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The Public's First Look at Wii

Zonk posted more than 8 years ago | from the it's-named-what-now dept.

282

isaacklinger writes "Time Magazine reports how it feels to play with the Wii. Overall it's a very enthusiastic review." From the Gamespot coverage: "Grossman traveled to Nintendo's headquarters in Kyoto, Japan, and was shown the Wii by legendary game designer Shigeru Miyamoto. The reporter was especially impressed with the Wii's controller. 'It's part laser pointer and part motion sensor, so it knows where you're aiming it, when and how fast you move it and how far it is from the TV screen ... There's a strong whiff of voodoo about it.'" Update: 05/08 16:50 GMT by Z : Ran into a registration screen when I tried for the original article, but eldavojohn had more luck than I. The original Time article is available for reading.

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The Article for the Article (5, Interesting)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286016)

I don't really care for coverage of coverage of a device.

For those of you who wish to read the original Time Article [time.com] I was able to read every page without a log in. Why that wasn't linked in the story, I'm not sure.

Unlike the hollow Gamespot article, this one offers a much more thorough and deeper look into games such as:
Video games are an unusual medium in that they carry a heavy stigma among nongamers. Not everybody likes ballet, but most nonballet fans don't accuse ballet of leading to violent crime and mental backwardness. Video games aren't so lucky. There's a sharp divide between gamers and nongamers, and the result is a market that, while large and devoted--last year video-game software and hardware brought in $27 billion--is also deeply stagnant. Its borders are sharply defined, and they're not expanding.
And:
Of course, hardware is only half the picture. The other half is the games themselves. "We created a task force internally at Nintendo," Iwata says, "whose objective was to come up with games that would attract people who don't play games." Last year they set out to design a game for the elderly. Amazingly, they succeeded. Brain Age is a set of electronic puzzles (including Sudoku) that purports to keep aging minds nimble. It was released for one of Nintendo's portable platforms, the Nintendo DS, last year. So far, it has sold 2 million copies, many of them to people who had never bought a game before.
There's a lot of good original information inside that article that Gamespot doesn't seem to think is interesting.

Frankly, I enjoy the idea of the controller changing. I feel that the industry has been plagued with bad hardware and also the fear to step away from the norm. The name and design of this system both do that ... although it may introduce a risk of failure, it sure is a breath of fresh air.

I feel similarly about the music industry and that's why enjoy bands like the Arcade Fire that introduce instruments like the accordion with straight rock music to escape the guitar + bass + drums = band template. I like to think of myself as open-minded and I'll remain that way until I can experience the Wii first hand.

Furthermore, I'm shocked that Slashdot had the courage to post something that wasn't only making fun of the Wii for it's name! Could it be that we're actually going to get to read about its performance and abilities instead of just griping about its poor name choice? That's outlandish!

Re:The Article for the Article (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15286091)

*cough* Karma whore *cough*

Hit all the big karma whoring points, too.

Re:The Article for the Article (0, Flamebait)

DrunkenTerror (561616) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286164)

Dude's linking to the fucking article I was about to go search for after looking at that BS Gamespot piece. I think you're just jealous you didn't link it first. Fuck off, AC troll.

Re:The Article for the Article (3, Insightful)

bunions (970377) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286163)

"Frankly, I enjoy the idea of the controller changing."

You got that right. The controller is completely central to gameplay, and it has undergone essentially zero changes since the PS1, and only evolutionary changes since the original NES. One or more Dpads, optional analog sticks, and 2 or more buttons.

The controller defines what games you can play. I think we can all agree that Street Fighter 2 was a good game. But it was impossible to implement in any reasonble way on any machine except the SNES, because the SNES was the only machine with enough buttons.

I am really looking forward to FPS games on a console that doesn't use the /incredibly/ awkward dual-stick control scheme.

Re:The Article for the Article (1, Interesting)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286358)

Well, first of all, there was a 6 button controller for the Genesis, specifically for games like SF and Mortal Kombat. I had Mortal Kombat for the GameGear. While it only had 2 buttons, the game was still playable. I think the way controllers have gone recently, cramming more and more buttons into the controller is the wrong way to go about things. We've even gotten to the point of having buttons under the analog sticks. Eventually, console gamepads will end up looking like this [alphagrips.com] . Of the current generation (xbox, ps2, GC), I like the GC controller the most, because the buttons are easy to press, and don't all feel the same. Also, they didn't put tons of excess buttons. Most games don't have problems. The programmers just have to learn that they can do without 14 buttons.

Re:The Article for the Article (1)

bunions (970377) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286456)

"Well, first of all, there was a 6 button controller for the Genesis"

Right, but it was aftermarket.

I generally agree with you, although I think the trigger buttons and shoulder buttons are totally natural. My biggest beef lies with the 2x2 matrix of buttons on the dualshock. It's easy to put your thumb in the wrong place. Look at fighter joysticks - that's good button placement.

Re:The Article for the Article (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286627)

Yeah, the shoulder buttons are natural. Except with the dual shock, where there is dual shoulder buttons. The GC is the best again, because your the shoulder buttons have nice grooves to rest your fingers. I think there's a nice balance between 2 buttons and 14. The GC is nice because in most games you're pressing 1 button, at least 75% of the time, so it makes sense that this button is big, and that the other buttons are located around the outside of this button, and in easy reach.

Re:The Article for the Article (1)

voice_of_all_reason (926702) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286434)

You got that right. The controller is completely central to gameplay, and it has undergone essentially zero changes since the PS1

Sometimes things are just plain fine for awile and don't really need any adjusting. The bicycle has had the same design for at least the last 50 years. Would you be willing to try one from a company that decided to be "innovative" and rotate the handlebars 180 degrees?

Re:The Article for the Article (2, Insightful)

bunions (970377) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286505)

hand a dualshock to someone who hasn't played a lot of videogames and ask them to play Halo. It's incredibly awkward. You only think it's ok because you're used to it.

Re:The Article for the Article (5, Funny)

apparently (756613) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286795)

hand a dualshock to someone who hasn't played a lot of videogames and ask them to play Halo. It's incredibly awkward. You only think it's ok because you're used to it. I'm not an expert, but the awkwardness you speak of might be due to the individual trying to plug a dualshock into their X-Box.

Re:The Article for the Article (1)

bunions (970377) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286864)

"I'm not an expert, but the awkwardness you speak of might be due to the individual trying to plug a dualshock into their X-Box."

Oh goddammit. :(

you know what I mean, ok?

Re:The Article for the Article (1)

The_Real_Quaid (892126) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286985)

I'm not an expert, but the awkwardness you speak of might be due to the individual trying to plug a dualshock into their X-Box.

Dualshock -> Xbox adapter. [jandaman.com]

/the more you know...

Re:The Article for the Article (2, Interesting)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286521)

Actually, the classic diamond frame bicycle came into being in the 1890s or so. Since then we have developed many different kinds of recumbent bicycle which are on totally different layouts. Some use handlebars in front of the rider, while some are under the seat. Some of them even put the pedals above the level of the hips, for aerodynamics reasons. So, no, you're wrong. The bicycle has changed, and significantly, in the last fifty years.

Re:The Article for the Article (0, Troll)

voice_of_all_reason (926702) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286637)

I beleive you are referring to the things that handicapped riders use in bike races. These are 1) designed to fulfill a specific need, and 2) relatively rare compared to regular bycicles.

Re:The Article for the Article (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286736)

I believe you don't know very much about recumbent bicycles. Easy Racers [easyracers.com] is probably the first place you ought to look, they've taken one or two human-powered land speed records. This website [bikeroute.com] seems to have some other stuff, they were just a top google hit for "recumbent bicycle". They seem to have the handicapped products available, as well. Cycle Genius [cyclegenius.com] has a few different layouts. Linear Recumbent [linearrecumbent.com] has several recumbents based on an unusual backbone design, and their bikes use underseat steering. Finally, for some other wacky recumbents, see Angle Tech [angletechcycles.com] . There's even more weirdness available out there, but this is a pretty comprehensive set of examples.

Re:The Article for the Article (1)

fossa (212602) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286821)

Um, recumbents offer many advantages over the traditional diamond bicycle are are probably not what you are thinking of. Unfortunately, recumbent bicycles are banned from most competitions [wikipedia.org] . I don't know too much about them and have never ridden one, but my avid cyclist cousin says you can put more power into the pedal stroke, and they have obvious aerodynamic advantages..

Re:The Article for the Article (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286939)

At the same time, they also have many disadvantages. When driving in traffic, you are much lower, and much less visible to drivers. It's also much harder to see what's going on around you. Also, unless you have suspension, going over bumps is uncomfortable. On a regular bike, you can stand up away from the seat when travelling over bumps. Also, they tend to be more expensive than an equivalent quality upright bike, because of the lower production numbers. I'm sure there's other disadvantages to having them that I haven't thought of too.

Re:The Article for the Article (1)

lgw (121541) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286851)

No, he's talking about recumbent bikes [wikipedia.org] . They kick butt on the track. The aerodynamics are much improved, because your cross-section is so much smaller, plus you can add a wind shell/fairing (which makes a massive difference). Also, your power on a normal bike is mostly limited by gravity (you can get a little help by pulling of with the off-leg, but it doesn't add up to much). On a some recumbent bike designs you have a back-rest, and your power is limited only by the traction of the wheel.

It's a substantially superior design for the track. On the street it's just about pointless because it's just too hard to see where you're going, it's hard to tun 90 degree corners, and it's annoying to stop.

Re:The Article for the Article (1)

joshsisk (161347) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286859)

There are significant variety of "regular" bicycles. Fixed-gear, single gear, dirt, road, race bikes all have different designs and elements. Bicycle technology has come a long way... different breaking systems, shock absorbers, gear systems, etc. You might want to look here [wikipedia.org] and here [wikipedia.org] .

Re:The Article for the Article (1)

The_Real_Quaid (892126) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286600)

"Sometimes things are just plain fine for awile and don't really need any adjusting. The bicycle has had the same design for at least the last 50 years. Would you be willing to try one from a company that decided to be "innovative" and rotate the handlebars 180 degrees?"

You know what would be cool? If someone took the just fine bicycle design, and added some innovation, like say a combustion engine, so that the bicycle could go really fast and you wouldn't have to pedal. Now that would be cool. I hope someone makes something like that someday.

No, nevermind. The bicycle is "just fine". Innovation is teh dumb.

Re:The Article for the Article (4, Insightful)

DingerX (847589) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286329)

Bah, "courage to post something that wasn't only making fun of the Wii for its name"? Huh? There are enough rabid Nintendo fans around here that they couldn't let a Time article escape.

And yeah, the article is well written and full of smart observations. One of my favorites:
"[Wii] was unimaginable for them," Iwata says. "And because it was unimaginable, they could not say that they wanted it. If you are simply listening to requests from the customer, you can satisfy their needs, but you can never surprise them. Sony and Microsoft make daily-necessity kinds of things. They have to listen to the needs of the customers and try to comply with their requests. That kind of approach has been deeply ingrained in their minds."

I don't agree with Iwata on many things, but customers don't give you your vision. You present it to them, and they either buy it or they don't.

FP (-1, Offtopic)

Demerol (306753) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286020)

omfgownedbecausewiisuckscockjustlikegamecube wii reviews [meatspin.com]

Re:FP (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15286090)

You really need to think of better ways to spend your time. Maybe growing up would be a good place to start.

Re:FP (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15286101)

ugh! Remind me to check the URL before clicking from now on.

-1 Obvious Joke (5, Funny)

rAiNsT0rm (877553) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286031)

"Time Magazine reports how it feels to play with the Wii. Overall it's a very enthusiastic review."

Re:-1 Obvious Joke (1)

twofidyKidd (615722) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286693)

"Sales are expected to be strong with college-freshmen males who are looking for an excuse to invite females over to play with their Wii."

I got to play with Wii this weekend (-1, Troll)

Demerol (306753) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286057)

I was playing at the local park and a man pulled up in a white van without any windows and was offering free candy. Suffice it to say, I entered the van and got my first taste of wii.

My predictions. (4, Insightful)

GundamFan (848341) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286108)

It will be cheap to produce, have enough power to run games slightly more advanced than the Gamecube, those games will include a number of rehashed titles and the controler design is going to lead to an endless stream of "optional" attachments (somtimes bundled) to even play a big chunk of the new titles.

I don't mean to sound negative but I don't see Nintendo changing it's stripes any time soon...

You know what? Wii (we) are all going to gobble it up this time just like the last two systems.

Mod parent whiny /.er (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15286276)

That's cute. I guess I could have made some ever-so-popular-on-Slashdot negative comments about Wii, but I was too busy reading the Time article. And if you'll read it, it really does sound exciting. But you're above being excited, I'm sure.

Re:My predictions. (1)

kisrael (134664) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286466)

Yeah, I'm not crazy about the whole optional attachments thing (since they tend to be undersupported...like the Sony multitaps) but I don't regret being mostly a Nintendo fanboy for the last two generations at all, but maybe that's just because of my bias towards multiplayer games...

Re:My predictions. (1)

GundamFan (848341) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286599)

That is really my point. The "fanboys" will be happy and Nintendo will expand there market, I just don't see them inovating in the game department which is what really has me worried. I don't think it will be as bad as selling the exact same game (Wave Race had no substantial new content) on a next-gen system (the download service should prevent that) but untill the games are on the shelves we won't know.

Re:My predictions. (1)

kisrael (134664) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286694)

Well, "Eye Toy" and Katamari Damacy are the only things I've said to myself "damn...Nintendo should have had that", given their attempt to reach out to beyond the choir.

And now with the controllers, there's obviously a load of potential there. Will it be fun? Too tiring? Gimmicky? THATS the $64,000 question

Re:My predictions. (1, Flamebait)

B0red At W0rk (876713) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286635)

Not me. I have a GC but I'm done rooting for the underdog and missing out on great games. Letting petty market share fanboy wars influence one's decisions is a sure way to get screwed. I can't believe how much denial there is in the Nintendo threads here. It's exctly the same as when the Sega system was dying. As far as I'm concerned, Nintendo is dead.

Re:My predictions. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15286886)

The odd thing is that Nintendo support among the Hard-Core gaming crowd is at a high that hasn't been seen since before the N64 launched; it doesn't matter whether you are on a PS2 fansite or TeamXBox every announcement about the Wii or DS is highly anticipated and analysed. Every (reasonably intelligent) gamer I have talked to is ready to admit that the Wii's controller is unique enough (and has enough added functionality) that Nintendo could regain control of the industry from this product; it all depends on how well developers take advantage of the controller.

Even the negativity that exploded with the announcement of "Wii" shows the massive strength of this product for a couple of reasons. It demonstrates that a lot of people care enough about the product that the name is very important to them (something NGage and Gizmodo didn't have), and peoples comments were very positive about potential sales; most comments involved things like "When I'm buying the system ..." or "When I invite my friends to play my system ...".

All in all, I think Nintendo is in as strong of a postition as they can be; the Nintendo DS has a rapidly growing (massive for it's age) userbase, and the GBA is still a widely supported platform; the Wii has way more potential than the DS, has much more fan support then the DS had at this point in its life, and the DS is one of the fastest selling systems in history.

Re:My predictions. (1)

joshsisk (161347) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286918)

Not me. I have a GC but I'm done rooting for the underdog and missing out on great games.

Why don't you just buy more than one system if you like more than one? They all have great games. It's not about rooting for the underdog, it's about playing games you like. Buy whatever system(s) that have the games you want to play.

Re:My predictions. (0, Offtopic)

Turken (139591) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286865)

"I don't mean to sound negative but I don't see Nintendo changing it's stripes any time soon..."

And why should they, since they are the only video game company (or company division) that seems capable of making a profit? Every single "prediction" that you made also represents a sound business decision.

Just because "cater to every fanboy whim, and do it for free" isn't on the list, you assume the system is inferior and doomed?

Link to Time article. (2, Informative)

ZombieRoboNinja (905329) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286109)

Kinda dumb to link a Gamespot article about the Time article, rather than the Time article itself, if you ask me.

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1 191861,00.html [time.com]

Re:Link to Time article. (1, Funny)

steveo777 (183629) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286442)

The dupe will be here in a few hours. Why did you spoil it?

hehehehe...voodoo... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15286139)

There's a strong whiff of voodoo about it.

Hehehehe...Oh, wait, it's a 'v'...

A couple weeks later... (3, Insightful)

Synesthesiatic (679680) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286154)

Am I the only initial detractor who's actually getting used to the name? At first I thought it was awful, but it's sort of growing on me. And now that the press has gotten over the cheap jokes it looks like they're starting to take the device seriously as well. It may not be the best name in history, but now I don't think that the name is bad enough to sink the console, at least.

Re:A couple weeks later... (2, Interesting)

Plaid Phantom (818438) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286193)

I'm getting used to it. I'd have to, to own one (which I will). It's liking it that I refuse to do.

Re:A couple weeks later... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15286340)

don't you mean "wiil"?

Re:A couple weeks later... (4, Funny)

b1t r0t (216468) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286203)

I deal with it by calling it the "Wii-volution".

Re:A couple weeks later... (2, Funny)

egarff (242535) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286256)

I deal with it by calling it the "Wii-volution".
Barbara Walters?? Is that you?

Hey, Wii ain't that bad. (1)

Rachel Lucid (964267) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286245)

It beats some of the other names they're tossing at us... Origami, anyone?

Re:A couple weeks later... (2, Funny)

Rude Turnip (49495) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286283)

"...but it's sort of growing on me."

The jokes practically write themselves :)

Re:A couple weeks later... (3, Interesting)

tukkayoot (528280) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286337)

I'm getting used to it, but you know, it makes it difficult for me to enthusiastically talk to my friends about the system. I anticipate the eye-rolling and dismissive snorts every time I think to say something like "Hey, have you heard about Nintendo's Wii?" or "Nintendo is unveiling the Wii on Tuesday!"

I know it the name is supposed to appeal to the non-hardcore gaming population, but all of my coworkers (who own video game consoles, but I would not call any of them really hardcore gamers) think the name is stupid and embarassing. So does my girlfriend. My mom and sister think it's silly. Just who is this name supposed to appeal to, because nobody I know personally likes it.

Will I get used to the name? Probably. Do I like having to double-check and rephrase everything I'm about to say about the console so it doesn't sound like a 2nd grader's penis joke? Not really.

I can't wait for tomorrow so there will be something to actually talk and think about regarding the new console besides its horrible name.

Re:A couple weeks later... (1)

the dark hero (971268) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286344)

I've been calling it "The Wii" for that past few days now. It just rolls off the tounge. Well, if anything it's easier to say than PS3 or 360.

Re:A couple weeks later... (3, Insightful)

forkazoo (138186) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286377)

Am I the only initial detractor who's actually getting used to the name? At first I thought it was awful, but it's sort of growing on me. And now that the press has gotten over the cheap jokes it looks like they're starting to take the device seriously as well. It may not be the best name in history, but now I don't think that the name is bad enough to sink the console, at least.

Now, you aren't the only one. I think it may turn out to have been a brilliant name for Nintendo. They get a *massive* media blitz covering the name, without having to actually do anything. Very shortly, everybody gets bored of the one or two jokes that are possible in the local language, but has still heard the name a lot. So, because they hard the name so much during the initial name-calling, people just get used to the name.

I do think that parents will still feel a bit silly, when they go into the store to ask for a Wii. But, I'm not sure that silly is bad. You get a Wii, feel a bit silly, and then get some game where purple migit puppy aliens dance in tune to your swinging a remote around or something. You feel a bit silly playing the game, just like you did buying the Wii. So much of the industry is so focused on being uber-Hardcore that a little bit of feeling silly in some key markets may be very good for Nintendo.

Re:A couple weeks later... (1)

Zwets (645911) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286946)

...feeling silly in some key markets...
That is quite probably the best use of marketing lingo I have ever seen. I tip my hat to you, sir! ;-)

Re:A couple weeks later... (1)

SetupWeasel (54062) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286993)

I do think that parents will still feel a bit silly, when they go into the store to ask for a Wii. But, I'm not sure that silly is bad.

Most non-gamer parents feel silly asking for a PlayStation. Imagine a parent trying to get their kid [em]-eNCHANT-aRM. All games are ridiculous to those who don't play.

Re:A couple weeks later... (1)

Council (514577) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286496)

Am I the only initial detractor who's actually getting used to the name? At first I thought it was awful, but it's sort of growing on me.

As someone's sig recently remarked, asking us programmers to name a console/flagship app is about as intelligent as asking the marketing guys to program it.

It sounded ridiculous to me, too. But I think they might know what they're doing.

Generally, people get used to absolutely ridiculous names. I'm reminded of a Boondocks strip, where Huey calls up Puff Daddy's studio and asks to talk to him, and the receptionist refuses to let Huey talk to him because Huey refuses to say "P. Diddy". The receptionist points out, "Well, when you think about it, it's no less stupid than 'Puff Daddy'." Touch&#eaccent, receptionist.

Similarly, I recently made a friend who is honestly named 'Muffin'. It was really weird at first, but I quickly got used to it. Ditto for my friends Lyric and Kestrel. Ditto for "The Empire Strikes Back". Names are labels, and they soon lose previous association and just become associated with the thing itself.

Re:A couple weeks later... (1)

Randle_Revar (229304) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286507)

Well, I still don't like it, but I am getting used to it. In my head I still call it the Revolution. It's just like SeaMonkey (formerly Mozilla) and Vista (Longhorn). Internally, I still use the old name for them, but I generally use the official name when talking to other people. And when I do I am not particularly bothered by the name.

I hate console games... (3, Insightful)

dlc3007 (570880) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286158)

... and I'm probably going to run out and get this one. I have no idea how much I'll actually play it, but it looks too interesting to pass up.

Not flamebait... (1)

dividedsky319 (907852) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286427)

Hmm... I don't understand why this was modded down as flamebait. It's a legitimate comment.

Aerobics (3, Insightful)

obsidian.ten (944782) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286159)

Is anyone else worried that this system will just be too darn aerobic? It's not that I'm against moving around, but is that what we want from a video game system? The time article mentions that the reporter had to take off his jacket to play the system, and numerous E3 technicians have commented on the aerobic natures of the games playable at the expo. Why break down a barrier with the controller, only to raise another one by making people move around to play a game?

Re:Aerobics (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15286195)

Are you american?

Re:Aerobics (1)

obsidian.ten (944782) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286829)

Yes, and I'm also a big Wii suporter. Just food for thought.

Re:Aerobics (5, Insightful)

oahazmatt (868057) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286230)

Why break down a barrier with the controller, only to raise another one by making people move around to play a game?

It's called "exercise". If Nintendo creates a really interesting video game that little Bobby exerts himself on, drops a few unnecessary pounds and increases his cardio-vascular system, how is this a bad thing? This is not raising another barrier, but adding another challenge to a game. Instead of finding the blue key, the player has to burn another 5 calories.

Don't get me wrong, I'm sure one or two children will throw fits and go back to their "easier" consoles that don't require more than a flipping of a thumb, but the Dance Dance Revolution crowd alone has proved that there is a following for this time of system, and that children have a natural energy the Wii can assist in depleting before bedtime.

Re:Aerobics (1)

secolactico (519805) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286455)

Actually, when I first heard about this new controller my first tought was: "How long until somebody with a disability sues for discrimination".

Of course, I tend to have a fatalist outlook sometimes.

Re:Aerobics (1)

oahazmatt (868057) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286645)

Actually the game is not that discriminatory in that there are apparently many games that you can play one-handed. A local Wal-Mart employee, who lost an arm in an auto accident, is anxiously awaiting this system for the fact that he does not need to use any sort of modified controller.

Re:Aerobics (1)

voice_of_all_reason (926702) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286510)

If Nintendo creates a really interesting video game that little Bobby exerts himself on, drops a few unnecessary pounds and increases his cardio-vascular system, how is this a bad thing?

Because Billy, Tommy, and Frankie might not take to it. Nintendo's whole opinion on the matter seems to be "If you like it so far, just wait and see what else we can do!. If not, fuck you."

We've actually done studies in this country that show people will sometimes resign themselves to a so-so tv show if the remote control is missing rather than get up and change channels until they find something better. This is not a viable business strategy.

Re:Aerobics (4, Insightful)

Absolut187 (816431) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286587)

Granted, many people will be too lazy to play if it requires any exertion, but that does not mean it cannot be a viable business strategy.

Soloflex is still in business. They don't care if you use your machine or not, as long as you buy one.

I bet a lot of parents buy this BECAUSE it will be marketed as helping their obese kids lose some fat.

Re:Aerobics (1)

voice_of_all_reason (926702) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286785)

Quite a good point, actually. I hadn't thought of that.

Re:Aerobics (1)

wilbz (842093) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286731)

But if there is one motion most lazy people are used to, it's pointing. "Hey, bring me that!" "Put that over there!" "Bring me the thing, and put it right here"

Most people who are going to enjoy themselves will be gesturing all over the place, but the sensitivity on the controller should be high enough that the lazier people should be able to do the same with minimal adjustment.

Re:Aerobics (1)

The_Real_Quaid (892126) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286860)

Nintendo's whole opinion on the matter seems to be "If you like it so far, just wait and see what else we can do!. If not, fuck you."

It's a good philosophy, I wish more people would follow it. It leads to innovation, rather than being a slave to a small core of loud whiny people with no imagination.


We've actually done studies in this country that show people will sometimes resign themselves to a so-so tv show if the remote control is missing rather than get up and change channels until they find something better.

TV shows don't cost $400+. Any such study is irrelevant.

Re:Aerobics (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15286266)

You say that as if doing anything besides sitting in your beanbag chair would be unacceptable in a gaming system.

Re:Aerobics (1)

bynary (827120) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286335)

The DDR games don't seem to have suffered from being "too darn aerobic".

Re:Aerobics (1)

bunions (970377) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286353)

Why break down a barrier with the controller, only to raise another one by making people move around to play a game?

Yeah, I'm guessing (and hoping) that waving a goddamn stick around for an hour doesn't really raise a significant barrier for a significant amount of people.

Re:Aerobics (4, Informative)

voice_of_all_reason (926702) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286567)

I was in ROTC in college for a semester. You'd be surprised how tiring an otherwise easy motion can be when repeated. The best example I can think of is "cherry-pickers." You stand feet-apart, arms held up at shoulder-height. Lock your four fingers together and clap them against your thumbs while keeping your arms up. It's real easy at first but gets very difficult as time goes on.

We're used to button-pressing because alot of other devices require the same movement. We've adapted. Suddenly throwing in a new, repetetive movement that you like enough to perform for hours on end might just be interesting.

Re:Aerobics (1)

mikeisme77 (938209) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286732)

Is it a bad thing if people have to take a rest every hour (or few hours)? I see that as a good thing as it'll help people "addicted" to a particular game do something else (for at least a few minutes). I'll admit that I've had that "game addiction" in the past where I've stayed up for more hours than I should have trying to beat a game/boss/whatever. Taking a rest probably would have been beneficial. And any added excercise is also bound to be beneficial. But really... who cares about all that? What matters is whether or not the games will be more fun/open new possibilities because of the new controller. I think it will.

Re:Aerobics (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15286787)

C'mon. If you can move around enough to play with your wee (and let's face it, you're a /.er), you can move around enough to play with your Wii.

I just hope they never use that in an ad campaign.

Wouldn't that be.... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15286176)

"First Look at Uss" ?

Re:Wouldn't that be.... (1)

UbuntuDupe (970646) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286488)

Clever, but it didn't get me [slashdot.org] any karma either. In fact, it lost me some, because while I kept getting modded up to 5, all of those moddings were for "funny", which doesn't help karma, while I got modded down for "overrated", which hurts karma. Someone needs to fix that. Getting modded up to 5 for funny shouldn't hurt your karma.

That said, I think a great way of protesting the name would be to refer to it as the "Uus" in the accusative case. Example: "The Wii is a great system. I want to buy an Uus."

Re:Wouldn't that be.... (1)

Turken (139591) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287009)

You may be desperate, but must you really announce to the whole world that you want to buy some "anUss" ?

Please, for the sake of the games, we really don't need yet another round of lame toilet jokes.

surprise surprise (1)

zeronitro (937642) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286250)

and without hesitation or thought the hardcore flamers launch into a barrage of ignorant and cliche remarks. it makes sense. they follow the same cliche xbox and ps mold for doing the same thing countless times. come on guys... you can at least try to be original. oh, you can also wait until you've played the system yourself or you might have to eat your flaming words (take whatever way you will).

Wii will work.. (5, Informative)

saboola (655522) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286317)

Just this weekend I introduced my young niece to Mario Kart. The first thing she tried to do was move the controller around in the air to drive. It's the most natural form of control, and I think people will realise that once again when it launches in the fall. I am really looking forward to it.

Re:Wii will work.. (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286486)

But the other end of the stick is that people can adapt to any type of control scheme. I was playing Mario Kart Double Dash on the weekend, and just for kicks I fliped my controller around so that the stick was in my right hand, and upside down, and the buttons were under my left thumb. I only did a couple races this way, but I still didn't do that bad. I imagine with the right practice, I could probably get to the point where I could beat the game like this.

Re:Wii will work.. (2, Insightful)

AlexanderDitto (972695) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286554)

I don't think the point is that we can adapt to it: nay, it is that we don't need to. Who here doesn't instinctivly lean when going through a sharp turn in a racing game, or make motions with their controler when playing any game? I know I'm guilty of it, and I think the fact that the Wii will actually respond to these sort of instinctive physical movements is just awesome.

Re:Wii will work.. (2, Interesting)

voice_of_all_reason (926702) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286604)

Except when you:

1) drop it, causing the car to do something completely unintentional
2) shift position (I often change from sitting up/lying down multiple times during a gaming session)
3) have trouble initially calibrating it (anyone who's ever played a space combat sim knows about "shopping cart wheel syndrome")
4) damage it (it may prove to be useless if you can't turn off the motion-sensor) 5) try to play in motion (isn't a big selling point of GB that you can play in the car/on a plane?)

Re:Wii will work.. (1)

sehryan (412731) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286837)

1) Can happen with a "standard" controller.
2) Got to give you that one, though I usually move in the breaks, like cut scenes, and not during gameplay.
3) No one knows what you are going to have to do to calibrate it, if anything. So this one is on hold.
4) Can happen with a "standard" contoller.
5) The Wii isn't a portable device, so you should never be in motion. And if you are, then assumably the sensors and tv will be as well, at the same rate, making it all relative, or more to the point, irrelevant.

Re:Wii will work.. (1)

Valdrax (32670) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286928)

5) try to play in motion (isn't a big selling point of GB that you can play in the car/on a plane?)

*blink blink* Ummm.... I'd be more worried about hooking up the power and video input cables on a car or plane than the motion of the controller.

Re:Wii will work.. (1)

AlexanderDitto (972695) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286931)

1. Because when you drop your controler during a NORMAL game, your player doesn't do something totally unintentional. This thing's not going to be coated in butter, you know.
2. You'll learn to adapt, learn what will register the motion sensors, and how you can move around while keeping the thing steady. I'm sure that if you're in a tense situation where you need precision and accuracy, making a sudden decision to sit up might not be a good idea.
3. I'm guessing Nintendo's already worked on this, especially if they're marketing towards older people and girls. People won't play it if it's hard to set up, and Nintendo knows this, for sure. Give them some credit.
4. Like a damaged controler on any other machine is good for anything? I know that I've accidentally pulled the cord on one of my Playstation controllers a bit too far, and now the thing doesn't work. What am I going to use it for, making pasta? Same goes for the Wii.
5. You're going to play a console in a car? I'm not sure that's entirely safe. Keep your eyes on the road, Sir, not on your in-car television screen.

how far it is from the TV screen... (2, Interesting)

pubjames (468013) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286379)

I can understand how motion sensors can tell the angle of tilt of the controller, but would someone explain to me how the controller knows "how far it is from the TV screen"?

Or does it know how far it is away from the console? I can understand that - perhaps the controller gives out a signal that the console can detect, for instance.

Re:how far it is from the TV screen... (4, Informative)

Gr33nNight (679837) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286448)

It comes with two sensors that you place on the top corners of your TV. This is how it detects how far away it is. According to reports they tested damn near all types of TVs on the market and even projection screens.

External sensor (1)

pjcreath (513472) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286501)

Rumors say [ign.com] that there's a horizontal rod that you place just near your TV that does the spatial detection. We'll know more tomorrow.

Re:how far it is from the TV screen... (1)

notea42 (926633) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286520)

The sensors inside can detect relative motion, so it can figure out if it's been moved and roughly how far. I got the impression the sensors on the TV were more to figure out which part of the screen you were pointing at.

Re:how far it is from the TV screen... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15286557)

The system works just like GPS.

The little signal generators that you put on the sides of your TV, will output a signal that is a function of time. This is really easy to do with some Linear Feedback Shift Registers( LFSR).

The remote has a clock and listens to each signal. It is then able to tell the time difference from the controller to the little signal generators.

Distance = Speed of Light/ time

and so we have the distance from each of the little signal generator boxes. a little triangulation and you know where you are with respect to the little signal generators.

Smells like... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15286431)

"There's a strong whiff of voodoo about it."

Stay away from the voodoo!!!

Controller Life (0, Flamebait)

KingBraden (959219) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286514)

I predict the average Wii controller will last 13 days before falling apart from: 1)Upset gamers throwing it against the wall, 2) old people trying to use it as a remote, getting upset and shaking it, 3) being left out and stepped on. Why is this damage worse on the wii controller? Because it has a motion sensor which requires sensitivity.

What?! (4, Insightful)

Tranvisor (250175) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286642)

Have you forgotten who is making this device? This is Nintendo, the king of making robust pieces of technology that can withstand a beating. Everything I've had of theirs' has been crazy hard to break. Heck my old SNES still works fine, can anybody at all say the same thing about their old PS1?

we've all been there (5, Insightful)

dlc3007 (570880) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286629)

You know you've done it. You've sitting in front of your computer or console, playing a driving sim. Without thinking, you find yourself leaning into a turn as you try to hold your line.
You're playing a FPS when suddenly, a zombie/mutant/demon/something jumps from around the corner. You instinctively duck in your chair as you jerk your char out of the way and unload a few shots.
Potentially, Nintendo has created the most intuitive, natural interface with a video game since the joystick. Well, at least it is the first new video game interface since the joystick.
Personally, I hate console games. I get bored after minutes of play and haven't purchased one since the NES (yes, the first one). Even so, I think I'll likely be getting one of these. I'm not crazy enough to camp for one, but I can see buying one. Interesting interface > same crap with better resolution.

Define "we" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15287036)

You know you've done it. You've sitting in front of your computer or console, playing a driving sim. Without thinking, you find yourself leaning into a turn as you try to hold your line.


Yes, there was always that one idiot who'd tilt the controller, or god help us, his whole damned body trying to powerslide around in Mario Kart. He usually got the Stupid bitch-slapped out of him by whichever unfortunate bastard was to his immediate left, right, or both.

Ditching the stigma of "gaming = loser" is hard enough without having the person beside you twitching and gimping about the room like a trout on amphetamines.

Next-Generation Gameplay (4, Insightful)

The_Real_Quaid (892126) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286682)

Wii is the only true next-generation system, as it is the only one with a controller that allows next-generation gameplay. The other systems have lots of power but it is wasted on last-generation gameplay.

Wii also offers last-gen gameplay in the form of the classic download service, but for new games it's time to move on to next-gen gameplay.

The best part of the Time article:

It's a remarkable experience. Instead of passively playing the games, with the new controller you physically perform them. You act them out. It's almost like theater: the fourth wall between game and player dissolves. The sense of immersion-the illusion that you, personally, are projected into the game world-is powerful. And there's an instant party atmosphere in the room. One advantage of the new controller is that it not only is fun, it looks fun. When you play with an old-style controller, you look like a loser, a blank-eyed joystick fondler. But when you're jumping around and shaking your hulamaker, everybody's having a good time.

After getting a tate of next-generation gameplay, everything else seems old and busted.

You don't want to be a blank-eyed joystick fondler, do you?

Re:Next-Generation Gameplay (1)

Gleng (537516) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286979)

Ooh, imagine Punch Out with a controller in each hand. :)

Can't... resist... tasteless... joke... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15286986)

You don't want to be a blank-eyed joystick fondler, do you?

Well, they DO say that it'll make you go blind, but (*waves hand in front of face*) so far so good.

Had this on my Wii site long time ago... (-1, Troll)

BTWR (540147) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286711)

Sigh. And, my /. article was rejected. Anyway, if you want to discuss Wii and Nintendo products with a small group of Nintendo fans, come to The Wii Talk! [thewiitalk.com]

Wii and violence (3, Funny)

scolby (838499) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286763)

So how long before Jack Thompson jumps on Wii? After all, swinging the control to fight with a sword seems like a much easier way to learn violent behavior than just pushing buttons. And just think how much more intuitive the Hot Coffe mod would've been with this thing...

Nintendo gets it (5, Insightful)

Vesuvias (584893) | more than 8 years ago | (#15286903)

But the name Wii not wii-thstanding, Nintendo has grasped two important notions that have eluded its competitors. The first is, Don't listen to your customers. The hard-core gaming community is extremely vocal--they blog a lot--but if Nintendo kept listening to them, hard-core gamers would be the only audience it ever had. "[Wii] was unimaginable for them," Iwata says. "And because it was unimaginable, they could not say that they wanted it. If you are simply listening to requests from the customer, you can satisfy their needs, but you can never surprise them. Sony and Microsoft make daily-necessity kinds of things. They have to listen to the needs of the customers and try to comply with their requests. That kind of approach has been deeply ingrained in their minds."


Finally a company gets it. Do not listen to the hardcore audience as they have absolutly no basis in reality (they have likely spent more time in virtual reality than actual reality for last couple years). Hardcore gamers spend so much time playing games they really can't think outside of the "these games are too short and too easy for my leet skillz" box. Games do not need to be harder to play or interface with. Games just need to be fun. Swinging a virtual sword, pump faking a virtual football and swating a virtual fly all seem like fun to me. I will gladly trade the hardcore "games are not fun unless you WORK for the accomplishment" attitude for this "new" idea of having fun while I acutally "play" a video game.

Ves
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