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NASA Hacker Gary McKinnon Interviewed

CowboyNeal posted more than 8 years ago | from the out-of-this-world dept.

402

An anonymous reader writes "A BBC article reports about an interview between Click and Gary McKinnon who in 2002 hacked into NASA and other US Military networks. In the interview he talks about how he accessed machines by using default passwords and a conversation with a NASA network engineer using Wordpad. He also talks about how he found information about anti-gravity, UFO technology, free energy and how UFOs are regularly airbrushed out from high-resolution satellite images."

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402 comments

I'm really skeptical (5, Insightful)

suso (153703) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276585)

No, the graphical remote viewer works frame by frame. It's a Java application, so there's nothing to save on your hard drive, or at least if it is, only one frame at a time.

What kind of moron spends 3 years breaking into government computers and doesn't know how to do a screen capture or see the importance of saving what he's doing. Sorry folks, but from reading this interview, he seems like bullshit.

Re:I'm really skeptical (1)

AndyAndyAndyAndy (967043) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276618)

Well at the very least, I believe he DID hack into NASA, everything else... I dunno. The British police probably have records too... where are all of those in his story??

A slight off topic, but interesting: About 5 or 6 years ago at my former high school a senior was caught hacking NASA (for whatever reason) from the school's library, and the feds showed up and arrested him on the spot. Freaked everyone out a little.

Re:I'm really skeptical (1, Insightful)

Threni (635302) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276665)

> from reading this interview, he seems like bullshit

He wants to seem like a hapless guy who got lucky but didn't know what he's doing. (All that stuff about a shadow of some guys hand as he stopped the download, and altering jpegs to 4bit mode as they downloaded etc are part of it. Oh, and since when was Wordpad an IM tool?) Either that or he's taking the blame for someone else. There's definitely something odd going on.

Re:I'm really skeptical (1)

danhuby (759002) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276707)

When I read the thing about talking via WordPad, I assumed he was using some sort of remote desktop client such as VNC. I've had conversations using Notepad with other VNC users of the same server in the past.

Re:I'm really skeptical (1)

Glonoinha (587375) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276759)

He wants to seem like a hapless guy who got lucky but didn't know what he's doing.

Honestly, that describes most of us, most of the time. Every once in a while you know exactly what you are doing, but most of the time you just get lucky. Granted for this guy the most appropriate quote might be 'some days the sun even shines on a dog's ass.'

I'd rather be lucky than good - any day. Of course the harder I work, the luckier seem to get.

Re:I'm really skeptical (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15276719)

If you had watched the video recording of the interview you would know that the transcript presented is actually pretty dumbed down and poor.

It seems more credible from the video.

Re:I'm really skeptical (4, Funny)

AndroidCat (229562) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276825)

Well, it would be hard for it to seem less credible, wouldn't it? What happens when you reduce the video to 4 bit colour?

Re:I'm really skeptical (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15276720)

And how did he 'see the guys hand move across' ?

Re:I'm really skeptical (2, Interesting)

FunkyELF (609131) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276726)

Agreed. He doesn't seem to be that technical.
If you watch the video rather than read the transcript...the part where he mentions having searched 65,000 computers for blank passwords, he elaborates and says that maybe only 5,000 were alive and of that, maybe only 500 ran Windows and only some of them had blank passwords.

The fact that he mentions targeting windows machines and having a conversation on wordpad with someone leads me to beleive he was usuing one of those Back Oriface / sub-seven things that were going around the time that this happened.

Oh that brings back memories of living in a college apartment complex and using those programs. Having conversations on notepad, playing sounds through their computers at night, printing stuff on their printers. One girl actually thought it was cool and said she felt like Whoopie Goldberg in Jumpin' Jack Flash.

Re:I'm really skeptical (1)

darkmeridian (119044) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276820)

SK: You were actually cut off the time you were downloading the picture?

GM: Yes, I saw the guy's hand move across.


By reading the article, you get the sense he is not a very "techy" kind of guy. He even admits to as much. I do believe that he was able to access government military computers. But that quote above shows he did not access the images he claimed to have. Did he hack into a NASA security camera that happened to be pointed at the screen? Or did he mean "cursor"? I dunna. He said "the guy's hand"...

Re:I'm really skeptical (1)

Bungopolis (763083) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276845)

He meant cursor.

Re:I'm really skeptical (1)

azav (469988) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276850)

If he was VNC'd into a computer with a webcam and a display of that cam on it, then he could have seen it the hand.

But face it, we're just speculating.

Re:I'm really skeptical (3, Insightful)

DrXym (126579) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276872)

This seems par for the course for UFO nuts. When pressed for hard evidence of the amazing things they claim, you get a bunch of excuses or some grainy blurry mess that could be and probably is a hubcap or a spray painted flower pot. In this idiot's case he has no excuse for not providing evidence. If he really saw these super secret UFOs, free energy devices etc, all he had to do was save / download the information and stash it somewhere.

Since he didn't he is full of shit. The UFO / conspiracy nuts will probably love him.

You are mistaken (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15276897)

Come on man, this is not Fox News we're talking about.

This is the BBC! The most credible news agency in the world! Except for maybe al Jazeera.

If we can't trust them, who can we trust?

UFOs, free energy, and anti-gravity? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15276589)

Is he certain he didn't stumble on a NASA honeypot?

Ugh.. (1)

jamesjw (213986) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276591)

I can see this story bringing out the conspiracy theory trolls for sure :)

Re:Ugh.. (1)

Archon-X (264195) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276634)

..what do you mean bring out.. they were here.. all along..

Re:Ugh.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15276801)

I can see this story bringing out the conspiracy theory trolls for sure :)

There are no conspiracy theorists... they are just something the goverment made up in order to make people dismiss accurate information.

I've heard of this guy (1, Insightful)

DerGeist (956018) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276592)

He apparently got ahold of tons of super-secret information and mentions just enough in interviews to sound like a movie trailer, but when pressed for details he just contemptuously laughs and says something vague like "oh, the time is not right yet.."

Does he really know anything interesting or did he just find a bunch of documents on how a missile works?

Re:I've heard of this guy (1)

Saedrael (880381) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276629)

He knows one interesting thing: many networked computers at NASA/the DoD have blank administrator passwords. If that's not interesting, I don't know what is.

Re:I've heard of this guy (1)

xiando (770382) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276684)

That's a good question.

Now, regardless of him knowing anything - and his story being true or made up, it really must be mentioned that I could have given the same interview. What I mean by that is that if you search the net, read some of those strange UFO/alien/conspiracy/etc websites then you will find "information about anti-gravity, UFO technology, free energy and how UFOs are regularly airbrushed out from high-resolution satellite images.".

http://www.google.com/search?hl=no&q=nasa+airbrush +ufo [google.com] - 17.000 pages found.

My point is that the information put out in that interview is publicly available on the Internet. Like.. BREAKING NEWS; SOMEONE'S MAKING CROP CICLES! I HACKED INTO NSA AND FOUND OUT! Honestly! 4,4 million pages on the Internet http://www.google.com/search?hl=no&q=crop%2Bcircle s [google.com] about that topic don't mean I'm not a haxor!!!

UFO Vs Alien & Gary's Flakey Story (5, Insightful)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276593)

I'm going to throw out this warning that this article was not fairly summarized by Slashdot.

I will preemptively state that UFO does not necessarily mean extraterrestrial technology or not from this planet. In the raw form of the acronym, it means simple that there is an Unidentified Flying Object. There are most likely hundreds of types of aircraft that governments around the world would refuse to classify due to a need to keep their enemies in the dark (national security).

From the article:
Gary McKinnon: I was in search of suppressed technology, laughingly referred to as UFO technology. I think it's the biggest kept secret in the world because of its comic value, but it's a very important thing.
He interchangeably uses "suppressed technology" with "UFO technology." I'm certain the United States Government has tons of suppressed technology as well as any other government for obvious reasons.

I should finish the quote, however:
Old-age pensioners can't pay their fuel bills, countries are invaded to award oil contracts to the West, and meanwhile secretive parts of the secret government are sitting on suppressed technology for free energy.
Ok, that last bit about free energy, you can go ahead and call him a nut job. And then there's also this:
I got one picture out of the folder, and bearing in mind this is a 56k dial-up, so a very slow internet connection, in dial-up days, using the remote control programme I turned the colour down to 4bit colour and the screen resolution really, really low, and even then the picture was still juddering as it came onto the screen.

But what came on to the screen was amazing. It was a culmination of all my efforts. It was a picture of something that definitely wasn't man-made.
Yeah, Gary, it sure is crazy how you can mess with the color quality and resolution of an image to make it look like my family picture is really some image a green gelatinous blob that eats people.
Firstly, because of what I was looking for, I think I was morally correct. Even though I regret it now, I think the free energy technology should be publicly available.
Uh, I only heard a story about a blimp above the earth's atmosphere. Where was the story where you saw a device that produced unlimited amounts of energy?

"In my house, we obey the laws of thermodynamics!" - Homer Simpson

Honestly... (4, Insightful)

Valdrax (32670) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276666)

Anyone who thinks that the US government is sitting on technology that would give us greater air superiority in combat, make exploration and military domination of space easy, eliminate a significant portion of our trade deficit, make us no longer beholden to countries like Iran, Venezuela, Saudi Arabia, and Russia, etc., etc. is a complete and total lunatic.

If we had alien technology, had reverse engineered it, and knew how to make it work, we would be using it right now.

Re:Honestly... (1, Flamebait)

xiando (770382) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276727)

If we had alien technology, had reverse engineered it, and knew how to make it work, we would be using it right now.

And what makes you think YOU'RE NOT, eh?

Consider this: WHY would you show off your MOST ADVANCED technology if your LESS ADVANCED technology already IS SUPERIOUR to the adversarys? It must also be mentioned that if you show me your latest technology in battle and it fails or you for some reason allow that technology to fall in the hands of your enemy then they will reverse your (alien or not) technology.

Phil Schneider http://torrentchannel.com/Phil_Schneider_-_Undergr ound_Bases_and_The_New_World_Order [torrentchannel.com] , who told his friends and family that if he ever "committed suicide" they could be sure he was murdered and died by "suicide" in a way which is IMPOSSIBLE to kill yourself, repeatedly stated that military technology is at least 100 years ahead of what the public is allowed to have.

Re:Honestly... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15276803)

Someone should fix you up with Barbara Schwarz [wikipedia.org] . She believes in underwater villages in the Great Salt Lake where no one grows old. She also believes in a massive conspiracies to hide the truth. I think it could work.

UFO Conspiracy Theories Debunked by Geopolitics. (5, Interesting)

Valdrax (32670) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276864)

Consider this: WHY would you show off your MOST ADVANCED technology if your LESS ADVANCED technology already IS SUPERIOUR to the adversarys?

You've obviously never read up on the kind of technological fantasies the US military has. Despite your BOLD STATEMENTS that EMPHATICALLY use CAPITALIZED WORDS which make me DOUBT YOUR SANITY, the US military is completely and totally incapable of understanding the words "good enough." Even though our military technology can stomp on anyone on the planet, the Pentagon has long argued for increased capabilities against a phantom Chinese threat. They conjure up the image of China suddenly having tech on par with ours in 10-20 years as a boogeyman to justify bigger and fatter budgets for more powerful weapons.

Second, the space program is a black eye for the US. It was a prominent sign of American strength and leadership that has decayed into a series of failures. It costs a ridiculous amount of money to send a space shuttle up and to deploy our many satellites. If we had alien technology, then we could half NASA's budget and accomplish the same goals. We could also cheaply weaponize space like the Pentagon always fantasizes about.

Third, oil. We have a lot of shady alliances worldwide that revolve completely around access to oil. Take Saudi Arabia. We've known for decades that the Saudis are state sponsors of terrorist groups and have spent their money heavily to foment Muslim radicalism. We know that the majority of the 9-11 attackers were Saudis. However, we're still all buddy-buddy with them because of oil. If we weren't dependent on oil, we could pressure the country towards democracy or at least leave it as some sort of backwater of no importance and focus on developing more friendly allies elsewhere.

Take Venezuela. The US government has long thought that the rise of Communism and Socialism in Latin America was to be stopped at all costs -- even to the point of toppling democracies for dictatorships. (I really, really hate this policy, BTW.) Venezuela is the vanguard of a new South American socialism movement, and it only succeeds because the state oil industry can support the entire economy. Guess what country is the number one customer of Venezuela despite our official dislike of Chavez? The US of course.

Take Iran. Right now, our conflict with Iran over nuclear power/weapons is sending oil prices skyrocketting and hurting Americans. If we had free energy, then Iran would have no leverage. If we were smart, we'd give it to the Chinese and the Russians and remove the economic leverage that makes them veto UN resolutions against Iran, Sudan, etc.

Oil blocks a very, very large amount of US foreign policy goals and make us have some goals that are very unsavory. Free energy would not only boost our economy, but it would make many of Washington's dreams possible. To say that we have it and aren't using it is to BLATANTLY IGNORE GEOPOLITICS.

Then again, I don't expect to reach you with facts. For crying out loud, you post a link to a site which goes on about "Illuminati," "The New World Order," and "Chemtrails." If you can offer a RATIONAL explanation of why we have a greater interest in hiding technology than in using it, I'd love to hear it. Bonus points if you can explain why 100 years advanced military technology isn't being used in Iraq right now.

Re:UFO Conspiracy Theories Debunked by Geopolitics (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15276892)

"Bonus points if you can explain why 100 years advanced military technology isn't being used in Iraq right now."

In all fairness we steamrolled Iraq and have suffered exceedingly low casualties. A low level, extremely unsuccessful, resistance is no indication that we're not using extremely advanced technology.

Though, I think if we had 100 year+ tech, we would have solved the IED sooner.

Re:Honestly... (2)

Andrzej Sawicki (921100) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276818)

If we had alien technology, had reverse engineered it, and knew how to make it work, we would be using it right now.
But there is no contradiction. Just substitute the "we" part with some secret government agencies that try to hide the technology from the public. You use it, while at the same time keeping everyone from knowing that you do (so you do not use it, in a way.)

Re:Honestly... (4, Insightful)

Valdrax (32670) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276896)

See my reply to the other guy. Please explain what rational motive would lead the government to hide technology that could solve several major US policy goals and that would give us even more military superiority when the Pentagon is never satisfied with what they have already. Despite the abundant benefits of openly using the technology, your excuse must provide a good reason why hiding it has more benefits, especially as our economic leadership is starting to decay.

Read your 1984 (0)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276908)

Perpetual war is better for a government than perpetual peace. No matter if this peace is achived by suppressing everyone outside your country and having the rest of the world work for your country.

Perpetual war has many very attractive features for a country.

First of all, you can silence all dissenters with the question "Do you not support your country? Are you a traitor?"

Second, it keeps people's mind elsewhere. If you have to worry about whether you're going to be bombed today, you don't care that your government is spending tons of money to keep you down while those it favors are bathing in luxury.

Finally, you can (and I guess we've seen that far too many times now) easily impose the most restrictive laws simply by claiming that the war makes it necessary.

I'm not saying that the "super tech" exists. I'm just saying that if it does, using it would be very dumb.

Re:UFO Vs Alien & Gary's Flakey Story (1)

noz (253073) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276753)

You clearly performed poorly in English comprehension testing in primary school.
Gary McKinnon: I was in search of suppressed technology, laughingly referred to as UFO technology. I think it's the biggest kept secret in the world because of its comic value, but it's a very important thing."
He interchangeably uses "suppressed technology" with "UFO technology." I'm certain the United States Government has tons of suppressed technology as well as any other government for obvious reasons.
Gary McKinnon does not use the two terms interchangably, but instead identifies they are not synonymous, and that users of the incorrect term are either (a) simply ill informed, or (b) dissenters, employing emotive language to emphasise the absurdity of his claim, and do so incorrectly.

Re:UFO Vs Alien & Gary's Flakey Story (2, Funny)

maggard (5579) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276756)

.. you can mess with the color quality and resolution of an image to make it look like my family picture is really some image a green gelatinous blob that eats people.
Clearly you've never been part of a large family reunion...

A green gelatinous blob that eats people would be preferable to some of my more distant relatives. Indeed, I think we had one attend once, at least it didn't offer to show me it's new tatoo in a place I'd just as soon skip seeing on any relative!

Hmm, now I'm tempted to Photoshop some of the reunion group shots, see if I cut the resolution and color palette down I'll find anything I can sell to the tabloids. Blur large Aunt Marge in her "party dress & party teeth" and it'll rival Hollywood's best SFX!

Re:UFO Vs Alien & Gary's Flakey Story (1)

Rob Carr (780861) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276902)

I have several pieces of technology in my posession that were not man-made. I didn't realize this was so important! You mean people are actually interested in this stuff? Should I ebay these things?

Chauncey, our Moluccan cockatoo, regularly chews branches into sticks he can hold in his foot and drum with. It's how cockatoos mark territory in the wild. Pretty stupid, if you ask me -- his screams are far louder than any drumming he does. I've been throwing the sticks out. Maybe I should send them to NASA.

I'm not saying he's deluded but ... (2, Funny)

ctid (449118) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276609)

... I can't think of any way to end this sentence. Here's a choice quote:

I got one picture out of the folder, and bearing in mind this is a 56k dial-up, so a very slow internet connection, in dial-up days, using the remote control programme I turned the colour down to 4bit colour and the screen resolution really, really low, and even then the picture was still juddering as it came onto the screen.



Re:I'm not saying he's deluded but ... (4, Funny)

hotdiggitydawg (881316) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276626)

I can't think of any way to end this sentence.

I can - 5 years, 3 with good behaviour.

Re:I'm not saying he's deluded but ... (1)

AndroidCat (229562) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276696)

SK: So did you get the one frame?
GM: No.
SK: What happened?
GM: Once I was cut off, my picture just disappeared.
SK: You were actually cut off the time you were downloading the picture?
GM: Yes, I saw the guy's hand move across.
So when downloading a static frame, he saw someone's hand move across the image and he was cut off, and that's why he didn't get the screen shot...

I'm saying that he's deluded.

April Fools? (1)

TheKidWho (705796) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276616)

April fools was last month folks!!

What's the date? (1)

dnnrly (120163) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276620)

I had to double check the date on the article to make sure it wasn't 1st April!

While this guy seems genuine, the whole conspiracy theory thing still rings alarm bells in my head. Not sure whether to believe him.

not sure?? (1)

slashmojo (818930) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276799)

Not sure whether to believe him

You're not sure??

Re:What's the date? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15276815)

There's nothing wrong with that alarm bell ringing in your head.

Too many people just blindly accept the world at face value because they won't accept anything else or because they can't, because finding out things are not what they seem would make it hard to watch sitcoms every night, and that's all they live for anyway.

So there's nothing wrong with worrying about what might actually be going on. The thing is there are a lot of people who think they know and they're happy to tell you. The trick, your task, is to consider carefully which ones you believe, which ones you reject, and which ones you aren't sure about.

In other words, it's OK to call some of them bullshit without losing your perspective.

Re:What's the date? (1)

fabs64 (657132) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276819)

the "free energy" thing should immediately tip you off that he's a complete wackjob

This guys best defense? (4, Funny)

wfberg (24378) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276625)

This guys best defense would be to issue a full and frank admission of guilt.

Who would believe him?

No, "not guilty by reason of insanity" seems best. (1)

Ritz_Just_Ritz (883997) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276670)

The guy is clearly a loon. Anyone who is "smart enough" to get into secure defence department computers and still cannot extract one iota of these images that prove his point is probably just inventing the whole thing (other than the break-in).

Can't get to story. (3, Insightful)

dietrollemdefender (970664) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276627)

But from reading the summary, he just uncovered sloppy security - breaking in using default passwords?!?

The other thing is about the "airbrushing UFOs out of photos.."

A UFO could be anything - Unidentified Flying Object - doesn't mean flying saucer from the planet Krypton. AND...if there really was flying saucers from Krypton out there, who's keeping the Europeans, Chinese, Russians, etc... from publishing those photos...

I agree with previous posters - BS.

The guy's trying to make a living on the talk-show circuit - somehow. Is there a way of finding out if he's being compensated for these "interviews"?

Re:Can't get to story. (1)

distilledprodigy (946341) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276734)

The government have an agreement with the aliens to only fly in our airspace, of course. Come on man...

Re:Can't get to story. (4, Funny)

xiando (770382) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276757)

AND...if there really was flying saucers from Krypton out there, who's keeping the Europeans, Chinese, Russians, etc... from publishing those photos...

The Bildeberg Group. You will hear of them soon enough. The media has time and time again told you the official government conspiracy story which claims that a guy in a cave somewhere was behind 9/11. As you will find by clicking the link in my sig, the evidence clearly shows it was an inside job. Millions of people worldwide have realized this and if you Google you'll find more websites about this issue than you could possible read in your lifetime.

But now, reciently, Alex Jones and Sharlie Cheen were allowed to inform that 9/11 was an inside job on CNN (who originally came with the "government story" and are complicit).

You WILL be infomed about the Bilderberg Group soon. And perhaps the truth about UFO's. You see, "The interests behind the Bush Administration, such as the CFR, the Trilateral Commission - founded by Brzezinski for David Rockefeller - and the Bilderberg Group have prepared for and are now moving to implement open world dictatorship within the next five years. They are not fighting against terrorists. They are fighting against citizens." (Dr. Johannes Koeppl, former official of the German Ministry for Defense and adviser to NATO, 2001)

Ufos? not really... (3, Insightful)

Captain Perspicuous (899892) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276628)

The last time he was interviewed [checktheevidence.com] , he said he didn't find any real proof for UFOs, just a file for "non-earth-based marines" (or something of that sort, it's been a year since I heard it). And now he suddenly has more info? This sounds to me like he's running out of money and tries to sell a story.

Re:Ufos? not really... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15276777)

"non-earth-based marines"

You mean marines don't spend all their time on land? Who'd have thought? I'm sure the navy and air force are going to be pretty peeved about that startling revelation.

Seriously, "non-earth-based" doesn't have to mean they are stationed on the offworld colonies!

The truth is out there... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15276632)

He also found out that the Lone Gunmen are dead.

There's evil afoot ... (2, Funny)

hotspotbloc (767418) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276633)

He also talks about how he found information about anti-gravity, UFO technology, free energy and how UFOs are regularly airbrushed out from high-resolution satellite images."

He forgot about UPC labels and the ZIP+4 system (which is really a secret relocation program). Just pray they never use it. =)

Airbrushed UFOs? (3, Interesting)

Megane (129182) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276635)

and how UFOs are regularly airbrushed out from high-resolution satellite images."

Like this one? [dvorak.org]

(Yes, I know it's probably a water droplet on a high-altitude atmospheric camera, since there's a grid of them. Why wouldn't the "UFOs" airbrushed out by NASA also be weather balloons and similar artifacts?)

No (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15276695)

probably a water droplet on a high-altitude atmospheric camera

It's a satellite photograph. There may well be a reasonable explanation that does not involve a UFO - but it sure isn't a water droplet.

Re:No (1)

imsabbel (611519) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276874)

No, its NOT.
Just because its a picture from above doesnt mean sattelite.

ALL google pictures with less than 30 meters per pixel are shot from aircraft.

Re:Airbrushed UFOs? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15276783)

"DAMNIT GRUNTAKGORPEN! I said cloak the ENTIRE ship, not just the damned bottom! They're googling us! Now we have to get an unjunction and go up aginst their lawyers!"

"We could death-ray them?"

"DAMNIT GRUNTAKGORPEN! You can't just death-ray google!"

Legal Defense (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15276638)

Sounds like he's been counseled towards an insanity defense. Good setup for it.

Please stop hijacking the "energy conspiracy"! (2, Insightful)

Zaphod2016 (971897) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276642)

I for one am getting sick and tired of various nutjobs, scoundrels and losers latching onto the "energy conspiracy" bandwagon in order to justify stupidity.

I've never met a hacker unable to grab an image- be it from cache or screenshot. This guy is full of shit, and looking for sympathy. Period.

However: despite these loons, there *is* a very real "energy conspiracy". And guess what? It doesn't involve alien races or secret technology, it involves PLANTS (ya know, grow from dirt, rather cheap and eco-friendly).

Biodiesel. Hemp. There ARE solutions. There ARE forces holding back progress.

And every time a fool like this "latches on" to "the cause" it hurts the credibility of some wonderful people who are are trying against all odds to save us from ourselves.

Re:Please stop hijacking the "energy conspiracy"! (1)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276770)

There ARE forces holding back progress.

Yes. Forces of the universe called the laws of physics.

Doesn't make sense (2, Informative)

ardor (673957) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276643)

1) Hacking into NASA for three years with a 56k only?
2) What about using the "Print" button which makes a screenshot? (Well, in Windows it does.)
3) They are suppressing free energy? Why? Free energy would launch an incredible boom for economy, help greatly in pollution reduction, provide an excellent way of getting rid of oil dependency, provide instant cheap space exploration (and thus access to the vast resources on the moon and in the asteroid belt, for example), erase any poverty and/or hunger etc. So WHY should anyone suppress that? Can anyone tell me why?

Re:Doesn't make sense (1)

stewartjm (608296) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276728)

You're kidding right? "Free" energy would allow the creation of absolutely incredible war machines. Tanks, planes, (space)ships, missiles, with unlimited range, speed, destructive power, etc. If anything I'd say the fact that such war machines haven't been fielded is a pretty good indicator that the military doesn't have this technology :)

Re:Doesn't make sense (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15276793)

You know, we already have nukes that can be delivered anywhere on the planet and annihilate any target. Power isn't the problem any more, it's control.

Re:Doesn't make sense (1)

GreenPlastikMan (881184) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276817)

Greed.

Free energy would mean the sudden end of the oil, gas, and coal industries, and all of the companies that service those energies. That's hundreds billions of dollars that are suddenly sucked out of the global market. These people are making very very sure that they stay somewhat cozy enough with other businesses (like the automotive industry, etc.) that they can indirectly or even directly influence politicians.

Heck even the government itself would lose out quite a bit of money from taxes (yes the energy sector does pay taxes, even if not quite enough compared to their windfall profits). Aside from the government, the energy companies are basically the only people have the resources to make "free energy" (I assume you mean room temperature, table-top fusion) a reality.

Not to mention that a limitless energy source would all the sudden mean that a large number of people that didn't develop into energy sufficiency were just pushed into mordernity. The closest analogy would be an NBA player that skipped college and then everyone wonders why they can't handle their money. Do honestly think that some of these countries would simply give up their biases and 1000-year old feuds and civil wars, just because of "free energy"? Of course not. The only thing that would happen would be that it would become infinitely cheaper for them to conduct their wars.

Personally, I'd love to see fusion, because it'll solve more problems in the end, but to the powers that be, it's a huge nightmare.

Re:Doesn't make sense (1)

alienw (585907) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276910)

Man, you need to lay off the crack. The energy industry does not run the country. It isn't the reason we don't have fusion plants. The oil companies don't really even care about fusion, since you can't exactly use fusion to run cars. Not to mention, there are no commercial companies that work on stuff like fusion. Companies don't generally work on such long-term, uncertain, and expensive projects. Oh, and I just love your conspiracy theory about the car companies being in bed with the oil companies. Who comes up with this shit? Have you not noticed that car manufacturers would kill to get a couple of extra MPG?

Re:Doesn't make sense (1)

xiando (770382) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276832)

3) They are suppressing free energy? Why? Free energy would launch an incredible boom for economy, help greatly in pollution reduction, provide an excellent way of getting rid of oil dependency, provide instant cheap space exploration (and thus access to the vast resources on the moon and in the asteroid belt, for example), erase any poverty and/or hunger etc. So WHY should anyone suppress that? Can anyone tell me why?

One word for you: CONTROL.

Re:Doesn't make sense (1)

zakezuke (229119) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276856)

3) They are suppressing free energy? Why? Free energy would launch an incredible boom for economy, help greatly in pollution reduction, provide an excellent way of getting rid of oil dependency, provide instant cheap space exploration (and thus access to the vast resources on the moon and in the asteroid belt, for example), erase any poverty and/or hunger etc. So WHY should anyone suppress that? Can anyone tell me why?

Because according to one theory the impact the industrial age has had on the Earth's climate. You have the surplus of greenhouse gasses creating a global warming effect... and according to some scienets the increase of particulate matter in the atmosphere has also resulted in global dimming [wikipedia.org] effect. Assuming cheap efficent clean engery existed, and also assuming that particulate matter does decrease the amount of solar engery that actually reaches the earth, it would be a good idea to supress it till such time as we can get our atmosphere back under control.

This however is a wacky conspiricy theory and would imply that people involved in goverment knew jack shit about their earth, which generally speaking they don't. They seem to be more worried about the effect it would have on the ecconomy which in all fairness a sudden switch from oil which is basicily a form of currency to anything else such as breader reactors would result in chaos.

Re:Doesn't make sense (1)

imsabbel (611519) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276885)

But thats not logical, again.
with free energy, once could just create big heaters to heat up the earth if it really gets colder.
I mean, the energy is free, right?

Interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15276653)

It's an interesting interview. Obviously, he did gain access to military computers, he admits to it, but it's not so obvious what he found. The only way to verify what he said would be to have an outside party with unrestricted access check into the same systems that he did and quickly. Whether or not there are aliens or we have alien technology I don't really care but I don't find it so far fetched that the government keeps secrets from us.

What's sad. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15276656)

Part of me wishes that he wasn't full of shit. Aliens and free energy, the two things that would really rock.

maybe the dude at nasa (2, Insightful)

maynard (3337) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276657)

was just fucking with him - trolling a hacker for laughs. Then it hits the press and NASA has a public relations problem on its hands. whoops.

Re:maybe the dude at nasa (1)

itsthebin (725864) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276810)

well it still looks like the hole [142.179.66.236] is still open .



Oh wait ...:p

Re:maybe the dude at nasa (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15276821)


hello[.jpg] I don't think I want to click on that link...

Extremely well documented (1)

xiando (770382) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276658)

Search Google, do research and your own thinking and you'll find that there is A LOT of "information about anti-gravity, UFO technology, free energy and how UFOs are regularly airbrushed out from high-resolution satellite images." on the Internet and even though these things may sound odd, they are all extremely well documentet. However, The "New World Order" gang http://torrentchannel.com/the_new_world_order [torrentchannel.com] does not want you to have access to this information, specially not about UFO's, and they also do not want you to have the fancy technology the've got, specially not anti-gravity and free energy. So you'll probably not find super-computers, free energy generators or anti-gravity devices in your local store any time soon (By super-computers I mean those NSA and NASA use; remember, 30 years ago computers who could monitor millions of telephone conversations and filter out words like "bomb", "communism" etc already existed)

Re:Extremely well documented (1)

PhxBlue (562201) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276798)

Search Google, do research and your own thinking and you'll find that there is A LOT of "information about anti-gravity, UFO technology, free energy and how UFOs are regularly airbrushed out from high-resolution satellite images." on the Internet and even though these things may sound odd, they are all extremely well documentet.

Are you suggesting we should believe everything we read on the Internet? And are you saying it with a straight face, no less?

Re:Extremely well documented (1)

xiando (770382) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276851)

Are you suggesting we should believe everything we read on the Internet? And are you saying it with a straight face, no less?

Definitively not. However, I do suggest that you READ what is on the Internet BEFORE you decide if you should believe it or not. The laws of physics and your own common sense can help you judge what is true and what is false information. BUT DO READ THE INFORMATION BEFORE YOU JUDGE IT. Dismissal of information without research, without an attempt to verify if it is true or false and most importantly, without even bothering to read it is probably the main cause of ignorance today.

Where does the lie start? (1)

4D6963 (933028) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276660)

Reading this interview, this guy *obviously* made stuff up, like the whole alien thing, however, since he has actually hacked the NASA, some of this stuff has to be true. Like, can that thing about default passwords can be true? That sounds just incredible to me, but yet this guy has actually hacked the NASA...

Also, any chance he actually found something about anti-gravity and all that and that he wrongly attributed it aliens? Sounds unlikely to me, but after all, (non-alien) UFOs seem to exist (relying on pilots and radar operators witnessings), and since they are of human origin, after all, the NASA *could* be involved (I know it sounds quite like science-fiction tho)

Use 'printscreen', paste to Paint, save. (1)

antispam_ben (591349) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276687)

From TFA... the guy can go through all this on the remote machine:

I got one picture out of the folder, and bearing in mind this is a 56k dial-up, so a very slow internet connection, in dial-up days, using the remote control programme I turned the colour down to 4bit colour and the screen resolution really, really low, and even then the picture was still juddering as it came onto the screen.

And then this:

SK: Do you have a copy of this? It came down to your machine.

GM: No, the graphical remote viewer works frame by frame. It's a Java application, so there's nothing to save on your hard drive, or at least if it is, only one frame at a time.


Skrip Kidees should have to pass a test of basic PC operations before being allowed to crack into Seekrit Gubmint Installations.

Re:Use 'printscreen', paste to Paint, save. (1)

AndroidCat (229562) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276747)

They should post a warning message on the login:

"You must be => this <= 733t to h4x0r this system"

Same bullshit, new mechanism. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15276710)

Instead of a dummy in a field taking shaking photos,
it's a dummy pretending he's a computer hacker.

Notice how his face was oily: he probably spent hours
putting on makeup to look good for his Big Day.

BBC Click (1)

Tx (96709) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276718)

For those who don't know, BBC Click is an extremely-dumbed-down-for-the-masses IT show from the BBC, to the extent that most slashdotters would probably cringe if they had to watch it. This being an interview, I'm assuming they're quoting verbatim and haven't edited it for the masses though, but you never know.

Only good thing about that show is Kate Russell, but she hardly gets any screen time.

US secrecy - remnant of the gestapo (0, Flamebait)

unity100 (970058) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276732)

Well, it was 1945, and the u.s. government had enough lack of vision and stupidity to incorporate remnants of the gestapo as 'experts' in 'intelligence' to then newly being formed CIA. Some of these 'people' are still alive !

Naturally a big change in the practices of government intelligence has formed there - Herd the crowds, hide anything that is against your or your interest group's profit from the public, do any plot neccessary to reach your ends even if it contradicts with your nation's heritage. These men were NAZI. They tortured people, their loved ones in front of their eyes, barred nothing in order to reach their ends, even not their own relatives, sons, daughters.

The simplest result of this have been the erection of puppet dictatorships throughout the 3rd world countries. And u.s. is paying the price for them now, in form of regional wars.

There are still nazi in u.s. government. The likes of which, many u.s. citizens have died or lost their close ones to remove from the face of the earth. And they have shaped the CIA, which has become a government on its own. Not to mention many other that were founded in the lines of it.

Oh yes it is possible - it is possible that many much-sought-for technologies might be found, and still kept hidden from public use, and reserved only for the so called 'government' - something which only cares about your own participants' interests and not the nation by now.

65000 passwords in 8 minutes? (4, Insightful)

sl4shd0rk (755837) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276738)

"I wrote a tiny Perl script that tied together other people's programs that search for blank passwords, so you could scan 65,000 machines in just over eight minutes."

65000/8 = 8125 per min.
8125/60 = 135 per sec.

Dunno about that. Just the time it takes to bring up a socket and get some syn/ack going chews up a good portion of a second. Maybe he was searching a local password database.

Re:65000 passwords in 8 minutes? (4, Insightful)

vidarlo (134906) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276827)

"I wrote a tiny Perl script that tied together other people's programs that search for blank passwords, so you could scan 65,000 machines in just over eight minutes." 65000/8 = 8125 per min. 8125/60 = 135 per sec. Dunno about that. Just the time it takes to bring up a socket and get some syn/ack going chews up a good portion of a second. Maybe he was searching a local password database.

In the TFA he says he was on a 56K dial-up link...Say each machine sends a 25 byte login string, you send a 20byte login credentials, they send 50 byte denials. That is around 100 bytes pr machine, in a theoretical minimum (overhead for TCP/IP - telnet handshakes and such makes it probably three times as much). So 135 machines would mean 135*100bytes=13.5kB/sec. 56K modem has 33.6kb upload speed, so he could send 4kB/sec at optimal. So he is clearly a nutjob.

Re:65000 passwords in 8 minutes? (2, Informative)

StuartFreeman (624419) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276830)

Not that I beleive the guy or anything, but this actually seems possible. He's just checking for a blank password, so all he has to do is set up an array of ips to check and start forking off processes to check them, just do 135 in parrallel and you can scan them all within a second.

Re:65000 passwords in 8 minutes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15276836)

amazingly fast considering he was on dialup.

Re:65000 passwords in 8 minutes? (1)

Gorshkov (932507) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276911)

Dunno about that. Just the time it takes to bring up a socket and get some syn/ack going chews up a good portion of a second. Maybe he was searching a local password database.

Good point, but you forgot something

He was operating on a 56k dialup line. Wanna drop those numbers a little? :-)

TRUTH OR NOT?? (1)

davecrusoe (861547) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276764)

A good way to find out:: Give the guy a polygraph before he's extradited! (Results would be interesting indeed, and if he's telling the truth, it should be recognizable, well, unless he's an expert at bypassing the polygraph test...)

Re:TRUTH OR NOT?? (3, Informative)

close_wait (697035) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276900)

Give the guy a polygraph

polygraphs are worthless pseudocience, whose only merit is in their ability to trick the gullible into confessing. They can be trivially defeated, for example by tensing your anal sphincter during the control questions (the ones where they try to get you to lie), in order to set a high baseline.

This guy is getting really tedious. (1)

nowhere.elysium (924845) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276768)

i've seen report after report about this joker on the BBC news for weeks now, and quite frankly, i'm sick of him. he started out saying that he's not a hacker, then he becomes a hacker, then he says he's found nothing conclusive, now he says that he's seen proof of 'free' energy systems. whatever. i call bullshit.

Re:This guy is getting really tedious. (1)

Dr. Kashik (973211) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276860)

"he started out saying that he's not a hacker, then he becomes a hacker, then he says he's found nothing conclusive, now he says that he's seen proof of 'free' energy systems. whatever. i call bullshit." Well, he'd be able to keep his story straight if it weren't for... the signals...

Hand of God, Perhaps (1)

gyrogeerloose (849181) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276790)

GM: Once I was cut off, my picture just disappeared.
SK: You were actually cut off the time you were downloading the picture?
GM: Yes, I saw the guy's hand move across.

The guy's hand move across? I think this guy's spent more time watching movies about computers than he has using actual ones. I don't know about you but any time I've ever telnetted or FTPed into a mainframe, all I got was text. Real-time motion is strictly X-Files stuff.

By the way, I'm not an expert on Windows so can someone tell me if it's even possible to have a two-way conversation using WordPad? I was under the impression that it's strictly a text editor.

Re:Hand of God, Perhaps (2, Informative)

sasserstyl (973208) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276875)

I'm pretty sure when he said hand, he meant cursor. It sounded to me like he was using a remote control application, in which case what he describes is perfectly plausible. It would have been v slow over 56k though.

On the wordpad conversation, in windows 98, you definitely could have a two way conversation with any text-editor you want.

We used to do it using the sub-seven trojan when i was at uni.

I havent looked into similar technology with windows xp, but no doubt it's possible.

Re:Hand of God, Perhaps (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15276881)

I think he was using some kind of java VNC client. You could have a Wordpad chat with that.

Re: Wordpad (1)

Monkeys!!! (831558) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276883)

I think what he was refering to is writing something in the wordpad file then saving it. Then the NASA guy would open it, read it, write a reply and then save the file. He would then open the file, then read it, etc etc etc.

Re:Hand of God, Perhaps (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15276891)

I've actually had such a conversation, using VNC. With both people having keyboard control, one person types, then the other person, then the first person again... Really quite inefficient, but it works.

Re:Hand of God, Perhaps (4, Informative)

Bungopolis (763083) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276898)

He was (idiotically) using a VNC style remote administration program. It sends a jpeg stream of desktop screen captures and forwards your mouse movements/clicks. By "hand" he surely meant "cursor" which he could see move if somebody else touched the mouse. The WordPad conversation was possible simply because both parties were looking at and inputting to the same window.

Re:Hand of God, Perhaps (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15276906)

What? Are you stupid?

If he's shadowing the session they can both type in the Wordpad window and read what the other person has typed!

Conspiracy (5, Insightful)

kakapo (88299) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276811)

The thing that always surprises me about these Giant Conspiracy nutjobs is that they never really ask themselves how such a conspiracy would *work*. There must be thousands of people in the know, going back for at least 30 years -- and they really think this wouldn't have leaked by now??

Apple can't keep the date they launch new computers secret (next Tuesday for the next batch intel powerbooks, by all accounts). And that is a secret with a finite lifetime (three months ago not even Steve Jobs knew the date -- a week from now everyone will know it).

The NSA can't randomly listen in on international calls for more than a year or two without someone blowing the whistle. The CIA grabs some very bad guy in Pakistan and holds his head underwater, and a few months later we can all read about it in the New Yorker.

Remember this giant conspiracy is brought to you by the same people who run FEMA and promote "absitence only" sex education as a solution to teen pregnancy. But somehow the conspiracy works well until some script kiddie breaks into NASA over a dialup line (you plan to find free energy devices that will change the face of civilization, and you can't spring for DSL??) and you find that all these "secrets" are protected by default passwords. This guy presumably did hack into NASA, but the rest of it crap -- he is either nuts, or hoping that the Feds will decide it isn't worth the bother to have the guy spouting this nonsense on the stand.

Retained format (1)

Robotron23 (832528) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276829)

"the picture was still juddering as it came onto the screen"

So it was a GIF? :)

Skepticism (1, Informative)

sasserstyl (973208) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276849)

It's good to be skeptical. But this guy clearly hacked into various US government organisations otherwise they wouldn't want him extradited.

For me three important things are thrown up by this case:
1. the incredibly harsh suggested punishment by the US govt. (60 years in jail)
2. the amazing lack of security at multiple us govt organisations
3. the broad dismissal of "conspiracy theories" as being fantastical (to use a Dane Cook-ism), before serious consideration

On the conspiracy theory point. People are free to form their own theories, such as this guy's that the US govt. is supressing alien technology, and these theories can actually be helpful in challenging governments where there might be a genuine public interest.

Take a look at http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-826005992 3762628848 [google.com] [google video] for info on another conspiracy theory (9/11).

My point is this: some (even most) conspiracy theories may be based on a misplaced sense of paranoia, but this doesn't mean that they can't raise valid questions that should be answered by the organisations concerned.

UFO's and Free Energy (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276887)

While the guy sounds like a nut case, i would like to point out that a *real* UFO classification only means that its unidentified, not that its a little green man buzzing around. US Military UFOs are not that uncommon. Remember the stealth fighter was classified as a UFO until we knew what it was and no alien tech there. just a lot of hard work from us humans.

Also, if you consider that technically sunlight is 'free' energy, and if you take into account the 'cost' of equipment to harvest it, the basic concept of 'free' energy sources isn't really that odd.

how insulting can this guy be? (3, Interesting)

3seas (184403) | more than 8 years ago | (#15276894)

It seems every so many years this sort of thing happens as a dumbing down of the general population.

many of the posts here point out the flaws in what this guy presents, but if he really did hack into some classified systems and he is that dumb to not know how to save a screen image....

what is he really saying?

that even a monkey can hack into national security?

Oh wait, didn't some research expose that a monkey was able to hack into the diebold voting machines???

There are alot of people on this planet that know that so called alien life exist, technology more advanced than what we have created exist and even sources of so called free energy, etc. SO WHAT?

The fact of the matter is that is NOT what we are doing with our time here.

here is something else we are not doing, though we have the knowledge, man power and natural resources to do it
and there is nothing hidden about it.

http://www.unesco.org/education/tlsf/theme_a/mod02 /www.worldgame.org/wwwproject/ [unesco.org]

since we can't even help ourselves, or don't show a real intent or effort to, then what the fuck useful is it to even acknowledge the existance of such advanced stuff?

unless you just want to insult others.

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