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316 comments

Story (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284532)

Silicon Graphics Files
For Chapter 11 Protection
A WALL STREET JOURNAL ONLINE NEWS ROUNDUP
May 8, 2006 6:56 a.m.

Silicon Graphics Inc., a long-struggling maker of high-performance computers, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.

A group of bondholders agreed to trade their debt for a stake in the company, which filed for Chapter 11 protection Monday morning in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Manhattan.

SGI is known for desktop workstations and larger server systems that are favored by engineers and others who demand sophisticated graphics, including Hollywood studios. But the company has suffered a long slide, partly due to competition from machines based on standard components used in personal computers.

The company's stock was recently delisted from the New York Stock Exchange for trading below a minimum threshold of $1 a share, and now trades on the small-cap OTC Bulletin Board.

Earlier this year, SGI replaced its top executive amid widening losses and lower revenue. Last month, the company said it expected revenue of about $108 million for the third fiscal quarter, well below guidance of $140 million to $160 million.

It's just Reorganization (1, Offtopic)

extremescholar (714216) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284687)

Chapter 11 Bankruptcy is not all that bad. I survived a company that went through this. Basically you renegotiate your major debts, likely a bank; and all this little creditors will likely get a pittance. Also, this makes them really very ripe for a quick sale at a very discounted price. They can come back bigger and better than ever without too much pain. I imagine a Google, or a Novell, or a Sun, or a Red Hat might be interested in a quick buy.

Re:Story (0)

slughead (592713) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284696)

OH NOES! NOT SGI! How long before that beleaguered fruit company [apple.com] follows suit?!

Wait, is that still funny?

Re:Story (1)

Hal_Porter (817932) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284761)

No, [apple.com] it's not [pbs.org]

Re:Story (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284735)

Here's the link from the SGI site about their debt reduction effort: STORY LINK [sgi.com] . Cheers.

Press Release (4, Informative)

datafr0g (831498) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284533)

SGI's press release here: http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/060508/sfm098.html?.v= 45 [yahoo.com]

Re:Press Release (0, Offtopic)

Barny (103770) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284604)

Press release for dummies...

Just shakeing down the house and don't want old debt/management to hinder how we plan to run from now on.

Only the US devision of SGI have filed, rest of world seems to be happy ticking over with what its doing.

I had heard (from the inquirer) that nvidia were looking at biteing a chunk off SGI in their graphics devision, obviousely an old dog can teach a new one some tricks :)

Re:Press Release (-1, Troll)

eno2001 (527078) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284720)

Really? My admiral swore blind that ATI was going to acquire SGI lock stock and barrel. I'm with him since ATI is obviously the better company than is the nVidia. nVidia is too friendly to open source to be solvent for much longer. ATI is more business friendly. If you were SGI who would you want o get bought up by, the captain of industry or the commie vegetarian place down the street?

Re:Press Release (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284738)

Here are some new tricks for you:

DIVISION, BITING, OBVIOUSLY, SHAKING, 'has failed', 'it's'.

Re:The death of SGI (5, Interesting)

ekimminau (775300) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284705)

SGI began its rapid decline the moment the announced the merger with Cray. As the stodgy crew of maanagers went on the land grab trying to justify their existence in their "new " company, it drove out many of the long hair, fast and loose crowd of exceptional engineers who believed SGI was a magical place.

SGI truly was a magical place to be. Not only the "Its Not just a job, Its a wardrobe" pens, frisbees, t-shirts for every new product, boxer shorts, key chains, and all the other swag SGI marketing was famous for. The "O" series of products, led by the Indigo2 Max-Impact were revolutionary products. Massively fast backplanes that still exceed the performance of all but a limite few systems, incredibly fast graphics sub systems with fill rates that still can't be achieved on lowly PC gear (they just can't push the bits fast enough).

In addition, SGI truly owned the internet space, well before Sun and then gave it away once Sun started the "dot in dot.com" marketing campaign. They had the NetScape server, free, included with the IRIX OS, on every server with a full HTML configuration interface in an age where most other companies still didn't have an officially supported HTTPD for their platform. They also included Indigo Magic, the FIRST full GUI HTML editor, again, free with the OS, as well as a full GUI VRML editor, and so on.

I truly weep for the company SGI used to be. It was the best job I ever had and the one I wish had never ended.

Re:The death of SGI (2, Interesting)

daviddennis (10926) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284779)

I never worked for SGI, but I loved the spirit of the company and their products.

I think (and thought at the time) they should have focused on a cheaper version of their products and tried to be an Apple alternative. They had the best OS out there until MacOS X came up, and it took a long time for MacOS X to work as well as Irix did. Most people aware of the company had very warm feelings about SGI products and the OS and I think they could have used that.

I reluctantly wound up switching from SGI hardware (used Indigo2s could be had for reasonable prices) to Macs about when MacOS X came out.

Re:The death of SGI (2, Informative)

deanj (519759) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284789)

SGI did not own the Internet space. Just because they had those on their platform doesn't mean they "owned" anything.

Mosaic - and shortly afterward, Netscape - was on every platform you can name. Httpd was supported on all those platforms too. By the time the "Internet revolution" and all the hype (and corruption) that drove up the stock market in the 90s, SGI was in the beginning of it's decline.

Sure, they had a great campus, they had great people working for them, but it didn't take long for it to come crashing down around them.

Which is unfortunate. SGI was a pretty cool place.

Re:The death of SGI (1)

guile*fr (515485) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284942)

and they gave the entreprise system to Sun, who sold them like hot cakes.

Re:The death of SGI (1)

arth1 (260657) | more than 8 years ago | (#15285013)

SGI began its rapid decline the moment the announced the merger with Cray.

I'd say their biggest mistake was bringing in Microsoft henchman Rick Beluzzo, whose philosophies didn't do much good for the creative and adaptive market that SGI was selling to.

In addition, SGI truly owned the internet space, well before Sun and then gave it away once Sun started the "dot in dot.com" marketing campaign.

I remember an SGI employee countered this with "We are the : in http:"

I will miss you, SGI. Thanks for your substantial contributions to Linux.

Regards,
--
*Art

Re:Press Release (2, Informative)

ajs (35943) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284739)

Summary:

* New CEO/CFO
* Major holders (read investors) get to keep their shares, everyone else gets nothing
* They have already reduced their size by $100M, and another $50M is coming (layoffs mostly, I imagine)
* They remain optimistic.

IMHO: They are doomed, but if the new CEO isn't just a "make it worth enough to pay off the debt" sort of guy, they could harvest the value of the Cray and SGI brands and parley them into a major product line once again. It would take the vision of a Steve Jobs type, but it could be done.

Re:Press Release (1)

Nexx (75873) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284849)

Except Cray has been sold [cray.com] to Tera Computer Company in March, 2000.

Re:Press Release (1)

ajs (35943) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284910)

Indeed... I had not known that. Well, then I suspect they're dead. I can't imagine them reversing their lot on the basis of the SGI brand alone. Perhaps... but it would be a HUGE longshot. The new CEO is almost certainly there to recoup the value of the assets only.

Re:Press Release (1)

UnanimousCoward (9841) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284795)

Well, there's a link on the SGI homepage [sgi.com] now. I like the way they avoid the wording "Chapter 11" like the plague...

Re:Press Release (2, Insightful)

Ctrl-Z (28806) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284924)

What, you mean like this text in the second paragraph? "...the Company and its U.S. subsidiaries have filed voluntary petitions under chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code."

Skip the spam (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284541)

and adverts, doubleclick webbugs, revsci webbugs, flash page takeovers

Silicon Graphics Files
For Chapter 11 Protection
A WALL STREET JOURNAL ONLINE NEWS ROUNDUP
May 8, 2006 6:56 a.m.

Silicon Graphics Inc., a long-struggling maker of high-performance computers, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.

A group of bondholders agreed to trade their debt for a stake in the company, which filed for Chapter 11 protection Monday morning in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Manhattan.

SGI is known for desktop workstations and larger server systems that are favored by engineers and others who demand sophisticated graphics, including Hollywood studios. But the company has suffered a long slide, partly due to competition from machines based on standard components used in personal computers.

The company's stock was recently delisted from the New York Stock Exchange for trading below a minimum threshold of $1 a share, and now trades on the small-cap OTC Bulletin Board.

Earlier this year, SGI replaced its top executive amid widening losses and lower revenue. Last month, the company said it expected revenue of about $108 million for the third fiscal quarter, well below guidance of $140 million to $160 million.

Re:Skip the spam (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284584)

Web beacons, not web bugs. Web beacons are a feature, not a bug.

There is no spam on the page since you don't get e-mail from it. Damn e-hippies ruining the corporate Internet.

Does this suprise anyone? (0, Troll)

GundamFan (848341) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284543)

They went from a big player to off the map very quickly. My question is; where they contributing anything new to the maket recently and for that matter where there any advantages to using a SGI card? Not to be harsh but companys don't just go bankrupt usualy it has somthing to do with high level mismanagment.

Re:Does this suprise anyone? (1)

zoid.com (311775) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284570)

The rise of cheap 3d cards and Linux made the high priced closed SGI Workstations hard to sell. Back in 1994-1995 I had a SGI Indy on my desk complete with 256meg of memory. Ah what a sweet machine....

Standard Template Library (4, Informative)

mosel-saar-ruwer (732341) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284574)


My question is; where they contributing anything new to the maket recently

It may not be all that "recent", but if you're a C++ programmer, you might want to download a copy of this documentation before the bankruptcy trustees pull the plug on the server:

Re:Does this suprise anyone? (1)

MykePagan (452299) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284597)

This was not a surprise and not quick. SGI has been limping for years and years. They succumbed to the increase in power of the mainstream PC. It's been a few years since a workstation was anything special other than a high-end PC with high-end graphics in it.

In a way, they were killed by Linux too. Who needs Irix on a purpose built workstation when you can do 95% of the work on a PC running Linux?

Re:Does this suprise anyone? (5, Insightful)

FuzzyDaddy (584528) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284608)

I used to work in the military simulation business about six years ago. SGI used to be the dominant player for real time graphics for the visuals for things like flight simulators. Even then, their fortunes were declining. The fundemental problem was that the problem in military simulation was not getting harder, and the commodity hardware was getting to the level of being able to handle it. People now longer had to pay the premium for the SGI equipment.

I don't think they stopped doing what they were doing - they just never came up with a strategy to handle the new reality.

Re:Does this suprise anyone? (1)

Stonent1 (594886) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284842)

I used to work in the military simulation business about six years ago.

I did as well and we were replacing simulators based around SGI Crimson and newer (mid to late 90's era SGI equipment) with a simultator built around Dell P4 desktops with a rack of Quantum3D image generators (Dual P3 systems with 1GB ram)

Re:Does this suprise anyone? (1)

grub (11606) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284856)


[T]he commodity hardware was getting to the level of being able to handle it. People now longer had to pay the premium for the SGI equipment.

How true. Over the past few years ago we've cut maintenance on our last SGI systems (Origin 2000, Origin 2200, Origin 3200, SAN, CXFS, etc.) Two new Linux clusters (33x dual Xeons and 14x dual Opterons) are now doing the lion's share of the work. Less money for more raw crunching.

Re:Does this suprise anyone? (1)

Billosaur (927319) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284622)

From the press release on Yahoo: This reorganization is planned with no disruption to day-to-day customer and partner activities as the Company positions itself to recapture mindshare and market share. Over the last 100 days, the Company under the leadership of its new management team has had several significant achievements. During this time it has:

Assembled a new management team including a new Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as well as the appointment of other experienced executives;
Closed on some significant sales orders reflecting continued customer confidence in SGI;
Completed a program that has resulted in $100 million in annualized cost savings with an additional $50 million in savings underway;
Identified additional paths to streamline operating and administrative costs;
Improved efficiencies in its manufacturing operations;
Strengthened and expanded its product roadmap; and
Implemented a plan to reposition its product and market focus to take advantage of the Company's significant technology and market potential.

Their relevance has descreased over the years as newer, faster workstations based on more standard components have become available and the rise of Linux has brought the cost of operating those workstations down. It's clear to say that their upper manaement didn't recognize the forest for the trees as their marketshare eroded, with the ultimate result that they became irrelevant. I seem to remember reading somewhere that Industrial Light and Magic, which was one of their greatest supporters for a long time, shifted away from SGI workstations in the last few years. Those are the kinds of blows it's hard to recover from.

Re:Does this suprise anyone? (4, Insightful)

datafr0g (831498) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284625)

The money's not in hardware anymore - hasn't been for a long time unless you can supply a massive like and do it well. Professional Services is where it's at now - IBM learned this in the early 90's.

Big hardware companies need to seriously change their outlook - if it can be done with a PC, it will eventually be done with a PC cheaply, the question is not what the "box" does, it's who's the best at providing the service.

"If it can be done with a PC" (0, Flamebait)

Hemi Rodner (570284) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284737)

Tell that to Steve Jobs..

Re:"If it can be done with a PC" (1)

datafr0g (831498) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284852)

Sorry?? How big is Apple's Mac market share over the mass produced PC?

If you're alluding to the iPod, Apple may have a lot of iPod's out there but how strong a showing do you think they would have today with the average joe if it wernt for the iTunes service. That service has enabled them to capture the market over everyone else very quickly.

Re:Does this suprise anyone? (1)

Barny (103770) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284640)

From what I have seen lately (talk of SGI adding an opteron range to its lines, as well as pruneing some of the dead wood of specialty hardware) they seem to be pushing toward the high-very high end server market, what with talks of putting ccNUMA backplanes with AMD cpus and getting out of the video side of things all together.

Basically competeing with the high end SUN and low end CRAY setups, from the info I have read about these chap 11 fileings, they are just removeing some old debts and have been promised a new bankroll from a few VCs.

Re:Does this suprise anyone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284643)

Itanium and Linux got one of their clusters into the Top 10 Supercomputers, but I would still think it's safe to say this was a casualty of the Itanic.

Re:Does this suprise anyone? (3, Insightful)

Frumious Wombat (845680) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284804)

It's not just the commodity workstations that did them in. Their high-end equipment was increasingly uncompetitive against IBM/HP/Sun. They did a lot of thrashing; they were going to compete on mid-range business systems (crushed by Sun/Linux from below and IBM/HP/Sun from above), then they were going to compete on supercomputers by buying Cray (sold the machine they didn't understand to Sun, which called it the E10000 Starfire, and sold billions, while SGI ended up selling Cray to Tera for a loss), then they hitched their star to Itaniums. There was also the issue of software quality control during the version 7 compiler development, which gained them a reputation for wonky compilers (hint: if you're selling to the HPC guys, rock-solid, DEC/IBM quality Fortran is a must), and the slipping performance advantage versus conventional PC. (The R5000 was equal, roughly, to a Pentium 233, when the PII/PIII were available for less than $2K, though you couldn't tell the SGI reps that if you waved actual simulation run times in their face)

So, in a way, gross mismanagement over a period of about a decade. The amazing thing is that it took so long to finally go bankrupt. Pity, as I remember my Indigo2 SolidImpact (with the CrystalEyes stereo adapter) rather fondly. On the other hand, I don't remember my days securing Irix nearly as fondly. Another contender who actually believed their PR, and lost sight of their market.

XFS (2, Interesting)

ex-geek (847495) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284814)

My question is; where they contributing anything new to the maket recently
The XFS filesystem [sgi.com]
I'm using this on a couple of machines. I sure hope that somebody will continue to maintain it.

This bankrupcy doesn't surprise me at all. I saw this coming for more than five years. But I remember having arguments with SGI fans who tried to defend the Indefensible.

Re:Does this suprise anyone? (1)

Bush Pig (175019) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284876)

Dunno that it was so quick.

We had a lab full of SG machines when I worked for the Geography Dept at Adelaide University about 10-12 years ago. They were sweet. _Really_ fast, and gorgeous graphics.

Re:Does this suprise anyone? (1)

stanwirth (621074) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284997)

Not surprising at all --10 years ago, while a bunch of software engineers from MITRE and SAIC were working on the
last edition of ModSAF on SGIs, a couple jarheads put together a more effective urban combat
training system in their spare time -- based on multiplayer DOOM.

Does anyone still use the SGI workstations anymore (2, Informative)

mentatultima (926841) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284544)

A lot of movies companies used to use SGI computers for special effects in the 90's, however a lot of them have switched to regular pcs and macs due to increases in technology.

So the question is are the SGI workstations worth the cost? Is SGI going to survive.

And for karma whoring here is the wikipedia index on SGI's history:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silicon_Graphics [wikipedia.org]

Re:Does anyone still use the SGI workstations anym (1)

Council (514577) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284593)

So the question is are the SGI workstations worth the cost? Is SGI going to survive[?]

I don't know; let's check their company for signs of health.

Re:Does anyone still use the SGI workstations anym (2, Interesting)

archen (447353) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284609)

When your core business is high end and you push products through lots of R&D then have your market sapped by commodity products, its easy to overstep your budget and not adjust the business quickly enough. Even worse of course if the people in charge don't see the train comming down the tracks for a long time, which is what often happens in bigger businesses. SGI is also in a more vulnerable position than say Sun because Sun can deploy a server that is expected to stay put (and need support) for many years - hell even SCO is hanging on this way! The graphics industry is constantly in the push of new and faster, so we're seeing a "Unix" company demise in accelerated time.

Coming... (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284552)

We all saw it coming.

Sad (4, Insightful)

syylk (538519) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284557)

I worked with IRIX at some point of my career. Nothing impressive, mind you. But the machine was stylish and the aura of "eliteness" leaked from every vent grill. Onyxes, Octanes, Origins... They could be beat by a low-level GPU these days, but back then, they were wet dreams coming true.

I'm sad to see them go. Not surprised, but still a bit sad.

Erwin will need a new home...

Re:Sad (1)

KiloByte (825081) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284655)

Hell yeah. Irices were maybe not impressive, but certainly cool.

I browsed some SGI docs literally a hour ago just to make a piece of software portable to Irix -- not out of any necessity or even utility, but just because of the old fondness.

Sleep well, Indy. We'll miss you.

Re:Sad (1)

bmh129 (928163) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284901)

It's Chapter 11 restructuring, not Chapter 7. They're still trying to survive. Of course, restructuring can mean the company will fundamentally change.

Nothing there yet.. (4, Funny)

Rob T Firefly (844560) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284558)

the SGI Investor's Relation page doesn't say anything

They'll add it in with green-screen later.

Because the *real* investors just got screwed (1)

HighOrbit (631451) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284845)

All of SGI's existing common stock and the unsecured subordinated debentures will be cancelled upon confirmation of the plan by the court and receive no recovery.
What just happened is that the new CEO & CFO cut a deal to enrich bankers (who held "secured" bonds) at the cost of the people who put their trust and money in SGI. So the guys who really belived in SGI all these years, who supported it, and who bought SGI's stock or bonds just got completely 100% screwed by a back room deal.

Well at least *some* of the employees will get to keep their jobs, but I'll bet the ones with their retirement plans in SGI stock will be hopping mad.

To be perfectly honest... (4, Insightful)

furry_marmot (515771) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284565)

...I'm surprised it took this long. After throwing over their own OS for NT workstations and losing the high-end specialty graphics market, they veered into supercomputers and bought Cray, which didn't help either company, and they haven't done anything interesting in years. RIP SGI

Re:To be perfectly honest... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284714)

One Name: Rick Belluzzo.

Some would think this is precisely what Belluzzo had in mind all along--to kill SGI. As a former HP employee, I wouldn't trust Belluzzo to wash my car.

Was anyone surprised Ricky ended up at Microsoft?

Terribly sad (3, Interesting)

mccalli (323026) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284571)

Got to say that I find this terribly sad. When I started in computing, SGI used to be some magical company that I aspired to touching the hem of - sort of how Pixar is viewed today, although obviously without the narrative bit.

I know it was inevitable. I know the economics. I know various other things but still...still...it's a sad, sad day.

Cheers,
Ian

Re:Terribly sad (1)

Ilgaz (86384) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284678)

I am sad too and I just hope no 16 year old around to say "who cares" since I won't care for my karma or anything to reply.

At least, respect for OpenGL folks!

Or if you have a EA game or something , look at the credits at the last page of manual. Always some SGI libs involved.

Re:Terribly sad (1)

Aglassis (10161) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284786)

Yeah it's a sad day, but it could be worse. Thank God that the Cray assets were sold before SGI went into its final downward spiral.

This day reminds me of the day DEC was bought. I knew that day that I'd never see another 'DEC' or 'digital' in big letters on a new computer again. Now I know I will never see another wire square logo on a new computer again.

Re:Terribly sad (1)

jbolden (176878) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284784)

I don't know that it was inevitable. There are far more people using far more computers today to do things then were at the height of SGI. There is more money going into hardware today then went in in the late 80's and early 90's. There are lots of people who want be able to do sound and video better than you can do with so / so hardware.

I don't see any reason there can't be a workstation market today.

Re:Terribly sad (2)

slayer17 (152559) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284802)

No other machine looked as nice as a sgi. Even today some of those systems look wonderful. They where always overpriced and I hated installing irix but I will always love their systems and I really hate to see them go. I lift up my morining cup of joe to the once great SGI. The maker of the sweetest looking machine to ever display a *nix.

When a corporation goes down.. (-1, Redundant)

f0dder (570496) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284575)

are we suppose to cheer? corporation == evil.. right?

Re:When a corporation goes down.. (0)

l3v1 (787564) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284642)

I'm certain there are companies (no, not just one) we'd keep parties when we'd see them go down. I'm sure SGI isn't one of them.

Re:When a corporation goes down.. (1, Funny)

jbolden (176878) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284828)

Nah big corporation == evil. If SGI had even 5% market share we could still talk about how bad Irix sucks and how SGI rapes you price wise. If Microsoft goes to 5% we can wane nostalgically about how great it was having the office suite always use the new technologies from the OS.

Unexpected (4, Insightful)

wombatmobile (623057) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284581)

Old age is the most unexpected [accelerating.org] of things that can happen to a man. -- Trotsky

Misunderstanding (0)

HugePedlar (900427) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284603)

I know the Stargate takes a lot of power, but surely the government's black hole account can take care of it.

Stargate SG1 (1)

lthown (737539) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284907)

I thought that said SG "one" when I first saw it, and I was like: "what! how am I supposed to learn about Origin now? at least we have Atlantis" good thing it's just SGI and not SG1

I guess Autodesk cares (1)

j-b0y (449975) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284630)

Seeing as Inferno is shipped as a HW/SW package for SGI boxes only. I guess that's a niche product though.

Re:I guess Autodesk cares (1)

boxy50 (776800) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284801)

I imagine Autodesk were very aware this was going to happen sooner or later, so they've ported Inferno to linux [autodesk.com]

Re:I guess Autodesk cares (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284826)

They are already switching everything towards Linux / PC's. They must have seen this coming.

Something died inside of us all... (5, Interesting)

MindPrison (864299) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284645)

I remember fondly my first encounter with 3D graphics, from the TRON movies, man - that was many years ago, the SGI computers was the no.1 on my wishlist as a kid - but a machine like that where WAY too expensive, and thats where the Commodore Amiga came and stole our hearts, all of a sudden - 3D became affordable, SGI did'nt belive in "3D-for-everyone" and I believe that would be the main reason for their demise.

You've got to put your belief in the little guy on the street if you want to survive, being boss - playing big, with the big - will only work until the rest of us grow up. And we did, but SGI didn't invest in our future together, if they did - we would have embraced them without as much as a seconds hesitation, but if you keep selling to the elite party (those with WAY too much money) you're out of tune with the development.


(For those too thick to read between the lines - it simply ment, they didn't follow the times)

Re:Something died inside of us all... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284791)

Pretty much... times changed and they were still stuck with old school thinking. To use an parrallel they were like the dinosaurs, overtaken and passed up by smaller, faster, more agile creatures who evolved to adapt to changing conditions.

I don't know if they will be able to restructure enough to survive, They will need to completely change their way of thinking and their direction. Personally I think they need to push their services and graphics libraries a lot more on generic hardware and concentrate on licenses, getting awfully hard to get by on hardware alone these days.

Re:Something died inside of us all... (1)

GreggBz (777373) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284837)

I always thought what killed the Amiga was the failure to see 3d polygonal graphics in entertainment as the future. Well, that and bone headed marketing...
Until the last, the Amiga's AGA, chipset, they seemed concerned with blitting sprites as fast as possible, and trying to sell their machines as powerfull business solutions.
I have some old Amiga catalogs here, most of the glossies show pictures of pie charts and some such..
Yea, no photorealistic sex apeal.... no larua croft or explosions, pie charts..

Amiga, never *really* focused on fun.. consumer entertainment and fun was and still is the key to selling machines and the catalyst for innovation. Getting "Work Done" was never the bleeding edge. Playing games was.

SGI seems to have missed this point.. Well most of the pointy headed captains of that company missed this point. Lots of the Engineers in SGI did not. Lots of those engineers now work for Nvidia.

Re:Something died inside of us all... (2, Interesting)

Greyfox (87712) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284866)

Computing becoming more affordable made for leaner times for a lot of those high-end workstation vendors. They were very specialized and couldn't innovate as fast as the industry as a whole. And perhaps they were resting on their laurels and didn't realize the danger until it was too late. I know the attitude at IBM at least up until the mid to late 90's was that PCs were toys and if you wanted real computing you shelled out big bucks for big iron.

When the 386 appeared on the scene and it became feasible to run a multitasking OS on a PC, the market for high end workstations dried up almost overnight. The articles hyping the processor and claiming "mainframe performance on a desktop machine!" were believed by managers world wide. Why shell out high 5 digits for a high end workstation when you could drop a couple grand and get the same performance. Interestingly enough I saw the "mainframe performance in a desktop PC" claim made for the 386, the 486 and the pentium in turn. And managers believed it each time.

Anyway the stage was set. The last act from SGI that I paid attention to was the appearance of one of their sales guys at a Linuxworld a few years ago (Must have been 98 or 99 I think.) He laid out the plan for SGI's recovery, and it involved branching into some areas of the industry that were dominated by IBM, Sun and StorageTek. I could have pointed out that they were fighting an uphill battle on that turf and that I didn't see enough of a value add from SGI to draw the customers, but it wouldn't have changed anything and I didn't want to be mean to the poor guy.

I don't know that SGI could have survived for much longer on high-end graphical workstations even if they'd stayed focussed on what they were good at. They just couldn't keep up with cheap render farms and Moore's law. Their best bet probably would have been to file patents like crazy and force every graphics card company on the planet to license their stuff, but they just weren't evil enough to go that route.

Investor Relations Info (3, Informative)

spacemky (236551) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284649)

Info about the Chapter 11 is up now, via a press release:

http://www.sgi.com/company_info/newsroom/press_rel eases/2006/may/sgi_reorg.html [sgi.com]

From the release:
"As part of this agreement with many of its major stakeholders, and as the next step in its previously announced plan to reorganize its businesses, the Company and its U.S. subsidiaries have filed voluntary petitions under chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. SGI's non-U.S. subsidiaries, including European, Canadian, Mexican, South American and Asia Pacific subsidiaries were not included in the filing; will continue their business operations without supervision from the U.S. courts; and will not be subject to the requirements of chapter 11. The Company expects to file its Plan of Reorganization reflecting the agreement shortly, and to emerge from Chapter 11 within six months."

One less icon for Slashdot to manage (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284661)

Will make those new look and feel updates to Slashdot all the more easy to create.

SGI collectors items (2, Funny)

chiph (523845) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284665)

My SGI shirts are now collectors items!
Woooot!

Chip H.

Sad. I loved using their Reality Engines (1)

MarkWatson (189759) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284689)

Almost 10 years ago, I had the use of two packed-to-the-gills Reality Engines, one supplied by Nintendo when I was doing game AI work and one by Disney when I was the lead on a virtual reality prototype.

I am not a computer graphics specialist, but it was great to work with full screen graphics at a high frame rate. The artistic types at Angel Studios where I worked created amazing 3d models, textures, and environments - really, some of the most fun I ever had working.

Re:Sad. I loved using their Reality Engines (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284780)

That reminds me of this article:

The Plumber Is Back [pbs.org]

For Nintendo, the problem was different. The Nintendo 64 had been designed in close partnership with Silicon Graphics (SGI). Nearly all the hardware was designed by SGI, as was the development system used to write games. Given that SGI had no real background in video games, this was probably already a bad idea, but then it got worse. There was an internal battle at SGI over whether to even continue its association with Nintendo. SGI founder and then-chairman Jim Clarke wanted to continue the Nintendo alliance, which had made SGI's MIPS processors more numerous even than Intel's. But SGI's management saw Nintendo as a distraction from its real business of high-end graphical computing, so SGI walked out of the Nintendo deal, leaving the game company with no plan for future games. Clarke then left in disgust to start Netscape. SGI's precipitous action is what kept Nintendo from having a fifth-generation game for so long.

Re:Sad. I loved using their Reality Engines (1)

MarkWatson (189759) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284868)

Interesting - thanks. I had a few co-workers who were so enamored with the 'reality chip' (actually a DSP) that SGI did for Nintendo, that they invested heavily in SGI.

I am not a hardware guy, but it was neat using early U64 protoypes.

Totally off topic, but I still enjoy my U64 - my grandson and I still enjoy some of the older games like Star Wars a lot.

Sad end... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284703)

I remember being amazed at the XZ 3D hardware capabilities of the Indy - the first SGI I had the freedom to play with. This was back when I was still dazzled by the breakthrough of DOOM! There was no company better positioned with *real* intellectual property to get involved in the PC graphics market. I don't think they have the economy of scale to come back from this, but they'll certainly leave an impressive legacy. They actually made great tools, rather than 'solutions'.

3dfx was minor player but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284711)

I know 3dfx wasn't loved by SGI especially but when it went chap 11 like this, first people to comment some insightful comments were John Carmack like industry people saying it is NOT a good thing.

People (users) were speaking about stupid "16bit rendering" while they saw the real thing coming as duopoly between Nvidia and ATI.

Now there are 2 companies and ATI is more focused on laptop chips now.

Who lost? Customers.

There will be always insightful morons around but it is the case mattering for the professionals, especially Holywood and major TV channels.

Re:3dfx was minor player but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284736)

I don't see what the problem is with having only one company providing chips for desktops.

A single company with single drivers delivering a finalized product (as opposed to the rushed, must-beat-competitor crap).

Re:3dfx was minor player but... (1)

Zardus (464755) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284871)

If I was the only person in the world producing bubble gum, I could a) make my bubble gum taste like shit and b) charge a billion dollars a stick. Now, people could stop using bubble gum, but people can't really stop buying graphics chips. Graphics chips are kinda necessary for games.

Gary Coleman Dead at 36 (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284743)

Gary Coleman was announced dead on May 8th, 2006 due to Kidney failure. He was 36 years old.

Best known as the loveable Arnold Jackson on the hit series "Diff'rent Strokes" (1978-86), child star Gary Coleman has struggled to redefine his life and career ever since he played the gregarious TV moppet. As with costars Todd Bridges and Dana Plato, Coleman descended into a life of career mediocrity and seemingly non-stop trouble once the show was canceled. Though he never succumbed to drugs like Bridges and Plato, Coleman nonetheless suffered the aftereffects of being a former child celebrity, even twice attempting suicide. But through it all, Coleman managed to pull himself up by the bootstraps and restore some dignity to his life.

Coleman grew up in Zion, Illinois, a small city on the shores of Lake Michigan 40 miles south of Chicago. His adoptive parents both worked in the medical field: his father for a pharmaceutical company and his mother was a nurse. By age 5, Coleman had three kidney operations, the result of nephritis, a congenital defect. The condition would stunt his growth, eventually leaving him 4'8" for life. However, his size worked to his advantage when he began appearing in Chicago-area commercials, because at nine years old he could pass for five.

In 1978, Coleman auditioned for a television revival of "The Little Rascals". The project never made it off the ground, but network executives were impressed with Coleman's talent and cast him as Arnold in "Diff'rent Strokes". With Coleman's pudgy cheeks and ability to pout on cue, the show was an immediate hit. The series first aired on NBC in November, 1978 and ran for six seasons, making its final appearance in August, 1986.

Coleman spent his "Diff'rent Stokes" years capitalizing on his saccharine image with several TV movies, three of which co-starred distinguished actor Robert Guillaume. First was "The Kid from Left Field" (1979), a remake of the 1953 movie with Dan Dailey and Anne Bancroft. Coleman played the son of a former baseball player-turned-refreshments vendor who leads the San Diego Padres from worst in the league to the World Series. The two actors teamed up again in "The Kid with the Broken Halo" (1982), about a child angel who returns to earth to save three souls. Rounding out their creative partnership was "The Kid with the 200 I.Q." (1983), a sappy melodrama about a precocious kid who learns that a large IQ cannot make up for a lack of confidence or maturity. All three films helped solidify the wholesome, chipmunk-cheeked kiddie image that would dog Coleman for the rest of his life.

Coleman's life jumped the shark once "Diff'rent Stokes" went off the air in 1986. The aging actor was no longer an adorable child and found difficulty being cast due to his size. To make matters worse, Coleman entered a bitter court battle against his adoptive parents, who swindled most of the money he made from the series. The parents set up a trust fund for Coleman, but structured the deal so that they could be paid employees of his production company. The result was years of embezzlement, followed by the actor getting the shaft when a court dissolved the trust: after earning $18 million from the show, Coleman received $220,000 to his parents' $770,000. Coleman sued, forcing his parents and managers to cough up an additional $3.8 million.

However, Coleman's troubles didn't end there. While broke, he was forced to take odd jobs, including one as a security guard, much to the relish of the national media. If that weren't embarrassing enough, Coleman got into trouble with the law while shopping for a bulletproof vest for his security job. A female autograph seeker asked Coleman to sign one for her. He obliged, but the woman felt it wasn't enough. After pestering him for more than his signature, Coleman lost his cool and punched the woman several times. Though the charge of assault and battery was reduced to disturbing the peace, Coleman nevertheless endured his own figurative beating at the hands of the media.

Coleman soldiered on, all the while managing to retain his trademark humor and charm. He made appearances here and there, mostly cameos and small roles parodying himself. In an effort to open some doors, Coleman interned at KRQ Radio in Tucson, Arizona, which later turned into a paying gig. He also began writing Coleman Confidential for UGO.com, a weekly column where readers submit questions about any topic under the sun and he responded with advice.

In a bizarre twist at age 35, Coleman entered the California recall election in 2003 (agreeing to run after his name was put into the race by East Bay Express, a Oakland newspaper hoping to satirize and protest the recall election). Though action hero Arnold Schwarzenegger went on to win, Coleman finished a respectable eighth place among 135 candidates with more than 12,500 votes, ahead of comedian Gallagher, porn star Mary Carey and LA-based billboard fixture Angelyne. Immediately after the election, Coleman's "campaign" resulted in a new job as the political analyst for the fledgling Hollywood-based All Comedy Radio network.

buck rogers (0, Offtopic)

jbolden (176878) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284836)

how can you possiblly spam /. and forget to mention that Gary Coleman appeared twice in Buck Rogers. You can't even spam well, tisk tisk tisk.

Sorry to see them go... (5, Informative)

saha (615847) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284747)

...although I'm surprised it took this long. Their upper management really was a mess and lacked focus. Their venture into the the Windows NT boxes and Itanium platform didn't help much either.

Heck, I use a Powerbook G4 for most of my tasks these days and my SGI O2 and SGI 320 NT box in my office are used little these days, but the Macs do lack some advanced hardware features that are only available on Infinite Reality gfx boards and Tezro v12. See Discreet's website and you'll notice that Flame, Inferno and Fire still run on ONLY SGI hardware. SGI InfiniteReality boards are used as image generators for flight military flight simulators and also to drive the Inferno compositing and film mastering, using up to 32 film resolution layers and 10-bit anti-aliased graphics

Sure, Nvidia and ATI cards go have an polygon count advantage and they do have features like pixel and vertex shaders, but overall for high fidelity graphics one still goes back to SGIs. If one looks at what is capable in Final Cut Pro HD, it still falls in terms of output quality compared to what an SGI can handle. For video DMediaPro options with support for two streams of high-definition 10-bit 4:4:4:4 RGBA video. Or if one needed to generate your own video signal. Programmable FPGA video card or drive a C.A.V.E. or Powerwall SGI Mutichannel Option cards are capable of doing this. I have yet to see PC based Image Generator be as successful at doing this without a lot of hacking, blood, sweat and tears. SGI's handle the tough visualization tasks do out of the box. SGI's gfx API are second to none

OpenGL Inventor

OpenGL Multipipe (+ SDK)

OpenGL Optimizer

OpenGL Performer

OpenGL Shader

OpenGL Vizserver

OpenGL Volumizer

ImageVision and Image Format Library (IFL)

SGI was a great company, although it was badly mismanaged. I'd love to see it merged with Apple and all the SGI gfx API's integrated into OS X. Plus other tecnologies like ccNUMA, XFS, CXFS, NUMAlink4 (6.4GBs), NUMAflex combined with Hypertransport and Infiniband (when customers need cheaper solution than NUMAlink)

Re:Sorry to see them go... (1)

ThousandStars (556222) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284951)

If one looks at what is capable in Final Cut Pro HD, it still falls in terms of output quality compared to what an SGI can handle.

How so? I was under the impression FCP has caught up with SGI -- if it hasn't, why have a fair number of Hollywood full-length films been made with FCP?

I'm not trying to flame -- I'm actually interested in how FCP falls short.

But even if the OP is correct and FCP still doesn't compare with SGI, FCP has the advantage of being relatively inexpensive. Every college student film type I know has FCP and and can use it effectively. When these people get in the industry, they'll use what they're familiar with. To my knowledge, FCP has been "good enough" for the past few years.

A similar thing happened in the PC industry: even if other OSes were technically superior to MS-DOS and later Windows, those OSes were the ones most people learned in the late 80's and early 90's. As a result, we're all still complaining about the MS near-monopoly.

Re:Sorry to see them go... (2, Informative)

Tester (591) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284988)

See Discreet's website and you'll notice that Flame, Inferno and Fire still run on ONLY SGI hardware. SGI InfiniteReality boards are used as image generators for flight military flight simulators and also to drive the Inferno compositing and film mastering, using up to 32 film resolution layers and 10-bit anti-aliased graphics

This is no longer true. Discreet has now ported all of their software to Linux PCs. Even the Inferno (which was the last). I was at NAB last week (major tradeshow for the media business) and they were showing the Inferno PC. There was no SGI left in the Autodesk/Discreet booth. The inferno/flame is now an IBM (Lenovo?) PC with an Nvidia Quatro, a DVS board (for video acquisition), dual-core cpu, lots of ram, and a fiberchannel raid array. The Flame has been a PC for a long time (at least a year) and the Flint for maybe 2 years. And yes the DVS board can do two stream at 4:4:4. And I've been reading of the possibility of making a laptop version of flint... (because they are getting bitten really hard by Final Cut Pro and Shake and other PC/Mac apps...)

SGI Workstations (2, Interesting)

10Ghz (453478) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284762)

I hope that someone will buy their MIPS-based workstation-business. What I would like to see is for someone to take that business, beef it up a bit, and port the whole lineup to Linux. I would say that there would be a sizeable market for quality MIPS-workstations that run Linux.

How about.... HyperTransport-links between CPU's, integrated mem-controllers, on-die L2-caches, HTX-expansion, multicore, multi-CPU-setups. All this, and running Linux. Hell, those changes alone would give us a nice boost, even if the CPU-core (R16000A IIRC) itself stayed relatively same.

doesn't say anything? (1)

MarsBar (6605) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284763)

Obviously the OP didn't read SGI's official release [sgi.com] ...

SGI (1)

certel (849946) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284765)

Man, what a shame. I've been a fan of SGI for quite sometime and it's unfortunate to see something like this happen. Hopefully they can climb back out.

SGI IS DEAD! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284778)

...but does netcraft confirm it?

They needed to repeat the success of the Indy. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284787)

In the early 1990s, SGI's Indy system became wildly popular. While still being relatively affordable relative to PCs of the time, it provided a very solid workstation. You could get the power of IRIX and acceptable graphics at a fraction of the price of their higher-end systems.

For many, the Indy proved to be a gateway system. Developers or graphics artists would purchase an Indy, become quite happy with it, and then go on to purchase higher-end SGI hardware when the need arose.

The Opteron provided an opportunity for them to repeat that feat. They could have released a low-cost, high-quality workstation based around that CPU. Had they beaten Sun, HP, and others, they could have had a large chunk of the market. They could have even used the distinctive blue/teal case of the Indy to appeal to former users.

In addition to that, they could have tweaked a system such as FreeBSD to run very well on their new Opteron-based system. Unfortuantely, IRIX development has lagged recently, and is just not up to par with other UNIX systems of today. FreeBSD, however, with SGI-specific modifications could have proved to be a real winner.

We use Origin 3800's... (1)

bchernicoff (788760) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284798)

...for our file and web servers, but we are moving to Sun. The SGI's have been incredibly stable, but their JRE is out of date and the JVM core dumps frequently.

SGI is now a good bargain (4, Insightful)

csoto (220540) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284833)

With a Chapter 11 reorg, a potential buyer would get access to a lot of very interesting HPC technology, without a lot of liability. This is what the current bondholders are counting on - buy it while it's cheap and sell it for more to some other company.

What do you get (of any value) when you snap up SGI?

-XFS/XVM/CXFS - one of the best storage environments out there in production
-OpenGL/VAN
-DMF/TMF
-GRIO
-Numerous other subsystems to IRIX/Linux

Their hardware hasn't kept pace as well. However, there's still a lot to like about the architecture (HyperTransport looks so much like SGI-Craylink). They're about the only ones who managed to make something useful of Itanium (another straw on the camel's back). Perhaps someone could do something with it, provided they supply the needed R&D money.

Now is the time... (3, Informative)

robbo (4388) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284848)

... to mirror the STL progammer's guide [sgi.com] (for personal use, of course).

It's sad to see them go, and not just for their cool h/w. This is the company that brought us OpenGL and, for a long time, the only useful STL documentation on the web (not to mention Irix had a working c++ compiler). I can almost forgive them for IRIX 6.5.

To the memory of SGI (2, Insightful)

Pervertus (637664) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284857)

Several factors are tied to the sudden but expected death of SGI:

  • Compatibility - they used to have a proprietary method for connecting things to the computer. Instead of using the VGA that we all use and love, they used 3 RGB cables. People didn't like that because they couldn't make fun use of SGI monitors - at least not without buying converters and stuff.
  • IRIX user friendliness - while it was cool that IRIX had scaleable icons, it was a shame that if you tried to use the camera with program A but the camera was in use by program B, then program A simply would just say "device in use", instead of giving more details about the error, like which program is keeping the camera busy. That frustrated many users, who hoped that the programmers would care.
  • Logo change - after SGI changed their logo to boring letters, it accelerated the demise. All the magic was gone.

I am sorry for SGI breaking down. But I hope that Apple can learn from their mistakes. It's too late for Sun I guess.
I shall remember you, SGI, and I will think of you every time I play with my future girlfriend.

It's Too Early (1)

Gryle (933382) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284881)

I read that as "SG-1 files chapter 11 bankruptcy." I was wondering how a TV show could go bankrupt

CH 11 (1)

mwaggs_jd (887826) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284885)

This looks like a pre-packaged chapter 11. The management has already put together financing and the outcome is nearly predetermined. 6 months in a chapter 11 is way to short for anything else. This should allow them to dump some debt, restructure some, and emerge in far better shape.

Nice systems, but the company was a pain to deal/w (2, Interesting)

timepilot (116247) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284906)

I bought a few of their systems, ranging from an R4400-based Indigo2 to an R12K based Power Challenge L. I was usually happy with the hardware, but the sales guys were really slimy, and the company made it very difficult and expensive to get basic OS and compiler updates.

A $3000 Indy might have seemed like a good deal, but when you need a thousand dollars a year worth of hardware and software contracts to support basic administration of the box, it didn't compare too well with its competition.

Of course, my POV is probably severly tainted by the fact that I just did NOT like the sales rep. Half of what came out of his mouth was BS.

On the other hand, this had to have been 10 years ago, and I should probably just get over it.

OpenGL? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15284908)

IIRC, doesnt microsoft hold a good amount of ownership over opengl? and now that SGI will more than likely be leaving the playing field, wont this mean that OGL will belong to microsoft? who will more than likely take it, lock it up, and sue the living fuck out of anyone who implements it? (read, makes free software implementations without paying absurd royalty costs)

of course, this is where OSS, years ago, should have started on a similar, but relatively OGL patent-free alternative.

Oh No! (2, Insightful)

twazzock (928396) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284917)

What's going to happen to OpenGL? The API can't die! I don't want to have to use DirectX! What will I use in Linux?

In Soviet Russia... (-1, Redundant)

Brian Stretch (5304) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284920)

...Itanic sinks YOU!

Sigh. Another legendary company gone via death by management.

Chapter 11 announced (1)

jakobgrimstveit (556576) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284936)

SGI Takes Action to Reduce Debt

SGI Announces Pre-Negotiated Reorganization

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif., (May 8, 2006)--Silicon Graphics (OTC: SGID) today announced that it has reached an agreement with all of its Senior Secured bank lenders and with holders of a significant amount of its Senior Secured debt on the terms of a reorganization plan that will reduce its debt by approximately $250 million, greatly simplifying its capital structure.

As part of this agreement with many of its major stakeholders, and as the next step in its previously announced plan to reorganize its businesses, the Company and its U.S. subsidiaries have filed voluntary petitions under chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. SGI's non-U.S. subsidiaries, including European, Canadian, Mexican, South American and Asia Pacific subsidiaries were not included in the filing; will continue their business operations without supervision from the U.S. courts; and will not be subject to the requirements of chapter 11. The Company expects to file its Plan of Reorganization reflecting the agreement shortly, and to emerge from Chapter 11 within six months.

Read more at http://www.sgi.com/company_info/newsroom/press_rel eases/2006/may/sgi_reorg.html [sgi.com]

I thank SGI for a lot of my early career... (2, Interesting)

Darth Maul (19860) | more than 8 years ago | (#15284985)

It's a shame, because back in the early 90's I got into comp sci and computer graphics, using Indigos and Onyx machines in all my early work. I even bought an Indy for use in college, and there's no way I would have been able to do such cool project work in school without it. It's a shame to see this, because I was as big a fan as SGI could have had back in the day, but I know the day SGI started its decline.

It was SIGGRAPH 2000. New Orleans. I got an invite to the SGI party, and we were all expecting a huge new announcement of a SGI-brand PC graphics card. This would have been the smart move, because about this time PC cards were starting to eat into SGI's markets... So why not use the amazing brand name of SGI and produce a killer PC card? So what did SGI announce? A new line of supercomputers. There were audible groans in the crowd.

Oh well, it was part of history. My Indy still works just fine, and I was even able to update to a newer version of Irix recently... And I'll still wear my SGI shirts, thankyouverymuch ;-).

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