it working properly (or really tried, for that matter). I believe the packages are called Howl and mdnsResponder.

Re:How is this different than... (3, Interesting)

CerebusUS (21051) | about 8 years ago | (#15160388)

I believe SuSE supports Bonjour out of the box, but it's been quite awhile since I made that discovery. The backstory is kind of fun, though.

We had a less-than-clueful consultancy come in to help us do an Active Directory installation on top of our NT4 domain. They suggested we use .local as the TLD for the AD domain. Wow, was that a mistake. All the macs on the network needed a user-created patch to enable .local DNS requests to pass through to an actual DNS server. I discovered the SuSE (at least I _think_ it was SuSE) "feature" when I tried to set up a box for play.

 

Re:How is this different than... (3, Informative)

Kelson (129150) | about 8 years ago | (#15160461)

This is also available for linux, but I haven't gotten it working properly (or really tried, for that matter). I believe the packages are called Howl and mdnsResponder.

I have a Fedora Core 4 system that advertises Netatalk shares and HTTP via mDNSresponder. Fedora 5 has dropped Howl in favor of Avahi [avahi.org] -- another zeroconf implementation -- though I haven't done anything with it yet.

Re:How is this different than... (4, Informative)

Rosyna (80334) | about 8 years ago | (#15159753)

Bonjour allows arbitrary clients to discover arbitrary services they can "subscribe" to. Like iTunes looks for other programs that offer the iTunes service via Bonjour. Or iChat allows you to talk to any other user on the same network via Bonjour. or iPhoto allows you to see other photo albums on the network. The TiVo also uses to automatically discover music, pictures being shared from desktop clients. None of it requires you know about the host offering the service beforehand. ZeroConf is just one aspect of it.

Xcode uses it to discover which clients on a network it can distribute complies to to speed up the horribly slow GCC.

Re:How is this different than... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15159997)

> Xcode uses it to discover which clients on a network it can distribute
> complies to to speed up the horribly slow GCC.

Guh... what!?! I can't say that I know the first thing about Xcode, but
how is automatically distributing your compiles to anonymous, unauthenticated
hosts possibly considered a Good Thing?

You say you've audited every last line of your code, and have verified that
there are no security holes? Here, let me just set up a node on the network
that will automatically insert a trojan into anything you ask me to compile.

Re:How is this different than... (1)

Rosyna (80334) | about 8 years ago | (#15160091)

Notice how I didn't say it uses it to blindly distribute it. It only does it to the computers you explicitly specify. And computers can only become nodes if they are specifically set up to do so.

Remember what they say about people that assume things, it makes you look like a troll.

Re:How is this different than... (1, Funny)

Lussarn (105276) | about 8 years ago | (#15159820)

How is this any different than the Wireless Zero configuration that comes with Windows XP

  • This will install quicktime for you.
  • This will install iTunes for you.
  • This will start up 5 needless background processes.
  • This will nag you all the time to buy the full version
  • This will look like an Mac app.
  • This will try to sell you stuff from Apple.
  • This will take up all your ram
  • This will contain some light form of spyware.

To sum it up, there are some small differences.

Re:How is this different than... (3, Funny)

Ohreally_factor (593551) | about 8 years ago | (#15159909)

I fear you're going to get marked down as flamebait, but that was pretty funny, not to mention apt.

Missing from the list:

This will cause you to grow a goatee.

This will cause an incredible thirst for lattes and koolaid.

Re:How is this different than... (1)

MoFoQ (584566) | about 8 years ago | (#15160373)

"OOOO...YEA!!"

  • Plus it's not susceptible to any future anti-trust settlements too as it's not a part of the OS.
  • It doesn't come with a pitchfork to go with that goatie.

Re:How is this different than... (1)

Kelson (129150) | about 8 years ago | (#15160407)

This will cause an incredible thirst for lattes and koolaid.

Or even koolaid lattes.

Re:How is this different than... (5, Interesting)

Yaztromo (655250) | about 8 years ago | (#15160427)

How is this any different than the Wireless Zero configuration that comes with Windows XP? It seems that they all offer the same thing except the Windows Wireless Zero is already on the machine.

It is completely different. Wireless Zero Configuration on Windows is a serviced used to connect your machine to 802.11 wireless networks, and (apparantly) to 802.1X network authorization systems.

Bonjour is a completely different animal, that is more of a combination of a decentralized DNS, and a way for machines to say "hey, heere are the services I offer that you can use" to any other machines on the network. Each machine running a full Bonjour/ZeroConf installation will advertise its name on the network, and the network services it provides. A system might, for example, advertise that it offers SSH, HTTP, FTP, AFP, Samba, and printing services. A client machine running Bonjour/ZeroConf that connects to this network will automatically know about these other services on the network, and can thus offer them as connection options to the user as is approperiate.

For example, say you take your laptop to the airport. You open it up, and get a wireless connection through Windows as usual. You fire up your web browser, and in a special bookmark menu you automatically see the links for arrivals, departures, and general airport information.

Or you walk into an office you are visiting, and need to print off a document. You open up the document, select Print, and find in the print dialog that your system has already found all available printers on your subnet.

You hit the cafe, and decide to fire up your favorite music application to listen to some tunes. Other people are there doing the same thing, and your system finds their playlists, and lets you browser through them and play them on your own laptop.

These are the sorts of things that Bonjour/ZeroConf permit. It's like a distributed DNS, where each machine only needs to know about itself, and the resolution database gets built dynamically. But it goes one step further to describe not just the hosts, but the public services those hosts offer.

I run Bonjour a lot on my networks. I do have a few Macs, but most of the systems I'm running it on are Linux systems. A client that connects to my personal network (something which is of course restricted by both WPA2 and a MAC filter list) will learn about all of the services they have public access to, including a few print gateways, digital audio streaming services, network sharing services, multimedia sharing services, chat services, and a variety of others. Suitably enabled client applications will know about these systems automatically, and can then build the relevent on screen menus or selection dialogs or whatnot to permit connecting to these services. And for a significantly large network size, it is significantly easier for an administrator to configure one printer to use Bonjour/ZeroConf than it is to have to tell potentially hundreds of clients where the printer is on the network.

Yaz.

Wild guess... (-1)

PFI_Optix (936301) | about 8 years ago | (#15159695)

...but this sounds like a bloated, laggy protocol.

What's wrong with TCP/IP and DHCP?

Re:Wild guess... (3, Informative)

Millennium (2451) | about 8 years ago | (#15160071)

The protocols you describe deal serve very different purposes. Bonjour complements them, rather than replacing them.

To put it another way, TCP/IP is about transport, DHCP is about configuration, and Bonjour/Zeroconf is about discovery.

Re:Wild guess... (1)

PFI_Optix (936301) | about 8 years ago | (#15160138)

That makes more sense. The copy/paste press release in TFA was rather vague.

I guess I've just never seen a need for such a product; I didn't know there was a market for it.

Re:Wild guess... (2, Insightful)

Kadin2048 (468275) | about 8 years ago | (#15160513)

It's kind of one of those products that you don't think you have a use for, until you use it accidentally. Then it strikes you as being really handy.

I didn't remember that it existed when a friend brought a PowerBook over to my house and was sitting in the living room, plugged into my LAN; a while later he asked to print something. I said "sure, go for it" figuring he'd put it on a flash drive or something and I'd print it for him, or he'd email it to me. But no, he just sent it to my shared laser printer.

It's also how Apple products do a lot of their "sharing" magic, i.e., seeing other people's photo and audio libraries on your computer.

It's kind of a subtle technology, it's not going to wow people (my friend didn't even understand why what he did was interesting, he just selected the printer from the list in the dialog box), but it works pretty well.

I'd love to see it get better supported on Linux.

I bet network engineers (0, Redundant)

EraserMouseMan (847479) | about 8 years ago | (#15159707)

are clamoring to get their hands on this. Seriosly though, why do I need this product? We already have wireless routers with built-in DHCP. And network neighborhood knows about computers on the network.

Re:I bet network engineers (-1, Offtopic)

EraserMouseMan (847479) | about 8 years ago | (#15159935)

I had a serious question. Some mac fanboy moderator modded me down for wondering why this product is needed.

Re:I bet network engineers (-1)

YU Nicks NE Way (129084) | about 8 years ago | (#15160041)

Oh, I don't know? Because Windows has had a full standards-based implementation of ZeroConf for...oh...seven years, so Apple can finally bring a partial, somewhat standards compliant implementation of ZeroConf to Windows users who've had it for the best part of a decade?

What? (5, Informative)

fidget42 (538823) | about 8 years ago | (#15160107)

Oh, I don't know? Because Windows has had a full standards-based implementation of ZeroConf for...oh...seven years, so Apple can finally bring a partial, somewhat standards compliant implementation of ZeroConf to Windows users who've had it for the best part of a decade?
According to here [zeroconf.org] , ZeroConf was finished on 2003. If I remember correctly, Apple provided the first ZeroConf implementation for Windows. You might be thinking about uPnP.

Re:I bet network engineers (2, Informative)

soft_guy (534437) | about 8 years ago | (#15160576)

Uh. No. They don't. In fact, I recently talked to Microsoft about their ZeroConf story. Right now they are saying that Universal Plug and Play will be replaced by a Web Services - Discovery thing that is coming out with Vista.

So, right now, you are better off building Bonjour into your products. You can negnotiate a license to distribute Bonjour with your app from Apple.

Re:I bet network engineers (1)

EraserMouseMan (847479) | about 8 years ago | (#15160604)

I hope the "Web Services - Discovery thing" that comes with Vista will be free. No negotiating licenses needed.

Re:I bet network engineers (5, Informative)

truthsearch (249536) | about 8 years ago | (#15160049)

My mac finds network printers with no delay at all and gets the appropriate drivers as needed (the Windows equivalent has sucked ever since they introduced it and it's specific to printers).

My co-workers' iTunes libraries show up instantly for me to play on my own mac.

iChat with no central server

There are others, but the point is that they all work over the same protocol. No specific network programming is required as long as a device is Bonjour-enabled. It's not the greatest thing since sliced bread but it makes networking easier. With Windows Microsoft prefers to program each device type separately.

Re:I bet network engineers (1)

NutscrapeSucks (446616) | about 8 years ago | (#15160224)

The Windows version (NBT) is not specific to printers. However, you're more likely to see it in use for finding SQL Servers than for chat programs.

Re:I bet network engineers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15160344)

My mac finds network printers with no delay at all and gets the appropriate drivers as needed (the Windows equivalent has sucked ever since they introduced it and it's specific to printers).

Maybe I don't want your computer to find network printers, because there are lots of them and I want to decide for you which printer to use. I want to prevent helpdesk calls where the idiot user keeps printing to the printer in the next office because they can't find their printout. I don't want you to print direct to the printer, since you're not allowed to - only the print server can print to the network printers. You have to print to the print server for logging & accounting.

And frankly, the windows equivalent is pretty easy. Just type "\\servername\printername" and the print queue is opened & the drivers are installed for you from the print server if you don't have them. You can quietly put it in the login script with "rundll32 printui.dll,PrintUIEntry /in /c\\servername /n\\servername\printername /q". You can also set the default printer with the /y switch.

My co-workers' iTunes libraries show up instantly for me to play on my own mac.

While that's handy, not many businesses encourage that sort of thing during office hours.

Re:I bet network engineers (5, Funny)

RJabelman (550626) | about 8 years ago | (#15160383)

And frankly, the windows equivalent is pretty easy. Just type "\\servername\printername" and the print queue is opened & the drivers are installed for you from the print server if you don't have them. You can quietly put it in the login script with "rundll32 printui.dll,PrintUIEntry /in /c\\servername /n\\servername\printername /q". You can also set the default printer with the /y switch.

Yes, that's much easier than choosing the printer you want from a list of those available to you.

Re:I bet network engineers (1)

moonbender (547943) | about 8 years ago | (#15160501)

It really is fairly simple. The user would only do the \\servername\printername thing, I know, because I've been on the user side in the past. Don't get me wrong, there was also a list, but opening that up and selecting the right one from the 40 available printers was slower than just entering the name I had memorised. (The servername is the same for all printers, incidently, I essentially had to remember a number that was also on a label on the printer...)

I wrote this because I was pleasently surprised how straightforward it is. The driver is silently installed on first access, you never have to screw around with it - it just works!

Re:I bet network engineers (1)

truthsearch (249536) | about 8 years ago | (#15160602)

The driver is silently installed on first access, you never have to screw around with it - it just works!

Never in my experience. It usually installed a version from the wrong version of Windows. It would regularly crash my workstation by installing a driver for 2000 on XP.

Re:I bet network engineers (5, Informative)

aldheorte (162967) | about 8 years ago | (#15160141)

There's a difference between computers and services in a distributed environment (network). DHCP operates at a lower level to get individual computers into the environment with an addressable endpoint (IP address). Computer names provide a poor form of 'fixed' DNS for addressing of packets inside the environment from one machine to the other, commonly used for such things as file sharing when you know you need to connect to the named file server and a particular share on it.

Services, on the other hand, could exist on any of the computers and Bonjour (formerly Rendezvous) and other service discovery protocols (such as used in Jini) work at this level, looking for particular services without a care of what computer on which they run, or if they changed from one computer to another because that computer got taken offline and replaced by another one. Services could include an iTunes broadcast stream, an iChat presence, or a service that, when called via a program, can return the expected weight of x pairs of jeans, for a totally inane example.

In the iChat example, if you had a coworker moving between machines, you wouldn't know which one to message just by computer name (such as that Messaging Service that Windows NT has where you can send a message to another machine by machine name and it comes up in a dialog window). With Bonjour, wherever your coworker logged in, your iChat would find his identity as a service and know to route your iChats messages to him at his current machine.

Re:I bet network engineers (1)

rduke15 (721841) | about 8 years ago | (#15160408)

you wouldn't know which one to message just by computer name (such as that Messaging Service that Windows NT has where you can send a message to another machine by machine name and it comes up in a dialog window)

Not really the best example, since you can also use the login name with the Windows messaging protocol, and it pops up on any or every machine on which that user is logged in. Or you can use the workgroup/domain name, and it pops un on every machine.

(Used to be a handy simple tool in LANs, until spammers found they could use it to spam boxes directly connected to the net, and MS stupidly disabled it in some Service Pack. You can re-enable it, but when you send "Going down for maintenance in 5 minutes" on the LAN, there are always some machines on which it hasn't been re-enabled, or has been re-disabled).

Re:I bet network engineers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15160608)

In the iChat example, if you had a coworker moving between machines, you wouldn't know which one to message just by computer name (such as that Messaging Service that Windows NT has where you can send a message to another machine by machine name and it comes up in a dialog window).

Not that I'm a big fan of windows messaging, you can send messages to a user the same way you send a message to a machine. If you send to a user, the message will get to them regardless of where they are logged in.

Re:I bet network engineers (4, Insightful)

ktappe (747125) | about 8 years ago | (#15160195)

why do I need this product? We already have wireless routers with built-in DHCP
This isn't the same thing as DHCP. DHCP hands out IP addresses on a lease basis. Bonjour is a discovery protocol that lets users easily find peripherals without needing to know their addresses. Under Windows without Bonjour (ZeroConf) you still have to manually type in the addresses of IP-based printers whereas Macs with Bonjour find those same devices automatically. It's actually pretty sweet technology that brings to the IP era what AppleTalk supplied back in the late 80's to Macs. And it's peer-to-peer so you don't need any other services (AD, LDAP) providing lookup for you; it's plug & play and it simply works.

-Kurt

Re:I bet network engineers (2, Interesting)

rnelsonee (98732) | about 8 years ago | (#15160257)

And network neighborhood knows about computers on the network.

You haven't used Bonjour, have you? That shit can find computers not on the network. And let you use those printers and other application data. Automatically.

(and I'm not kidding. When my neighbor's daughter launches iTunes, her library shows up in my iTunes, and I can play them. Note that my network is WEP-enabled and MAC filtered, and I'm not part of her network).

Re:I bet network engineers (4, Insightful)

Mikey-San (582838) | about 8 years ago | (#15160353)

When my neighbor's daughter launches iTunes, her library shows up in my iTunes, and I can play them. Note that my network is WEP-enabled and MAC filtered, and I'm not part of her network

You might be WEP-enabled and MAC-filtered, but that doesn't mean you aren't on the same network. (WEP and MAC filtering have nothing to do with Bonjour services specifically.) Bonjour works on a subnet, not over a WAN; getting it to work across separate subnets requires special configuration.

You two are on the same network.

Re:I bet network engineers (1)

soft_guy (534437) | about 8 years ago | (#15160555)

There is a wide area version of Bonjour.

Re:I bet network engineers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15160702)

did you miss the "getting it to work across separate subnets requires special configuration." part?

typical slashdot....

Re:I bet network engineers (1)

teh*fink (618609) | about 8 years ago | (#15160562)

on a related note, one of the other cool examples of bonjour is being able to be on a wired network and browse itunes shares using your wireless card (or vice versa, etc.)

Re:I bet network engineers (1)

soft_guy (534437) | about 8 years ago | (#15160535)

It is needed if you want to dynamically discover something (or be discovered) on your network using Bonjour.

wow (3, Funny)

larry bagina (561269) | about 8 years ago | (#15159711)

from TFA:

Installing Bonjour: Double-click the Bonjour installer and follow the onscreen instructions.

Thanks, I never would have thought of that.

Don't need it (5, Funny)

n6kuy (172098) | about 8 years ago | (#15159772)

I've already said Bonjour to Windows...

Re:Don't need it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15159818)

I think you mean au revoir.

Re:Don't need it (1)

PDubNYC (650812) | about 8 years ago | (#15159836)

I don't think it means what you think it means.

Good day does not work that way.

au revoir

Re:Don't need it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15160096)

Actually, you can say "bonjour" to end a conversation - it's considered quite polite.

And, yes, i am a Francophone.

Re:Don't need it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15160565)

Sorry, but you're from quebec, right? I know by the way you said "bonjour" to end a conversation. And even here in quebec, it's wrong, it is "bonne journee" which is a wish that the day goes good. bonjour is actually used to start the conversation all over the french world.

This isn't news (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15159806)

Sorry but this isn't news

Anyone who has used an airport express on their network with a windows box has already seen this as part of wireless printer discovery

Bonjour vs UPnP (1)

Digital Pizza (855175) | about 8 years ago | (#15159871)

How does Bonjour compare to Univeral Plug-n-Play (besides probably being more secure, given UPnP's reputation)?

Is UPnP widely used already, and if so could Bonjour ever gain any traction in the Windows market?

Re:Bonjour vs UPnP (1)

minus_273 (174041) | about 8 years ago | (#15159923)

most printers support bonjour (i.e. rendezvous v2 ) and all itunes clients and their clones do as well. Limewire and a ton of linux clients use it with DAAP to access itunes shares.

Re:Bonjour vs UPnP (2, Funny)

HardCase (14757) | about 8 years ago | (#15159937)

How does Bonjour compare to Univeral Plug-n-Play (besides probably being more secure, given UPnP's reputation)?

It's much more hip and cool. And it smokes French cigarettes.

Re:Bonjour vs UPnP (4, Informative)

Rosyna (80334) | about 8 years ago | (#15160057)

In Bonjour, application developers describe the service used. For UPnP, The UPnP forum creates the profiles. If a profile doesn't exist, you must wait for the UPnP forum to create it. There appears to be a list of them here [upnp.org] .

For example, there does not appear to be a profile for something like iChat (Internet Chat), Xcode (Distributed Computing), or Font Sharing. Yet Bonjour enables both of these since the standards bodies do not limit the services.

This always comes up. (1)

NutscrapeSucks (446616) | about 8 years ago | (#15160078)

Short Answer: Bonjour doesn't compare to Univeral Plug-n-Play

Bonjour compares to NetBIOS-over-TCP/IP (aka NBT aka "Workgroups") ... ie it's a broadcast protocol that finds printers and other services on your local subnet.

Unless you are using something Apple-specific like iTunes, most apps already use NBT.

Re:Bonjour vs UPnP (0, Flamebait)

Osty (16825) | about 8 years ago | (#15160253)

How does Bonjour compare to Univeral Plug-n-Play (besides probably being more secure, given UPnP's reputation)?

UPnP is insecure because of its reputation? Aside from a little bit of GRC grand-standing [grc.com] , UPnP is perfectly safe (with normal precautions you'd take for anything network-related, of course). Sure, there were a few flaws in Microsoft's implementation of a UPnP IGD (Internet Gateway Device) for use in conjunction with ICS (Internet Connection Sharing, or "NAT" as the rest of us know it), which is something you probably shouldn't use anyway (consumer-grade routers have better connection sharing). Enabling UPnP on your router for use with UPnP-aware applications like Xbox Live, MSN Messenger, Azureus, Media Center Extenders, etc, is perfectly safe. If you use a Linux box as a NAT router, you can even install an IGD [daishar.com] daemon for Linux (of course, you'll want to make sure it's not broadcasting on your public interface).

Others have mentioned that Rendevous/Bonjour is not a competitor to UPnP. I'm talking about the perceived threat of UPnP, and the unfortunate damage that idiot GRC did five years ago by spouting off about crap he didn't understand.

Re:Bonjour vs UPnP (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15160596)

Enabling UPnP on your router for use with UPnP-aware applications like Xbox Live, MSN Messenger, Azureus, Media Center Extenders, etc, is perfectly safe.


Sure. Until your kid installs a trojaned game he got from a buddy at school on his PC, and the trojan asks your router to please open some outbound ports that you wanted to keep shut down. Because you can do that with UPnP, without authentication.

Re:Bonjour vs UPnP (1)

soft_guy (534437) | about 8 years ago | (#15160594)

Microsoft is replacing UPNP with a thing called WS-Discovery in Vista. So, lucky you if you used UPNP, you get to rewrite your app!

If you use Bonjour, you just replace the Bonjour library with this new one.

This is the firts step (0, Flamebait)

denisbergeron (197036) | about 8 years ago | (#15159927)

to replace the bsd kernel by the Windows Kernel !

Re:This is the firts step (1)

hunterx11 (778171) | about 8 years ago | (#15160017)

Ah, but OS X doesn't use a BSD kernel! It uses a Mach kernel--the userland is BSD. You know, programs like ftp, things that are totally different on Windows :)

Not very useful (1, Insightful)

Smack (977) | about 8 years ago | (#15160007)

I don't see the point of this. The stuff is already built into the Apple Windows products.

It would be nice if it was an actual zeroconf windows client, with Samba support or something. But it's not.

Internet Explorer??? (1)

crotherm (160925) | about 8 years ago | (#15160104)


From the article..

Bonjour for Windows includes a plugin to discover advertised HTTP servers using Internet Explorer.

uhh, no thanks...

Linux (1)

metamatic (202216) | about 8 years ago | (#15160573)

Has anyone written a simple guide for how to get Bonjour working on Linux?

By "working", I mean I want to be able to telnet machine.local or ping machine.local like I can on OS X...

Re:Linux (1)

bano (410) | about 8 years ago | (#15160729)

That can be accomplished via multicast dns.
There are mdns implimentations out there.
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