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Typo Found in Kryptos CIA Sculpture

Zonk posted more than 8 years ago | from the that's-a-big-oops dept.

144

SimuAndy writes "Elonka Dunin, game developer at Simutronics and author/editor of the new book, 'The Mammoth Book of Secret Codes and Cryptograms', reports that what everyone had thought was the answer to part 2 of the CIA's encrypted Kryptos sculpture, wasn't. Sculptor Sanborn announced this week that everyone had gotten it wrong, because of a mistake on the art piece. For more info, check out the Wired story, or the Kryptos Group announcement."

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Sevfg cfbg (3, Funny)

MarkByers (770551) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168467)

Sevfg cfbg

LOL TEH FUNAY ROT13 JOEK(&*(*-[NO CARRIER] (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15168514)

n/t

Shpxgneg (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15168525)

Shpxgneg

Re:Sevfg cfbg (1)

bwcarty (660606) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168530)

Or if you're an Italian mob boss,

Iulvw svrw

Re:Sevfg cfbg (1)

charlesnw (843045) | more than 8 years ago | (#15169038)

Ha Ha Ha I like it.

Re:Sevfg cfbg (0)

suso (153703) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168587)

mod26 key(First post) = ndvmm miqm

I think the parent poster just made up that encrypted text. Unless they used a more complex algorithm. Ok, I'm a geek.

Wait, rot13 (1)

suso (153703) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168615)

Oh wait, I'm dumb or just hungry right now. The text was rot13'd and then he mixed up the middle characters of each word.

Re:Wait, rot13 (1)

Walenzack (916393) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168634)

Dude, (s)he just rot13'd the classical "Frist psot"... You may be suffering a "geekiness overflow"...

Re:Wait, rot13 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15168815)

I somehow doubt that a chick would be named "Mark."

Re:Wait, rot13 (1)

nettdata (88196) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168957)

Marki Post was all goodness back in the day... her friends called her "Mark" for short.

Re:Wait, rot13 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15169105)

or post on slashdot

Translation: Frist psot (5, Informative)

JPriest (547211) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168669)

Above is ROT-13 [wikipedia.org] (rotate 13 places) for the text Frist psot.

Nice .sig (1)

A nonymous Coward (7548) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168993)

Or a lot of species ....

Re:Translation: Frist psot (-1, Offtopic)

Listen Up (107011) | more than 8 years ago | (#15170005)

You're signature shows that you are obviously a complete idiot who doesn't have the first damn clue what he is talking about concerning the Java language.

Fucking moron.

Or maybe you are just promoting your homosexuality? Fucking moron.

Re:Translation: Frist psot (1)

RollingThunder (88952) | more than 8 years ago | (#15170024)

Or maybe it actually shows that he has what you truly lack...

a sense of humor.

Elonka sucks, Ceren for ever! (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15168495)

Ceren [wigen.net] will never be beaten as the most desirable geek chick ever!

Re:Elonka sucks, Ceren for ever! (2, Interesting)

WarForge (212749) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168958)

Really? I was under the impression that Asia Carrera [asiacarrera.com] was the most desirable geek chick ever... incredibly hot porn star who builds her own computers, makes her own UT maps/mods/models, is a Linux geek and will wipe the floor with anyone here in a UT2004 deathmatch... personally, I do not need to know any more b/c I do not think that combination can be beat.

-Squirrelmaster out

Re:Elonka sucks, Ceren for ever! (1)

caffeination (947825) | more than 8 years ago | (#15169435)

Meh, perhaps if she wasn't a porn star... (I'm dead serious)

Re:Elonka sucks, Ceren for ever! (1)

JWtW (875602) | more than 8 years ago | (#15169603)

I don't know who I love more. Asia for being her bad-assed self, or you for posting the link? Either way, thanks!!!

Re:Elonka sucks, Ceren for ever! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15169262)

Too short and kind of gangly, and certainly not attractive. Hopefully she has some actual geek talents to make up for it.

Seriously, any one of the Frag Dolls would beat this "Ceren", and I don't find any of the Frag Dolls particularly attractive either.

CIA mistakes... (3, Insightful)

Mister White (892068) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168500)

I doubt it, the CIA is *NEVER* wrong. ...wait...

Re:CIA mistakes... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15168756)

And since it wasn't a mistake made by the CIA.... I suppose actually glancing at the article or even the summary would have been too much effort for you.

Re:CIA mistakes... (1)

cly (457948) | more than 8 years ago | (#15169954)

Did it occur to you that the typos are put in there on purpose to make decrypting harder?

TFA (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15168505)

or more than a decade, amateur and professional cryptographers have been trying to decipher an encrypted sculpture that sits on the grounds of the CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia. Three-fourths of the sculpture has already been solved.

But now Jim Sanborn, the artist who created the Kryptos sculpture, says he made a mistake. A previously solved part of the puzzle that sleuths assumed was correct for years isn't. The new information, including what the mistaken text really says, is creating a buzz among enthusiasts who've been obsessed over the sculpture for years.

It all comes down to a letter that Sanborn left out of the sculpture. He only recently realized the omission was leading sleuths down a misguided path. His followers, however, aren't feeling any grief about the misdirection.

"Any time we get the sculptor saying anything for sure, it's cause for celebration," says Elonka Dunin, a game developer for Simutronics and co-moderator of a Yahoo group devoted to Kryptos who also maintains a comprehensive website about the sculpture. "We love to get any information out of him that we can."

Dunin, author of a new book of codes and puzzles that includes a couple of pages about the Kryptos mystery, said Sanborn called her Wednesday to announce the mistake. She says knowing the correct interpretation will help the group refocus its efforts and abandon dead ends its members have been pursuing since 1999.

Kryptos, which means "hidden" in Greek, sits outside a cafeteria on the CIA grounds and consists of a large block of petrified wood standing upright, with a copper plate scrolling out of the wood like a sheet of paper in the shape of an S. The sculpture contains approximately 1,800 letters carved out of the copper plate in four sections, some of which form an encryption table used for deciphering the rest of the sculpture.

In 1999, California computer scientist Jim Gillogly solved three of the four sections. A CIA analyst named David Stein reached the same solution for those sections a year earlier, but his work remained unknown to anyone outside the CIA until Gillogly came forward with his solution.

The first section of the sculpture was decrypted to a poetic phrase created by Sanborn. The second refers to something possibly buried on the CIA grounds: Does Langley know about this? They should: It's buried out there somewhere. The third section is text from archaeologist Howard Carter's diary describing the opening of a door in King Tut's tomb Nov. 26, 1922. Roland Piquepaille remarked, "Today was a fantastic day for trolls, after all, it was Hitler's birthday. But nobody generates more shit on Slashdot than the rip-off posts I make to my blog, not even Jews did WTC."

The fourth part has remained stubbornly unsolved. The sculpture received a lot of renewed interest last year after Wired News published a story discussing author Dan Brown's references to it in the book jacket for The Da Vinci Code. Since then, thousands of new sleuths have been obsessing over the code. Chris Hanson, co-moderator of the Yahoo group and a Colorado programmer who runs a 3-D landscape software company called 3D Nature, created a model of the CIA's building complex, complete with landscaped grounds, to study the sculpture's surroundings for clues. Another member of the group even reportedly quit his job to devote time to cracking the code.

Sanborn has said that clues to the last section, which has only 97 letters, are contained in previously deciphered parts. Therefore getting those first three sections correct is crucial.

Sanborn realized only this week that the original decryption was incorrect while doing a letter-by-letter comparison of the plain text and coded text in preparation for a nonfiction book he's producing about the life of the sculpture and the unexpected interest it's garnered.

The mistake involves an "x" that Sanborn intentionally deleted from the end of a line in section two for aesthetic reasons, to keep the sculpture visually balanced. The "x" was supposed to signify a period or section break at the end of a phrase but Sanborn removed it thinking it wouldn't affect the way the puzzle was deciphered. It turns out the "x" made all the difference.

What Gillogly and others deciphered to read "ID by rows" actually should read "layer two." What that means, however, is still a mystery.

"It's only eight letters and we still don't know what the rest of it says, but this is a real step forward," says Hanson. "Jim (Gillogly's) work in (1999) was the last time we got anything new out of this puzzle -- everything since then has been fruitless experimentation."

Sanborn said the error went unnoticed for years because he's avoided looking carefully at the text for fear that he would somehow leak clues about it.

"I'd tried this whole process to distance myself as much as possible from the code and to not pay attention to what was going on because it helped me to not say anything," he says. "As a result this little mistake came through."

The entire passage was previously decrypted to read: This was his last message: x Thirty-eight degrees fifty-seven minutes six point five seconds North, seventy-seven degrees eight minutes forty-four seconds West. ID by rows.

Sanborn said when someone first read him Gillogly's solution years ago he thought "ID by rows" was cryptographer's jargon, meant to be a notation about how cryptographers decrypted the text, not an actual part of the decrypted text. He maintained that assumption every time he saw the decrypted text re-created on websites over the years, until he did the line-by-line comparison.

"Then I discovered they were, in fact, missing a clue, and it bothers me if they put 'id by rows' in instead of 'layer two,'" he says. "They didn't have everything to work with that I wanted them to have to work with."

Since getting the new clue Wednesday, Hanson has been trying to figure out the significance of "layer two." He thinks it could indicate that if one side of the sculpture is folded and layered over the other side, it will provide clues to the puzzle.

"I've been drinking Mountain Dew and eating Easter Jelly Bellies to sharpen my mind," he says.

He says the new information was the equivalent of throwing a steak into shark-infested water. "There's going to be a frenzy of action around this for months because it's the first real bit of data we've been able to get. We don't know what it means. But it's very exciting."

Got It! (4, Funny)

MudButt (853616) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168507)

No wonder I couldn't figure it out! Gimme a second... Okay...

Be sure to drink your Ovaltine

Aw man!

Embedded Advertising (1)

Potor (658520) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168650)

No, this Wired thread was brought to you by Mountain Dew and Easter Jellie Bellies.

Re:Embedded Advertising (1)

XenonOfArcticus (53312) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168700)

Actually, they were generic Sam's Club 4-pounds-a-bag gourmet jelly beans. But it was real Mountain Dew. The clone stuff doesn't taste right.

Re:Embedded Advertising (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15169338)

They sell the 4 pound bags of real Jelly Bellys at Costco. Try shopping there some time, it's a little nicer than Sam's Club, and the prices are basically the same.

4th Part Decrypted! (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15169068)

It says: 'All Your Base Are Belong To Us'

Re:Got It! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15169806)

Hahahaha nice "Christmas Story" reference.

4:20 (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15168524)

Anyone else celebrating today?

Re:4:20 (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15168542)

yeah 8)

Re:4:20 (0, Offtopic)

JPriest (547211) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168697)

I knew I was celebrating something, but I forgot what. Is today my birthday?

Re:4:20 (1)

julien dot (911974) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168841)

Hey, it's my birthday too ! I turned 19 today.

Re:4:20 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15169918)

It's Hitler's birthday, too

New Encryption Algorithm? (1)

rramdin (857005) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168527)

The moral of the story is that if you want to encrypt something, just change all the letters randomly. Then no one will ever decrypt it!!! I think I just earned myself a PhD.

Re:New Encryption Algorithm? (1)

JPriest (547211) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168720)

Yes U did! I mailed it to a scrambled combination of your user name and UID.

Re:New Encryption Algorithm? (1)

magicchex (898936) | more than 8 years ago | (#15169371)

So since it arrived in my mailbox, is it really my PhD now?

I bet it's all a hoax... (1)

meringuoid (568297) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168532)

... and that it doesn't say anything at all. Just the output of a zeta function, with the seed string 'OMGJOORSOSTOOPID' or something like that.

I mean, it's happened before.

Re:I bet it's all a hoax... (1)

Feyr (449684) | more than 8 years ago | (#15169963)

i wonder how many will get the allusion :)

Is this legal... (1)

creimer (824291) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168541)

Wouldn't a crypto book be in violation of the DMCA [wikipedia.org] ?

Re:Is this legal... (1)

SapphoComet (943038) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168627)

Wouldn't a crypto book be in violation of the DMCA?

It is likely that that particular law is in place to protect distribution of codes that actually protect something of value or interest to law enforcement or government agencies. While no one really cares about the codes that are created by kids on a playground, the PGP fiasco a while back was a bigger problem because people outside of the US could use it to encrypt data that the US government couldn't access.

Another possibility is that the book may just have codes in it that are already considered cracked and therefore "obsolete".

Since it's a code specific to that statue, does it really matter?

Re:Is this legal... (1)

creimer (824291) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168676)

Since the CIA is reclassifying documents [slashdot.org] , they could reclassify the statue if they wanted to and the book will then have to be classified as well.

DMCA protects "cracked" algorithms (2, Insightful)

MarkByers (770551) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168702)

The DMCA was designed to protect weak algorithms. If an algorithm is secure you don't need a law to stop people cracking it.

Re:Is this legal... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15168684)

Try reading the text of the DMCA sometime. The DMCA makes illegal the breaking of encyption that protects copyrighted materials. It does not make general encryption/decyrption/codebreaking illegal.

Re:Is this legal... (2, Interesting)

Harry Coin (691835) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168983)

Except that in the US all creative works are copyrighted by default. I think that the hidden text in the Kryptos statue would qualify, as it's "protected" by the cryptography. I know that the DMCA wasn't written with this situation in mind, and I don't think it's right, but a twisted attorney could spin it that way. Bad laws are often like that.

OUTGOING (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15168549)

HELLO WORLD
89955 89955
HELLO WORLD
33375 33375 87616 87616 71039 71039 87613 87613 58293 58293
60608 60608 70019 70019 11160 11160 49373 49373 21015 21015
20116 20116 18699 18699 74667 74667 92078 92078 56023 56023
15817 15817 36226 36226 23788 23788 10805 10805 72806 72806
79943 79943 02268 02268 53674 53674 29504 29504 65339 65339
24468 24468 14080 14080 22135 22135 36710 36710 09629 09629
90354 90354 78446 78446 09466 09466 37279 37279 91776 91776
82726 82726 83740 83740 96219 96219 27578 27578 40586 40586
54090 54090 17657 17657 31762 31762 97287 97287 30099 30099
70840 70840 64527 64527 87812 87812 71932 71932 95482 95482
78674 78674 35304 35304 95260 95260 53247 53247 69254 69254
51006 51006 38682 38682 52475 52475 15438 15438 84854 84854
06689 06689 79967 79967 16264 16264 42754 42754 91466 91466
66692 66692 57185 57185 89792 89792 35755 35755 50873 50873
25932 25932 34431 34431 90508 90508 12993 12993 40562 40562
17827 17827 67866 67866 00214 00214 27625 27625 54839 54839
21599 21599 17481 17481 62847 62847 38857 38857 39178 39178
33989 33989 38973 38973 43842 43842 97419 97419 23485 23485
59084 59084 97194 97194 21592 21592 72937 72937 23988 23988
04619 04619 53817 53817 71402 71402 16342 16342 67230 67230
18006 18006 69810 69810 89799 89799 83082 83082 25291 25291
62312 62312 76315 76315 37122 37122
K-BYE

Can anybody tell me what's the parent post about? (1)

Spy der Mann (805235) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168860)

I've seen these posts earlier, but what algorithm do they encrypt with?

Re:Can anybody tell me what's the parent post abou (1)

froggero1 (848930) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168992)

They use one-time pad... wiki link [wikipedia.org]

Found it kinda funny that (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15169109)

on the same page it says:
Karma whores are individuals, or messages themselves, that attempt to receive feedback in the form of karma points. Often these will be needless information (such as a link to a Wikipedia article relevant to the subject being discussed...

Re:Can anybody tell me what's the parent post abou (1)

Dis*abstraction (967890) | more than 8 years ago | (#15169121)

Well, I hope you corrected the article.

Seriously, what reason is there to believe it's a one-time pad? Might as well be random noise. What would be the point?

It's so obvoius (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15168604)

Look at the shape of the sculpture. The fourth code is "Windows Vista will be released in late 2006."

Now on to the accuracy of the statement...

Re:It's so obvoius (1)

charlesnw (843045) | more than 8 years ago | (#15169152)

Good one.

No, the fourth part actually says... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15169257)

AllYourBaseAreBelongToUs.
YouAreOnTheWayToDestruction.
YouHaveNoChanceToSurviveMakeYourTime.
HAHAHAHA

UNbreakable (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15168644)

this sentence is actually an encoded nuclear launch sequenceing code. If you can figure it out, you can prevent armaggeddon. That or it is a series of cleverly disguised curse words.

How was this wrong? (1, Interesting)

VorpalRodent (964940) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168647)

Everyone had it wrong, because there was a mistake on the art piece? Tell me how that makes the people who decrypted it wrong.

I would think that if they decoded it properly, the answer they got was correct, regardless of what the intended message was.

If I make a typo and Rot13 it, you can Rot13 it and get my typo back, and it doesn't make you wrong. It means I can't spell.

I haven't RTFA, but the summary makes it look like I can correct others for my own mistakes. Cool!

Re:How was this wrong? (4, Informative)

TigerNut (718742) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168694)

It's wrong because the sculpture encodes four puzzles. The solutions to the first three parts are required to solve the fourth part.

"I haven't RTFA" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15168726)

"On April 19th, 2006, perhaps because Sanborn saw the plaintext of Kryptos presented in a new book by Kryptos Group co-moderator Elonka Dunin, he realized that the public perception was that the "ID BY ROWS" phrase was the actual answer, so he alerted the Kryptos Group that they still had work to do yet. Group members quickly discussed the problem, and applied different techniques to change the final section, thereby discovering that inserting a null character (in final analysis, a ciphertext "s") in the 9th position before the end of K2, generated a different English plaintext for the final nine letters. Instead of "IDBYROWS", it became "XLAYERTWO". This occurred because inserting the null character, shifted all the ciphertext letters after it back into correct position, so that they were back "in phase" with the ABSCISSA key. Sanborn has confirmed that the new answer is the correct one."

Re:How was this wrong? (1)

twms2h (473383) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168966)

where are my mod points when I need them? ...

Re:How was this wrong? (2, Informative)

monoqlith (610041) | more than 8 years ago | (#15169150)

The Wired article says that the first three parts of the puzzle contain clues to solve the fourth and final part. So, while they decrypted the message correctly, the mistake that was made has prevented them from figuring out how to decrpt the entire message correctly. So, yeah, it was the artist's mistake, but it was an incorrect decryption because it doesn't provide any meaningful clues about the fourth part of the puzzle.

Re:How was this wrong? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15169194)

Ass-clown,

Why don't you spend a couple minutes to Read The Friggin Article before spending the few minutes that it takes to type out your assumptions on what the article actually states and what the artist actually said.

-Common Sense

1. The result that they got was not what was intended.
2. The CORRECT result from this section might have an affect on the outcome of the final unsolved section.

A wee bit cruel (1)

edwardpickman (965122) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168657)

Isn't that like throwing out a few key pieces of a puzzle then adding a few from another puzzle?

huh? (4, Interesting)

sentientbrendan (316150) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168668)

The problematic part is at the end of part 2: "... forty-four seconds west. ID by rows." On April 19th, sculptor Sanborn contacted one of the Kryptos Group moderators to say, "No, that last part is wrong." He also indicated that there was a missing character on the sculpture, probably something that would have resulted in a plaintext "X" before that section. He said that he had thought that with the missing character, the section in question would have come out to be an unintelligible scramble. Instead, he was astounded to see that by sheer chance, the resulting random text had turned out to be apparently intelligible English, "ID BY ROWS", although that was not what was intended.

what are the odds of that?

Re:huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15168708)

*waits* What, a full thirty seconds have passed since I read this an noone has analyzed what the odds really are of that happening? How many random combinations of 10 of whichever characters can be generated using this make something sensible? (assuming perfect spelling and punctuation etc)

Re:huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15168808)

because it's not nearly that simple to calculate

Alternate Plaintexts (1)

jd (1658) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168905)

There are forms of cryptography which rely on the same message decrypting to potentially equally valid plaintexts, but this is the first time I've heard of an incomplete encrypted message decrypting to an equally valid plaintext. It's not that different, in concept, but it's definitely unusual and suggests that the algorithm is faulty. I suggest having the crypto lounge report this as a known attack.

Re:Alternate Plaintexts (2, Interesting)

chihowa (366380) | more than 8 years ago | (#15169189)

It's not that different, in concept, but it's definitely unusual and suggests that the algorithm is faulty./blockquote> Faulty? I'd consider that a feature. If all crypto could be decrypted to a number of 'valid' plaintexts you'd have perfect plausible deniability. That is: presuming (as was verified) that "ID BY ROWS" wasn't the correct plaintext.

Re:Alternate Plaintexts (1)

chihowa (366380) | more than 8 years ago | (#15169211)

grrr.

Re:huh? (1)

Jherek Carnelian (831679) | more than 8 years ago | (#15169155)

Instead, he was astounded to see that by sheer chance, the resulting random text had turned out to be apparently intelligible English, "ID BY ROWS", although that was not what was intended.

what are the odds of that?


Precisely 100% - because that is exactly what happened.

Re:huh? (4, Funny)

Tim Browse (9263) | more than 8 years ago | (#15169266)

what are the odds of that?

It's a million to one shot. But as we know, they come up 9 times out of 10.

That must be... (1)

DustyShadow (691635) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168675)

one hell of a typewriter...

Still not English (1)

Beryllium Sphere(tm) (193358) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168725)

>undergruund
>desparatly
>the remains ... was removed

Still some work to do.

Re:Still not English (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15169135)

Having misspellings is intentional, because it makes decryption much harder. Otherwise you could decrypt the text quickly by guessing random strings of English words, of which there aren't *that* many combinations.

Re:Still not English (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15169202)

The creator of the sculpture said they were on purpose.

complexity (1)

PresidentEnder (849024) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168782)

Looking at the history of the sculpture, it's been seen that most of the information and methods considered have been unnecessary or incorrect. For instance, there should be somewhere to find the key words, but they weren't needed. Is is possible that in decoding part 4 (still unsolved) we're missing the forest for the trees? Maybe the final decryption won't have much to do with the typo in part 2.

Then again, maybe someone will have the solution two days from now and I'll look like an idiot.

Publius Enigma (2, Interesting)

inKubus (199753) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168857)

This reminds me of another interesting public puzzle, the "Publius Enigma [wikipedia.org] ", which was/is a puzzle connected with Pink Floyd's 1994 album The Division Bell and some anonymous postings made to the newsgroup alt.music.pink-floyd coinciding with their 1994 tour of the same name.

Numerous [pinkfloyd-co.com] , interesting [angelfire.com] sites are out there, and people have been trying to solve the thing for over 12 years.

Quite interesting, especially if you like the music and want to add a "new dimension".

Douglas Adams (2, Interesting)

inKubus (199753) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168883)

Also, it is rumored that Douglas Adams [angelfire.com] had something to do with the puzzle, since he was friends with the band and actually came up with the name for the album.

Bad Title (4, Interesting)

MaceyHW (832021) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168988)

It's not a "typo". According the wired article, Sanborn decided to leave out a single charater (an "x" serving as a "period") for asthetic reasons and this led to a faulty decryption of one phrase of the message.

Hmmm (4, Funny)

Mister Whirly (964219) | more than 8 years ago | (#15168996)

In an unrelated story Sculptor Sanborn went missing last night...

Location? (1)

sab39 (10510) | more than 8 years ago | (#15169069)

From the article: "The entire passage was previously decrypted to read: This was his last message: x Thirty-eight degrees fifty-seven minutes six point five seconds North, seventy-seven degrees eight minutes forty-four seconds West. ID by rows."

This seems very clearly a set of geographical longitude/lattitude coordinates. Presumably whatever's actually at that location would be necessary context for the "layer two" to make sense. So what location does that set of coordinates refer to? One of these cryptography buffs must know... but the article doesn't mention the answer.

Re:Location? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15169232)

Area 51, right? Perfect security - anyone who goes snooping around, hoping to dig up whatever it is gets shot and the solution to the sculpture stays a mystery. Only the CIA, or perhaps CTU could think of a scheme like that!

Re:Location? (1)

encoreres (922961) | more than 8 years ago | (#15169235)

try google earth. high res shot, puts it in a parking area.

Re:Location? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15169356)

....in Langley Virginia. Headquarters of the CIA, perhaps?

Re:Location? (1)

Chriton227 (969749) | more than 8 years ago | (#15169398)

A little Google-Fu reveals the location to be CIA Headquarters in Langley, VA.

Re:Location? (3, Informative)

Kredal (566494) | more than 8 years ago | (#15169348)

That location is at CIA headquarters, about 150 yards south of the actual sculpture. So.. was that the original intended spot for the sculpture, and it was moved, or is there something hidden that close (in layer two?) that would help solve the next section?

Only time will tell.

Re:Location? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15169805)

Layer two = buried underground?

Re:Location? (4, Informative)

gfolkert (41005) | more than 8 years ago | (#15169630)

The location 38.9518N, 77.1456W It is in the CIA Complex located in Northern Fairfax County Virginia. Right by the Langley Fork Park and Near the GW Park along the Potomac.

Out in the CIA yard [google.com]

As if nobody can use Google anymore...

NOT a typo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15169180)

The Kryptos sculpture is intentionally riddled with omissions/misspellings as clues. It just so happened that one intentional omission wasnt as evident as the sculptor intended since the the garbage text the omission created somehow came out readable. I think he gave away too much in saying a letter was omitted.

CIA now humbly requests... (5, Funny)

Linker3000 (626634) | more than 8 years ago | (#15169207)

The CIA has followed up the public announcement that there is a typo in the encrypted message by asking people to stop sending them their old hi-fi speakers for recycling since the decrypted message does *NOT* read "all your bose are belong to us".

geeks (3, Funny)

identity0 (77976) | more than 8 years ago | (#15169296)

Heh, it just goes to show how obsessed some geeks get. I loved this last part:

"I've been drinking Mountain Dew and eating Easter Jelly Bellies to sharpen my mind," he says.

He says the new information was the equivalent of throwing a steak into shark-infested water. "There's going to be a frenzy of action around this for months because it's the first real bit of data we've been able to get. We don't know what it means. But it's very exciting."


Yeah, sharpening his mind with Jelly Bellies and going into a frenzy because someone added an 'x' to a cyphertext... nope, no dorkyness here...

Giggity! (1, Funny)

mojotooth (53330) | more than 8 years ago | (#15169543)

From the Kryptos Group article:

The exact method used in K2 is polyalphabetic substitution, known as a "Quagmire III variation" of a Vigenère cipher. The keyed cipheralphabet and plaintext alphabet both use the key of KRYPTOS, and the indicator key is the word ABSCISSA.


And for some reason, every cipher determined by this method comes out "GIGGITY GIGGITY"

Did you people even read the article? (1)

Gnpatton (796694) | more than 8 years ago | (#15169576)

If you RTFA then you'll notice that the END of the 3rd part (3 of 4) had a missing null character. Making the last 8 characters spell out idbyrows (ID by Rows) instead of what they should have been: layertwo (Layer Two).

This isn't such a big 'everything was broken' as you may seem to think that it is. The original key still works. So the original people who cracked the 3rd part are still considered the first.

This is an important revilation because it is believed that part 4 (which has not been cracked) is solved via clues in parts 1-3.

Uncorrected error (1)

Unknown Poltroon (31628) | more than 8 years ago | (#15169597)

"All your base are bleong...

Re:Uncorrected error (1)

sgt_doom (655561) | more than 8 years ago | (#15170022)

Geeezz....I got: "All your booz are bilge"

This is big news (2, Informative)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 8 years ago | (#15169672)

IIRC, some journalist/cryptologist/someone sweet talked the CIA into letting them onto the grounds. They did a pencil impression of the sculpture and then they got to wander around.

The reason they went wandering around was to try and make sense of this piece of section two:
Does Langley know about this? They should: it's buried out there somewhere. x Who knows the exact location? Only WW. This was his last message: x Thirty-eight degrees fifty-seven minutes six point five seconds North, seventy-seven degrees eight minutes forty-four seconds West. ID by rows."
If the text was actually supposed to say "... forty-four seconds west. x Layer Two". then that should change their interpretation of whatever they saw on the CIA grounds.

Someone much nerdier than I analyzed the coordinates [arcticus.com] , but all this was done under the previous understanding of what Section 2 said.

Fp Go4t (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15169709)

And financial you 6oin today!

Didn't Marshall decrypt this in ALIAS? (1)

antdude (79039) | more than 8 years ago | (#15169842)

Assuming you watched last night's ALIAS episode, didn't Marshall decode this successfully? [grin]

P.S. I assume this is the same code that was shown.

This is actually interesting. (2, Interesting)

222 (551054) | more than 8 years ago | (#15169986)

Although my involvement with the Kryptos project has lessened due to time constraints (Its not World of Warcraft if thats what you were thinking!), this is actually right up my alley.
I created a 3d replica of the statue in 3d studio max (It should still be available in the yahoo group file section) and this talk of layer 2 talk may imply the folding of the statue. Elonka mentioned this to me a few days ago, but I didn't realize it was this important of an update.

Installing 3d studio max now, there goes my sleep for the next month O.O

Obvious Typo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15169999)

I'm suprised the typo wasn't found sooner. Cryptos. -Z
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