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Cancer Resistant Mouse Provides Possible Cure

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 7 years ago | from the one-of-many-recent-possibilities dept.

364

Evoluder writes to tell us that scientists at Wake Forest University have found a "cancer resistant mouse" and bred it to make a small army of cancer resistant mice. When transplanting blood from one of these mice to a normal non-resistant mouse they are able to provide "lifetime cancer protection". From the article: "The cancer-resistant mice all stem from a single mouse discovered in 1999. "The cancer resistance trait so far has been passed to more than 2,000 descendants in 14 generations," said Cui, associate professor of pathology. It also has been bred into three additional mouse strains. About 40 percent of each generation inherits the protection from cancer."

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364 comments

Cancer resistant... (5, Funny)

Chabil Ha' (875116) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295686)

but mortally susceptible to the common cold.

Re:Cancer resistant... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15295881)

They need to stop this before the mice become resistant to poison and mouse traps.. maybe they'll even become resistant to being hit with a hammer and then what. Huh?

It hits the fan, thats what!

Re:Cancer resistant... (2, Insightful)

GTMoogle (968547) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295960)

I think there's a mouse in africa or australia that can actually survive being run over by a car. It has interlocking spines on its ribs that spread out force.

Re:Cancer resistant... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15295988)

WTF

I for one... (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15295692)

...welcome our cancer resistant mice overlords

population control (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15295694)

There goes another perfectly good form of population control

fuck zion (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15295697)

KILL

ALL

JEWS

GO IRAN!

Re:fuck zion (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15295808)

L is for loser

I for one... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15295702)

will skip the line you expected here and get right to the point: INVINCIBLE MICE ARMY?!?

Re:I for one... (4, Funny)

From A Far Away Land (930780) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295937)

The old warfrin poison trick still works, don't worry. Plus we could just breed an army of cancer resistant snakes to take care of the mice.
Oh...

Re:I for one... (5, Funny)

soxos (614545) | more than 7 years ago | (#15296007)

> The old warfrin poison trick still works, don't worry. Plus we could just breed
> an army of cancer resistant snakes to take care of the mice.
> Oh...

must... resist... can't...

cancer-resistant mongooses for the snakes
cancer-resistant gorillas to rid us of the mongooses
cancer-resistant tigers to attack the gorillas
cancer-resistant elephants to take care of the tigers
and cancer-resistant mice to scare the elephants

lather, rinse, repeat

Cause of the cancer resistance (-1, Redundant)

castoridae (453809) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295705)

Would be nice if they could do a "diff" between the new cancer-resistant white blood cells & normal ones. Find out what makes the new ones better, and then do more of it. Or extract the benefits, if that's reasonable once the cause is understood.

Re:Cause of the cancer resistance (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15295746)

I believe the general term is "scientific method"

Re:Cause of the cancer resistance (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15295831)

Thats a brilliant idea.

Why dont you email them and suggest it?

Reading between the lines of your analysis, I think youre saying there could be a real future application for it.

Like I dunno...curing cancer maybe?

Nice, but... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15295707)

Will this cure cancer in rats? Because, EVERYTHING causes cancer in rats!

Re:Nice, but... (1)

castoridae (453809) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295875)

If only we could cause rapidly terminal cancer in the "wild" rat population. Now THAT would be a breakthough!

Blood type issues? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15295710)

I know humans have several blood types and generally you have to follow rules as to which blood type you can give to another blood type person. ("O" type can donate to "B" type person, but not visa-versa)
Do mice have this issue? Or is this irrelevant because we are talking about white blood cells and not whole blood

I know, I know...wikipedia is my friend...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_type [wikipedia.org]

Re:Blood type issues? (4, Funny)

Ingolfke (515826) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295734)

I don't have a specific answer to your question, but I do know that it all tastes good to me.

Delicious (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15295712)

I'll take a carton of cigarettes and a shot of mouse blood.

Wireless? (-1, Flamebait)

foundme (897346) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295721)

Is it wireless?

Beware. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15295723)

Scientists should be wary about trying to genetically modify humans with the knowledge gained from these experiments.

Thinking of a "cancer gene" is misleading. Imagine a net of rubber bands all knotted togethor. Changing one gene will "stretch a rubber band" differently possibly affect all the other aspects of the organism, often unpredictably.

This cancer gene could be the one that also gives humans a soul. We can't tell with a mouse, of course, because they only speak in pips and squeaks, but scientists should know all the risks involved with creating such a possible genetic enhancement.

Re:Beware. (1)

Ingolfke (515826) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295762)

scientists should know all the risks involved with creating such a possible genetic enhancement.

Why that's positively unscientific!

Re:Beware. (4, Insightful)

EGSonikku (519478) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295777)

Er, gives us a soul? I wasn't aware that the 'soul' was part of our DNA sequence, care to enlighten us heathen atheists as to what scientiffic observations led you in this direction? Also, if my soul is damaged, can I get a transplant donor soul?

Re:Beware. (1)

Burlap (615181) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295874)

i think they are more interested in the ability to transplant white blood cells to a non-immune mouse. there have always been people (or mice) that have been naturally resistant to cancers, just as there are those who are more likely to get it then average... whats huge is the ability to give the later a shot of something and turn them into the resistant type.

Large scale human eugenics isnt possible... too many people doing thinge 'au natural' to be able to control the outcome.

Re:Beware. (1)

porcupine8 (816071) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295896)

Yes, I'm sure they were planning on taking this and immediately making the same changes to human DNA. Good thing you're here to tell us all how genetics work and warn us of the dangers of immediately applying a finding in one species to all species without further research, or else we'd be in big trouble.

Re:Beware. (5, Insightful)

drwho (4190) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295918)

Scientists should be wary about trying to genetically modify humans with the knowledge gained from these experiments.


Thinking of a "cancer gene" is misleading. Imagine a net of rubber bands all knotted togethor. Changing one gene will "stretch a rubber band" differently possibly affect all the other aspects of the organism, often unpredictably.


This cancer gene could be the one that also gives humans a soul. We can't tell with a mouse, of course, because they only speak in pips and squeaks, but scientists should know all the risks involved with creating such a possible genetic enhancement.


You're a moron, Mr. Rifkin. Seriously, though, this is the type of comment that lies outside of answering, outside of science, and beyond reason. You can't win an argument with someone like this, and it's not even worth trying. It's a religious matter. For much of human history, such thoughts set the policies of governments. Then, we discovered reason and science. But the pendulum seems to swinging back the other way again.

Re:Beware. (1)

zerus (108592) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295966)

Cancer gene is misleading? That's where cancer comes from! Radiation and chemical effects of cancer change are present in the restructuring of DNA strands during the dna replication phases of cellular reproduction. That's why you have multiple treatments of x-rays for a cancer treatment, to kill cells that were in between reproductive cycles. And what rubber band is stretched? The replication sequence follows a straight path on the individual rna strands. It doesn't look at multiple locations on different strands before deciding to create a protein. If they created a stop codon that blocks unrestricted, accelerated cellular reproduction (cancer), then great. But if this affects the "soul gene," then I think James Brown might sue.

Re:Beware. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15295973)

This cancer gene could be the one that also gives humans a soul. Bwahahahah. There's my belly laugh for the day.

Re:Beware. (3, Informative)

CFTM (513264) | more than 7 years ago | (#15296018)

Well as terrified as I am about the "cancer gene" messing with the "soul gene", I'm willing to take the chance. Oh and last I checked, neurobiology has made some headway in cracking this whole "soul mystery" thing. Turns out that human individuality might actually be created by something called a "long interspersed nuclear element". A lot less handwaving than a "soul gene". LA Times has a rather extensive article on it and although the LINE is similar to a gene it's considered a precursor...

Assuming that this article [latimes.com] isn't completely incorrect, I'd say it's pretty safe to say that we'll have trouble fucking it up. It exists in every mammal [including mice] and has existed for well over 600 Million years. Fun read on a fascinating topic.

Re:Beware. (2, Funny)

Maxo-Texas (864189) | more than 7 years ago | (#15296031)

That's kinda cool.

So then we could transplant that gene and
1) Give plants souls
2) Give animals souls
3) Give bacteria souls

We already have a clearly soulless population of humans (CEO's and Lawyers) so we could isolate the difference between their genes and the rest of the populace to isolate this cancer-causing soul making gene.

Re:Beware. (4, Funny)

Anonymous Meoward (665631) | more than 7 years ago | (#15296032)

This cancer gene could be the one that also gives humans a soul.

Hmm, lessee.. no cancer in my lifetime in exchange for something I've never had any use for. Man, hard choice.

Ch-ching!

Next week, maybe I'll get to trade group sex for herpes.

Dupe (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15295741)

Seems like these mice are dupe resistant too.

*squeak* *squeak* (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15295747)

Viva la resistance!

Re:*squeak* *squeak* (1, Funny)

Spy der Mann (805235) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295775)

The Brain: I told you, Pinky! My genetic manipulation machine WORKED!
Pinky: Yes, Brain, but I'm tired of the needles... zort! poit!

Dear editors (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15295767)

Stop rejecting my good stories. Just because they're not about the latest Linux kernel it doesn't mean they aren't worthy.

e.g. one that just got rejected: Spy on your neighbours through digital TV [bbc.co.uk]. BBC News - check. Technology - check. Privacy concerns - check. Perfect Slashdot material, you would think.

Thank you.

Dear crybaby (1)

AssCork (769414) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295972)

Change your diaper and then go to Digg.

It is there that you will discover that your uninspired drivel will be tried by a jury of your peers. I hope that also sounds like an affront to the intelligence of Digg users - It is.

Kisses

Lucky perverts (3, Funny)

solevita (967690) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295774)

There's hundred of guys on the internet that will now never get cancer of the ass. So I'm told...

Cancer? (1)

Renraku (518261) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295794)

Someone told me that if humans were meant to live forever, then God would have made us immune to cancer.

How does God know about cancer? He doesn't even smoke or play in asbestos!

You have no idea (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295872)

When you smoke the right shit, you can talk with God. Take more of it and it feels like you ARE god.

The next day, you feel like your tongue is made of asbestos, though.

Re:Cancer? (1)

Bryansix (761547) | more than 7 years ago | (#15296058)

Maybe we were not meant to live forever but certanly for a much longer time. Adam lived to be something like 900 years old.

Fringe benefits? (3, Interesting)

rmerrill11 (308424) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295807)

Hmm... now curing cancer is nice and all, but if/when applied to humans, does this mean they can smoke cigarettes w/o ill effect, clean up nuclear waste with their bare hands, or travel in space for extended duration w/o ill effect?

How good is this really?

(Assuming this is true, it is a wonderful step.)

Re:Fringe benefits? (1)

Burlap (615181) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295904)

does this mean they can smoke cigarettes w/o ill effect

well, they will still smell like an ashtray

Re:Fringe benefits? (1)

AndyG314 (760442) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295935)

Hmm... now curing cancer is nice and all, but if/when applied to humans, does this mean they can smoke cigarettes w/o ill effect
Smoking causes numerous other helth problems.
clean up nuclear waste with their bare hands
Radation poisioning would still be an issue, and a very unplesent way to die.
or travel in space for extended duration w/o ill effect?
One could only hope.

Re:Fringe benefits? (1)

misleb (129952) | more than 7 years ago | (#15296040)

Hmm... now curing cancer is nice and all, but if/when applied to humans, does this mean they can smoke cigarettes w/o ill effect,

Cancer is hardly the only ill effect of smoking cigarettes. It is just hte one that gets the most press because, well, it is cancer. Smoking is one horrible, horrible thing you can do to your body. Even without cancer.

clean up nuclear waste with their bare hands,

Again, cancer isn't the only ill effect here...

r travel in space for extended duration w/o ill effect?

Again... ;)

-matthew

Re:Fringe benefits? (1)

drpimp (900837) | more than 7 years ago | (#15296073)

If you smoke, because smoke contains carcinogens, you still can get Emphysema [wikipedia.org], along with a slue of other diseases not directly associated with, but can led to cancer from smoking. Nuclear waste is also Carcinogenic [wikipedia.org]. So to answer your question, it may only cure the cancer butt (sorry for the pun) of the equation. Long cell deteriation in the lungs or elsewhere will cause health problems.

Cylon? (3, Funny)

tokki (604363) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295820)

So the mouse is a cylon?

I mean, a'doy. Dr Baltar already figured this out. It cured President Rosylin's cancer, after all.

For humans to benifit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15295821)

Next stage is to dress up a mouse in a really sexy outfit and post her pics to slashdot...

Another cure??? (4, Informative)

Pedrito (94783) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295834)

The media is quick to call things like this a cure. The fact remains that, with some exceptions, men are not mice. Back in the late 90s, angiogenesis inhibitors (a class of drugs that inhibit the growth of new blood vessels, needed by tumors to provide nourishment as they grow) were being tested with amazing success in mice, preventing the spread of almost every form of cancer. It was hailed as the coming cure.

Some angiogenesis inhibitors have proven to be very helpful in treating cancer, but they are not a cure. They aren't nearly as effective in humans as they were in mice, it appears.

I'm always skeptical (and you should be too), when you hear about something that isn't even in clinical trials, as a possible cure for some disease people get. People simply don't respond the same as mice.

That said, this does look promising as an avenue, but I wouldn't go out and take up smoking just yet.

Re:Another cure??? (3, Insightful)

31415926535897 (702314) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295981)

People simply don't respond the same as mice.

I have always held the same skepticism with regard to studies like these as reported by the media for this very reason. What I always wonder about is how many things we miss because mice (or rabbits, or monkeys, etc.) don't respond to them but humans would. I don't know if there is any good answer to this, because we don't want to start testing random crap all willy-nilly on humans, but sometimes I just wonder if we've already passed up that miracle cure.

Perhaps someday we'll have powerful enough computers that we can simulate everything, including synthesis of a new drug for your specific form of cancer that your body will respond to. Of course, 'perhaps someday' will probably be long after I die of whatever cancer I'm going to get.

Good Idea/Bad Idea (4, Informative)

kbonapart (645754) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295847)

Okay, let's think about this for a second.

A cancerous cell is one that doesn't know when to quit. It is outside the normal cell cycle, and not listening to every cell's built in death trigger. Forvige my lack of specific biology terminalogy.

So these mice are "cancer-resistant"? When exposed to carcenigous, do they ignore them? When exposed to massive ammounts of UV light, do they tan but not burn? Do they burn but not get skin cancer? If you clogged thier lungs with cig smoke, would they develop a cough but not cancer?

How the frak does this work? Are the little mice cells just really tuned into thier death trigger? When a cell mutates enough that it doesn't listen to it's death trigger, it is a cancer. Are these mice just impervious to cell mutation?

If so, wouldn't that make them an evolutionary dead end? Cancer, while bad, is a by-product of evolution. If cells weren't allowed to ever mutate again, would that spell the end of mice evolution? And if we impart that "cancer-immunity" to we humans, would that spell the end of evolution?

By all means, someone correct what I have wrong. Biology was never my strong suit. (Nor is spelling)

Re:Good Idea/Bad Idea (3, Insightful)

Golias (176380) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295986)

The end of evolution is only a Bad Thing if you consider the capacity to adapt to your environment to be some kind of moral win.

Humans, like a very small few other species, have the capacity to adapt our environment to suit us, rather than the other way around. No need to go through all that painful natural selection when we can build central heating, agriculture, and wheelchair ramps.

Re:Good Idea/Bad Idea (5, Informative)

BoredWolf (965951) | more than 7 years ago | (#15296039)

It's all in the title of the article... The white blood cells "recognize specific patterns on the cancer cell surface", and flag/attack them as they would any other foreign body. Biology wasn't my strong-suit either, but I would venture a guess that by knowing what sort of mechanism would lead to the white blood cells identifying cancerous/precancerous cells as a risk, the response could be adapted to work similarly (if not identically) in humans. Cancer is not a by-product of evolution, it is a result of malfunctioning cells which replicate uncontrollably. This is generally not a product of 'evolution' as you and I would think of it, but by some sort of damage to the cell which caused it to malfunction. It isn't so much a "death trigger" as replicating without purpose; when you no longer need skin cells at a certain location, and some mutated cell keeps replicating malfunctioning cells, you've got cancer. If your immune system cannot recognize something as a threat, it cannot respond to it, which appears to be the current predicament with cancer in humans.

Wow... Wake Forest is in the news... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15295848)

For something other than losing at basketball...

Take heed, Slashdotters! (5, Funny)

Guppy06 (410832) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295850)

"The cancer resistance trait so far has been passed to more than 2,000 descendants in 14 generations"

If you cure cancer, you get laid.

Re:Take heed, Slashdotters! (1)

FecesFlingingRhesus (806117) | more than 7 years ago | (#15296029)


If you cure cancer, you get laid.

No given the basis of the article if you cure cancer someone else gets laid. The mice are getting laid not the scientist. So the correct assumption is that if you cure cancer the steroid shooting jock still gets laid he just does not die of cancer in the end. Way to balance the scales guys.

Re:Take heed, Slashdotters! (3, Interesting)

MooseTick (895855) | more than 7 years ago | (#15296052)

"If you cure cancer, you get laid."

If a guy was somehow determined to be "cancer-resistant", imagine how many women would want to procreate with him so that their children would be immune to cancer. The guys that could be declared "cancer-resistant" could have women lining up down the street waiting for the guys to knock them up!

Did anyone say this yet? (0, Troll)

myth24601 (893486) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295876)

I for one welcome our new cancer resistant rat overlords.

Re:Did anyone say this yet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15295949)

In Soviet Russia, cancer cures YOU!

Not for humans (2, Insightful)

nstlgc (945418) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295879)

Sad thing is that it still isn't transferrable to humans. From what I've read, it also works for pigs, rats and mice, but not humans.. Oh well, give or take another 20 years, I've got time...

Re:Not for humans (4, Insightful)

HotNeedleOfInquiry (598897) | more than 7 years ago | (#15296020)

A better question would be "Are there cancer resistant humans and we don't know about it?"

I know that that there are no cancers on my mother's side of the family despite heavy smoking , coal mining and high-risk lifestyles. Perhaps there is cancer resistant strains of humans and we just don't know about it.

Re:Not for humans (2, Interesting)

Jamil Karim (931849) | more than 7 years ago | (#15296072)

Oh well, give or take another 20 years, I've got time...

I wouldn't be so sure. My sister-in-law died of cancer at the ripe-old age of 25, and I'm sure there are many other slashdotters that personally knew someone who died of cancer prior to reaching 30.

As the mice say... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15295884)

Smoke 'em if you got 'em!

What if... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15295890)

The cancer resistant mouse is the normal one and all the others are the mutants?

Lifetime cancer protection (4, Funny)

markov_chain (202465) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295902)

they are able to provide "lifetime cancer protection"

I see, so the protection lasts right until they die... from cancer. I think Aleve can do this just as well :)

All that money! (2, Funny)

ashtophoenix (929197) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295910)

All that money spent in research, and all we come up is with better mice! Plus I don't think they care too much about having cancer.

In other news... (3, Funny)

Paladine97 (467512) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295915)

Richard Gere is all smiles and breathing a sigh of relief.

Re:In other news... (3, Funny)

mapmaker (140036) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295942)

So that's the secret method of transferring the immunity to humans! I think I'll take the cancer...

Re: must resist....OMG...I'm not gonna make it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15296069)

So that's the secret method of transferring the immunity to humans!

Good news, it's a suppository!

A cancer resistant male (1)

BadassJesus (939844) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295917)

so far has been passed to more than 2,000 descendants in 14 generations

So... a cancer resistant male would be considered a premier breeding stallion...

I don't know why, but I'm hoping (1)

bunions (970377) | more than 7 years ago | (#15295959)

that you gain their anticancer properties by eating them so I start seeing nutty stuff like Mousicles and Xtra-Kreemy Mac-n-Mice in the health food aisle.

Presumably this is patented? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15296011)

So how much do you think they will sell it for? Will it only be available to Republican families? I presume we won't let the French have it ...

Remarkable. (1)

posterlogo (943853) | more than 7 years ago | (#15296035)

This is a rather remarkable finding, though very fortuitous (as many great discoveries are). The "cancer resistance" trait is heritable, so it can ultimately be mapped to specific gene(s) -- that is the most exciting finding, along with the fact that the physiological effect has already been mapped to white blood cells. This way, when the gene is discovered, both the mechanism of cancer resistance and the genetic basis for it will be readily discernable.

Animal Testing!?! (0, Flamebait)

sarlos (903082) | more than 7 years ago | (#15296038)

I, for one, am horrified at what they are doing to these poor little mice! Injecting them with cancerous cells, just to see if new white blood cells will fight the cancer? When does it stop! Think about the poor little things, squeaking, squeaking, flailing their little limbs, their cute little whiskers all a-quiver. And then they get stuck with *another* needle, in their stomach! I can tell you from experience, that ain't comfortable! [/sarcasm]

Take Over The World (1)

lbmouse (473316) | more than 7 years ago | (#15296041)

"The cancer resistance trait so far has been passed to more than 2,000 descendants in 14 generations,"

So that is all the Brain had to do.... find a cure for cancer.

Not quite a reliable claim (2, Funny)

NevarMore (248971) | more than 7 years ago | (#15296046)

"... able to provide "lifetime cancer protection"."

The article fails to mention that 'lifetime' can be greatly affected by the neighboring reptile obesity study.

Need to find the cancer resistant human equivelant (1)

ZSpade (812879) | more than 7 years ago | (#15296065)

Because if they did, wouldn't that just make life so easy. Either way, this is a fantastic step in the right direction. It looks like nature was able to do what our science has yet to accomplish.

WTF! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15296070)

Cancer?!
Here I thought all I had to worry about was carpel tunnel.....

Are they good on toast? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15296088)

They'll be delivered as a suppository, though they'll make a bit of a squeaking sound as they are inserted in your ass.
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