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Vendor Pays OSS Developers for Enterprise Support

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 8 years ago | from the hard-niche-to-fill dept.

73

Anonymous Coward writes "eWeek is reporting that a company called OpenLogic is paying qualified experts in the open-source community to provide enterprise support for projects they are intimately familiar with. OpenLogic calls its new initiative its Expert Community program."

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Slashvertisement? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15287461)

What's the point of this then?

NOT paying. (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15287493)

the article is incorrect. they DO NOT PAY.
QUOTE :
OpenLogic is looking for the best and brightest open source developers to join the OpenLogic Expert Community. As a thank you for their time, Open Logic Expert Community members can earn points redeemable for rewards in the OpenLogic Rewards program. Learn more about the OpenLogic Expert Community and the OpenLogic Rewards program.

Are you sure? (2, Informative)

Kelson (129150) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287539)

From the OpenLogic Community FAQ [openlogic.com] :

Do I get paid to be a part of the Expert Community?
Yes, the OpenLogic Rewards program pays Expert Community members upon successful resolution of an incident. OpenLogic charges enterprise for support. OpenLogic's internal technical support team resolves basic issues. OpenLogic, in turn, contracts with members of the community to resolve more complex issues.

Re:Are you sure? (4, Insightful)

AuMatar (183847) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287602)

They get paid in points which, supposedly, can be cashed in for cash and prizes. So can tickets I win at the local skee-ball arcade, but I don't expect to make a living there either. I couldn't find a public list of how much various items cost in points, what the turn around time for cashing in points is, or even what items are available (other than the Xbox 360). Also, it looks like they get a fixed amount of points by severity, rather than based on the difficulty of the problem. This means the more difficult problems will be actively avoided, as the pay/hr is not worth it. I'd be seriously concerned about all of that if I was considering signing up. Of course, I rather doubt I have committer access on any of the projects they're looking for anyway.

On a side note- anyone else find it amusing that the big reward they're pimping out is an MS product?

Pls, Mod parent UP. (1)

dietrollemdefender (970664) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287698)

Yes, sir!

Re:Are you sure? (1, Flamebait)

Homology (639438) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287745)

Common, dude! This is nothing less than a transparent scheme to get highly qualified persons work for free. Why does this remind me of IBM and Linux?

Re:Are you sure? (0, Troll)

dietrollemdefender (970664) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287793)

Common, dude! This is nothing less than a transparent scheme to get highly qualified persons work for free. Why does this remind me of IBM and Linux?

And, Goddamn Richard Stallman! Him and His "software needs to be free" !

yEAH, Yeah, He doesn't mean that software should be given away - but, tell that to all those "free software" folks out there!

Please!, you F/OSS folks! Take pride in your skills! CHARGE - at least SOMETHING for your work! YOU are creating a supply that is outweighing demand - READ up on your ECONOMICS!!!

Don't beleive me? (1, Insightful)

dietrollemdefender (970664) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287849)

From my fucking school "career" board"

Employer: Wahoo Docks Division: Information Technology Job Title: Software Programmer Description: This position will work with our existing IT professional to supplement the development of our in-house developed MIS system, develop new software to be used with our operations, and to monitor, expand and build on our existing Web Sites. In short, we need additional support with our software as we are continually developing new products and require faster lead times on changes. General aptitude with a variety of software packages, general intellect and personality fit with existing staff are the most imnportant criteria we will use to identify candidate. Software we currently use includes MS Access, C++, MySQL, VBA, CAD, Basic, HTML, PHP, among others. We work hard at our firm and have a good sense of excellence at what we do - we expect the candidate to be accretive to the overall group. We provide a very work hard/play hard atmosphere and are looking for someone who is enthused by this atmosphere. Location: Atlanta Position Type: Full Time Desired Major(s): All Liberal Arts/Computer Science, All Business/Computer Information Systems Desired Class Level(s): Senior, 1st Year alumni, Alumni Work Authorization: US Citizen, Permanent Resident Salary Range: $30,000 - $40,000

That fucking job should be paying at least $75k. Disagree? Fucking applying! And don't cry to me when you're at the office for 80+ hours a week!

To the nit - fucking - pickers... (1)

dietrollemdefender (970664) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287874)

I used to get $120K for that work.

...everybody woke up, (1)

patiodragon (920102) | more than 8 years ago | (#15288565)

the drugs wore off, more-than-needed computer skills graduated from college, outsourcing started to work, and...

so what was your point? You and the parent post are longing for the "good ol' days"?!

Re:Don't beleive me? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15287926)

That's because knowing MS Access is woth -$40000

Re:Don't beleive me? (1)

JakusMinimus (49854) | more than 8 years ago | (#15288039)

This situation has just about zero to do with FOSS. The reason that work is paying so little now is the availability of dirt cheap developers in India, simple as that.

The skill requirements as listed ARE entry level and 30-40k sounds about right for your random freshly minted college graduate.

Re:Don't beleive me? (1)

JakusMinimus (49854) | more than 8 years ago | (#15288053)

meant to add "and/or impoverished Indian developer."

Re:Don't beleive me? (1)

AuMatar (183847) | more than 8 years ago | (#15288156)

Lets see- this is an entry level job (they're asing for 1st year alumni and seniors, not experienced devs). Its website work, not serious development. And its from Wahoo Docks, which is located in rural Georgia- cheap land, low prices, low economy. That sounds about right. If this job was on the west coast, it would be under paying. In that location, its dead on.

Re:Are you sure? (1)

Homology (639438) | more than 8 years ago | (#15288158)

I think you misunderstood my post. When a corporation wants some features, they should pay for it. Open source developer != sucker works for free.

Re:Are you sure? (1)

zotz (3951) | more than 8 years ago | (#15288520)

[Please!, you F/OSS folks! Take pride in your skills! CHARGE - at least SOMETHING for your work! YOU are creating a supply that is outweighing demand - READ up on your ECONOMICS!!!]

I do charge for my work, good money too. If I am doing it for others.

When I do it for myself, not always. That said, the amount that I have saved versus PAYING for every last piece of code on each and every one of my boxes makes me come out ahead in any case.

Perhaps you might think a little deeper about economics yourself.

all the best,

drew
-----
http://www.ourmedia.org/node/187924 [ourmedia.org]
Bahamian Nonsense

Re:Are you sure? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15287901)

Payment in scrip [dol.gov] was outlawed more than 100 years ago.

Re:Are you sure? (1)

AuMatar (183847) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287921)

Actually, I think this is legit based on the link you provided- they have a cash out option. Of course, my list of concerns still stands- I wouldn't be applying to this program even if I qualified.

well, I am (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15289553)

what are stocks then? Electronic promises of maybe this might be an IOU with zero guarantees that it is worth more than the paper it isn't even printed on anymore.

sounds like scrip to me! In fact, stocks sound worse! At least scrip was closer to a legit IOU, a promissary. Company goes bankrupt, a ha! thinks you, at least I'll get "my share" as a "stockholder" because "I wonzors part of de company and stuff" when they auction off the furniture and company ragmobiles! WRONG! The creditors come first, ahead of you, and 99% of companies out there don't have enough honest tangible assets to cover their debts with creditors, let alone what some pumped up hyperinflated bingo card "stock" is worth. *Especially* "new economy" IP based companies.

The "bet the farm" method based on intangibles is a pretty risky business to be in, especially today when so many people think they are "worth" being "rich" because of being able to duplicate some grade B or C quality intangible product. The rest of the planet is noticing that intangibles that can be easily reproduced for ultra cheap are at best really only worth about 2% of what people think they are 'worth'.

Piracy prices are a LOT closer to an honest market reality point than the artificial prices they pull out of their butts for intangible products.

When it is posible to clone your product for one penny, you better start to think about what that product really is worth. If they could clone cars for a dollar, would you still feel justified paying 20 grand for a cheap one?

And software? For real, let us hear some honest defense of making word processors even bigger and adding more features? Any takers? Paying a song or watching a video, are we 'there" yet? Can you add sums in many interesting ways, display them on a graph or table?
Outside of a very few small (and usually scientific based) niche areas, usually using clusters, where exactly does software needa whole lot more features? What I see is some code clean up is needed the most now. What else do you really need in a browser that you can't get now, more eyecandy and 3-d spinning desktops? and after that dubious effort?

Just a word to the wise for those in the "IP" business in year 2006 (notice it is not 1986 or even 96 any more). There are 6 billion people in the world. Within ten years there will be MILLIONS AND MILLIONS AND MILLIONS of coders all over the planet, *most* of them in the few bucks a day nations, and that will be considered "well paid". The world will be AWASH in code then, simply a TSUNAMI of extra code.

Really think prices are going to stay high then, or even at a medium level?

People need to really think what they might imagine the economy will be then and what hanging around typing is going to be worth. There is going to be a LOT of competition for the hanging around in the climate controlled office typing type jobs, given the alternatives. Are you REALLY going to be "worth" the same cost as ten other people someplace else for the same money?

You are still IN the go-go huge bucks phase of this IP business, BUT, it is not going to last that long now, the planet has already passed critical mass with this job to take it from leet into "ho, hum, another job" phase and that trend is accelerating.

Re:Are you sure? (1)

ThousandStars (556222) | more than 8 years ago | (#15288988)

I agree with your general sentiment; still, I'd point out that if the company in question wants, say, a patch for a bug you're going to fix anyway, or an effort to port to another platform, or some other objective you ultimately wish to accomplish, it can be worthwhile.

I suspect a lot of people working on open source projects aren't thinking on a pay/hour basis, since they're getting $0. I also doubt anyone is going to try to make real money off this -- if they wanted to, they'd be working as an independent consultant, and people who work on big-deal open source projects by and large can find employment elsewhere anyway. The money aspect is probably just frosting for most people.

I also find it amusing they're offering a Microsoft project as an award -- but if they switch to the PS3 when it arrives, will they receive less grief on /. given Sony's recent CD malware debacle?

Re:NOT paying. (0, Redundant)

Marlow the Irelander (928776) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287540)

The rewards are the payment.

Quote from the FAQ (emphasis mine):
"Do I get paid to be a part of the Expert Community?
Yes, the OpenLogic Rewards program pays Expert Community members upon successful resolution of an incident. OpenLogic charges enterprise for support. OpenLogic's internal technical support team resolves basic issues. OpenLogic, in turn, contracts with members of the community to resolve more complex issues."

just to quibble (1)

JeanBaptiste (537955) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287562)

I'd imagine there is some sort of exchange rate between OpenLogic Rewards points and US dollars, something that could easily be figured out by posting some for sale on Ebay.

Would it be worth it? Probably not. But they are being 'paid' in the form of goods.

Bollocks (4, Informative)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287605)

Horsecrap - I can't see that quote anywhere in TFA or openlogic's press release [openlogic.com]

The press release says in fact:
Through the OpenLogic Expert Community, OpenLogic will pay qualified experts within the open source development community to provide in-depth support for open source products.
and:
In addition to paying members of the OpenLogic Expert Community to resolve enterprise issues, OpenLogic will also contribute money for each issue resolved to a fund that will be used to help further open source efforts.
And (slightly offtopic, but put more elequontly & humorously then the usual 'blah blah, oss has noone to sue'):
"We have heard loud and clear from our larger enterprise customers, some of whom are using more than 400 open source products, that they want one throat to choke for open source support," said Steven Grandchamp, CEO of OpenLogic.
You sir, are a shill from one of the proprietary companies, trembling in their boots about new business models.

Re:Bollocks (1)

Slightly Askew (638918) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287638)

Try the third paragraph here [openlogic.com] .

Re:Bollocks (4, Informative)

GigsVT (208848) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287775)

1 point is $1. You get $100 for resolving an "incident" that they claim will generally take less than 4 hours.

So $25 an hour or more. Not exactly inspiring, but not bad either, especially if it was shit you were going to fix in the next release anyway.

Re:Bollocks (1)

Evro (18923) | more than 8 years ago | (#15288042)

1 point may be $1 today, but one of the main reasons for using a "point" system rather than a "dollar" system is that the person in charge can change the value of a point whenever they want. My bank's credit card rewards program issues 1 point per dollar charged to your card, which would seem to indicate $1 = 1 point, but when you redeem you find that's certainly not the case. After 4 years I accumulated 10,000 points and I was able to redeem my points for a shitty flatware set that retails at Target for like $50. Another card I have also accumulates points at 1/$1 but the redemption value is closer to 100/$1, whereas the first one's is like 200/$1.

Re:Bollocks (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 8 years ago | (#15288137)

As an employee in the marketing department of a business that has a loyalty card program, I am curious; What gave you the impression that you would get back a dollar for each dollar spent? Do you normally assume that companies will pay all your bills, or is this something you reserve for carded loyalty programs? Inquiring minds want to know.

I'm mostly just curious because we, too, give one point per dollar spent. Our conversion rate is definitely multiple points to the dollar - and a bunch of 'em, too.

Re:Bollocks (1)

LFS.Morpheus (596173) | more than 8 years ago | (#15288188)

I don't think he is expecting to get back $1, just using it as an example of how point systems can mean that the people in charge of the point values choose (and can change) how much a point is worth.

Re:Bollocks (1)

GigsVT (208848) | more than 8 years ago | (#15289478)

I doubt it would go down.

For one, it's already kinda low. They aren't going to attract the people they want to attract with lower rates.

As other people have pointed out, your example isn't really very good, since they never said you'd get back all the money you spent.

They probably call it points in an attempt to get people to use it on the items instead of cash, since those probably cost them less and have less tax implications.

Re:Bollocks (1)

Evro (18923) | more than 8 years ago | (#15301010)

No, actually I worked at a company whose purpose was loyalty rewards programs and the like, and the banks specifically said the currency had to be in points so that they wouldn't have any cash value and if they decided to lower the value of a point customers couldn't sue them.

Re:Bollocks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15287783)

pay in points you moron, not money. the original AC was right.

Re:NOT paying. (1)

xlv (125699) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287715)

I think you need to look at the FAQ at http://www.openlogic.com/community/faq.php [openlogic.com] :


you will receive 100 points per incident you resove. [...] Points can be traded in for cash (100 points = $100 dollars) or merchandise (such as an Xbox 360).

You will get paid! (2, Informative)

stormypeters (973568) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287857)

You will get paid! For any issue you resolve successfully, you will get paid. We track how much you'll get paid in points. You can trade in the points for cash or for things like XBoxes. (This is in addition to the XBoxes being given to the first members to join on successfully resolving their first issue.) The reason we added the point system was because some people would rather have prizes like XBoxes than cash. (I was told by SEVERAL people that they'd rather get things like XBoxes because if they got cash their wives would never let them by XBoxes.) But you can trade in your points directly for dollars. Or you can save them up for XBoxes. Or you can donate them to open source software organizations.

Re:You will get paid! (1)

DrewCapu (132301) | more than 8 years ago | (#15288517)

(I was told by SEVERAL people that they'd rather get things like XBoxes because if they got cash their wives would never let them by XBoxes.)
These guys have wives? No way. I think "wives" is just an alternate way to spell "moms."

Re:You will get paid! (1)

micq (266015) | more than 8 years ago | (#15288693)

that's just sick... you come home after a long hard day at work to spend some intimate time with your.... mom?

Re:You will get paid! (1)

milimetric (840694) | more than 8 years ago | (#15288793)

because if they got cash their wives would never let them by XBoxes ... But you can trade in your points directly for dollars

Ok so you figured by adding that layer of complexity in the middle there with these "points" that you would completely confuse the subpar intelligence of the beast known as wife. So like she'll be sitting there looking at her living room full of geeks playing oblivion and snorting coke all over her couch, looking back and forth from the points to the cash or xbox 360 options... back and forth slowly with a confused look and cavewoman groaning noises.

riiight... have you ever like talked to a woman?

Re:You will get paid! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15289088)

Stormy, like all of us, probably talks to herself now and then.

Re:You will get paid! (1)

noidentity (188756) | more than 8 years ago | (#15288931)

"Or you can save them up for XBoxes."

The X-Box, because you can never have too many.

Rebutting the myths (0)

Kelson (129150) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287503)

Add this model to the list of rebuttals to the "you can't make money on open-source" meme.

Re:Rebutting the myths (1)

Timesprout (579035) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287533)

Depends how mush you get paid really doesnt it. This sounds more adhoc than full time support.

Also does it not rebutt the myth that if you have the code you can easily maintain and improve it yourself?

Re:Rebutting the myths (1)

Kelson (129150) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287570)

does it not rebutt the myth that if you have the code you can easily maintain and improve it yourself?

No more than the existence of Dell, eMachines, and other PC manufacturers rebuts the "myth" that if you have access to computer components, you can easily build and upgrade a computer yourself.

Re:Rebutting the myths (1)

Timesprout (579035) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287670)

Sorry I'm still pissing myself laughing at your original 'how could I possibly be more wrong' post to respond properly to your lack of understanding of economics.

Re:Rebutting the myths (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15290872)

Hell of a convincing argument you've got there.

Re:Rebutting the myths (1)

Aspirator (862748) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287647)

Full time support personnel are mostly employees.

This ad hoc approach seems to fit in well with the whole open source approach,
for areas where a smaller amount of expert support is required. It seems to be
a welcome addition to the employee or consultant roles.

The myth that you can easily maintain the code is rebutted very quickly in
the mind of anyone actually trying to do it.

Improving or adapting code can often be done, particularly on the smaller projects,
depending on the architecture of the code base you are trying to do it to,
and quite frequently if an improvement is made it can be offered to and adopted
by the main project.

Re:Rebutting the myths (4, Insightful)

spun (1352) | more than 8 years ago | (#15288180)

Also does it not rebutt the myth that if you have the code you can easily maintain and improve it yourself?

It proves the truth that if you have access to the code you can easily maintain and improve it yourself by paying someone to do it for you. Or did you think that simply having the code automatically makes everyone a programmer? Or (more likely) are you deliberately misinterpreting this "myth" to make some snarky straw-man point? In any case, your comment made me laugh my ass off and now I need to "rebutt" myself.

Re:Rebutting the myths (1)

poopdeville (841677) | more than 8 years ago | (#15288944)

Straw man or not, it's the myth I bought into before I was a programmer.

Re:Rebutting the myths (1)

NineNine (235196) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287613)

Nobody has said that they're making any money, or will make any money in the future. This is just a press-release (paid?) for a service that they may provide in the future. Very little money has been made with OSS across the entire industry up to this point, and the failure rate has been phenomenal. As of yet, this is still an unproven "model".

Re:Rebutting the myths (0, Troll)

Directrix1 (157787) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287905)

Hey you know you're right [google.com] . Compared to the competition [google.com] , open source is just a waste of time. Well, I mean as long as you ignore the gentle down slope of microsoft stock and rapid rise of red hat stock. I wish I would have invested in redhat earlier this year, I would have tripled my money. Additionally, you completely ignore the fact that open source is not so much a provided service, as much as a cooperative venture. Company's don't buy open source software like closed source software. If the company is smart, they buy into open source software: tack a couple devs onto some projects, and cooperatively guide the open source hand to render something useful for all involved, at a fraction of the cost of purchasing proprietary software or doing software development from scratch. I'm sorry but to say that open source software is an unproven model, is to underestimate the very meaning of open source software. That meaning is synergy. Not the buzzword, but an actual practical application of parrallel interests which exponentially accelerates the progress of software development, and diminishes the cost of software maintenance by a similar degree.

Re:Rebutting the myths (2, Insightful)

NineNine (235196) | more than 8 years ago | (#15288226)

1. Stock price has little to nothing to do with the profitability of a company.

2. The question was about OSS and making money, which is still argely unproven. Whether or not OSS provides better advancement in software in general is a point that can be argued, but whether or not it can make money can't be argued at this point: By and large, OSS does NOT make money.

Re:Rebutting the myths (1)

Directrix1 (157787) | more than 8 years ago | (#15290806)

It is extremely difficult to effectively sell OSS software. True. Anything given away is difficult to sell. That is far away from meaning that OSS does not make money. You should refine your statement so as to specify what "model" you are talking about. There has been limited success with the sale and support of specific linux distros (but at the same time others have done exceedingly well in this arena). But software developers are software developers and administrators are administrators. You can hire someone to work with proprietary code and foot the whole bill, or hire somebody to work with an open source project and foot part of the bill but share with others. Independent software developers have existed for a long time now. OSS doesn't change that aspect at all. If anything it provides another avenue to consider. Additionally, businesses, mine included, benefit GREATLY off open source software. We would not operate nearly as efficiently if we were more dependant on proprietary software. By far open source software has provided us the most flexible, easiest to adapt, and cheapest to maintain solutions. Anyways, I guess I'm just trying to say: OSS can make you money using it, but making money off OSS sales itself is relegated to a select few monsters like the Red Hats and Novells. IMO

Re:Rebutting the myths (1)

RingDev (879105) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287827)

Yes, the parent company will make money supporting OS software. This is nothing new. The only difference here is the OS developers and community managers have a chance to earn 'points' that they can redeam on prizes. So if you are an OS developer and willing to live off of cracker jacks, then yes, you can get paid this way.

-Rick

yeah, sure (1)

everphilski (877346) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287879)

You get paid "points" which can be redeemed for "cash and prizes" ...

Another posted put it best "like tickets at an arcade ... but I don't expect to make a living there"

Earn Points...Claim Valuable Prizes (4, Funny)

Slightly Askew (638918) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287558)

From their website:

Be a Part of the Expert Community
OpenLogic is looking for the best and brightest open source developers to join the OpenLogic Expert Community. As a thank you for their time, Open Logic Expert Community members can earn points redeemable for rewards in the OpenLogic Rewards program. Learn more about the OpenLogic Expert Community and the OpenLogic Rewards program.

In other words, no, you're not going to get paid for helping. You will receive 10 Bazooka Joe comics for each Apache installation, and 5 Chuck E. Cheese tickets per debugged line of code.

Re:Earn Points...Claim Valuable Prizes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15287639)

5 Chuck E. Cheese tickets per debugged line of code.

Sweeet I been saving up for a sticky-hand key-fob

Wow, redundant *and* wrong! (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15287667)

Look a bit further through their website. You'll also find the FAQ [openlogic.com] which states that these "points" can be redeemed for cash. 100+ points/incident, 1 point = $1. So if you want the cash, that's $100/incident.

Re:Earn Points...Claim Valuable Prizes (1)

LoonyMike (917095) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287688)

If there is a pre-established arrangement where you receive something, isn't that considered pay?
This isn't the same as rewarding the guys afterwards with some goodies, this is the equivalent to a price list - do this, get that.

Re:Earn Points...Claim Valuable Prizes (1)

flyweight_of_fury (972871) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287713)

You will receive 10 Bazooka Joe comics for each Apache installation, and 5 Chuck E. Cheese tickets per debugged line of code.
Personally, I'm hoping they'll pay in Linden dollars [wikipedia.org] .

Tickets!?!???! (2, Funny)

not-admin (943926) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287714)

Once Chuck E. Cheese starts stocking computer parts, I'll be debugging like crazy.

Re:Earn Points...Claim Valuable Prizes (2, Funny)

bmac83 (869058) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287804)

As a progressive, forward-looking individual, I scoff at all you reactionaries espousing your quote-unqoute "efficient markets" and "capitalist systems." What this world really needs is an accelerated advancement toward the economics of the future: barter.

Just think, I could earn twenty Betty Boop comics for some httpd.conf work and give them to some institution - say, a "bank" - in exchange for a piece of paper granting the bearer twenty Betty Boop comics. Then, we could all happily wear burlap sacks and live in a world of peace and harmony.

Or, you know, you could just confine yourself to an eternal world of cash-based corporate greed. Your choice.

Re:Earn Points...Claim Valuable Prizes (2, Interesting)

Slightly Askew (638918) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287834)

Ok, as someone said, you can trade in your points for cash. This begs the question of why the company would do this. This would have to add overhead to maintain the site for cashing points, providing gifts, etc. Why not just give you the money?

My guess is that if they give you points, then you redeem them for things (including cash), you will be taxed the Gift Tax rate of approximately 40% and the company will not be required to pay various taxes that they have to pay for regular employees.

Opensource payment for developers (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15287624)

This article goes on to say that even though the developers ARE NOT BEING PAID , when the suport was outsourced offshore , then it ended up being cheaper TO PAY the offshore developers THAN TO NOT PAY the American developers.

The reason for this is the "time cost" of having to "talk" to American developers, whereas for offshore support, nothing you say is understood, so you bypass the "communication" or "talking" aspect of things.

U send me ur non paying outsourced job plz.

This is just cheap labor (2)

mustafap (452510) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287789)

>help solve issues and win an Xbox 360.

Wow. So they charge big bucks an hour, and we get a shiny xbox!

What idiot accepted this article?

finally, is official (1)

ranjix (892606) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287812)

from the summary and comments, it's obvious that there is a business case for open source: open source pays and doesn't pay, possibly giving points which could be redeemable for cash, to american or offshore programmers. or not.

HAVE NERD... WILL TRAVEL (1)

EntropyXP (956792) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287818)

NERDS working for free. Awesome. It's a great idea!
Next thing you know MicroShaft will "pay" its own "expert community" to debug Windows Vista with old XBOX games.

Legal Agreement (3, Insightful)

ArikTheRed (865776) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287837)

3. Compensation. Unless otherwise covered in a separate written Addendum to this Agreement, your compensation for completing an assignment will be listed on the Committed Community website when you apply for the assignment. Compensation is subject to change by OpenLogic and any changes shall be effective when posted to the Committed Community website or provided to you via email. You are responsible for any and all taxes due on any compensation received from OpenLogic.

Wow, why didn't anyone think of this before? A compensation program that is subject to change at will... I only need to usually make my house payment anyway.

A step towards an entirely open community ... (1)

unity100 (970058) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287873)

... where jobs will be posted in open forums/sites, and people will take them on and get paid, be it contract jobs, be it support for open source software - a truly open world we are going towards ?

This is a great way to get enterprise support! (1)

xxxJonBoyxxx (565205) | more than 8 years ago | (#15287923)

This is a great way to get enterprise support...if your idea of "enterprise support" is a couple of high-schoolers with a couple months of Linux experience on their two-box networks telling you what to do. (Plus, "I migrated EDS from Cleveland to San Antonio and all I got was this lousy XBox?")

I wonder if OpenLogic takes coupons and IOUs as payment in lieu of cash? (Don't laugh too hard; many class-action suits end with the plantiffs getting coupons.)

From the EULA (or 'OpenLogic ECA') (2, Informative)

fiddlesticks (457600) | more than 8 years ago | (#15288399)

Legal Agreement:Please review the OpenLogic Expert Community Agreement [openlogic.com] If you are accepted to the OpenLogic Expert Community, you will be asked to read and accept the agreement.

'Assignments may be bugs, errors, problems or other issues associated with open source projects. OpenLogic will post assignments on the Committed Community website located at www.________.com '

(their underscores, not mine)

'If you develop any source code or other material as part of any assignment, you agree that you will provide a copy of the source code or other materials to OpenLogic.You also agree to assign to OpenLogic joint ownership in any and all worldwide copyrights, moral rights and other proprietary and intellectual property rights you have in the source code or other materials'

XBox 360 - no thanks. (2, Insightful)

david.gilbert (605443) | more than 8 years ago | (#15288560)

I got an email from OpenLogic last month, inviting me to join the program. I binned it when I read:

In addition, as an introductory offer, if you are one of the first 75 people to join the OpenLogic Expert Community, you will receive an Xbox 360 once you resolve your first issue.

Which part of their market research made them think I'd want a Microsoft TOY as a reward for my expertise?

A Service no one needs. (1)

Qbertino (265505) | more than 8 years ago | (#15288740)

So when I'm doing a phat Typo3 Project Kaspar Skarhoj is the best choice for advice?
Yes.

If I wanna do some Real Time 3D thing I need Ton Roosendaal and the Blender Crew?
Right.

Do I need this company?
No.

To me it just looks like some shop trying to feed of the OSS community. This might be attrative for someone who's good at coding but can't market himself. But from what I can tell all those people at project leads are doing perfectly well in doing business all by themselves.

more greedy middle-men (1)

Danny Rathjens (8471) | more than 8 years ago | (#15289303)

*sigh* More greedy people trying to squeeze their way in as useless middle men. It seems to me that when money enters the picture, things hardly ever go well.

Look at the scammy behaviour prompted by google's adsense money or yahoo and overtures' click bounties and "alliances" promoting spyware spammers and ad farms and search engine abuse. I even just got a spam of a monster.com job offer; apparently due to some kind of reward which is motivating people to spam their job postings around. "work at home" scams and reward systems like this seem to be the modern corporate way of doing things in unethical ways while maintaining plausible deniability.

I suppose stuff like this has always happened in the real world and I was just isolated from it in the open source world where most folks fix bugs and help each other and explain things for free. I just wish we could keep the real world out for a couple more decades. :)

"One throat to choke" (1)

Medievalist (16032) | more than 8 years ago | (#15295804)

"We have heard loud and clear from our larger enterprise customers, some of whom are using more than 400 open source products, that they want one throat to choke for open source support," said Steven Grandchamp, CEO of OpenLogic.
People having been using this phrase a lot lately. I always ask them "Are you quoting Carl Panzram [wikipedia.org] or Caligula [wikipedia.org] ?"

"I wish you all had one neck, and my hands were around it." -- Carl Panzram

"Utinam populus Romanus unam cervicem haberet!" (I wish the Roman people had one throat) -- Caligula

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