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Giant Rock Growing in Mount St. Helens' Crater

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the ch-ch-ch-chia dept.

144

An anonymous reader writes to mention a CNN article about the huge geological formation growing in Mount St. Helens' crater. From the article: "The fin-shaped mass is about 300 feet tall and growing 4 feet to 5 feet a day, said Dan Dzurisin, a geologist at the U.S. Geological Survey. The rock in the crater began growing last November, steadily moving west and pushing rock and other debris out of its way as it goes." Scientists think the mountain will eventually replace the lave dome blown out by the original 1980 eruption.

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144 comments

Is it just me? (0, Offtopic)

isecore (132059) | more than 7 years ago | (#15273892)

I guess st helen can expect to have her world rocked pretty soon!

Re:Is it just me? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15273915)

For the LOVE OF LAVE!!

Yes, yes. "St. Helen" will definitely be doing the breakdancing (!?!?!)

Maybe it's not a rock (5, Funny)

dotslashdot (694478) | more than 7 years ago | (#15273894)

Maybe it's just happy to see you.

Re:Maybe it's not a rock (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15273938)

i posted the very similar comment right below yours. Great minds think alike!

...or maybe we both just need to get laid really bad.

Re:Maybe it's not a rock (1)

Oldsmobile (930596) | more than 7 years ago | (#15273964)

"...or maybe we both just need to get laid really bad."

You mean, get laid by something incredibly large and mountanous sporting a huge erection?

Welllll.... whatever floats YOUR boat....

3 ft of growth a day for the past 6 months... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15274197)

It's time for tentacle rape hentai!

Re:Maybe it's not a rock (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15274393)

It's a red rocket.

Re:Maybe it's not a rock... Or, maybe it's (1)

davidsyes (765062) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274690)

an anneuroid or a hemorrhism. Or, just a volcanic hemorrhoid...

It's a good thing that kind of thing doesn't follow a heavy night of drinking or too much cake and sausage and soda pop...

Is that a rock in your pocket.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15273895)

...perhaps he's just really glad to see us?

Or maybe it's that sexy mountain next door.

Re:Is that a rock in your pocket.... (4, Interesting)

peacefinder (469349) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274011)

"Or maybe it's that sexy mountain next door."

Maybe so. [usgs.gov]
"Northwest Indians told early explorers about the fiery Mount St. Helens. In fact, an Indian name for the mountain, Louwala-Clough, means "smoking mountain". According to one legend, the mountain was once a beautiful maiden, "Loowit". When two sons of the Great Spirit "Sahale" fell in love with her, she could not choose between them. The two braves, Wyeast and Klickitat fought over her, burying villages and forests in the process. Sahale was furious. He smote the three lovers and erected a mighty mountain peak where each fell. Because Loowit was beautiful, her mountain (Mount St. Helens) was a beautiful, symmetrical cone of dazzling white. Wyeast (Mount Hood) lifts his head in pride, but Klickitat (Mount Adams) wept to see the beautiful maiden wrapped in snow, so he bends his head as he gazes on St. Helens.

-- Excerpt from: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Gifford Pinchot National Forest "Mount St. Helens" Brochure, 1980

Tom Cruise will save us (0)

zapwow (939754) | more than 7 years ago | (#15273897)

It's the Martians. They buried their attack force in Mt. St. Helens millenia ago, and now they've come to claim our world for themselves!

Re:Tom Cruise will save us (1)

EnronHaliburton2004 (815366) | more than 7 years ago | (#15273920)

No no no. It is a fingernail of a gigantic cave troll. It just keeps growing & growing until the top crumbles off.

Those pictures are a little freaky.

Re:Tom Cruise will save us (1)

StarfishOne (756076) | more than 7 years ago | (#15273990)

Shhhttt!!

Didn't you sign that NDA about the script for M:I:IV yesterday?

Tom

P.S. You're fired! <python move>

Re:Tom Cruise will save us (1)

StarfishOne (756076) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274031)

Doh! I completely forgot to mention a possible deal with Intel too:

M:I:IV... VIIV.. you're thinking what I'm thinking.. uhhu ;)

Re:Tom Cruise will save us (1)

iced_773 (857608) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274119)


Not Martians. It's Xenu. He's breaking free. Then Cruise really can save us!

Or maybe I should just keep my mouth shut. I'm sure CmdrTaco doesn't need to get bullied^H^H^H^H^H^H^Hin trouble with the legal clowns^H^H^H^H^H^Hdepartment of the Church of Scientology again.

Re:Tom Cruise will save us (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15274238)

You can't handle the truth, show me the money!!!

uh oh (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15273904)

this one time in geometry class i developed a 'huge formation', and then the teacher called me to work out a problem on the board!

the girls all laughed at me. hopefully mt. st. helens won't have that problem.

Re:uh oh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15274139)

this one time in geometry class i developed a 'huge formation', and then the teacher called me to work out a problem on the board!

the girls all laughed at me. hopefully mt. st. helens won't have that problem.


Do you go by the Imperial or metric 'huge'? I might have an explanation for you.

Re:uh oh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15274153)

Hopefully you didn't have the eruption St. Helens had either...

Just when you thought it was safe... (4, Funny)

Jhon (241832) | more than 7 years ago | (#15273908)

The fin-shaped mass is about 300 feet tall and growing 4 feet to 5 feet a day
It's a Land Shark! [bioware.com]

Re:Just when you thought it was safe... (1)

frisket (149522) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274233)

No, it's just like that blackbody monolith we found on the moon 5 years ago... (oops, sorry, no-one knows about that, do they :-)

Rebuilding (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15273912)

I wonder how long it would take for the old dome to be rebuilt? Didn't find it anywhere in that article.

Re:Rebuilding (4, Informative)

anagama (611277) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274040)

The eruption caused a massive debris avalanche, reducing its summit from 9,677 feet (2,950 m) to 8,364 feet (2,550 m) in elevation. Cite [wikipedia.org] . The mountain lost 1313 ft in its 1980 eruption. The article mentions the rock is rising 4-5 ft per day, and is 300 ft tall. It has 1003 ft to go, or about 250 days, assuming it continues at the same rate -- an unlikely assumption however because to replace the cone, it would need to not only rise to its former height, it would have to fill in the mile wide crater as well.

Re:Rebuilding (3, Interesting)

anagama (611277) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274107)

Looking at the wikipedia article I linked above, it looks like 40-50 years at current rate to replace the dome (look at "2004-present activity" section). One nice thing is that there is a high res picture on wikipedia of the formation as opposed to CNN's thumbnail shots about 2/3 the size of their ads. A picture 3000 pixels wide is way more enjoyable than one 75 or 80 pixels wide -- you'd think CNN could foot the bill for an extra kb or so and post real pictures.

Re:Rebuilding (1)

ozbird (127571) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274314)

The mountain lost 1313 ft in its 1980 eruption. The article mentions the rock is rising 4-5 ft per day, and is 300 ft tall. It has 1003 ft to go ... ... once the lava dome reaches the crater rim (the current summit.) The top of the dome is at 7155 ft [usgs.gov] so it has to grow 1209 ft to reach the rim, and 2213 ft (total) to reach the original summit height.

Re:Rebuilding (1)

livewire98801 (916940) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274383)

The first eruption happened the day before I was born. Maybe this year it'll be a birthday present :)

St. Helens webcam [fs.fed.us] , for those interested.

Re:Rebuilding (1)

spun (1352) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274056)

Considering just the height, at five feet per day it would take less than a year to make up the approximately 1,000 feet of vertical height lost. But it's not just the height, half the damn mountain slid away. My guess is it will take a long time to fill in the crater left behind.

She's gonna blow! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15273933)

Arrrrr, mateys! She's gonna blow, I tell ya.

Will the volcano have another major eruption? (2, Insightful)

SeaFox (739806) | more than 7 years ago | (#15273943)

"Given the way things are going now, there's no hint of any sort of catastrophic eruptions," USGS geologist Tom Pierson said. "At any time, however, things can change."

I hate quotes like that in news stories. They amount to "there's nothing happening right now, and I dont know if anything is going to happen, as the situation could change as soon as I finish telling you everything is fine". An eight-year-old could have offered us as much insight.

Just reassuring locals (1)

dietrollemdefender (970664) | more than 7 years ago | (#15273989)

I took it that he was reassuring folks that right now, there's no need to panic or anything like that. I'm sure there's plenty of folks who lived through the first eruption are getting a little freaked right now.

Re:Just reassuring locals (2, Insightful)

anubi (640541) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274373)

Yeh, it makes me think of the physics behind Old Faithful.

Except we get lava, not hot water.

I think we all know how a "relaxation oscillator" works, and Mt. St. Helens sure looks like the physical implementation of one to me.

The difference is the volcano has the phase change difference of the liquid lava forming a dense rock upon cooling which introduces a significant chaotic factor into the dwell time, so no one knows just when its gonna cycle.

Not the thing for a good night's sleep.

Re:Will the volcano have another major eruption? (3, Insightful)

ZSpade (812879) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274022)

The fin-shaped mass is about 300 feet tall and growing 4 feet to 5 feet a day

Just what exactly is your definition of "nothing heppening right now"? Geologically, 5 feet a day is pretty rapid change.

Re:Will the volcano have another major eruption? (1)

peacefinder (469349) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274086)

Yeah, but it sounds better than the real message: "As far as we can tell this is not very dangerous outside the crater, but volcanism is not a well-understod phenomenon. This volcano surprised and killed a lot of people 26 years ago. There might be severe and dangerous surprises ahead. If you hike up there this afternoon and get your head blown off, don't come crying to me."

Re:Will the volcano have another major eruption? (2, Funny)

gardyloo (512791) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274208)

"If you hike up there this afternoon and get your head blown off, don't come crying to me."

    Sweet. If you can get your head blown off and go crying to anyone, I wanna know about it!

Re:Will the volcano have another major eruption? (4, Informative)

NMerriam (15122) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274363)

An eight-year-old could have offered us as much insight.

Well, the difference is the eight year-old would be guessing.

The USGS stating that it's stable now but is capable of changing at any moment without warning is useful information, because it makes explicit that if something terrible is to happen they won't be able to see indicators 24-48 hours in advance and thus warn people away. If you want to get away, there is no precursor activity that will tell you when, so you just basically have to go and wait, potentially for a long time.

Re:Will the volcano have another major eruption? (1)

vux984 (928602) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274451)

I hate quotes like that in news stories. They amount to "there's nothing happening right now, and I dont know if anything is going to happen, as the situation could change as soon as I finish telling you everything is fine". An eight-year-old could have offered us as much insight.

Blame retarded journalists. Seriously.

Journalists asks Geologist
"Is it going to blow up? [I hope it will... that would be a big story...]

Geologist answers:
[ /sigh...Trapped. I can't categorically just say "No", because the situation could change... and of course the answer isn't "Yes", so I have to make some pointless statement an 8 year old could have figured out. Hopefully they'll clue in that there is simply nothing of consequence to report on that.]

"No. Its fine for now, nothing to worry about, but the situation could change."

Journalist:
[damn... no story... except for that part about the situation changing... I'll report that....]

"Local geologist claims that while there is no reason to beleive there will be an eruption, he warns that the situation may change. We'll monitor the situation and provide hourly updates..."

Geologist: [Dammit]

Journalist:
"In other news today, no terrorists were captured, but we might find one tomorrow so be vigilant... and the price of gas at the pump is reaching record highs but it could go down again if the situation changes. Stay tuned for an update on all of these breaking stories..."

[I'm such a great journalist... ]

Re:Will the volcano have another major eruption? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15274686)

that quote caught my eye as well. imo, it's just a geologist trying to make his job seem more interesting that it actually is... i mean, the guy studies rocks for a living... *sigh*

nothin against geologists of course... =P

Eight-year old? (1)

vwjeff (709903) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274802)

"...there's nothing happening right now, and I dont know if anything is going to happen, as the situation could change as soon as I finish telling you everything is fine. An eight-year-old could have offered us as much insight."

This looks more like the work of Geraldo Rivera. Comparing the reporting to the work of an eight-year old is giving more credit than deserved. Geraldo is a better baseline for comparison.

sulfuric lake (1)

nicodemus05 (688301) | more than 7 years ago | (#15273960)

So this is only marginally on topic, but the story reminded me of a video I saw when I was a kid, I think featuring the Kraffts, that talked about a sulfuric lake caused by volcanic activity. I seem to recall the hosts of the video talking about someone's skin being eaten away by the acid in the lake, but I can't find anything on it in a quick google search. Has anyone else heard about this lake or this gruesome skin story? Now I've got the image in my head and I want to read more about it. I'm drawn to it like a train wreck. Well, a train carrying vats of sulfuric acid, at least.

Re:sulfuric lake (1)

rsd-17 (765038) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274193)

Dude, you should rent/download "Dante's Peak". That exact scenario is played out when a Mount St. Helens like volcano in the Pacific North West blows its wad.

Re:sulfuric lake (1)

LiquidCoooled (634315) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274994)

Your remembering a section from the movie Dante's Peak!

Dantes_Peak_Movie_Volcano_Facts [geolor.com]

  FACT 4: LAKES AROUND A STRATOVOLCANO CAN BE MORE ACIDIC

Sulfur Dioxide is a gas common to volcanic eruptions. This gas, when dissolved in water, produces sulfuric acid, one of the worst known acids and one a person would definitely not want to come in contact with.
Other gases dissolved in magma, hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen fluoride, hydrogen chloride and carbon dioxide, also contribute to the acidity of surrounding bodies of water.

A pH of 0-2 (where 7 is neutral, and any number lower than that is acidic) is not impossible and the water can be quite corrosive to metal. If you think that the juice from a lemon is acidic, imagine water thousands of times more acidic than that! One definitely would not want to swim in water that is very close to an active stratovolcano.

In a period of perhaps several hours, a thin metal wire could corrode away.

Notice what happens to Grandma in the movie and also to the metal boat the actors try to escape in. Would you say that the events stay in line with the facts?

I was living in Seattle when St. Helens blew (5, Interesting)

spun (1352) | more than 7 years ago | (#15273961)

It was on a Sunday if I recall (I was all of 9 years old)and I slept right through it. Some people claimed they could hear it, and you could see a funny shaped cloud on the horizon if you squinted real hard. I kept waiting for the predicted ash fall, but it never got as far as Seattle.

I visited the mountain some years later, and I can't begin to describe how small I felt looking at the devestation. Miles and miles of forests flattened, all the trees lined up in the same direction, following the contours of the hills. Everything coated in a layer of fine ash. Scary, in a "look how freakin' insignificant you are" kinda way.

If you ever go, be sure to bring a lantern and visit Ape Caves, [wikipedia.org] a 5 mile long lava tube near the base of the mountain. It's an easy hike even if you've never been in a cave before, and unlike most caves the sole improvement is a rickety metal staircase leading down in the middle. You can hike 2.5 miles up and exit out where it collapsed, and/or hike 2.5 miles down and it gets really narrow and stops. (By "up" and "down" I just mean the thing runs down the side of the mountain, so one end is higher than the other, not that it goes straight up and down.)

As for this latest development, 5 feet per day?! Wow, that's pretty dang fast. I'd heard a new lava dome was growing, but this speed is certainly a new develpment. Still, it will take a long time to get back to its former size. Over 1,000 vertical feet of mountain got blown off the top, and most of one side slid away.

And Bors, that's five. No, three sir! (1)

spun (1352) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274032)

Apparantly Ape Cave is only three miles long, not five, according to wikipedia, which is never, ever wrong. But it is still the third longest lava tube in the US. Must have seemed bigger when I was eleven.

Three. Three. And we'd better not risk another frontal assault. That rabbit's dynamite.

Re:I was living in Seattle when St. Helens blew (1)

peacefinder (469349) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274054)

Yep. Sunday May 18th, 1980. I was asleep, but my Dad rousted my brother and I out to go look when he got the news. From Southwest of Portland, the ash plume was a vertical column appearing thicker than my thumb held at arms length. It was quite a sight.

And if anyone is ever in the area, the view from the Johnston Ridge observatory is amazing.

Re:I was living in Seattle when St. Helens blew (2, Funny)

value_added (719364) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274324)

It was on a Sunday if I recall (I was all of 9 years old)and I slept right through it...

It was Tuesday. In time it came to be known as Mount St. Helens Tuesday.

That was one day before Wednesday.

Which came to be known as ...

wait for it ...

Ash Wednesday.

-- I was camping near the blast zone (5, Interesting)

kefler (938387) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274431)

I was pretty young.. but I sort of remember..

It was a Sunday (for the first bigger eruption in 1980). We were supposedly in the 'safe zone', but we all know how that went. We had just gotten up out of the tents when the ground shook continuously for minutes like an earthquake.. Then we could see a grey cloud rising up near the horizon.

Very quickly, the cloud appeared to go so high that it was over us. There was lightning at the edge of the cloud. Rain began to fall immediately, I remember it was warm and black.. Looking closely at a drop you could see the individual ash particles.

By that time, we had pulled up the tent with everything in side it and threw it in the back of the truck in a single motion.

The ride back to Yakima, WA was slow, and the visibility was just about zero. It was hard to breath and the roads were jammed with panic'd people.. We later found out that the campground we were at was covered in a large amount of burning hot mud.

When we got home there was ash everywhere, and it stayed dark for what seemed like days. I remember wearing a mask for weeks afterwards to go outside.

Re:I was living in Seattle when St. Helens blew (1)

kerrbear (163235) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274990)

As for this latest development, 5 feet per day?! Wow, that's pretty dang fast. I'd heard a new lava dome was growing, but this speed is certainly a new develpment. Still, it will take a long time to get back to its former size. Over 1,000 vertical feet of mountain got blown off the top, and most of one side slid away.

It's now 300 feet tall. So by your reckoning it will take (1000 - 300) / 5ft/day = 140 days. That should make it back to original height by late September. So I guess it's not that long.

Sorry, I just can't resist doing this stuff :-)

Re:I was living in Seattle when St. Helens blew (1)

aquatone282 (905179) | more than 7 years ago | (#15275141)

It was a Sunday.

I was eighteen, living a few miles north of Olympia on Puget Sound, sleeping off a night of partying. I came downstairs about ten a.m. and my parents asked me if I'd heard "it."

Heard what, I asked?

St. Helens erupted they told me, sometime between 8 and 9 that morning.

Nope - I didn't hear it. It's hard to hear anything when you're passed out.

It was a a week or two before we saw any of the ash. Richland, Pasco, and Kennewick on the other side of the Cascades got buried though.

Seven years later I visted the Mount St. Helens National Monument for the first time. The blast area, where the "experts" had said it would take 100 hundred years for any form of life to return to, was already covered with low brush and Douglas Fir saplings.

I live in Florida these days. I put the Volcanocam [fs.fed.us] on my Google page. Now I watch the sun light up the crater in the mornings - or sometimes I don't. You know how the weather is in the Pacfic Northwest. . .

3d info - fly throughs (3, Interesting)

drDugan (219551) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274005)

it seems that 3d virtual environments are getting pretty good. lots of people playing WOW and 2nd life, simms...

When I see an article like this - I want a 3D environment. I want to download the "map -o- the crater" and be able to fly around and see what it's really like there.

it wouldn't need to be that detailed, or be a replacement for pictures. it's just that I can't seem to get a sense for the size or the scope of what we're talking about.

3D standards litter the last 10 years like dead bodies in war zones - but it still is nice to dream.

Re:3d info - fly throughs (1)

AaronPSU777 (938553) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274043)

Google Earth has it modeled in fairly good detail and you can fly around it all you want, zoom in, pan, etc. http://earth.google.com [google.com]

Re:3d info - fly throughs (1)

drDugan (219551) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274270)

yup - that worked pretty well! the search even worked. previous attempts with google earth were lackluster. surpising to me, this time I typed in Mount St. Helens and zooooooom right to the mountain. no shark fin visible though. :(

*knock* *knock* (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15274010)

Land Shark!

Hmmm (1)

GmAz (916505) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274013)

Scientists think the mountain will eventually replace the lave dome blown out by the original 1980 eruption

Or, it will explode like it did in 1980. Hmm...it had a large formation back then and exploded, it is making a large formation now, but will just fill in the GIHUGION crater it made the first time. How bout gather your stuff up now and run for it.

Spherical Spacecraft (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15274030)

Actually it's a section of the huge spherical spacecraft that crashed to earth long ago, punching a hole in the crust which resulted in the volcano. The wreckage is now being pushed to the surface.

You heard it here, first!

volcano cam (4, Interesting)

drDugan (219551) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274044)

TFA links to a "volcano cam"

http://www.fs.fed.us/gpnf/volcanocams/msh/ [fs.fed.us]

before and after pics (2, Interesting)

drDugan (219551) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274069)

Re:before and after pics (1)

Khyber (864651) | more than 7 years ago | (#15275163)

holy hell, I think we need to go after nature for having WMDs that powerful. :P

Nanotech Spaceship? (2, Funny)

billstewart (78916) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274089)

It's how the dolphins are planning to get off the planet.

There's actually a book about that (1)

Chemisor (97276) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274556)

I recall reading a book about a nanotech mountain suddenly appearing on earth. It was in the Death Valley though, and was actually a fake spaceship, placed there by hostile aliens about to destory the planet. We ought to look around there and see if there are any anvil-headed aliens lying nearby. The book was The Forge of God [amazon.com] by Greg Bear, and it wasn't particularly good, although one might want to read it for background, complimentary to its sequel, The Anvil of Stars, which is superb.

I think the question on everyone's mind is... (1)

Tibor the Hun (143056) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274161)

Who's the lucky father?

Thank you, thank you.
Try the veal, and don't forget to tip your waitress.

Re:I think the question on everyone's mind is... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15274781)

"That's not a Helen. That's a Herman!"

a minor error... (1)

david_bonn (259998) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274164)

The lava dome was was not blown out in the 1980 eruption. The upper thousand-plus feet of the mountain were blown out. A lava dome formed in the time period after the major eruptions of 1980 and that lava dome was blown out later, I think around 1985.

deliberately buried... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15274212)

Its origin and purpose still a total mystery.

Cannon Ball (1)

peterfa (941523) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274380)

One of these days pressure is going to build up, there will be another erruption, and that ball will be blown into outer-space.

Detective John Kimble (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15274382)

"IT'S NOT A TUMOR!"

Old news and faulty (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15274401)

The current eruption has been going on since september/october 2004 and has built 7 of these formations, named spines, so far. This last one is not even the largest of these.

The old lava dome was not built during the "1980 eruption" which was a Plinian, explosive event triggered by a massive landslide. The old lava dome was built during quiescent eruptions, just like this one, in the period 1980-1986.

Title (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15274490)

Giant Rock Growing in Mount St. Helens' Crater

Oh, yeah. No innuendo there.

Does it run Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15274500)

If it does, you cant stop it. It will be impervious to
spam, viruses, and all other malware.

New York Times (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15274610)

This was in the Science times about 3 months ago.

I have a bad news for you, St.Helens... (1)

Maxhrk (680390) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274647)

I hate to break the bad news to you...St. Helens... you have a cancer tumour. My best guess you will explode in few months from today.

KFC (1)

packetmill (955023) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274807)

Can you go there on foot? bcz before long people will be visiting that place and staring in wonder and then the lava will erupt and then...

is that... (0, Redundant)

penguin-collective (932038) | more than 7 years ago | (#15274889)

Is that a fin-shaped geological formation growing in your crater just before an eruption, or are you just happy to see me?

(Sorry, I couldn't resist.)

this is normal (2, Informative)

buldir (951689) | more than 7 years ago | (#15275031)

This latest activity is normal for a volcano that typically erupts more silicic lava. The magma at depth is generally more viscous and after an eruption the momentum of the magma migration slows, but still continues to rise up through the vent due to residual pressure beneath the volcano. This type of thing occurs quite a bit at another volcano in Kamchatka, Russia, called Bezymianny. The dome builds up, then collapses, then rebuilds, etc. The USGS should no doubt be concerned with the growth of the dome at MSH, as a major collapse can easily cause a pyroclastic flow...nasty stuff. Questions remain, however, how much more magma is beneath the volcano and what is the rate of replenishment?
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