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What Can Mandriva Linux 2006 Mean for Home Users?

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 8 years ago | from the just-get-their-feet-wet dept.

278

sitor writes "What can Mandriva Linux 2006 mean for home users? is an article giving an extensive explanation about the pro's and con's of using a linux distribution such as Mandriva Linux 2006. It was written with people in mind that are in doubt whether linux might be something for them or not. It aims to inform them in a neutral way, understandable to newbies. Next time you have someone asking you questions about Linux not knowing whether they should try, you can just direct them to this article."

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278 comments

With all respect to Mandriva.... (3, Insightful)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 8 years ago | (#15283990)

Next time you have someone asking you questions about Linux not knowing whether they should try, you can just direct them to this article."

With all respect to Mandriva, I'd much rather just point them to ubuntu [ubuntu.com]

(I feel I should make an OS X reference, but I just can't be bothered)

Re:With all respect to Mandriva.... (3, Insightful)

Bigos (857389) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284007)

I used Mandriva for 5 years, few months ago I moved to Ubuntu and I am not going back. Quality is important to me. I don't wan't to waste time trying to fight the system.

Re:With all respect to Mandriva.... (2, Informative)

Aladrin (926209) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284013)

And if you need reasons to back that up, just read the 'What could be improved' section on the last page of that article. It talks about show-stopping bugs that are enabled by default if you download the wrong version. It also talks about some of the most common linux features (ability to write to FAT partitions) that are disabled and you have to compile from source to change it.

They claim they are just trying not to run afoul of USA law, but what they've really done is trash their own distribution. (At least for the intended users in the article.)

Re:With all respect to Mandriva.... (2, Interesting)

joe 155 (937621) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284024)

A lot of linux distros do stuff like this though... I use fedora (although if I'd have had perfect knowledge at the start I might have chosen Ubuntu) and in that you can't read/write NTFS, you can't play mp3, you can't play comercial dvds... why don't they just say on the site that they are opperating under Russia (or a country with even less regulations about copywrite) law and then have done with it, making a really good, usable out of the box distro

Re:With all respect to Mandriva.... (5, Insightful)

ElleyKitten (715519) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284038)

A lot of linux distros do stuff like this though... I use fedora (although if I'd have had perfect knowledge at the start I might have chosen Ubuntu) and in that you can't read/write NTFS, you can't play mp3, you can't play comercial dvds... why don't they just say on the site that they are opperating under Russia (or a country with even less regulations about copywrite) law and then have done with it, making a really good, usable out of the box distro

That would be SimplyMEPIS. Seriously, it's Ubuntu with all the propietary stuff.

I personally don't care, becaue i don't think it's hard at all to enable MP3s, DVDs, etc. Just a couple checks of EasyUbuntu, or some copy&paste from the Ubuntu wiki and you're all set.

Re:With all respect to Mandriva.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284059)

Normal users can't even do copy&paste, how could they know that Ubuntu has wiki?

Re:With all respect to Mandriva.... (2, Interesting)

Ginger Unicorn (952287) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284355)

Those same users would then obviously not have been able to install Ubuntu, so therefore the person that did install it would be able to copy and paste the commands for them.

Re:With all respect to Mandriva.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284175)

Mepis is cool, but the one thing Ubuntu has over Mepis is that it runs Gnome by default.

I don't want to start a flame war over KDE vs. Mepis but KDE is so damn cluttered looking, it ain't funny. It looks like an intimidating nightmare of icons right on the desktop. This doesn't even begin to describe the amount of programs under the start menu - half of which, in my experience. don't even work even when packaged by the distro (especially KDE IDE programming tools).

And that's a shame, I do like some KDE programs better (Digikam) than the KDE counterparts. But while Gnome approaches "OS X" on the philosophy of simplicity (I'm not saying it's similiar, but just closer), KDE easily surpasses Windows in user interface complexity.

This same reason made me abandon Knoppix as well.

Spare yourself from the headaches (1)

Provocateur (133110) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284304)

Not only should you warn your friends:

Those games you love to play on Windows? GIve them up.

But also:

Those mp3s and DVDs? Don't expect them to play out-of-the-box. I'm serious.

Considering the hoops that I had to go through to make Mandrake do multimedia AND DVDs, your friend might as well be as skilled as 'Mr. decss' Johansen to get video or music playback.

Don't call them a boxed set of Linux CDs; call them a botched set of Linux. Period. The only ones singing Mandriva praises are those who've cut their teeth on previous editions, who've hung out in the forums, who know what a wiki is, and who have Linux as their middle name, not Joe Sixpack.
 

Re:With all respect to Mandriva.... (2, Insightful)

Aladrin (926209) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284040)

Because they don't live in Russia and they have to obey the laws where they live, unfortunately.

A better solution would be to have the package/installer maintainer live in Sweden. Make it his responsibility that things got packaged like that and then stop worrying about it.

I don't so much disagree with abiding by their local laws (since they usually are mine, too) but you can't claim to have a home user solution and not have it do basic things like write FAT and play DVDs out of the box. Those are basic functions for a computer these days.

Re:With all respect to Mandriva.... (5, Interesting)

ajs318 (655362) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284041)

The problem is that Fedora is distributed from the USA, which allows stupid things to be patented. In Europe and Britain, the MP3 patents are null and void; and it is quite OK to distribute MP3 playback and recording software in those places. {As an aside, if they ever do allow software patents in the UK or Europe, all the illegally-granted patents won't automatically come into force: patent holders will have to reapply for them, and may not get them on the grounds of prior art or obviety.} Likewise in Europe and Britain, if you own a DVD then you are legally entitled to do whatever is necessary to watch it on your own equipment.

Re:With all respect to Mandriva.... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284101)

incredibly offtopic but:
You Brits just HATE being a part of Europe don't you? =D

Re:With all respect to Mandriva.... (3, Funny)

ajs318 (655362) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284113)

Some do. We seem to be a nation of masochists, hanging onto ridiculous things as though they mattered. I personally love Europe -- I'm just practising for when we get kicked out of the EU. But this is spiralling further away from topic.

Re:With all respect to Mandriva.... (1)

ydrol (626558) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284071)

It also talks about some of the most common linux features (ability to write to FAT partitions) that are disabled and you have to compile from source to change it.

I can write to fat without having to change anything.

Re:With all respect to Mandriva.... (2, Informative)

Proud like a god (656928) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284232)

"It also talks about some of the most common linux features (ability to write to FAT partitions) that are disabled and you have to compile from source to change it."

FUD.

Where does it say you have to recompile anything to write to FAT? Anywhere near the bit that says "TIP: You can change this rather easy in the MCC in the partition management module. You go into expert mode (watch it!) and select umask=0."?

Re:With all respect to Mandriva.... (2, Insightful)

Aladrin (926209) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284358)

My appologies. I apparently skipped over his tip there. At any rate, why is that disabled by default? That doesn't sound like an 'expert' user thing to me.

Re:With all respect to Mandriva.... (3, Informative)

Jaqui (905797) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284235)

"It also talks about some of the most common linux features (ability to write to FAT partitions) that are disabled and you have to compile from source to change it."

funny, editing a configuration file is compiling from source? since when?
I thought it was using a text editor to alter the contents of a file..like opening a word .doc file in ms word and changing the contents.

actually, it's easier than that, change the default security setting to the next lower level and the access is granted..this can be done during the INSTALL.

Re:With all respect to Mandriva.... (2, Interesting)

kcsmith (923281) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284048)

For me ubuntu has one big problem, it only comes on one disk. I live in South Africa and most people still use dial-up, so I try to avoid downloading packages. When you get mandriva you get 5 discs, or 1 dvd full of software. Granted there is a dvd for ubuntu, but most I know have only ever used the single ubuntu disc. When I introduce them to mandriva they normally thank me cause mp3 and videos work aswell. (Note: I don't use mandriva, but it was the first distro i used)

Re:With all respect to Mandriva.... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284054)

Did you know that "ubuntu" originally means "obnoxious fanboi"?

It explains everything, no joke.

Re:With all respect to Mandriva.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284103)

Given how much better Ubuntu generally is for average home users, and that blunt claim, your post have the potential to become a score 5 Flamebait. :-)

Fucking (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15283994)

Niggers in #gentoo, Fuck you, freenode. KILL ALL THE NIGGERS AND JEWS

What can it mean? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284001)

It means no driver support, half-finished software, archaic text mode apps from the 1970s, a bloated buggy 2.6 kernel, definitely no games, and the idea that you're supporting a filthy French company.

Re:What can it mean? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284064)

Sounds like a perfect example of Linux.
Given that i used a mandrake 7,i must
conclude it never changes.Even FreeBSD
is way better then this.

Re:What can it mean? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284094)

all my hardware works, 2.6 kernel is rock solid here. OOo is a stable product, and about half finished software... Windows is finished???? OSX is finished????
Textmode not needed when using Ubuntu, SuSE, Mandriva, Fedora Core.
There are more and more games available.
I can only agree with you on the French company :)

Re:What can it mean? (1)

sgant (178166) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284096)

It also means that no matter what it's called today, the name will change again. Just when you get used to something, it changes....for no good reason really.

Re:What can it mean? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284150)

Ah, the joy of casual racial hatred. Since you're not allowed to say "nigger" anymore, its nice to see that White America has found a new outlet to pour their tradition of bigotry and ignorance onto.

Hurrah!

Re:What can it mean? (1)

fufubag (935599) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284159)

Since when does 'Anonymous Coward' = White America. Douche.

Thanks AC (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284172)

"Ah, the joy of casual racial hatred."

What race are the French again?

I love it when you idiots do this. Keep screaming racism so I can keep making fun of you.

Re:Thanks AC (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284366)

Blahdy blah, go on splitting hairs behind AC if it makes you feel clever.

Racism, jingoism, chauvinism, whatever ... just a subclass of bigotry, which in turn is a subclass stupidity. The French are probably the only people who make Americans feel inferior, hence your petty childish lashings out. At least they aren't stupid.

Re:What can it mean? (1)

got2liv4him (966133) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284306)

did I miss something??

Re:What can it mean? (2, Funny)

FudRucker (866063) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284153)

RE:"and the idea that you're supporting a filthy French company."

reminds me of another company that resides on the northwest coast of the USA

Nice idea but... (4, Insightful)

wirah (707347) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284019)

That article is rubbish. Ubuntu is obviously the choice for first-time switchers, and is the most polished and accessible distribution for newbies and gurus alike. The article doesn't seem to have much of a grasp of the concepts of Linux, or say who would switch and why, and what they'd encounter. And as for paying for mandriva so that you can play DVDs. What the hell? Who wrote this crap? Sorry, nice idea, but better articles have been written before. I think a windows->linux wiki written by past, present, and future switchers would be a much more interesting idea.

Re:Nice idea but... (1, Flamebait)

lezard (866687) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284033)

Bullshit : Ubuntu obviously the choice ? They merely offer halt of the content of Mandriva tools. And why would you pay to play DVDs on Mandriva where everythin is under PLF repos ? Where did you read this nonsense (not in the article, I guess). So stop telling the same maketing propaganda, and just face it : Mandriva is an excellent distribution and an excellent choice for newbies.

Re:Nice idea but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284112)

You could say the same for AOL's DSL. In fact, you sound like you use it.

next time (3, Funny)

illtron (722358) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284022)

Next time you have someone asking you questions about Linux not knowing whether they should try, you can just direct them to this article."

Oh, if only I could get back the time I've spent explaining Linux to neighbors and grandmothers! I've thrown away my life! I'll never get those preciouos 43 seconds back!

Here's the explanation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284194)

"Can I run my regular software on Linux?"

"No"

"Can I play my games on it?"

"No"

"Well, at least it's easier to use right?"

"Well, not at first, but after you figure it out..."

"Um, thanks anyway..."

Mandriva Fanboyism? (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284034)

Read the subject, enough said.

Mandriva 2006 at home (5, Insightful)

Nuffsaid (855987) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284035)

Linux Mandriva 2006 _is_ my home PC main operating system, i.e. the one that gets booted by default. That said, if this is one of the supposedly most "desktop friendly" distributions, i can't be very optimistic. For starters, 3D acceleration does not work. It's an ATI card, ok, but you can't dismiss what nearly half PCs use just by saying "buy supported hardware". You can blame ATI more than Mandriva, but it's a fact that the same hardware under SuSe worked with ATI drivers (other minor things didn't work, like booting reliably and not freezing). Then there's the myriad of little (and not so little) annoyances, like the KDE Control Center becoming suddenly empty. What would you say about Windows if the Control Panel icons randomly disappeared for no apparent reason? And how do you explain to your non-geek (but not illiterate) relatives that in order to download and install software it's not sufficient for the site to say "RPM - for Linux", but it must be pulled "automagically" from some repository holding just the right kind of RPM for the specific Mandriva release? IMHO, these are the kind of things that keep lots of people from using Linux on their home PCs, where things either "just work" or they are not worth fiddling in order to make them work.

Windows software management Just Works? (1)

Jussi K. Kojootti (646145) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284069)

Let's make one thing clear: Installing software from a single repository using a single UI is both simpler and more secure than doing it with a hundred different UIs from a hundred different web sites. The windows way of installing software is the opposite of "It Just Works" -- people are just used to going through all the hoops that particular installer requires (which is fine, they can keep using what works for them).

Explaining the concept of package management to intelligent non-geeks is not difficult. In fact in my experience people "get it" quite naturally -- they just need to be told about the pros and cons, not just "click here, here and here".

Re:Windows software management Just Works? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284138)

A single package repository is the equivalent of a centrally governed economy. It's nice if it works for you, but if you want something that the maintainers didn't plan for, you're fucked. There's no reason why packages should come as an executable themselves, but you're kidding yourself if you think that packages are any safer than setup.exe. Packages do contain setup scripts.

Re:Mandriva 2006 at home (5, Funny)

iogan (943605) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284073)

"What would you say about Windows if the Control Panel icons randomly disappeared for no apparent reason?"

I'd say "NOT AGAIN!!"

Re:Mandriva 2006 at home (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284108)

I'd say "NOT AGAIN!!"

I think you should try to get your revenge against Arthur Dent for that.

Re:Mandriva 2006 at home (3, Informative)

jozi (908206) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284092)

[...]these are the kind of things that keep lots of people from using Linux on their home PCs, where things either "just work" or they are not worth fiddling in order to make them work

I am not very interested in playing around with computers or operating systems. I think the computer is a wonderful invention just as I think the car is a wonderful invention. I use a computer and I use a car but I am not really interested in how they work or why things doesn't work, I just want them to work, like you said. I have had a Linux installation once and most things kind of worked but there are still too many things that doesn't. I want the majority of applications and games that I can see and buy in the store to work on my computer, not a reason why they will not work. I want to be able to exchange documents with others without having to think about formats and why the document doesn't look the same when I send it to the majority of my friends/colleagues who uses Windows and MS Office.
I want my internet bank to work on my computer, just as I know it will under Windows and no, I do not want to switch to a different bank.
There are people who love computers and operating systems who will gladly work around all these problems by dual-booting, downloading some obscure instruction about how to make things work or by any other way they can figure out but I am not one of them.

The problem is that there are millions of people like me who are not really interested in computers and they will not switch until they know that things will work the same or better than it does with MS Windows.
The majority of people like me are not windows advocates, we just want things to work.

Re:Mandriva 2006 at home (1)

RalphSleigh (899929) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284189)

Well said, I had Ubuntu duel booting for a while, I even got over the thou shalt not access my own bloody (NTFS) hard disks, the lack of MP3 support, atleast 3 differnt methods of changing the screen refresh rate, none of which worked properly. It was changing from the onboard NIC to a usb wireless device that killed it, despite a good half hour surfing various ubuntu sites I still couldnt find any reliable infomation about weather or not my network dongle would work, which drivers to use, or any inmstallation instructions that didnt involve several pages of command line input.

Shortly afterwards I reclaimed the small partition it was on for more storage space under windows and got on with USING my computer...

Re:Mandriva 2006 at home (1)

killjoe (766577) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284202)

It sounds like you need a mac. WIndows never "just works". You pretty much have to rebuild it every six months too.

I have a mac, and I have a linux box, I am forced to use windows at work. FOr me mac vs linux is 50/50 for some things I prefer linux, for other I prefer the mac. I would never in a thousand years buy windows or use it for personal use. It's just too much hassle and work. Every day it does something to annoy the crap out of me.

It's been my experience that people who like windows just don't know any better. It's like people who like outlook. They only like it because they have never used anything else and don't realize how much a bloated mess of a pig it is.

Re:Mandriva 2006 at home (1)

frostw (739485) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284255)

This is Slashdot you insensitive clod. Stop talking sense!

Re:Mandriva 2006 at home (1)

ajs318 (655362) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284106)

What you really need to do is to write to your local lawmakers, explaining why it is wrong that companies such as ATI and nVidia should be allowed to keep the driver details for their video cards secret. Not only does it effectively lock Open Source out of the market, it also hinders competition in the marketplace; denies users the freedom to use their own property to its fullest potential; and allows ATI and nVidia to make mendacious advertising claims which cannot be disproven.

ATI and nVidia are the robber barons of the display adaptor marketplace, and the best solution to their unacceptable behaviour is legislation. This is why we, as the people who pay their wages, must demand action from the governments of the world.

Re:Mandriva 2006 at home (1)

Registered Coward v2 (447531) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284234)

What you really need to do is to write to your local lawmakers, explaining why it is wrong that companies such as ATI and nVidia should be allowed to keep the driver details for their video cards secret. Not only does it effectively lock Open Source out of the market, it also hinders competition in the marketplace; denies users the freedom to use their own property to its fullest potential; and allows ATI and nVidia to make mendacious advertising claims which cannot be disproven.

You are free to buy whatever card you want - if your favortie OS is supported, buy a diferent card. ATI and nVidia have no obligation to support any particular type of software - the do it because they can make money. If they can't get a decent return from open source then they will (rightfully) ignore it. If it was important enough, then some company would bring out drivers even if they had to pay the card manufacturers to develop them - but since it isn't happening my guess is there isn't enough money to be made developing drivers.

Video cards are a competitive market - ATI and nVidia need to keep secret what they perceive as giving there cards an advantage.

ATI and nVidia are the robber barons of the display adaptor marketplace, and the best solution to their unacceptable behaviour is legislation. This is why we, as the people who pay their wages, must demand action from the governments of the world.

Legislation is a very dangerous answer - what happens when someone decides that the GPL is anti-competitive and should be legislated into allowing anyone to use GPL code and modify it without releasing their mods?

Re:Mandriva 2006 at home (1)

ajs318 (655362) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284333)

ATI and nVidia are effectively a cartel, riding on the back of Microsoft's dominance. It's also quite likely that they are using deceptive and misleading practices in their advertising, under the cover of secrecy.

And anyway, you're ignoring the point. If I buy a piece of hardware, then I have a right to know everything there is to know about using that piece of hardware. The details of what each register does, and so forth, are not proprietary secrets -- they form part of the instructions for use.

Most people are never going to make much use of that information and would not be bothered by its omission. But for the minority who are bothered by its omission, and who are being unfairly denied access to it, it's one hell of an issue.

Re:Mandriva 2006 at home (2, Interesting)

ElleyKitten (715519) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284122)

Mandriva isn't the easiest Linux distro, anymore at least. Other distros like Ubuntu and SimplyMEPIS and PCLinuxOS have surpassed it in that regard. Mepis comes with all the proprietary stuff, and Ubuntu just requires a simple download of EasyUbuntu (no installing, just extracting) to get all the proprietary stuff going.

Using a package manager connected to repositories is certainly different from Windows, but it's not harder. If anything, it's easier, because you don't have to hunt around the internet for something and risk downloading a virus/spyware instead, and once you find it on Linux in your package manager, you don't have to fuck around waiting for it to download and then install it. It automatically installs itself without the inane questions that Windows software asks when it's installing. I've heard a lot of people complain about installing software on Linux, but I really don't understand it because Linux's easy install system is one of the reasons I converted from Windows.

Re:Mandriva 2006 at home (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284134)

I have Mandriva 2006 installed (and the default) on my HP notebook. 3D accelration does work! And it's ati. Wireless works! I don't have any problems at all. Even if I wasn't familiar with the technology, I don't think I'd have any problem. Because, you know what, it worked. And I didn't have to do anything special. User-friendly? I'm sure it is ... well, maybe not for stupid users. *wink*wink*

Re:Mandriva 2006 at home (1)

Threni (635302) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284142)

> For starters, 3D acceleration does not work. It's an ATI card, ok, but you can't
> dismiss what nearly half PCs use just by saying "buy supported hardware".

Same as my experience. I installed Suse 10.0 and have a Radeon 9800 pro, and it didn't get recognized. Why not? I can't find any way of making Suse detect it, or even letting me browse for one.

Also, I can't get online. All the config tools I've seen mention stuff like phone numbers to dial. What have phone numbers to do with internet access in 2006? Windows just works with all this stuff. You plug something in and it recognizes it immediately.

Still, nice penguin logo.

Re:Mandriva 2006 at home (1)

Fred_A (10934) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284239)

Regarding the "getting online" bit, I believe you didn't look at the right tools, it should be in the network settings somewhere (not familiar with SuSE), not in the dialup tools. Most distributions I've seen for the past 4 or 5 years supported ADSL out of the box. SuSE, having a reputation for being fairly polished nowadays, shouldn't be any different.

Re:Mandriva 2006 at home (1)

killjoe (766577) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284186)

Mandriva doesn't have something like synaptic or YAST? How odd.

Re:Mandriva 2006 at home (1)

Fred_A (10934) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284248)

Of course it does. Everyone has a pretty admin GUI nowadays. Madrake even had one of the first ones (was kind of kludgy at the time). I suppose it's more polished nowadays. I haven't used that distro in ages.

Re:Mandriva 2006 at home (1)

Raumkraut (518382) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284370)

No, the Mandriva urpmi GUIs are still pretty kludgy - or they feel like it at least. After using synaptic on PCLinuxOS, I'm loathed to go back to Mandriva's tools.
That's tools, with an "s" - four separate apps for package installation, removal, updating, and for managing your repositories. You can't run them all at the same time either (IIRC), as each one will lock the RPM database for itself...

Re:Mandriva 2006 at home (2, Informative)

opkool (231966) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284294)

Yes it does.

It is called urpmi [mandriva.com] .

For Debian users:

urpmi is apt
rpm is dkpg
rpmdrake is synaptic

Urpmi comes both in command-line [utexas.edu] and GUI front-end [google.com] . Urpmi also comes with a "WindowsUpdate-like" tool called MandrivaUpdate [mandrakehelp.com] .

There is even an online urpmi configurator tool [zarb.org] , where you can even select the program sources "forbidden" in the USA, as they contain pre-packaged programs and modules that will allow you to watch DVDs, have 3D acceleration with ATI and nVidia cards, and a whole bunch of programs that its legality is doubtful in USA, as well as non-free programs.

Peace!

Neutral (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284043)

Yeah, right. Suggesting Linux to average users isn't neutral, not even with a "what could be improved" chapter to ease your conscience. Only if you disregard much of what people expect from computers does "the switch" look like a viable option for more than a fringe group at the moment. A neutral article would tell it like it is: Linux for infrastructure, but not on the desktop, yet.

Re:Neutral (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284051)

Linux is fine for the desktop. Sure it's a little harder than windows and the average user has some learning to do it. It's not as hard as you people make it seem.

Re:Neutral (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284066)

Yes, it is. People don't want an admin looking over their shoulder all the time, to do things that they can do themselves with Windows. Take a look at any tutorial which supposedly leads to a working, full featured system. The first "open a shell" in there is a showstopper. End of installation. So, you say you don't need tutorials, you just pop the installation CD in and the graphical installer does it all. Well, go to a home banking website and witness what being in a fringe group means when they reject your not-so-IE browser (this is improving, admittedly). Watch a CSS-encrypted DVD. Play a game. Open a Word document (without having to completely recreate the formatting). Install Skype. In fact, install anything that didn't come with the distribution. As much as I would love Linux on the Desktop, it just isn't ready. Almost every user that you introduce to Linux now is going to have a lasting bad memory of the experience. And they talk.

What Can Grammar Lessons Mean for /. Users? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284052)

Next time you have someone asking you questions about Linux not knowing whether they should try, you can just direct them to this article.

My eyes! My eyes are bleeding!

Re: What Can Grammar Lessons Mean for /. Users? (2, Informative)

remembertomorrow (959064) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284177)

In case you missed the first part of the article, he mentioned that he was translating it from Dutch (which is a scary language as it is), and that there would probably be grammatical/contextual errors.

Overall, it seems he did a good job though.

Re: What Can Grammar Lessons Mean for /. Users? (1)

1u3hr (530656) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284183)

My eyes! My eyes are bleeding!

That must be why you missed the pro's and con's.

And there's not much point directing anyone to this article, the whole server has disappeared. Hosted by a free server, so that was entirely predictable. Mirrordot only has the intro.

Help is on! (1)

novus ordo (843883) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284226)

Hear take any of those!

Mandriva or not (1)

HeliumHigh (773838) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284055)

Linux in general could mean a whole lot for home users. Easy, free, fun apps, a good interface, and little to no maintaining needed. Ubuntu and Mandriva look especially good for such purposes. However, the question isn't what _can_ linux mean for home users, but what _will_ linux mean for home users. Short answer? Not much. Long answer? Microsoft has a monopoly. They own home computers. As long as MS has its way, the "Year of the Linux Desktop" will never come. MS is powerful, has connections with computer makers, and has literaly billions it can put into advertising. Untill Linux becomes more unified, more high-profile, and easier to use (command lines suck for home users) it won't stand a chance. Maybe, just maybe, and if it surpasses those problems, it will have a chance. I'm not against it, I love linux, but I just can't see it working the way it is.

~HH

Start at the top, not the bottom (5, Insightful)

Solo-Malee (618168) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284099)

I generally agree that Microsoft has the monopoly and consequently it is very hard for Linux to mean anything to the home user but...

Lose the Microsoft Office Applications off of the Windows platform and the home user suddenly has less and less reason to be sitting on a MS platform. The Opensource movement can make a serious impression on the Microsoft world by pushing hard the alternatives like OpenOffice.org that the home user can really make productive use of.

Make a couple of apparently insignificant 'baby steps' away from the Microsoft applications and all of a sudden, you begin to wonder why you need Windows. I made the move to OpenOffice back in November 05 and I am now beginning to see the light and the possibility that within the next few months I may not need Windows at all. Without MS Office, there is almost no need to have Windows!

There are only two things that need to be fixed in the Linux world in my view for even greater acceptance:
* Vendor support for Printer drivers (eg: Canon)
* Mainstream publisher support from all the top games vendors.

Re:Start at the top, not the bottom (1)

remembertomorrow (959064) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284222)

There are only two things that need to be fixed in the Linux world in my view for even greater acceptance:
* Vendor support for Printer drivers (eg: Canon)
* Mainstream publisher support from all the top games vendors


Yeah, I hear that. I have a Lexmark printer/scanner combo here that is completely useless in Linux. :(

As for games, a lot of that is also design decisions... if you write well-designed programs and use graphical APIs that support multiple platforms, porting is a non-issue (see <insert id Software title here>). id's code is well-structured, so they can simplify input on Windows by using DirectX, but also write Mac/Linux input handling just as easily in the same source tree.

On the other hand, newcomers like Valve don't have anywhere near the experience Carmack/id are packing, so I'm sure some decisions were made early on to develop only for Windows.

Re:Start at the top, not the bottom (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284236)

* Vendor support for Printer drivers (eg: Canon)

Right now, I'd like decent vendor support for my HP PSCxxxx for Windows! The drivers that came with it are buggy as hell (and are now missing), and the downloadable package from their website? 350MB!!! For a frickin' printer/scanner driver! Sheesh!

Re:Start at the top, not the bottom (1)

HeliumHigh (773838) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284244)

Too true. Microsoft apps only run on Win, but there is a _huge_ selection of opensource and closed source programs for linux. If you look at it though, the reason there isn't more support is that they are all in MS's pocket. It's the same thing that happened with the ipod. You buy the ipod, you get your music from itunes. As for games? Yes, win has all the good games, excluding a few such as ut2k4, doom, and quake. That, however, doesn't always matter, especially on most home computers. The target audience is the family that needs to: Surf the web, chat over aim/yahoo/msn, and use word/writer and excell/presenter (or whatever the OO.o alternative is.) As for drivers: developers just need to get a little motivation. Money and corporate backing is very motivating.

Re:Start at the top, not the bottom (1)

Dan Ost (415913) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284300)

Printing in Linux is still a religious experience. Most printers
will eventually work with CUPS to some degree, but it's often
difficult to understand why a printer is misbehaving or why
certain features are unavailable. If you're lucky
enough to have a printer that understands postscript, then
you can simply send it raw. If not, the difficulty of
getting this working acceptably seems to be related to your
karmic standing with the cosmos.

Configuring printers is the only part of setting up a Linux
desktop that still makes me nervous (used to be nervous about
setting up X, but it's been several years now since X has
given me any non-trivial problems).

screenshots and i18n (2, Interesting)

sankyuu (847178) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284058)

Taking a look at the screenshots on page 4 [coulier.org] , i noticed that some apps (KDE?) are in Dutch, while others (Mandriva-specific?) are in English. Looks like i18n isn't finished yet, unless they mixed shots from different language installations (which i very much doubt).

Incidentally, the reason I left Mandrake 4 years ago for Fedora (core 2, i think) was that Fedora had better Japanese language support. I also didn't like MenuDrake.. too inflexible, iirc.

Re:screenshots and i18n (1)

toganet (176363) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284315)

Wow, apparently you didn't read even the first paragraph of the article, in which the author explains how the artile was originally written in Dutch, and then translated to English.

I think that is a reasonable explanation for the mixed-language screen shots.

Too early for Monday (3, Interesting)

tacocat (527354) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284065)

Oh God!! I was't really prepared to wade through a flame war over distros this morning. What a bunch of freaking zealots! You distro fanatics make me want to puke.

I started on Slackware because someone said it's a good distro to use if you want to learn what's really going on. I stand by that statement today. If you want to learn Linux then don't use some mamby-pamby cute distro. If you want to be a user of Linux then use whatever most resembles whatever floats your boat. Some might argue it's best to use something that looks most like Windows. Some wouldn't.

I ran into an intersting discussion in the real world this week that I thought pertinent. The conclusion goes as follows:

  • If you want a great GUI, use Mac OS-X as there is nothing even close to it.
  • If you want a simplified server then you can choose from RedHat, SuSE, or a dozen others.
  • If you want a highly customizable server then you can choose from the less pretty distros of Debian, Slackware, Gentoo where changes are tightly controlled and lightly managed by the package manager.
  • If you want to have a workstation (any OS) that is both a simplified interface and ultimately customizable then you won't find it.

From a practical point: most *nix servers that are not Linux based (HP/Sun/IBM) have little in the way of cute interface management tools. On these heavy lift platforms the configuration tool of choice seems to be vi more than a GUI. I don't think anyone has been able to surpass this customization and I'm not certain that it is a requirement that they do. If you don't understand the workings of the applications then a GUI interface will only permit you to do damage.

It's very likely that my proposed list of distro's will create a lot of controversy, but first consider where you sit on the spectrum between ultimate customization of the machine and "I'll take what I get" user.

Re:Too early for Monday (2, Interesting)

geminidomino (614729) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284107)

It's very likely that my proposed list of distro's will create a lot of controversy, but first consider where you sit on the spectrum between ultimate customization of the machine and "I'll take what I get" user.

Unfortunately, "I'll take what I can get" is the mantra for Linux on the desktop.

I use Linux almost exclusively on the desktop (I clock about 3 hours/6 months on my Win2k partition), but there's a good number of things I have had to learn to do without.

Before you flame, consider these common (or increasingly-common) uses of desktop PCs.

-The latest games: This one doesn't really bother me. I'd rather play UQM or Xcom and Blake Stone in dosbox than the latest FPS-du-jour any day. I just wish cedega would stop buggering up randomly and refusing to run Diablo II. Other people might not be so forgiving of this shortcoming.

-DVD Authoring: Almost impossible. When it is possible, it's obscenely difficult (playing with transcode, mencoder, mplex...) without any sort of GUI. Fine, no problem. If I can code perl, I can deal with a few command line utilities. Except there is only ONE PROGRAM that can actually create the DVD structure(so much for open source variety) and it's so flaky that there's apparently a 99% chance that you're file won't be accepted anyway.

-USB hardware support: Some works wonderfully (external HDD, Zen Xtra, usb keys, motorola p2k phone...) and some don't work at all (Saitek Cyborg joystick, gravis gamepad pro). It's luck of the draw.

These are just the ones that have annoyed me THIS week.

However, I find that the increased power of Linux is worth the trade-off of these annoyances, rather than using Windows. Thus, in these areas (and others), I will, indeed, "Take whatever I can get."

Re:Too early for Monday (1)

Fred_A (10934) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284275)

Unfortunately, "I'll take what I can get" is the mantra for Linux on the desktop.

Isn't it rather the mantra for desktops in general? As in:
"Why did you get Windows"
"well that's all that came with the computer"
or
"that's the only system that'll run this app I need"

In my case I don't mind that much having 40Gigs set aside for a Windows partition on one of my disks so that I can play games. I wouldn't do anything else while I'm playing anyway so it doesn't really matter that I'm in an unfriendly environment (and worse case I can wake up a laptop) and wasting an extra minute(s) rebooting to switch systems isn't much of a bother. I can use that time to organise my desktop for gaming.

It's so far the only type of application that has ever required my using Windows. So I view Windows like a software gaming console.

Re:Too early for Monday (1)

Archtech (159117) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284237)

"Oh God!! I was't really prepared to wade through a flame war over distros this morning."

Then don't.

Re:Too early for Monday (1)

Vexorian (959249) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284386)

Oh God!! I was't really prepared to wade through a flame war over distros this morning. What a bunch of freaking zealots! You distro fanatics make me want to puke. I started on Slackware because someone said it's a good distro to use if you want to learn what's really going on. I stand by that statement today. If you want to learn Linux then don't use some mamby-pamby cute distro. If you want to be a user of Linux then use whatever most resembles whatever floats your boat. Some might argue it's best to use something that looks most like Windows. Some wouldn't. The desktop and the distro are quite different things. Slackware attempts for example is the best experience for developers and Ubuntu aims to be the best experience for users. It is the distribution's philosophy and not looks what is more important for first timers. * If you want a great GUI, use Mac OS-X as there is nothing even close to it. BS , Mac OS-X is not a Linux distro, it is not even free software and you have to buy a whole different computer to use it. Mac OS-X is out to the question you won't move to mac just to have "the best GUI" that's worthless. If you want a simplified server then you can choose from RedHat, SuSE, or a dozen others. * If you want a highly customizable server then you can choose from the less pretty distros of Debian, Slackware, Gentoo where changes are tightly controlled and lightly managed by the package manager. Sure, but don't call them less pretty, they can be really pretty * If you want to have a workstation (any OS) that is both a simplified interface and ultimately customizable then you won't find it. For the record, the interface and the customizability factor are not mutually exclusive so there is no reason at all to think that way. From a practical point: most *nix servers that are not Linux based (HP/Sun/IBM) have little in the way of cute interface management tools. On these heavy lift platforms the configuration tool of choice seems to be vi more than a GUI. I don't think anyone has been able to surpass this customization and I'm not certain that it is a requirement that they do. If you don't understand the workings of the applications then a GUI interface will only permit you to do damage. It's very likely that my proposed list of distro's will create a lot of controversy, but first consider where you sit on the spectrum between ultimate customization of the machine and "I'll take what I get" user. Sure, but It is possible that something starts by giving you the possibility to use GUI but later you can switch to config files. I have not heard of any GUI that blocks you the access to config files.

Mandriva 2006 (1)

Ice Wewe (936718) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284095)

I don't see why this is anything new. I've been using Mandriva 2006 on my home PCs for almost 6 months now! I'm running 2006 x86_64 (recently I've moved over to Unbuntu), and 2006 Cooker on my i686. Mandriva is a nice attempt at a distrobution. Although I find that they don't generally have as stable and well maintained software as other distro's I've used. However, Ubuntu is perfect in almost every way. When it installed, it even came with a chipset driver, which Mandriva didn't. Now this may not seem like a big deal, but when you're running an nForce4 chipset, you realise how crummy it is to recompile your Video/chipset driver everytime you use a different kernel.

What does it mean for me? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284118)

Another Linux distro that I won't bother installing on my XP box.

Mandrake (2, Informative)

NVP_Radical_Dreamer (925080) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284130)

I used to use "Mandrake" back in the day when Wal*Mart sold it. I was about 15 at the time (23 now) and loved it other than the fact that I had a winmodem and it didnt work for me to connect to the internet. I toggled back and forth with it as each release came out thinking each new release was a step in the right direction.

Then someone showed me ubuntu and I havent looked back, it does everything I've always wanted from a distro right out of the box with no tweaking necessary, at least in my case. I may start a virtual machine and load mandriva just to see if it has improved on anything, but right now I am content with the latest ubuntu

How long will Mandriva be around? (2, Interesting)

FishandChips (695645) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284131)

No disrespect to Mandriva, but their "model" doesn't sound that appealing. OpenSuSE will give you pretty well the same for free (fast downloads, too) while even the official version of SuSE with extra packages on the DVD is quite a lot cheaper than the Mandriva offerings. I hate to say it, but if I had to choose a distro that was losing out as the Linux competition hots up, it is Mandriva. That doesn't mean it isn't extremely good, just that its future looks dubious to say the least. The name changes, their financial situation and news of trouble at the top doesn't help either.

Re:How long will Mandriva be around? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284277)

Not just that, it seems like their community model is kind of broken and they are just floating out there doing reving the software versions for major releases.


On the cooker mailing list over the last year, I've lost count of how many people have left Mandriva, I want to say 10-15, some of whom were fairly well known and popular.


Mdv has had a great product, they've paid some dues and gone through some hard times but it seems like the world has kind of left them behind, it's kind of sad.

Re:How long will Mandriva be around? (1)

Fred_A (10934) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284365)

I used to like Mandrake a lot a while back and installed it quite a bit for corporate desktop use.
Nowadays though it's gotten fairly expensive both for domestic and small business users and I can't really understand what market they're after.

Nowadays, especially with newcomers like Ubuntu on the scene which have done much better on the "easy access" front, I'm not sure the future looks too bright for Mandriva. They'd have to either outperform Ubuntu or to recenter their efforts on the corporate market where RedHat and to a lesser extent SuSE are already well entrenched.

It would be sad to see the last big European distro disappear but they seem to be set in their ways and unwilling to move with a volatile market... so time will tell...

2 days = too long (1)

fufubag (935599) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284143)

TFA: Re-installation of a Windows system took us easily two full days to get the system completely up and running again: installation of the OS, all drivers and all applications and the tweaking of it all. Getting the system in a similar state of usability takes with Mandriva about half a day.

huh? 2 days? Maybe I just don't use enough applications (it is for sure tweaked for optimum gaming performance ~ 'tweakguides'), but 2 days is quite a stretch. More like half to three quarters of a day.

Sorta Off Topic: For all the talk of security threats and ease of "upkeep", for a moderate to advance user (which is, from what i've heard, what you have to be to use *nix) Windows XP pro 64-bit isn't hard to keep clean and secure, at least for me.

mandriva my foot (0, Flamebait)

luther349 (645380) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284145)

lets see my ati pretty mutch fell over and died this includs my tv card that runs on every other linux distro sence the open source drivers work. after abought 3 hrs trying to make shit work in mandriva i just gave up. mandriva used to be good now it sucks. now suse 10 works fine on my pc ati etc all work. most linux users would say blame ati but isnt it odd it works fine in suse. i think suse does something called beta tesing and making shure stuff works not just package and sell it. when my 3d card didnt work i was fine with blaming ati but when the tv card failed my blame switched couse it works in every ver of mandriva befor 2006.

ubunto isnt perfect eyther it managed to fail on my soundcard witch even works in mandiva.

I got a better idea (3, Informative)

N8F8 (4562) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284152)

http://www.phildev.net/linux/apt-quickref.html [phildev.net] Below is a quick reference to cover some of the most commonly needed apt uses.

Download and install package:
apt-get install package

Update apt's list of available packages:
apt-get update

Upgrade all installed packages with upgrades available:
apt-get upgrade

Upgrade to new distro, or in general upgrade anything available for update including core system packages:
apt-get dist-upgrade

Uninstall package:
apt-get remove package

Uninstall package, and its config files, and don't leave it in the database as 'uninstalled':
apt-get --purge remove package

Search for a package like pattern:
apt-cache search pattern

Get information on installed package:
dpkg -s package

Find which installed package file belongs to:
dpkg -S inetd.conf

List which files are in package:
apt-file list package

Find out what packages provide file:
apt-file search file

Run a command (such as ./configure or make) and have all necessary packages installed as needed:
auto-apt run command

Unless specified, the package in reference doesn't have to be already installed for these to work... but the database needs to be updated. You can update the appropriate database via:
apt-get update
or
auto-apt update
or
apt-file update

Installing programs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284162)

I had used Mandrake since 8.1. I ran out and bought 10.0 Power Pack. I gave up on it when I became frustrated trying to install programs that weren't already installed. Mandrake wanted you to buy a membership for most of the stuff they have available online. The other thing that got up my nose was that Mandrake wanted you to insert the CDs that came with the distro and then quit recognizing the CDs.

I realize that there are ways to solve the problems I had. It's just that every time I changed something, I would have to re-implement the solutions. Since it had been a while since I originally solved the problem, I had forgotten the solution and it would take me nearly as long to implement it the second time. I gave up.

Most of my boxes now run SuSE. For reasons that I can't quite put my finger on, it's way less annoying; and they aren't trying to sell me a membership.

Dumbing down the entire system, for starters (2, Interesting)

martinultima (832468) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284178)

I'd much rather a good solid Slackware-style distribution (preferably my own, of course, but there are other good ones, too). From what I've seen, they tend to be a hell of a lot faster, easier to configure – imagine a world without those horrible RPM's! – and probably a bit more secure as well. So far I've got everyone in my family hooked on my distribution, which is saying quite a bit actually since most of them were fighting tooth and nail just to keep Internet Explorer for a while...

Bad choice in the long run. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284192)

Mandriva is not a sitting target. The trend I've seen (since V6) has caused me to abandon the distro. While easy to start with, it's a difficult distribution to support. Try building the stock kernel for example. You'll discover that the Mandriva kernel naming conventions are unique and arbitrary- the source kernel distributed with the release won't build the same kernel you have installed by default & you need to coerce the kernel name too, after you figure out where the right .config file is (/boot). Try and explain that to a new user...

Joe Blow Windows Users (2, Insightful)

remembertomorrow (959064) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284195)

Why would an average PC user make the effort to change over to Linux?

Unfortunately, the average PC user running Windows Whatever doesn't even know what Linux is.

As user friendly as distros like Ubuntu and Mandriva are, I personally have not seen many people "making the switch". I am not the type who goes out and attempts to "convert the masses", but most people do know that I use Linux at home regularly.

The only person who has approached me for help with Linux is a fellow programmer who is learning web-based languages. He was looking for a way to host a website for free off of his home network, and said it was a good excuse to get exposure to other OSes. So, I hooked him up with one of my Ubuntu CDs (which I received for free in the mail), and showed him the goodness of LAMP.

Other than him, nobody I know really seems to give a crap. They know Windows is insecure by default, but don't want to have to jump through hoops to chat on AIM, or post on MySpace. I don't see any of these people spending the time to learn the basics of an entirely new OS to be completely honest.

While I can appreciate the ease-of-use that these distros have, I almost feel (from how they are advertized) as if they are trying to wage war against Microsoft. Instead of focusing on the unwashed masses, maybe these distros would be better marketed towards those who are fed up with Windows and looking to try something new?

Ugh (-1, Troll)

Spacejock (727523) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284212)

How about the pros and cons of apostrophe use?

Loose != (!gain) (1)

rkcallaghan (858110) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284224)

There are solutions to this (e.g. the installation of MS Office on Mandriva Linux with the aid of Crossover Office), but then you loose some of the advantages of Mandriva Linus (price, a bit of security,...).

Everyone has their internet spelling nazi pet peeve, this one is mine. Drives me crazy because many otherwise intelligent people seem incapable of spelling lose.

~Rebecca

Response: (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284240)

RUN FOR THE HILLS!

a couple of things.. (1)

Jaqui (905797) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284254)

To help people install Linux, for the first time, the following was targeted at this, keeping a dual boot system:
http://techrepublic.com.com/5100-10877_11-5982893. html [com.com]

for those that say Ubuntu is great, my own take on it:
http://techrepublic.com.com/5100-10877_11-6066271. html [com.com]

a better option for helping people pick a distro:
http://www.zegeniestudios.net/ldc/index.php [zegeniestudios.net]

It means... (1)

jb.hl.com (782137) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284276)

That anyone using an Nvidia graphics card can't use it. The shipped X server on the DVD ISOs, and probably the CDs as well, is broken for NVidia cards and just shows a corrupted display. You have to do a text mode update, or use VESA while you do a graphical one, for it to work properly.

Re:It means... (1)

Cheeze (12756) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284291)

reminds me of installing just about any other operating system. Even the big players in the OS market are rather lousy at detecting and installing proper video drivers.

Yeah (1)

andreyw (798182) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284284)

I tried Mandriva 2006 Free... on my dad's laptop. He needed to hook-up to our wireless and couldn't figure it out how with their shitty GUI tools. Needless to say, considering the guy is a nuclear physicist, neither could I.

Oh sure I can bring it up /by hand/ using iwconfig and dhclient. But their crappy redhat-derived network up scripts (which aren't documented ANYWHERE, unlikes Debian's/Ubuntu's) and broken-ish KDE tools (both of them - the one in the "control panel" and the dock) don't seem to understand what to do with the 128 WEP key I give them.

Sheesh.

Re:Yeah (1)

Jaqui (905797) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284338)

Probably because Mandriva did as most .rpm distros and some .deb distros have done.. they set the systems to use ndiswrapper and the ms windows drivers for wireless. Therefore making it harder to use the open source alternatives.

Who Cares? (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284326)

It will mean nothing since the vast majority of home PC users do not run Linux.

Well. I think Mandriva is OK! (1)

Angelox (764087) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284335)

Seven years (Mandrake/Mandriva) and still with them - Works great for me! Thank you Mandriva!
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