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Vintage Diseases Making a Comeback

Zonk posted more than 8 years ago | from the gotta-catch-em-all dept.

403

An anonymous reader writes "MSNBC has a piece on a recent resurgence in some old-timey diseases. Mumps, Whooping Cough, and Rickets are making a comeback, back in style like it's 1955." From the article: "Public-health officials certainly weren't expecting to get 'bitten' by mumps this year. Although the virus has been circulating in British kids since 2000, it hadn't caused much trouble in the United States since an outbreak in Kansas 18 years ago. The Midwest is the epicenter again, but the victims are primarily college students, not children. Once a childhood disease, the virus has now taken hold in university towns. That's partly because crowded dorms and cafeterias are breeding grounds for germs that are spread by sneezing and coughing."

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Innoculations? (5, Interesting)

SeaFox (739806) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233584)

Isn't MMR (measles-mumps-rubella) a standard set of vacines everyone gets before they go into school? How long are those supposed to be effective?

In a side note: the girl sitting next to me right now (at work) was gone with the mumps a couple weeks ago.

Re:Innoculations? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15233594)

They were, but then the public started believing the media which overhyped the fact that a small number of vaccinations can cause health problems and I've seen far too many parents who don't get their kids vaccinated.

Re:Innoculations? (5, Interesting)

NoTheory (580275) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233598)

It's not clear. NPR had a story discussing this last week. The outbreak is wide enough that people are beginning to wonder if there's a hole in the efficacy of the MMR vaccines. Normally the vaccine is inneffective in 10% of the population, but the way it's spreading makes it seem like there's a wider problem of some sort.

I also wonder if it could have been that there were bad batches of vaccine or something. Then again, i don't know what the demographic background of the people effected is. If it's people from all over the country (a possibility with college students) then the cause will be different if it's just people from a cluster of states in the mid-west.

Re:Innoculations? (5, Interesting)

PhysicsPhil (880677) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233638)

It's not clear. NPR had a story discussing this last week. The outbreak is wide enough that people are beginning to wonder if there's a hole in the efficacy of the MMR vaccines. Normally the vaccine is inneffective in 10% of the population, but the way it's spreading makes it seem like there's a wider problem of some sort.

I also wonder if it could have been that there were bad batches of vaccine or something. Then again, i don't know what the demographic background of the people effected is. If it's people from all over the country (a possibility with college students) then the cause will be different if it's just people from a cluster of states in the mid-west.

The article and other news outlets are blaming it on two major factors. The mumps-measles-rubella vaccine shifted from a one-dose variety to a two-dose in the late 1980s. Many people didn't get the second dose, leading to a lowered immunity. That same generation are now going to school and meeting other susceptible people. Instant outbreak.

Also there was a medical study that indicated some links between the vaccin and autism some time ago. The claim was largely retracted, but it was scary enough that some families didn't have their children vaccinated.

What does somewhat surprise me is the university students getting this disease. Don't the universities require proof of up-to-date innoculations for incoming students?

Re:Innoculations? (1)

thebdj (768618) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233674)

It wasn't too long ago I was applying to school, and only one school to which I applied required medical records to show proof of vaccination. I did not have to provide proof to my eventual school after enrolling either. Though, I am properly vaccinated and even have two non-mandatory vaccinations. Another aside, I think there has also been talk about needing to give another booster shot for MMR.

Re:Innoculations? (3, Interesting)

bcmm (768152) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233641)

There is also the problem of people avoiding the vaccine because of the autism scare. I've heard teenagers refusing school MMR vaccinations because of it, because no one has explained to them that they are too old to "catch autism" from the jab.

Re:Innoculations? (4, Insightful)

bcmm (768152) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233657)

Pressed submit too soon...

A population is considered protected if greater than a certain percentage of people are immune, because beyond that point an outbreak will tend to die out as people get better faster than others are infected. If the vaccine fails in 10% of people, it shouldn't really matter. However, worries (and tabloid scares) about side effects lead to too many people refusing the vaccine, which starts to put a lot of people in danger.

Re:Innoculations? (5, Informative)

Stickerboy (61554) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233773)

It's called herd immunity [wikipedia.org] .

Here are the equations [wikipedia.org] relevant to immunizing a large populace from a disease.

many other problems though (1, Insightful)

r00t (33219) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233888)

The immune system is an unstable beast. Get it confused, and it kills or maims you.

Without the benefit of technology or even neurons, the immune system must somehow learn to attack the right things. Don't destroy the skin. Don't destroy the ear. Destroy the mumps virus. Don't destroy the pancreas. Destroy bacteria in the heart. Keep the intestinal bacteria from getting out, but don't destroy the intestines while doing so.

Now, you poke this unstable beast. Most likely you get the desired result. There is a decent chance that nothing happens at all. Sometimes, the unstable beast goes into a fit of rage and decides that nerve cells are evil, maybe because there was a nerve cell found at the injection site or, well, "just because". Maybe it decides that the liver is an alien parasite growing in your chest.

There are plenty of military examples. The famous one was a female Apache pilot. (bias? no, of course this never happens to males...) She never flew again.

A vaccine is only good if the benefit exceeds the risk. Risk depends on your exposure to the disease and your general health. A kid in a low-cost L.A. daycare center has far more risk than a kid growing up in an isolated community of people who value personal space and extreme sanitation, but far less risk than a malnourished kid in a refugee camp. Evaluate your risk.

Re:Innoculations? (2, Insightful)

caenorhabditas (914198) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233785)

I live in the area that the mumps outbreak is affecting, and some friends of friends have contracted it. It's mostly affecting college students in and around the University of Iowa. Because the UI is a state school and because the people affected are all roughly the same age, I'd say that a bad batch would be a good possibility. It's also possible that it's just a different strain that has the wrong antigens for the vaccine.

Re:Innoculations? (2, Informative)

ElectricOkra (876481) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233800)

a bad batch of vaccines were to blame for a measles outbreak in Texas in 1986-87... I was only 13 at the time, but I don't remember it breaking out nationwide... hundreds of kids 15-16yrs old got it... my brother was one of them, but both my sisters and I were unaffected...

The thing with the MMR vaccine now is that they suggest a booster at about 18, but it isn't manditory (or even widely known that it is offered, really) so I imagine that is why we are seeing an outbreak among college-age people...

Re:Innoculations? (0, Troll)

Cymerc (750760) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233928)

I think it's because of all the illegals from mexico that haven't been vaccinated for these diseases. They then spread it to us.

Re:Innoculations? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15233601)

You would be surprised at the number of parents who refuse those vaccinations. "Oh, it will cause autism", "Oh, it's the evil government injecting us with implants", "Oh, it will cause mumps",...

As usual, superstition is going to cause incredible suffering by bringing back these old diseases.

Re:Innoculations? (1)

ElectricOkra (876481) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233826)

getting a disease due to a vaccination isn't far-fetched... it happens a lot, but the disease is greatly reduced in its severity... When I was 9 and my family and I were moving overseas, I had to get all kinds of additional vaccines (smallpox, polio, cholera, etc) and ended up getting a small case of cholera that kept me out of school for quite a while...

Re:Innoculations? (1)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233894)

When I was 9 and my family and I were moving overseas, I had to get all kinds of additional vaccines (smallpox, polio, cholera, etc) and ended up getting a small case of cholera that kept me out of school for quite a while...

I can relate to that: when I did my military service, I didn't have proof that I was vaccinated for common disease, so they gave me a sort of "super shot" supposed to immunize me against many disease. Well I don't know what was in that shot exactly, but I sure got sick for three days.

Re:Innoculations? (0, Offtopic)

SeaFox (739806) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233605)

Oh! Dammit! I forgot to say First Post! And for once I actually got it.

Re:Innoculations? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15233625)

The problem is not the MMR vaccine, it's the fear of autsism that was plastered over UK news papers as a risk of being given the vaccine.

The middle classes are weighing the small risk of autism against debilitating childhood diseases and death.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MMR_vaccine#1998_Lanc et_paper [wikipedia.org]

A number of issues (2, Insightful)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233639)

  1. One is that parents are forgetful or not knowledgable. Many parents do not know what is suppose to be done, and with insurance changin all the time, it means that a child can drop through the cracks.
  2. Illegal aliens are afraid to go to the docs, so do not get vaccinated.
  3. Finally, you have the neo-con/far right wing religious types (focus on the family) that believe the gov and science is out to get them. So they do not vacinate, even though it is irresonsible on their part. This was partialy due to the fact that the small pox vacinne was killing several hundred kids a year throughout the world even though there was no apparent outbreaks. Sadly, it was required to rid ourselves of the menance.

What is needed is a program that is designed to track kids and even require them to get into schools. Until then, we will see more and more outbreaks.

Re:A number of issues (1, Insightful)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233722)

you neglected

4. the New-ager/Far Left wing hippie types that believe the gov and science is out to get them. So they do not vacinate, even though it is irresonsible on their part.

I keep hearing about "mercury levels" and Thimerosal on the radio from the "organic foods," chiropractic, and "alternative medicine" types that think vaccines are some kind of conspiracy put forth by the eeeevil medical establishment to make you treatably, but not curably ill, so they can continue to make money treating you.

Re:A number of issues (1)

Jack9 (11421) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233878)

Lemme do a quick reality check. How many ppl do I know who are not vaccinating their kids because they are liberal whack-jobs afraid of autism? 0. How many illegal aliens from Mexico (with no health coverage) do I know, about 200. I think the "number of issues" is much like the "number of issues" with the spread of HIV. Yes you could theoretically spread it through toilet seats. How many people do I know who got AIDS that way? 0 More likely it's the young, poor, irresponsible, and needle users...of which I have known 5.

Re:A number of issues (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15233943)

There's probably an equal number of right-wing nutzoids that think vaccination is a communist plot, and/or home-school their kids and never get the vaccinations.

Perceived association to autism (1)

benhocking (724439) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233725)

And, #4, some parents believe that the thimerosal (a mercury-containing organic compound) that was present in most vaccines (but is now present in only a few - such as inactivated influenza) was responsible for the meteoric rise in autism rates. Thimerosal is a preservative, and the CDC and FDA do not believe it has any connection to autism. However, many parents refuse to vaccine their kids out of the fear that their might be a connection. This is even more likely to be true in families where relatives have autism - as autism (or at least some forms of it) definitely does have a genetic component. And, of course, families that have relatives with autism are more likely to have heard of the thimerosal theory. (I say theory, not myth, because I'm not 100% sure that there isn't something to it. Time should help answer those questions since the decision to drop thimerosal from most vaccines should result in a drop in autism if thimerosal was a contributing factor to it.)

Oh, and even though thimerosal is not present in vaccines such as MMR, there are still parents who refuse to vaccinate their kids on the theory that it could have been something else in the vaccines that was responsible. Timing is no doubt one culprit here, as autism does not usually surface until 2-3 years old, although I am aware of one child whose brother had autism who had it diagnosed prior to his first birthday.

Re:Perceived association to autism (1)

MaXiMiUS (923393) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233762)

I agree with that. My brother was perfectly normal until he was given shots (I was too young to remember this, so I'm retelling the story as it was told to me), and he began developing autism. He can no longer speak, and focuses on things that an average person wouldn't even give a second glance, for hours.

Re:A number of issues (1)

EnronHaliburton2004 (815366) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233747)

you have the neo-con/far right wing religious types

To be fair, there are many hippyish/far left wing types and centrist-types who don't vaccinate their kids either, or who choose to use some sort of 'homeopathic' alternative to vaccinations.

From my perspective, the primary motivation for these parents is the fear over mercury/thimerosal in the vaccines, grouping many vaccines together in a single doctor visit for an infant, etc.

I find it all pretty scary.

(My family is all vaccinated)

Re:A number of issues (1)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233792)

My 2 y.o. daughter is going through all of her shots.

So far, I know of several ppl who are not going through it because they believe the vaccines are not safe. Interestingly, they will home school and are FOTF types. But they pointed out about the Small Pox and gov. oversight as being their issue (and faith in god).

But in my close COFs, I know of one person's daughter who is not getting MMR. What is intesting is that she is a bio-staticians for CU med. But her issue is that she believes that natural exposure is better. In fact, we talked about the mercury thing, and she looked into it and found nothing to back it. Another friend at the poker party is a Children's hospital emergency room doc. They are like myself, vacinating their daughter.

Re:A number of issues (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15233822)

While I agree with points 1 and 2, regarding point 3 I must point out that one should not build straw men to burn down. I am a very conservative Christian, and have found the group you mentioned to generally fall in line with the same beliefs I hold. Most of the people I know, whether through church, work, etc. hold very similar views. The point is I can't say I know anyone who has refused to have their children vaccinated. Are there Christians that have done this? Probably so. Are non-Christians that have done this too? Again, probably so. I only ask that you refrain from making sweeping generalizations either to make a point or to "villainize" a group of people holding views that differ from yours.

Re:A number of issues (1)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233892)

The several ppl that I refered to another post, are conservative christians, they live in the springs and attend the mass there, are associated heavily with FOTF. And yes, they said that they thought that gov could not be trusted with this (even though the serum is not from gov.).

In addition, now that I recall it, my nephew and nieces were not vaccinated in the 80's. They were home schooled, and taught that vaccination was against god (But to be fair, their mother was more whacky, than religious).

This was not a strawman. There is a fairly large group that does not vaccinate due to religion pushing it. It is very strong in the bible belt.

I personally find that behavior irresponsible and illogical. They run higher risks on their children as well as on other in the society (if we could get back to the high rates of vaccination, we could irradicate some of these and then would be able to stop doing them). You may not like what I said, but you did notice where the incidents occured? Basically, along the lines of the bible belt. 'Nuff said.

Re:A number of issues (1)

Thing 1 (178996) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233872)

Many parents do not know what is suppose to be done, and with insurance changin all the time, it means that a child can drop through the cracks.

I think what they perhaps should have done is carpet the floor. Or linoleum. Barring that, put the damn boards closer together.

I also think it amusing that Kansas was the only place affected 18 years ago. I suppose, in Kansas, neither diseases nor humans evolve?

Illegal aliens are afraid to go to the docs, so do not get vaccinated.

Many illegal aliens can't read english, so it's understandable that documentation would scare them.

The humor comes to an abrupt halt:

Sadly, it was required to rid ourselves of the menance.

What is needed is a program that is designed to track kids and even require them to get into schools. Until then, we will see more and more outbreaks.

"Required?" No, killing children is never required. Your conclusion sounds like both the RFID and national ID card proponents, wrapped into one nice little rights-averse package.

Does your plan include banning home-schooling? What if the parents refuse? Is it jail time for them, for not wanting "the state" to indoctrinate their offspring? Or, simply fine them until they lose their house? (Might as well have put them in jail, then, because you're most likely going to afterwards.)

Re:A number of issues (1)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233944)

"Required?" No, killing children is never required.

ALL of the nations ran the small pox program for some time, until it was thought that Small pox had been eradicated. Had they stopped too soon and kids had not had it for some time, then the outbreak would have caused many times more deaths than what happened by running the program as long as they had. In fact, it would have been highly illogical to stop too early, as it would nessicaitate that more ppl die in the future. It does sound cruel, but it has been decades since anybody (let alone a child) died of the pox.

Or do you think that you would have ended it early and allowed future children to die by the millions?



Does your plan include banning home-schooling? What if the parents refuse? Is it jail time for them, for not wanting "the state" to indoctrinate their offspring?

Far from it. I am not opposed to home schooling. I suggested requiring vaccinations if the child attends school; as in public school. Once they are together, they are now a risk to each other.

Any other red herring, straw man and ad hoiman attacks that you care to make?

Re:Innoculations? (2, Informative)

quentin_quayle (868719) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233678)

Part of the problem is that many parents now associate the significant increase in autism in recent decades with the MMR. In many cases the condition becomes manifest *immediately* after the vaccination causing a drastic difference in the child.

One theory holds that it's the combination all three at once that brings on the disease in susceptible individuals. Another is that it's mercury. Until recently these vaccines were laced with Thiomersal (Thimerosal?) which contains ethyl mercury. Methyl mercury is extremely toxic; elemental mercury is relatively inert in the body; the effects of ethyl mercury are officially unknown. The questioning of the MMR, or the mercury-containing version, seems to be a bigger controversy, and more acted upon by parents, in the UK than in USA, but there's a lot about it on www and many parents are concerned here too.

Of course the health authorities reactions to these parental concerns have ranged from derision to contempt to hostility. They refuse to offer the vaccines separately and then blame parents who are reluctant to give them together. They reject any concerns about the mercury as quackery. Studies in journals have purported to show no effects from the doses of mercury. The ingredient (a preservative) has been officially banned now, but was not recalled, so it is still in doses in stocks used by doctors, clinics.

Re:Innoculations? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15233789)

And that autism is usually only discovered by doctors, and when the children are in the age to get MMR vaccines, has nothing to do with it. Nope, no siree.

Re:Innoculations? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15233848)

Of course the health authorities reactions to these parental concerns have ranged from derision to contempt to hostility.

And the reason for that is that there's no evidence whatsoever that vaccines cause autism (but there are a whole lot of studies disproving it). False, unfounded beliefs should be met with derision.

Re:Innoculations? (1, Troll)

JohnFluxx (413620) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233854)

Something particularly funny in the UK is that in an area with a low number of vaccinations due to stupid parents, there was an outbreak recently and quite a few number of children died. 90% of them weren't vaccinated because of their stupid parents. I find it funny that science wins again.

Actual Answers... sort of... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15233679)

Isn't MMR (measles-mumps-rubella) a standard set of vacines everyone gets before they go into school?

Yes, but most schools allow a waiver. In which case the parents sign away the rights to sue the school.

How long are those supposed to be effective?

As a educator, my school recommends the staff gets boosters every 10 years, due to our higher then normal exposure.

Re:Innoculations? (2, Informative)

bluelark (642039) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233701)

As far as bad MMR batches go, there was knowledge that the MMR vaccines given in the mid 1970s were possibly ineffective. How I found this out was at a pre-college physical back in 1992, I got another MMR dose "just in case" because I was a female of childbearing age. Anyway, a few years later, when I was in school, there were cases of measles on several different college campuses, which lead to universities demanding proof of immunization before registering for classes.

Special Report: "Disease, unwanted import" (3, Informative)

reporter (666905) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233715)

According to a special investigative report [washingtontimes.com] by the "Washington Times", "Contagious diseases are entering the United States because of immigrants, illegal aliens , refugees and travelers, and World Health Organization officials say the worst could be yet to come".

The author the report further states, " In 2003, nearly 26 percent of foreign-born TB patients in the United States were from Mexico ".

The author also warns, "Federal data suggest that as many as 10 percent of the approximately 1,000 Mexicans who emigrate to the United States daily probably are infected with Chagas , said Dr. Louis V. Kirchhoff, a Chagas specialist and a professor at the University of Iowa's medical school". Chagas is fatal and kills you via a set of debilitating chronic conditions which manifest themselves decades after initial infection.

Re:Special Report: "Disease, unwanted import" (2, Insightful)

alienw (585907) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233833)

The Washington Times is a right-wing tabloid, and this is exactly the type of BS they are known to spew. Are you going to start posting articles from the Weekly World News next?

Re:Special Report: "Disease, unwanted import" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15233907)

alienw (585907) asserts that the claim, " In 2003, nearly 26 percent of foreign-born TB patients in the United States were from Mexico. ", is an outrageous lie.

There is just one problem. What is alienw's source for his refutation?

Re:Special Report: "Disease, unwanted import" (1)

Dis*abstraction (967890) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233919)

That's why we should grant them permanent residency. Proper documentation makes it easier to get health care, including treatment and proper immunizations for children.

Re:Innoculations? (2, Informative)

NVP_Radical_Dreamer (925080) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233831)

I'm not sure if it is this way everywhere, but here in West Virginia at around 5th grade it is offered at school, but your parents must sign a permission slip. It is free of charge, but many students do not take the paper home because they do not want to get the shot.

Re:Innoculations? (1)

duffbeer703 (177751) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233853)

Many evangelical christian sects are notorious for their opposition to vaccines in general. In addition to cooking up laws pushing things like intelligent design, they also push for laws that make vaccination optional for school-age children. (Most states require innoculation before you enter primary, middle, and schools. Some require proof of vaccination before entering college)

Considering that these outbreaks are taking place in the Midwest, there should be no suprise that mumps are making a comeback in these places.

you let the lobbyists decide (-1, Flamebait)

r00t (33219) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233950)

Go ahead, inject poorly-understood crap into your baby. Lobbyists for the drug companies say "think of the children" . Nice. You think about your children, and I'll think about mine.

Homeschooling is a damn fine way to avoid horrible diseases.

Lots of these diseases aren't all that bad anyway, especially with modern standards of living (nutrition, central heating, etc.) and care.

The sickest thing is that some places vaccinate newborns against STDs. That's like the government telling me that my baby is going to be a dumb slut. She can't even walk!

Re:Innoculations? (1)

Exocrist (770370) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233857)

I would assume also that the viruses would mutate over time, and possibly making the vaccines ineffective.

Re:Innoculations? (1)

katrinatroll (956377) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233879)

I've got a vingate disease. Fucking dem babies. Man, I love fuckin dem babies.
delicious crunchy babies. mmmm.
fuck the babies.

I always knew University was bad for me. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15233587)

And our parents are trying to kill us.

Wait, whatever happened to MMR? (1, Interesting)

TexasDex (709519) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233595)

Doesn't the UK vaccinate kids for this sort of thing? The US has shown the power of childhood vaccination programs, and only a few whackos object to it because of unfounded theories that it causes Autism/Aspergers.

Re:Wait, whatever happened to MMR? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15233618)

Yes they do, but as you said there are some who object.

Re:Wait, whatever happened to MMR? (3, Insightful)

RobertLTux (260313) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233632)

the big problem is what happens if a bug somehow (RC or ID) gets a mutation to
1 blank the vacciene (like we know the flu bug does)
2 increases the inucubation period
3 ramps the bug to LETHAL
4 includes the "airborne vector"

Re:Wait, whatever happened to MMR? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15233650)

The media started hyping the 'dangers' of the MMR jab over here in the UK around 5-10 years ago. So loads of parents, in a Daily Mail induced 'intelligence distortion field' decided to not allow their kids to have the MMR jab.

Bang. Suddenly all these diseases are growing in number again. Decades of hard work and effort in protecting the population against these diseases up in smoke because of the media's hyping of a still UNPROVEN link (indeed, all but one study appears to prove the opposite, but people still panic) between MMR and autism, etc.

Sadly media is business, and sales require sensationalism, and the plebs need something to talk about and worry about and fear, so they'll continue with their irresponsible behaviour that is actaully damaging and dangerous. Quite why there aren't balances in place against this irresponsibility is beyond me...

I'll just assume that it is survival of the fittest, where intelligence is the 'fitness' aspect. If you can't think past the lies and hype, then you stand a greater chance of your offspring not surviving when you don't give them vaccinations. Sadly too many of the plebs will survive because medicine is so good these days that even when the runts get sick because of the parent's thick fear-driven behaviour they'll mostly survive.

Re:Wait, whatever happened to MMR? (2, Informative)

WarwickRyan (780794) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233671)

We do vaccinate against all of the usual suspects - MMR, TB, Tetinus etc.

However, thanks to Rupert Murdock's rag http://www.thesun.co.uk/ [thesun.co.uk] a large number of parents became afraid of the MMR jab, and thus let their children go without.

All of that flies in the face of the scientific evidence, and of the risks - i.e. your kids are at more risk from the diseases themselves than they are a reaction to the MMR vaccine.

Re:Wait, whatever happened to MMR? (2, Insightful)

Homology (639438) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233724)

The US has shown the power of childhood vaccination programs

Whatever gave you that idea? Vaccination was not invented in USA, nor where USA first out to have vaccination programs.

Re:Wait, whatever happened to MMR? (1)

Virtual Karma (862416) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233816)

*cough**cough* I dont think *cough* the vaccination *cough* was effective for me *cough* *cough*

For Fun (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15233606)

Overlay a map of illegal immigrant concentrations with out breaks of these and related outbreaks. You will notice something.

Re:For Fun (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15233617)

What, that there's no particular relationship and you're a fucking bigot?

Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15233656)

Have you done this already? Does such a reliable map exist? These outbreaks are in the midwest .. not in California or big cities.

But whatever, I suppose you wouldn't hate immigrants less if they're carrying smallpox and wiping out the native population.

Vintage? (4, Funny)

richdun (672214) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233614)

1864 Mumps: A little fruity, but solid, bold taste. Goes well with chicken (pox).

Re:Vintage? (1)

spongebue (925835) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233889)

Dude, that stuff is over a century old. I wouldn't recommend having it, it could make you sick.

Vintage? (5, Funny)

escapedlabmonkey (965708) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233615)

Vintage diseases huh? I guess that makes them retroviruses.

Re:Vintage? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15233883)

I had some of those when they were "childhood diseases". I feel so vintage.

Rickets is not an infectious disease... (5, Informative)

racecarj (703239) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233619)

It's caused by a lack of vitamin D. Children develop Rickets, typified by "bow bones." Adults get osteomalacia, with an increase in fractures. Rickets has nothing to do with "vintage diseases." All someone has to do to prevent it is a) better diet b) multivitamin c) suntan. mumps, pertussis, etc. are a different story...

Re:Rickets is not an infectious disease... (2, Informative)

Watson Ladd (955755) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233738)

They mean rickasseti. I know I misspeled it. They cause Typhoid, Rocky Mountian Spotted Fever, and are intracellar parisites. Chalydima is one.

They really did mean rickets (4, Informative)

Stickerboy (61554) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233804)

They didn't call rickets an "infectious disease", they called it an old disease that is making a resurgence.

From the article:

"As if they didn't have their hands full with mumps and whooping cough, doctors are also starting to worry about other blasts from the past. National statistics haven't been collected, but many papers in the medical literature argue that rickets--a vitamin deficiency long thought to be a relic of the 19th century--is increasing among African-American and Hispanic kids, particularly in the North. Doctors blame it on everything from an increase in breast-feeding (breast milk doesn't contain much vitamin D) to the overuse of sunscreen (the body needs ultraviolet light to produce the vitamin).

OT Historical Note (1)

fm6 (162816) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233801)

Rickets used to be very common before they started adding vitamin D to milk. My father had ribs that didn't quite line up because of a childhood case.

You know. (2, Funny)

kitsunewarlock (971818) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233622)

Well, the part about university students being a breeding ground for virus' and disease is nothing new. Oh wait, you said universities! Nevermind then.

Border control (-1, Troll)

mrshowtime (562809) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233626)

These ancient diseases are coming from outside the united states, specifically from the overflow of illegal aliens who cross the border seeking healthcare in the USA. I have seen it with my own eyes, having had to use public health care in California for several years. It was downright scary being in the same room with someone hacking up a lung with a facemask on.Dr. Michael Savage has been saying that illegals are bringing these ancient epidemics to the USA for almost 10 years and he's right.

Re:Border control (2, Insightful)

cowboy76Spain (815442) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233647)

Yes... all of the illegal aliens go straight into midwest universities. That's why the illness is developing there, and not in the cities / neighbourhoods with more aliens, isn't it?

Nice biassed theory, don't let reality stop you from quoting it...

Re:Border control (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15233696)

http://newsroom.hrsa.gov/speeches/southwestborder. htm [hrsa.gov]

If U.S. territory within 100 kilometers of the border were a state, its 11 million residents would rank:

        * last in access to health care, with about 30% of the population uninsured;
        * second in deaths due to hepatitis; and
        * third in deaths related to diabetes.

Rates of several serious communicable diseases are far higher there:

        * tuberculosis along the border is six times the national rate;
        * measles and mumps are twice the national rate; and
        * HIV/AIDS is spreading rapidly, especially in the California sector.

Fake science (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15233871)

If U.S. territory within 100 kilometers of the border were a state, its 11 million residents would rank:

                * last in access to health care, with about 30% of the population uninsured;

Ok, how is this a disease they're importing?


                * second in deaths due to hepatitis; and
               


Which state is first?


                * third in deaths related to diabetes.

Which state is first and second. Also DIABETES IS NOT CONTAGOUS! Are you ignorant? Actually these deaths are more than likely because these people don't have access to diagnosis treatment (caused by lack of access to health insurance and would explain the hepatitis stat too).

Rates of several serious communicable diseases are far higher there:

                * tuberculosis along the border is six times the national rate;


Which state has the most ..has this to do with environment? Ok whatever .. you found an anomaly. What's the numbers for toenail fungus prevalence?

* measles and mumps are twice the national rate; and


Who's first? Also, as proven above they dont have access to health care insurance

* HIV/AIDS is spreading rapidly, especially in the California sector.

Mexico has a lower HIV prevalence than the United States!

  http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/ mx.html [cia.gov]

--

Anyway whatever .. you hate these people and you'll interpret whatever half ass "science" and "statistics" to favor you. You'd hate them regardless of what they're carrying. "No room in the inn" is the phrase we're hearing. "Reject the lepers". Etc.

Not all illegal aliens are here to steal! They may have broken the law (ever speed?), but it's a) it's a misdemeanor b) they are seeking to work and improve their family's lives while providing a service

===

Leviticus 19:10 Do not go over your vineyard a second time or pick up the grapes that have fallen. Leave them for the poor and the alien. I am the LORD your God.

Leviticus 19:33 "'When an alien lives with you in your land, do not mistreat him. The alien living with you must be treated as one of your native-born. Love him as yourself, for you were aliens in Egypt. I am the LORD your God.

Deuteronomy 10:18 He defends the cause of the fatherless and the widow, and loves the alien, giving him food and clothing.

Jeremiah 7:6 if you do not oppress the alien, the fatherless or the widow and do not shed innocent blood in this place, and if you do not follow other gods to your own harm,

Jeremiah 22:3 This is what the LORD says: Do what is just and right. Rescue from the hand of his oppressor the one who has been robbed. Do no wrong or violence to the alien, the fatherless or the widow, and do not shed innocent blood in this place.

Matthew 25:
  42
        For I was hungry and you gave me no food, I was thirsty and you gave me no drink,
43
        a stranger and you gave me no welcome, naked and you gave me no clothing, ill and in prison, and you did not care for me.'
44
        18 Then they will answer and say, 'Lord, when did we see you hungry or thirsty or a stranger or naked or ill or in prison, and not minister to your needs?'
45
        He will answer them, 'Amen, I say to you, what you did not do for one of these least ones, you did not do for me.'

Re:Border control (3, Interesting)

Dr. Eggman (932300) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233648)

So they are infected with mumps and they cross right over the boarder, right over Texas, right over the south and settle in Iowa? That's the stupidest thing I've ever heard! Unless your saying they came in illegally from Canada, in which case that's the stupidest thing I've ever heard.

Re:Border control (1)

quarkscat (697644) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233932)

I will respect you enough to merely consider your remarks as "uneducated" rather than either an ignoramous or a troll.

Illegal aliens that cross the USA's southern border, including Mexicans (largest percentage),
Latin Americans, East Asians including those from China, Korea, Indonesia, and Phillipines,
West Asians including those from India and Pakistan, Africans, and Arabs all migrate to
all parts of the USA, including along the USA's northern border.

The web is a great tool for gathering news and information, if one should decide to dedicate
some time and effort instead of a knee-jerk reaction. News aggregators such as www.cis.org,
google, and yahoo have had links to local news stories about public outcry over Mexican
day laborers in such places as Idaho, West Virginia, and New Hampshire, Mexican document
mills run in such places as Washington, Tennessee, and Georgia, MS-13 gang activity in such
far-flung locales as Arkansas, Iowa, and Maine.

Please engage the tools available on the internet prior to unthoughtful posts.

Naaawww baby!! (1)

mangus_angus (873781) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233627)

That rash is from...uhhhh....whooping cough! I swear! Would I lie to you cindy..I mean mindy?

Twenty-five percent of Americans can't be wrong! (1)

TerranFury (726743) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233660)

(That's the percentage that has an STD. And that's just genital herpes...)

Yay college!

Bioterror? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15233629)

I'm not trying at all to be alarmist, but after reading about some of the bio-weapons engineering work done in the former Soviet Union I do wonder if it's ONLY mumps (etc.) or if there is something sinister "piggybacking" on the "normal" disease.
I know, this is kind of a consipiracy theory, but an article about the research in Russia gave me pause when I saw this headline. It's not likely, but not outside the realm of possibility either.

Re:Bioterror? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15233705)

Shut the fuck up

I call bullshit! (1)

WML MUNSON (895262) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233659)

Diseases?! Originating from college dorms?!?! This just can't be true!

Holy hell.. (3, Informative)

Khyber (864651) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233677)

Taking a look at some of the downmodded posts, I took one of their ideas, and took a nice overlay of (known) illegal immigrant population centers and outbreaks. The similarity? About 75% of the areas do overlap. That doesn't necessarily mean anything but it does raise interesting thoughts/possibilities.

Re:Holy hell.. (2, Insightful)

MBCook (132727) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233717)

Well that kind of thing can be a possibility. I have no idea if it is though.

But here in the US everyone (more or less) gets MMR vaccines. In most places you often can't get into middle/highschool without it. The few people who were born and grew up in this country who didn't get it (and were children of citizens) didn't get it because their parent were nuts or hyper-suggestable (there is a 0.001% chance that taking vaccine X will enhance the possibility your kid will get Y by 7%, we better not give it to him).

But with immigrants, we don't know. With legal immigrants they may get the same same (either in their home country they came from, were forced to when they moved here, etc) but if you come from some country where vaccination is not common, you may slip by (I don't think I had to prove I had my vaccinations to go to college).

This is only made worse by many illegal immigrants being afraid of hospitals/doctors/police/etc because they think they may get reported and sent back (not all are like this, and while unfortunate I can understand the fear).

This is just one more issue in the immigration debate. It's a smaller one (I think the drain on the tax, medicaid, and other systems are bigger), but it is still something. When someone sneaks in, we don't know what they have, what they don't have, what they are vaccinated against, etc.

Re:Holy hell.. (1)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233744)

First off, what maps did you overlay? We would certianly like to see them. But I can think of a much better map; Consider mapping the poor and universities on the outbreaks. I suspect that we will see a higher correlation. or even the maps of income from say the last 15-20 years compared against children below age 5. I would suspect that you will see a high correlation amongst high growth areas where couples were fairly mobile and jumping across insurances. As to the associations with illegals, well, they do not tend to live in beverly hills.

Re:Holy hell.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15233809)

I don't know when we started calling University students immigrants. Anyways, there is a reason why very intelligent people say that universal health care is a basic human right. It has something to do with: we all benefit from the health of the people around us. Thank God the Republicans torpedoed Hillary Clinton's health care initiatives!! We would not want for people to be healthy -- they might want a responsive government then.

Re:Holy hell.. (1, Interesting)

quarkscat (697644) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233836)

The co-relation of 75% overlap between areas of increased (and formerly controlled)
  infectious diseases and that of increased population density of illegal aliens is not
casual.

There was a good reason for medical screening and innoculations that was such a
large part of the legal immigration process at such historical sites as Ellis Island.
Based upon monitoring of immigration news aggregators such as "www.cis.org",
every contiguous TX, NM, AZ, and CA county to the USA's southern border, as well
as every internal focal point of illegal immigration, has seen dramatic increases in
HIV/AIDS and drug resistant STDs, TB, hepatitus, and even malaria.

Border states are now (or in the process of) suing the Federal government for
additional Medicare/Medicaid funding due to the fiscal stress on hospitals and
urgent care medical clinics that are legally forced (and morally obligated) to
provide free health care to the indigent, especially illegal aliens. It is only a
small percentage of illegal aliens who, without false papers, are forced to work
as "off-the-books" day laborers. Most illegal aliens do have documentation -
through ID theft or ID fraud that includes SSNs, health certificates, driver IDs,
and innoculation records. The service industry, especially restaurants, meat
packing plants, K-12 schools and universities, all hire low wage labor whose
documentation will not bear close scrutiny.

If you support the USA May Day demonstrations, you can blame the next
disease you catch on your own political inclinations.

Re:Holy hell.. (1)

DAldredge (2353) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233880)

That is because mexico doesn't have nearly as an effective childhood imunization program as the USA and Canada.

Not a racist comment - it is fact.

new age (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15233681)

"that are spread by sneezing and coughing"

that's the new term for farking like rabbits?
there's a reason this is huge in university towns.

(not that i'm some prude against such acts, but come on, in this day in age you got to be reasonable)

KISS (3, Interesting)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233846)

Then why the absense of veneral diseases?

More likely the reason is that unis cramp as many people into 4x4 yards room as they can without having troubles with PETA 'cause they have less room than laying hens.

a Game Theory view of Innoculations (5, Interesting)

Hextor_Freebish (971956) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233683)

These resurgences stem from the growing proportion of un-inocculated people in the U.S. When the proportion of people who are invulnerable to infection and transmission goes below a critical threshold, these diseases can spread through the population. The proportion of people who are not innoculated is growing because a calculated cost-benefits analysis reveals that it is wise to avoid some vaccines. There are some diseases that are now so rare in the U.S. that the expected health impact from the vaccine outweighs the risk of being unvaccinated in a by-and-large vaccinated society. In game theory terms, we have a game with two coalitions, Vaccinating and Non-vaccinating, and a couple hundred million players. All players will not join the Vaccinating coalition, because when the proportion of players is significantly above the critical virulence threshold, parents see an advantage to be gained in abandoning the Vaccinating coalition strategy and safeguarding the health of their children to some non-trivial degree. Given that the players in the game are going to continue to be free to choose whether to be vaccinators of their kids or not, not all people will make that choice. And not just because of some primitive superstition or political inclination, either. It's simple opportunism. The only thing that will shift the equilibrium of populations of vaccinators to non-vaccinators are environmental factors that affect each players' benefits analysis, such as: Fear - hysterical news coverage about the mumps and such Conformity Pressures - public shame upon those parents who break with the Vaccination Coalition of the Willing Misinformation - hysterical news coverage that insists that vaccinations don't have any negative health consequences Legislation - rolling back of laws that allow parents to not vaccinate, such as the one in Texas Such actions can be taken, but beg the question of whether they should be taken. Unless we are going to actually eradicate a disease, the Nash Equilibrium that results in the greatest good for society is the equilibrium set by the disease's virulence, A.K.A. only enough people get vaccinated for it to be an advantageous strategy to the rest to not get vaccinated.

Just a friendly constructive comment... (1)

TooMuchEspressoGuy (763203) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233765)

Using paragraphs makes something like this much more readable. You should use 'em in the future. :)

Don't forget... (2, Interesting)

Max Threshold (540114) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233688)

Bubonic plague [latimes.com] , now available in California!

Re:Don't forget... (1)

alfrin (858861) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233749)

Up at Lake Tahoe Nevada/California for as long as I have known there are signs warning against bubonic plague telling people not to play with squirels because of it. As far as I know there are quite a few places with those warnings, it may not be a problem but it sure isn't gone.

Relax (3, Informative)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233808)

Plague has been around for a LONG time. In fact, one of the hottest spots in the world for it, is Colorado. That is why the branch is located at CDC-Ft. Collins.

this could be good (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15233695)

"That's partly because crowded dorms and cafeterias are breeding grounds for germs that are spread by sneezing and coughing."

Maybe this will persuade university authorities to get off their backsides and do something about the shambles that is university accomodation - at my university it's four to a flat - I understand that people have seperate rooms, but that such a thing is not the case everywhere

where old disease is stored and preserved.... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15233702)

never fart in a jar....

Whooping Cough Sucks (3, Interesting)

TedTschopp (244839) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233710)

I got Whooping cough last year for about 5 months. Man did that suck. You can't sleep well at all. You wake up all the time not being able to breath. The bigger problem is that my Dr. didn't believe me and thought I had a bunch of other problems until the CDC sent out a letter. Anyway, the basic problem, I think, is that the shots I got back in the early 70's last only 30 years. So guess what. It's 30 (well 29) years later, and I got it, almost 29 years to the day that I got the shot.

   

Illegal Aliens (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15233729)

They're also bringing in drug resistant Tuberculosis (it costs about 250,000 to cur it, and takes about 2 years), Leprosy (we had about 700 cases in the previous 40 years. There were about 7,000 in the last 3), Malaria, and Chagas Disease (no cure, and it's infecting our blood supply), and other previously unknown diseases.

Re:Illegal Aliens (5, Funny)

Xiroth (917768) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233754)

Foreigners coming into America and afflicting the people living there with new dieseases? For some reason, I feel like I've heard that one before.

Very Good! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15233770)

You never have mod points when you need them. :-)

Keep your germs to yourselves. (0, Troll)

Scrameustache (459504) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233774)

If there's one thing that make me want to kick people in the teeth, it's seeing them cough wetly with their mouths gaping open in public places.

Bonus: In the teeth with steel-toed boots if, after you tell them nicely to put their hands in front of their mouth, they claim they are "not contagious anymore".

I think the japs have it right: Face mask for the sick.

Mumps in adult males can be evil (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15233858)

F34r teh mumps! This is one disease I'm glad I got when i was a child. I'm most likely immune to getting it again. As an adult male, these knots can result in orchitis (inflammation of the testicles.) I had a friend in college get it and he said it felt like he was kicked in the balls and the pain wouldnt go away. Have fun with that.

Way too much sleep deprivation... (1)

DigitalHammer (581235) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233882)

Did anyone else first read the title as "Venereal Diseases Making a Comeback?" :/

It's a side-effect of illegal immigration (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15233890)

A slew of illigal immigrants from the poorest countries in the latin America are coming across our borders without passing any medical tests. Since they come from the poorest regions and have not had any sort of innoculations, they're the perfect carriers for these diseases.

No one posted the obvious pop-culture reference? (0, Offtopic)

kimvette (919543) | more than 8 years ago | (#15233926)

Remember this Brady Bunch [tv.com] episode?
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