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RIAA Targets LAN Filesharing at Universities

samzenpus posted more than 7 years ago | from the stop-sharing dept.

608

segphault writes "The RIAA has sent letters to 40 university presidents in 25 separate states informing them that students are engaging in filesharing on their campuses using the local network. Apparently, the RIAA wants to get universities to use filtering software on their networks to detect student filesharing. The RIAA did not disclose the methodology they used to determine that filesharing is occuring on those local networks, but it probably didn't involve asking permission. The article goes on to predict that the RIAA will eventually try to get the government to require use of anti-filesharing filtering technologies at universities."

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608 comments

Download while you still can (4, Informative)

IntelliAdmin (941633) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242273)

Well it has been almost 6 years since Napster made its way into our lives? 6 Years Really? Lets look around and see what file sharing programs are left after the music and movie biz nuked the crap out of most of them.

1. Emule [emule-project.net] - This is one of the best we found out there. Hint (Search for server.met on google to update your server list)

2. Bearshare [bearshare.com] - Nice Gnutella client, lots of good hits

3. Limewire [limewire.com] - Another Gnutella client. It even works on the Mac!

4. Shareaza [sourceforge.net] - A beautiful Gnutella client with no spyware.

5. BitTorrent [bittorrent.com] - Perfect for downloading movies, or that latest linux distro

6. KaZaa [kazaa.com] - Old favorite. Oh yea - Aussie users, you can't download - Yea Right!

7. Azureus [sourceforge.net] - BitTorrent client that works on Mac, Linux, and Windows 8. Morpheus [morpheus.com] - Wow. They are still around? Wha happened!

9. Gnucleus [gnucleus.com] - Open source Gnutella for you freeloading open source hippies out there - Yea I am talking about you

10. Napster [napster.com] - Ah, just put this one here to see if you are still reading, and I guess for shits and grins too

So there you have it folks. These are slim pickings. Get um while they still work!

Re:Download while you still can (2, Informative)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242410)

Shareaza is actually a Gnutella, Gnutella 2 & E-Mule client

And if you're serious about E-Mule, you'll probably want to use one of the other versions [kademlia-mods.de] [German site alert]which provide in-depth tweakability.

Re:Download while you still can (2)

Breakfast Pants (323698) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242505)

KaZaa is completely broken; they only hash every other byte of every file, so the whole thing is full of junk. Worst optimization ever.

Re:Download while you still can (3, Informative)

paulius_g (808556) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242578)

I think that FrostWire [frostwire.com] deserves a mention aswell.

Essentially, it's a open source Limewire client which connects to Gnutella. It looks like the "pro" version of Limewire, so it's easy to use but it's free and open source.

Also, uTorrent [utorrent.com]deserves a mention to be wicked-small and fast Torrent client for Windows. It only takes 155 KB of space!

When I was a youngster... like 8 years ago (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15242282)

This is all we had, and we LIKED it! Napster? What's that? iTunes? iHuh?

Re:When I was a youngster... like 8 years ago (0, Offtopic)

wideBlueSkies (618979) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242301)

8 years ago Duke Nukem Forever was in development, and people were wondering what it would be like when it was released.

I guess not much has changed.

wbs.

How do they know (5, Interesting)

phorm (591458) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242286)

but it probably didn't involve asking permission

Despite the implications of this statement, what it probably really involves is paying off a student or two to sniff out and inform on filesharing activity, either by running RIAA apps or just manual searching. It wouldn't be the first time they've used this method.

Re:How do they know (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15242307)

Paying an insider on a network to reveal security info about that network to an outsider: sounds like the RIAA is doing exactly what is implicated by that statement.

Re:How do they know (1)

markbark (174009) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242496)

Paying an insider on a network to reveal security info about that network to an outsider:

Hurmmm... sounds like a violation of the DCMA...or perhaps espionage laws... or at least of the AUP.
If such an event occurs, couldn't the owners of said network sue the "bypassers of security" of same?

I'm just sayin'

--MAB

Re:How do they know (4, Interesting)

darkmeridian (119044) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242470)

That's probably unauthorized use of the University's information systems. Running a third-party application meant to spy on students? Accessing the system with the intent of providing sensitive information on other network members to third-parties? The Universities should demand proof via IP packets, the source of that proof via the student-spy, and then expel the student for misuse of the computer systems. Repeat as necessary.

Spying? (1)

phorm (591458) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242573)

From the sounds of it, we're talking about open network shares here. It would hardly require any invasive software to find or browse them, and not likely anything illegal. In fact, ruling software that scans open SMB shares would probably be just as much a slippery slope as anything.

Enforcement? (4, Insightful)

MadUndergrad (950779) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242296)

Really, what are they going to do to enforce this? It's not as if they have a way to snoop on lan traffic, and if they did it would be illegal. I know that for one, my university has a "don't know, don't want to know" attitude about filesharing, so long as you keep the traffic below about 1.5GB per day. I really don't think they have the muscle to do anything about lan sharing.

Re:Enforcement? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15242312)

Mine has this as well, although there really is no 'limit' per se that is set internally (I'd venture to guess that internal transfer amount to hundreds of gigabytes per day in many cases)... I guess as long as you keep connections to the outside to a minimum, ya'all are alright.

Re:Enforcement? (1)

QCompson (675963) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242355)

It's not as if they have a way to snoop on lan traffic, and if they did it would be illegal.

Would it be illegal for the university to snoop on inter-university traffic? I'm not so sure it would be (especially at a private university), and even if it were illegal, wouldn't it be as simple as altering the student code of conduct to make it perfectly permissible?

Besides, in the near future I think we can all look forward to increased ISP snooping and traffic-shaping on our internet activity. The twin spectres of terrorism and child (OMG the children!) pornography have proven to be enormously effective in increasing internet monitoring of innocent citizens. Due to the amount of influence the RIAA and their ilk have in the government, it wouldn't take long for the increased survelliance to be used to crack down on p2p file-sharing.

Seems Reasonable To Me (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15242300)

The RIAA did not disclose the methodology they used to determine that filesharing is occuring on those local networks, but it probably didn't involve asking permission.

And it's really no big secret if you just ask either. Having just finished school, probably almost all of the filesharing is in copyrighted material which they have no right to "share". Therefore it is illegal and should be stopped. It was disgusting to me how much people were trading movies, games, and music which didn't belong.

The schools probably will realize they could be liable if they don't try to put a stop it or slow it down. I like how the article and slashdot makes no mention of the copyrighted nature of the material, as if everybody is just sharing Linux distributions. At least be honest about this, guys.

Re:Seems Reasonable To Me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15242328)

Illegal? Yeah.

Disgusting? I don't really see how.

I'm being honest when I say that I have no problem with sharing tunes and warez with my friends. I just don't see the big deal.

Re:Seems Reasonable To Me (1, Troll)

gui_tarzan2000 (625775) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242450)

"Illegal? Yeah. Disgusting? I don't really see how. I'm being honest when I say that I have no problem with sharing tunes and warez with my friends. I just don't see the big deal."

You might if it were taking money away from you.

Re:Seems Reasonable To Me (1)

QCompson (675963) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242477)

He may very well be taking any money he would have spent on CDs and DVDs and instead spending it on computer peripherals and hard drives. Therefore, by not allowing him to share tunes and warez with friends, the hard drive manufacturers would lose money. The hard drive manufacturers spend a lot of time and effort creating their products. Why are you trying to deny them their profits? Why do you hate hard drive companies?

Re:Seems Reasonable To Me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15242532)

Sorry, I didn't realize you were a brainwashed pawn of the billionaire media conglomerates. My apologies if the honest sentiments of humans asserting the rights they have had for the last thousand years offended your desire to concentrate wealth.

Ha! Against the law. Funny how laws get created whenever big companies need to make even more money. I am sure it's all about what's right and how to make the most people happy. Yeah, right.

Re:Seems Reasonable To Me (1, Insightful)

Wes Janson (606363) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242484)

It was disgusting to me how much people were trading movies, games, and music which didn't belong.

You don't get it. The whole damned point is that it shouldn't be illegal. That the law itself is immoral. Your reactions are themselves disturbing to me.

I have my own network (5, Interesting)

Virtual Karma (862416) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242303)

I have more than one computer on my home network and I share music between all of them. Are they going to get me too? What is the law regarding file sharing on a private network? What if my girl friend copies my music from my laptop? Is that piracy?

Re:I have my own network (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15242383)

Yes, your girlfriend funds terrorism

Re:I have my own network (1)

sexybomber (740588) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242420)

Technically, if she doesn't sell it, then no, it's fair use. A precedent was set for that regarding making tape recordings of CDs. Also, I think she's also covered under your right to make backup copies, since you could just claim you made a backup copy and then gave it to her and didn't ask anything in return. (One presumes that the sex isn't contingent upon her copying your music ;-) ) The RIAA wants you to think it's piracy, though!

Re:I have my own network (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15242429)

Assuming you have a "girl friend" [sic], yes, it would be illegal if she copied them and took them to a seperate location.

Re:I have my own network (1)

Firehed (942385) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242567)

If it were up to them, you'd need to buy a copy for your computer and a copy for your portable and a copy for your car and a copy for your laptop. However if that doesn't completely undermine "fair use," I don't know what does. Of course, if it were up to them we'd all be paying $30 a month for the ability to listen to any radio station, regardless of whether we do or don't listen (I immediately gave up radio after getting a portable player). Plus the blank media tax that would apply to every single writable optical format there is, regardless of whether it's used for music, data, or a makeshift weapon when broken in half.

And yes, your GF copying music from your laptop is piracy. In fact, it's the sort of casual piracy that actually hurts business (excluding mass bootlegging, of course, which isn't a problem where I live but you can't expect it in the middle of nowhere).

Re:I have my own network (1)

Beryllium Sphere(tm) (193358) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242572)

>Are they going to get me too? What is the law regarding file sharing on a private network?

Those questions have almost nothing in common.

Traditionally nobody went to court to test the legality of sharing a CD with your girlfriend because that would have been insane. Ditto sharing it with yourself over your network.

Then again, traditionally nobody sued dead people and people who've never owned computers for P2P file sharing. Budget five figures if you think you'll fight a case.

What's next...mandated sniffing? (5, Interesting)

Ritz_Just_Ritz (883997) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242309)

So are the universities (and all networks, by extension) supposed to sniff every packet and look for "copyrighted material" so it can take whatever action the industry think is "appropriate"?

Perhaps every car should also have a sensor to detect speeding and automatically cut the gas?

Fuck the music industry. Their ever more desperate measures only mean they are painfully aware of how irrelevant they are about to become.

Re:What's next...mandated sniffing? (2, Interesting)

Shelled (81123) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242337)

"So are the universities (and all networks, by extension) supposed to sniff every packet and look for "copyrighted material" so it can take whatever action the industry think is "appropriate"?"

What's yet to penetrate public perceptions is: Yes. Exactly. Precisely. The only way universal DRM can work is by monitoring every packet transfer. It's insane how much we as a society are giving up to preserve these niche market middle-man pricks.

That's not enough. (1)

dhasenan (758719) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242455)

You could be sending encrypted information. Heck, even using some sort of Vignere system would probably suffice to hide the content. So packet sniffing isn't worth much, if it's checking content. It has to check format, and then it only checks format. So if you have substantial non-infringing usage, that looks the same, in a cryptographically secure system, as substantial infringing usage.

So, if you simply target peer-to-peer systems in a campus network (connections between any two student computers), well, you'll stop me from using SSH on my computer, and I'll complain bitterly. Then if you allow SSH, I'll just have to use port 22 for all my filesharing. (Which means I have to run BitTorrent as root, and I'm not willing to do that....)

By coincidence, though, today's keyword is 'bootlegs'.

Re:That's not enough. (1)

PaulBu (473180) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242549)

Then if you allow SSH, I'll just have to use port 22 for all my filesharing. (Which means I have to run BitTorrent as root, and I'm not willing to do that....)

Why not? ;-)

A "root" on one of the _virtual_ servers on your Linux box! Maybe you'll have to connect to some other port to ssh into your real system, but hey! ... ;-)

Paul B,

Re:What's next...mandated sniffing? (1)

kfg (145172) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242419)

Perhaps every car should also have a sensor to detect speeding and automatically cut the gas?

Cool idea, Dude!

KFG

They should patent it and sue... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15242451)

the eventual inventor.

Ourtunes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15242311)

I don't know if everyone hear has heard of it, because it doesn't really work well at all outside of large campuses, but Ourtunes is definitely the primary method of music sharing at my school. It allows you to download music from other people who have itunes. I can turn it on while on campus and see hundreds of thousands of songs and download them immediatly. We have apple to thank for this great opportunity :)

what next is the RIAA going to do (3, Funny)

has2k1 (787264) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242315)

It looks like they will soon send messages to parents informing them that their kids are engaging in filesharing amongst themselves at their homes using the home network.

Re:what next is the RIAA going to do (1)

jZnat (793348) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242507)

But what about the parents who are the ones doing the infringing? I know one friend who's father is a contract lawyer (dealing with IP-related things), and [the father's] the biggest collector of downloaded music I know (terabytes by now). I enjoy the irony.

who defined insanity (5, Interesting)

yagu (721525) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242318)

I don't remember, maybe it was Einstein who said the definition of insanity was to repeatedly do something and expect a different result. Is the RIAA insane?

This is cutting their (RIAA/Entertainment industry) future profits off at the source on a number of levels.

  1. The university demographic is probably one of the least likely to be their cash cows, i.e., many, if not most students aren't living fat and happy on exorbitant budgets (I know, some are). They don't have tons of money to fill the RIAA and cohort's coffers.
  2. Throwing the college campus dragnet may result in catching file-sharing but it sets the tone for how these students perceive the industry for the rest of their lives, and it's going to be adversarial in this light.
  3. In addition to poisoning their future audience, the RIAA misses a great opportunity to expose students to a wealth of music. Sure they're going to share, sure it's technically illegal, but they're going to graduate with some illegal tunes, and likely an appetite to get more music, and with real jobs and real money, most would pay fair prices.

Also, it is so problematic to try and institute filtering in an academic arena. There are probably any number of legitimate ways and reasons to see file sharing on a college campus that would not be legal outside. This will force universities to layer artificial distribution mechanisms they otherwise could have handled with firewall policies. (All this at an added expense to universities, and eventually to the cost of an education.)

So, once again the music industry goes to the "we don't know for sure, but to be safe we're going to assume you're a crook" mentality. The RIAA needs to listen to clue.mp3.

Re:who defined insanity (2, Informative)

Doggan (945328) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242345)

I don't remember, maybe it was Einstein who said the definition of insanity was to repeatedly do something and expect a different result. Is the RIAA insane?

It was Ben Franklin [brainyquote.com]. Ironically, I received a Napster advertisement when I went to the above site.

Re:who defined insanity (1)

Crazyscottie (947072) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242547)

2. Throwing the college campus dragnet may result in catching file-sharing but it sets the tone for how these students perceive the industry for the rest of their lives, and it's going to be adversarial in this light.

Exactly! What the RIAA seems to not realize is that the very demographic they are targeting is the same demographic that will someday create the legislation which makes or breaks their post-retirement livelihood.

If I were the RIAA, I'd be hiring the kids who are "stealing" music, not crucifying them.

Re:who defined insanity (3, Insightful)

DrEldarion (114072) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242579)

The university demographic is probably one of the least likely to be their cash cows, i.e., many, if not most students aren't living fat and happy on exorbitant budgets (I know, some are). They don't have tons of money to fill the RIAA and cohort's coffers.

IIRC (don't have sources, but I remember it from somewhere...), college-age people are historically the second highest spending group on music, only after early to mid/late teens. They may not have a lot of money, but they also don't have a lot of responsibilities for what money they do have. Music is one of their top purchasing priorities.

What are they going to do? (1)

hobbesmaster (592205) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242320)

So how are they planning to block SMB and sneakernet? Thats the most common ways files are shared where I am...

Re:What are they going to do? (1)

corrosive_nf (744601) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242378)

no shit, when I go on a hotspot, 20-30 computers come up in network neighborhood, and all have shared folders full of porn, music, divx, etc..

Re:What are they going to do? (1)

The MAZZTer (911996) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242386)

My college blocks SMB (I assume you're talking about Windows Network Neighborhood... Macs call it SMB, right?) network browsing, although you can still navigate directly to an IP (the actual SMB port isn't blocked). Although that's ususally enough.

They can't block SMB itself though because the network uses it for printer sharing in computer labs and sharing of ITS files to users.

Of course a fun little unintended use is that I can print anything on any printer from anywhere on campus. Bwhahaha. :D

Re:What are they going to do? (1)

Lehk228 (705449) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242427)

browsing isn't blocked to stop warez, it keeps the 1337 5|!11z |)00|)z from going around printing goatse on everyone's printer and publishing everyone's deadAIM logs.

sure, sure (4, Interesting)

digitalsushi (137809) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242324)

That won't work very well.

If I can get onto the same network as 10 of my buddies, chances are very high that they have stuff I want to steal.

There's no way you're going to lock down to layer 7 filtering (looking at the program data itself, very intensive to comute) at a layer 2 scope (your local IP subnet, or close enough). So you either block SMB ports (file sharing altogether, the lifeblood of a computer network with actual users), or pay $$$ to filter it, poorly.

Rumor has it that if I have my laptop at the library, and so do some other people, that we can magically create a network between us that has no juristiction by the University. Or maybe they *do*, but they have no idea about it.

Any way it gets sliced up, the dollars can't keep up with the ways to get around it.

Re:sure, sure (2, Interesting)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242485)

Well, an ad-hoc wifi network with no connection to the internet would be the best solution.

Obviously, stuff like DC++ isn't cutting it. As a runner up, I'd propose a P2P app optimized for LANs.

First you'd need to encrypt the traffic, then kick the data through [min number] other people on the network. It'll be like Tor, but at LAN speeds.

If you really wanted to, you could toss a bandwidth limited proxy into the client so that any external P2P downloads are routed through the same anonymization network.

This would be practical on a LAN, as your upload/download bandwidth is symmetric.

Re:sure, sure (4, Interesting)

Large Green Mallard (31462) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242522)

Three words: private vlan edge.

It's a Cisco config option that says client stations can't speak to each other except via a router. Firewall rules in the router to only allow access to a proxy server, mail server and dns server, problem solved.

Then you'd need to leech via wireless, or physically co-located systems plugged into a seperate hub/switch, but at which point it isn't the University's problem, which is what the RIAA is looking at.

Disclaimer: I'm an IT Security Manager for a University. Not one of the ones the RIAA has talked to (we're not in the US). The only way I'd consider those sort of restrictions on residentials networking is due to force-majeure in the form of a competant legal body or management direction. Residential networks are what contributes today to the collegiate atmosphere in on-campus living. These sort of restrictions impact that far too much for my liking.

ahh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15242331)

ahh the fight against students. The fight against anarchy and the "girls gone wild" crowd. Good luck RIAA. You might as well start another war on drugs, but this time call it a "war on compressed shit quality audio archives". See how much of your profits go down the drain :)

The RIAA should just cut to the chase (5, Funny)

miskatonic alumnus (668722) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242333)

and demand that Congress pass a law requiring every person with a social security number to purchase 5 DRM loaded cd's per month, and staple their receipts on form 1040 come April 15th. After all, the government requires us to support the insurance companies by purchasing auto insurance. Why not entertainment too? I mean, EVERYBODY is guilty of pirating music anyway, right?

Re:The RIAA should just cut to the chase (1)

Breakfast Pants (323698) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242558)

Hmm, my grandmother got her license taken away and doesn't have a car and yet the government doesn't require her to pay any car insurance. Where are you getting this from?

Is there no end to their greed? (1)

kurt555gs (309278) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242352)

What about fair use?

Is this new filtering software going to protect file sharing legally allowed under the fair use doctrine?

How far will these greedy bastards go, what is the extent of thier selfishness and dishonesty?

This is sad

Go ahead and try.... (1)

corrosive_nf (744601) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242354)

Usenet and irc will always survive.

Re:Go ahead and try.... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15242408)

shhhh!
The first rule of usenet is that you do not talk about usenet!

My biggest fear is that services like easynews are going to bring a lot of heat down on my file sharing garden of eden.

Just fishing (1)

Bullfish (858648) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242357)

I don't think that anyone is under the illusion that filesharing doesn't go on in universities. All they have to do is get the university to give them a fishing license to get a new group of people to sue. It's easier than developing new talent for their labels I suppose. The universities that are reluctant to comply, well, that's what the threat to go to the government is all about. Similarly to their cases against single mothers, grandmothers and dad people, they like to go after the low hanging fruit, and fear of the expense of litigation is their biggest tool. Will this make a difference to filesharing, no, not really. Nothing else has worked, but they may be able to squeeze a few bucks out of some students. Is it underhanded, sure, but that's been their stock in trade for qite a while now. I used to think they would eventually wise up and put out product people want to buy, but it appears they are a lot thicker than I thought.

iTunes shared music (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15242372)

At my university, the majority of the sharing that occurs happens because tons of people use iTunes and turn on the share my music feature. At the very least this allows you to listen to other people's collections, but thanks to programs like myTunes, you can also download from their collection. While there are some restrictions that are put up (like 5 users each times iTunes is restarted, and only being able to see people on the same branch of the network as you are), you can get quite a bit of music this way. I guess if the university wanted they could block these ports, but that would also block the streaming feature, which the RIAA doesn't seem to actively object to. Telling users not to install iTunes would just be silly, since it seems like half the campus has iPods.

Re:iTunes shared music (1)

waffffffle (740489) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242527)

The day that Apple released iTunes 4 back in April 2003 I of course set it up there were already several dozen Mac users sharing music. This was the same month that a sophomore on my campus was sued [dailyprincetonian.com] by the RIAA for $97.8 billion [dailyprincetonian.com]. So I immediately set up my own shared music library, calling it ***FUCK RIAA*** (with the asterisks so it would be at the top) and shared only free music.

Pretty Common (2, Informative)

Dr Reducto (665121) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242374)

This isn't anything new. The RIAA has been policing campus network traffic. USC's campus DC++ hub was busted by the RIAA after the RIAA came in and convinced the University to allow them access.

All the RIAA has to do is politely ask (more like......we will hold you harmless if we are given access to investigate) and the Universities usually will bow in and allow access to the campus network.

As for stopping campus filesharing, it's pretty hard to stop as long as it stays within the borders. And moreover, with students in such close physical contact, it's fairly easy to set up rogue networks, or even just swap burned DVDs/memory sticks.

Re:Pretty Common (2, Interesting)

Lehk228 (705449) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242456)

as an admin it would be quite easy to subvert such threats, and i have not ever met a network admin who likes being threatened. first make sure the ops of the DC hub know which IP range is the ITS building, then give the RIAA access within the ITS building.

i know i blocked the computing center when i was at university from even being able to see anything on my ftp server. well that and the accounts i gave out to people were restricted to their dorm IP or IP block so it would be considerably more work for a low level employee to actually connect, as they would need to be given control of a router or the DHCP server to have a chance.

Use Creative Commons Metatag filters - No to DRM. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15242388)

Title: Use Creative Commons idea(s) not DRM!

To: those who want to protect digital copyright... use Creative Commons!

Can Creative Commons protect works for "commercial only" purposes?

If so, then...

Use Creative Commons, with a meta-data tag, that gives a digital file a digital ID that is search-able, filterable, and then protect that meta-data from changes or removal by creating a law that prevents the change or removal of a file or it's meta-data. ISP's could filter the meta-data - like how anti-virus software works, and notify a user (ISP has their email address for billing purposes) that the users account is being used to exceed "fair use" of copyrighted material, beyond a quota, or established "fair-use" limit. Of course Creative Commons or the government needs to establish a Creative Commons style of "commercial only" license with a way to register (on-line) a creators digital meta-data. Shareable meta-data (See Creative Commons Share-alike) would be not filtered or audited, only commercial only meta-data would be filtered. The notification process would first be friendly, then a process of questioning by the ISP could happen if the "commercial only creative commons meta-data" continued to be shared beyond fair use! If all friendly attempts to stop the infringer from exceeding fair use quota did not affect the traffic the ISP could then notify a central world wide infringer data base providing a "hidden" Pseudonym email address to the database where others could email this Pseudonym address and the ISP would then forward the email to the infringer (the creator of the works, owner of copyright, or fans of the work could then ask the infringer to stop (could be digital and automatic once the infringer's pseudonym email address hit the database listing the files meta-data along with the pseudonym's email address. Friendly notification, only amplified could continue, before enforcement action via law suit or criminal process could continue. IP v6 could allow an ISP customer a "assigned IP address" and even if the user had a open wireless network that was usable by anyone, they could be advised in a friendly way to investigate the users of the network or be able to "block the sending of certain files on their network" at a central router or firewall. Final penalty for user who infringes on "commercial only creative commons copyright digital meta-data" would be the termination of the Internet account by the ISP (private ISP or public if the municipality were providing free Internet access)! No one would like to loose their Internet access, would be worse than fines (as a repeat infringer could be targeted in a database with the risk of being black listed for X amount of time from using other ISPs). Of course, other Internet anonymous use could continue as only "commercial only" meta-data would be filtered or audited! China does a similar thing now to control Internet access there, only in violation of human rights. Blocking content is possible as well and the creative commons license, once violated, revokes future use of the licensed work (meaning that the ISP could block that one file from being shared, etc). Auditing traffic of certain file types is possible because of the meta-data idea with creative commons! 12 year olds sharing files should not be criminal, yet does need attention of parents who don't want to lose their Internet access due to illegal sharing. Remember that Creative commons can also have meta-data for sharable works that use the various degrees of creative commons protection and notification of the terms of use with the license.

No DRM at all!

Friendly to all.

See Creative Commons web site and use your imagination as to see how easy this would be to get going all over the world.

http://www.creativecommons.org [creativecommons.org]

The music, movie, and other artist's are a bit paranoid. Some industry folks have a second interest in DRM (protected by law), and that is to profit from the sale of many different and changing types of digital formats and thus force the customers to pay a 2nd or more times for the fair use of the same content they already paid for! Many who owned "records" with content and thus fair use, bought CDs and the record companies profited. That is wrong. Once a work is acquired there should be fair use where the copyright user can take a file and use it on various devices (and not be locked-in to one manufacturer's device by DRM).

Artists who want to allow for freely sharable files have that option with Creative Commons license that would allow users to freely share their works.

Using the same idea, artists who want digital control for profit of a file could also have this right... and it could be enforceable in a friendly way as well, again using creative commons (if creative commons created a "commercial only" license with meta-data.

From Creative Commons FAQ: http://creativecommons.org/learnmore [creativecommons.org]

"What happens if someone misuses my Creative Commons-licensed work?

A Creative Commons license terminates automatically if someone uses your work contrary to the license terms. This means that, if a person uses your work under a Creative Commons license and they, for example, fail to attribute your work in the manner you specified, then they no longer have the right to continue to use your work. This only applies in relation to the person in breach of the license; it does not apply generally to the other people who use your work under a Creative Commons license and comply with its terms.

You have a number of options as to how you can enforce this; you can consider contacting the person and asking them to rectify the situation and/or you can consider consulting a lawyer to act on your behalf. For information about how you may be able to locate a suitably qualified lawyer, please refer to this question and answer".

" What is the Commons Deed? What is the legal code? What does the html/meta-data do?

Creative Commons licenses are expressed in three different formats: the Commons Deed (human-readable code), the Legal Code (lawyer-readable code); and the meta-data (machine readable code).

The Commons Deed is a summary of the key terms of the actual license (which is the Legal Code)--basically, what others can and cannot do with the work. Think of it as the user-friendly interface to the Legal Code beneath. This Deed itself has no legal value, and its contents do not appear in the actual license.

The Legal Code is the actual license; a document designed to be enforced in a court of law.

The meta-data describes the key license elements that apply to a piece of content to enable discovery through customized search engines". see http://creativecommons.org/faq [creativecommons.org] for more!

http://creativecommons.org/about/licenses/ [creativecommons.org]

http://creativecommons.org/about/licenses/meet-the -licenses [creativecommons.org]

No DRM (no DRM viruses owned by paranoid media industry types), Free Fair use again to what it is meant to be. Use Creative Commons. The Creative Commons Meta-Data is better than DRM.

See more about Meta-Data here: http://creativecommons.org/technology/usingmarkup [creativecommons.org]

It is easy to choose a license to use: http://creativecommons.org/license/ [creativecommons.org]


This work is hereby released into the Public Domain. To view a copy of the public domain dedication, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/publicdomain/ [creativecommons.org] or send a letter to Creative Commons, 543 Howard Street, 5th Floor, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA.


PS - See these two programs viewed still on C-SPAN online:

Here: C-SPAN: DIGITAL FUTURE [c-span.org]

C-SPAN - Digital Future Series

Two programs, one Lawrence Lessig, other Neil Gershenfeld

Thursday, March 3
Lawrence Lessig, professor of law at Stanford Law School and founder of the Stanford Center for Internet and Society Lessig is the author of "Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace" and an expert on the issues of copyright and "copyleft." He is the inventor of the revolutionary concept and application Creative Commons, which invites the right to use material under specific conditions.

Monday, March 28

Neil Gershenfeld, director of the Center for Bits and Atoms at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Gershenfeld is the author of "When Things Start to Think." His new concept Internet Zero (0) proposes a new infrastructure for the existing Internet that would give an IP address to all electronic devices - from light bulbs to Internet addresses and URLs - and interconnect them directly, thereby eliminating much intermediating code and server technology. His topic is "From the Library of Information to the Library of Things."


When last i heard from the majority of congressmen (5, Insightful)

plasmacutter (901737) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242392)

When interviewed, the majority of congressmen said point blank that person to person "dormroom" sharing of music was fair use and in no way objectionable.

Further, the DMCA's notice and takedown only applies to the internet, not local area networks.

Any university complying with these bs "complaints" has to have the stupidest administration ever, and any claims made by the RIAA are now utterly specious.

What next.. "illegal sharing through car radios"? .. "in the news today the RIAA demanded that automakers comply with new requirements to prevent passers by and non-drivers from "illeagally hearing" music from car stereos which "by law" is only entitled to the owner/operator of the vehicle alone."

Re:When last i heard from the majority of congress (1)

jZnat (793348) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242550)

What next.. "illegal sharing through car radios"? .. "in the news today the RIAA demanded that automakers comply with new requirements to prevent passers by and non-drivers from "illeagally hearing" music from car stereos which "by law" is only entitled to the owner/operator of the vehicle alone."

You don't know how good an idea that is. I'd love for someone to legally shut those subwoofer hydraulics the fuck up. ;p

And next... (3, Funny)

Transcendent (204992) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242395)

The RIAA will be going after Microsoft for allowing people to share files on their computer over a "network neighborhood". After which, hard drive manufactures will be sent letters informing them that their products are used in the distribution of copyrighted material and must include anti-file sharing technologies. Tesla will be woken from the grave and bitch-smacked for his accomplishments in electro-magnetism, and finally they will sue God for giving humans ears in which they can listen to stolen songs.

Wow, that slope was slippery...

College Student Reports: (1, Troll)

AnotherAnonymousUser (972204) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242401)

Last year, I got contacted by the net admins at my university and had my internet shut off because they'd been contacted externally by Paramount for downloading a 'tagged' movie. The movie had evidently been scripted with some kind of tracing code that reported its movement and transfers back to the source it originated from. Whether or not this technique is commonplace or can be done to any file, I don't know, but this tracing method is definitely one way that the moving of copyrighted files can be detected.

Re:College Student Reports: (1)

Lehk228 (705449) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242467)

was it a WMV file? did you open it with Windows Media Player? if not the admins were full of shit and sniffed your traffic. either that or they allowed the MPAA to sniff everyone's traffic.

Re:College Student Reports: (1)

Surt (22457) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242490)

This is one reason it's a really good idea to run a firewall outside of your computer that doesn't trust microsoft (if you're using media player). On linux, you can probably trust that most of your players aren't going to inform on you, but unless you inspect the code, it's probably a good idea to run an external firewall there too.

Re:College Student Reports: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15242506)

interesting, i had the same thing happen to me in the fall of 2003 while living in the dorm

paramount contacted the school, the school shut off my internet access, and within a day i was back online with just a warning

i wonder if the movie i was downloading was tagged as well

WASTE (3, Interesting)

FLaSh SWT (233251) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242402)

Am I wrong to think that a program like WASTE (http://waste.sourceforge.net) is the easy fix if they started sniffing the local traffic?

Re:WASTE (1)

turkeyphant (648612) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242458)

WASTE isn't foolproof and is a lot more hassle than the current alternatives anyone can figure out. But yeah, I can see several busted DC++ networks migrating to encrypted sharing in the next few years.

Dumb Idea (1)

comwiz56 (447651) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242407)

There is no way that the RIAA can expect the campuses to block all filesharing, and whatever isn't blocked will become the new norm. College students are especially conservative with wasting money on music, and with plenty of intelligent computer gurus around, even the most technophobic students will get friends to hook them up with free music.

In short, the students will always remain one step ahead of the filtering.

block one port... (1)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242409)

...and they'll just use another.

are you going to block all of ftp, scp, mail, and so on? unlikely.

I actually love watching this arms race. I know how it will turn out, too. ;)

Purge the evil (2, Insightful)

topical_surfactant (906185) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242411)

The record cartel (RIAA members) are quite clearly evil. Indescriminately suing 12-year olds, senior citizens and welfare-moms has sealed their judgement in my mind. Eroding personal rights and freedoms for the sake of pure greed doesn't hurt either. Musicians stupid enough to sign with an RIAA member deserve no listeners, no profit, and no airtime.

Don't buy RIAA member CDs, make music mixes for friends and support the indie scene. If someone chides you about filesharing, tell them to get stuffed.

http://www.downhillbattle.org/ [downhillbattle.org] http://www.eff.org/ [eff.org] http://www.riaaradar.com/ [riaaradar.com]

Well, (1)

guruevi (827432) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242447)

I've got a list of all universities in the USA. Maybe the RIAA would be interested in buying it from me, for say, 10000$ and a life long guarantee that I won't get sued.

And how the heck are they going to filter all that? My file sharing goes through NNTP, HTTP and FTP (and recently more often through SFTP)

It will be nice... (2, Funny)

SilentResistance (960115) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242469)

when they outlaw loudly distributing music over the atmospheric network. Thus I will finally be able to get some sleep...

I heard... (1)

Trip Ericson (864747) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242479)

I heard that if the LANs were shut down, students could be sharing files using CDs, Zip Disks, or, help me, USB Flash disks!

I think the RIAA needs to call on everyone to install antipiracy guards (otherwise known as superglue) into USB ports and disk drives of all computers!

That'll solve piracy forever!

(Note, that was sarcasm)

Ladies and Gentlemen (1)

Lehk228 (705449) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242495)

this is the use for a wireless mesh.

if each dorm area has a person or two who knows how to set up a file server with some indexing and request code so the users can log in to any server in range, or ask for a list available on out of range server, out of range file requests would be processed by passing the file to a moderate sized temporary location on the intermediate file servers until it was accessable by the original requestor.

a file in temporary storage which is requested often would be moved to a semi-permenant storage that way a file should not have to move across campus more than once or twice to reach everyone who wants it.

admissable in court? (3, Insightful)

a_greer2005 (863926) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242498)

How can any LAN data be admissible in court? There are two ways that the RIAA can get the data:
1: gain unauthotized access to the network: a crime
or
2: pay off students, who are not experts, or potentialy worse, students with know-how and malis to collect the data, so how can they prove that the data is valid, and not tamperd with?

Any lawyers in the house? Care to give it a shot?

Re:admissable in court? (3, Insightful)

thepotoo (829391) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242570)

you don't undersand their tacitcs. It's all about fear. They are trying to scare you into thinking that if you pirate music, you'll get caught.

Wireless Mesh Networks (1)

Kiaser Wilhelm II (902309) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242501)

This would be a great time for students to start setting up wireless meshes on their campuses. The university can't regulate it or give RIAA a tap to go sniffing around. The infrastructure would be easy to set up too.

"Not asking permission." (1)

Captain Scurvy (818996) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242517)

The RIAA did not disclose the methodology they used to determine that filesharing is occuring on those local networks, but it probably didn't involve asking permission.

Share a copyright file on a major p2p network. Log all direct connections. See who the IPs belong to.

This happend to me.. (3, Interesting)

Ichigo Kurosaki (886802) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242518)

About two weeks ago the direct connect hub at the university of texas was shut down due to outside pressure from the **aa. Our ITS department already imposed strict bandwidth restrictions on amount of bandwidth used (4gb-12gb a week with more bandwidth costing more money). We used the hub to share files (primarily new tv shows) so everyone could get what they wanted without runnign out of bandwidth. Before the letters, ITS looked the other way because the hub accually saved them money on bandwidth. The owner of the hub had his internet revoked and was orderd to shut down the hub a facebook group and serve 40 hours of community service in exchange for not turning his name over to the copyright holders for prosecution.

Whoa (1)

Drakin030 (949484) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242534)

students are engaging in filesharing on their campuses using the local network
NO WAY!!!!!
The RIAA did not disclose the methodology they used to determine that filesharing is occuring on those local networks
Common Sense?

Universities are complicit with internal networks (2, Interesting)

turkeyphant (648612) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242541)

In the UK, almost every university has at least one DC++ hub that a large portion of the student body knows about and uses. Many have customised installers that make it easy for lay people to get starting filesharing and, with computers so ubiquitous on campus, almost anyone has the knowledge to get involved.

The thing is, these massively efficient networks that often contain dozens of TiBs of data would not be nearly as widespread as they are if it weren't for unwritten university policies. If the university isn't on JANET, external bandwidth is expensive. If it is, bandwidth isn't metered as such, but it's in the institutions' interests to not rinse their external traffic too much especially with high upload rates favoured by P2P protocols such as Bittorrent. As such, students using massive amounts of external P2P bandwidth are quickly clamped down upon while they are simultaneously reminded that the existing LAN costs sweet fuck all. What's more, untold masses of viruses come in from kids searching for warez ftp sites or loading up KaZaA.

It doesn't take too long for the computer scientists to put two and two together and test the waters with a DC++ hub either within the university or outside. As long as users do not saturate the university network and hence impinge upon academic use, it's a win-win situation. College kids get the new Tool album for free without getting busted and the university avoids angry letters from the xxAA while seeing its bandwidth bills fall. As long as students don't make it the university's problem, they're happy to ignore it.

It's hard to see how the RIAA can achieve anything by this. After all, they are private networks and no university's computer office is going to give them access to their network if they have any sense. The kids will be forced back to torrents and such. As long as those running hubs are intelligent enough to delete logs and people are prepared to migrate to something like WASTE, the RIAA's efforts are futile.

FERPA (1)

kaufmanmoore (930593) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242546)

I thought FERPA didn't allow college administrators to disclose personal information to outside authorities without proper documentation like a search warrant.

Well at least I'm safe.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15242562)

The * at * works great, noone will take down our *. The RIAA can't get into our * legally......

How about... (1)

The Sultry Salesman (972209) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242569)

How about the MPAA and RIAA focus on creating music/films WORTH the money they are asking instead of going after the consumer? If a film is worth watching I will go to the theater/buy/rent it. When you constantly put out cliche manufactured music/movies then they won't get my money. It's that simple.

First Gonzales, now the RIAA (4, Insightful)

Gary Destruction (683101) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242575)

Gonzales wants to track users on the Internet for the sake of "fighting porn". This in of itself is scary because it's not difficult to imagine the potential for abuse. Now the RIAA wants to monitor college networks for "file sharing". This could easily be manipulated to filter out certain ideas and beliefs as a means to suppress freedom of speech. It could also be used to target students for their beliefs.

The RIAA..? (4, Insightful)

wingman358 (912560) | more than 7 years ago | (#15242582)

First of all, why is the RIAA monitoring colleges' LANs? Is that even legal? Secondly, I fileshare on my LAN all the time. The sharing of my clients' orders and bills is necessary to the survival of my business. Don't flame me for asking this because I honestly don't know the answer: does the RIAA have any authority or legal right to be monitoring students and their actions on private college's LANs? Where does the Recording Industry Association of America get off thinking that they have any authority over the sharing on local networks?
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