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257 comments

Skip to Eight: Nautilus Scripts (5, Informative)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301088)

The most useful feature of Nautilus is the scripts functionality, so simple & elegant.

I have a lot of iso cdrom images, that I use occasionally - I popped the iso mount script [wordpress.com] in my ~/.gnome/nautilus-scripts & off I went, merilly mounting & using iso files.

I looked for equivilant functionality under windows recently & just couldn't find it - this microsoft app [softwarepatch.com] wouldn't mount (map, whatever you whacky windows guys call it) lots of my isos, rar was nagware (and required you to extract, rather then giving you a virtual drive), nero's expensive, etc etc.

Anyway, back on topic - go download Nautilus scripts from g-script [sourceforge.net] they've got loads of scripts, which solve a lot of problems in a very unixy way. All in all, handy.

Re:Skip to Eight: Nautilus Scripts (5, Informative)

D4rk Fx (862399) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301123)

Daemon Tools [daemon-tools.cc] is what you're looking for, for mounting ISOs in windows.

Re:Skip to Eight: Nautilus Scripts (0)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301230)

Daemon Tools is what you're looking for, for mounting ISOs in windows.

I tried Daemon Tools - but didn't like it because:

1) It bundles ad-ware.
2) It's hard to uninstall.
3) You have a limited number of ISOs you can have mounted.
4) There's rumours of spyware

(and frankly the fourth one applies to virtual all closed source software that doesn't come from MS or Apple).

Re:Skip to Eight: Nautilus Scripts (5, Informative)

Lovepump (58591) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301299)

1. It doesn't - at least the last version I installed (3 months ago, I guess) doesn't.
2. It uninstalls in exactly the same way as every other Windows application - via Add/Remove programs.
3. It creates a virtual CD-drive and mounts the image under each one. You can have up to 4.
4. I've never heard of these rumours, so I can't really comment. I do know I've been using it for the last 4 or 5 years without any spyware, adware, trojans, etc.

I suspect that the rumours of spyware and ad-ware comes from the people who are using it to mount ISO's of games which have had little 'surprises' installed by some distribution site before it's released to the masses clamouring for a pirated copy of Doom4 or some other such shite.

Re:Skip to Eight: Nautilus Scripts (2, Informative)

Neoprofin (871029) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301370)

The adware in deamon tools is opt-in volountary last I had seen it.

They also have one of the most active support forums I've ever seen.

Re:Skip to Eight: Nautilus Scripts (1)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301444)

The adware in deamon tools is opt-in volountary last I had seen it.

No - its included by default - you have to opt-out

Re:Skip to Eight: Nautilus Scripts (1)

Neoprofin (871029) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301484)

Shows how much schooling has destroyed my memory. Either way, it's a simple check box during installation.(As of 4.03 anyway)

Not to get it confused with other notable "opt-out" programs like CD clubs or microsoft error reporting.

Re:Skip to Eight: Nautilus Scripts (1)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301523)

Indeed, it is simple - but I never reccommend software that comes bundled with 'opt out' spyware. It may not stay opt out forever.

Re:Skip to Eight: Nautilus Scripts (1)

Wudbaer (48473) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301707)

By the same logic you shouldn't recommend software without spyware either, because some might be bundled in a later version. Oh, and be very careful about this so-called Open Source Software. There have been instances where criminally inclined authors decided to close later versions.

Re:Skip to Eight: Nautilus Scripts (0, Troll)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301396)

1. It doesn't - at least the last version I installed (3 months ago, I guess) doesn't.

Quoting from wikipedia: [wikipedia.org]
DAEMON Tools is currently being developed and distributed by DAEMON's Home and is free for non-commercial purposes. Version 4 of DAEMON Tools is bundled with WhenU software, which is spyware.
This only happened recently (4.x series), but I think it was longer then four months ago.

2. It uninstalls in exactly the same way as every other Windows application - via Add/Remove programs.

Yes, but I had an image mounted (under a different user) & it did not uninstall correctly, but removed itself from the Add/Remove programs list. I eventually had to reghack & delete the binaries to get rid of it.

3. It creates a virtual CD-drive and mounts the image under each one. You can have up to 4.

Yes, I know. Thats why I said You have a limited number of ISOs you can have mounted. I need up to twelve.

4. I've never heard of these rumours, so I can't really comment. I do know I've been using it for the last 4 or 5 years without any spyware, adware, trojans, etc.

Yes, its only in the 4.x series (and you don't have to install it, but I don't trust a company that bundles whenU [benedelman.org] )

Re:Skip to Eight: Nautilus Scripts (1)

ivan256 (17499) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301571)

Not only don't you have to install it, but it's not installed by default. You have to check the box, and they explain that it's ad-ware before you do.

There isn't anything better out there for free. There isn't anything better out there for pay either, if you want the copy protection emulation.

Re:Skip to Eight: Nautilus Scripts (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15301595)

you must be running a backup of that car repair documentation that comes on 12 cds..
naughty naughty

Re:Skip to Eight: Nautilus Scripts (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15301650)

Yes, but I had an image mounted (under a different user) & it did not uninstall correctly, but removed itself from the Add/Remove programs list. I eventually had to reghack & delete the binaries to get rid of it.

So you tried to uninstall a progam that was in use at the time?

I am not following you.

What is the proper thing to do in this case?

Uninstall and break the other user, or unistall for you and leave the other use functional.

Do you even know how to use a windows box or are you limited to what a Mac can do?

Re:Skip to Eight: Nautilus Scripts (0, Redundant)

everphilski (877346) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301360)

1) no it does not. Unless you downloaded it from an unofficial site. (Official site: here [daemon-tools.cc]
2) use the control panel. I used it for 1 day at work to install Microsoft SDK and it removed cleanly
3) Limited by the operating system (IIRC). I know I've had at least 4 going at once
4) None whatsoever

Re:Skip to Eight: Nautilus Scripts (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15301527)

1) Actually it does, you just have to uncheck the box in the list of setup stuff.
2) Yes, it uninstalls fine, and if you have troubles there is a manual uninstall on their website
3) Yes, up to 4.
4) None other than the searchbar you uncheck.

Re:Skip to Eight: Nautilus Scripts (1)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301578)

I've pretty much answered [slashdot.org] your rebuttal already (as your points are identical to another poster). But anyway:

1) no it does not. Unless you downloaded it from an unofficial site. (Official site: here [daemon-tools.cc]

Incorrect - see the official site you linked to (try searching for whenu [daemon-tools.cc]

2) use the control panel. I used it for 1 day at work to install Microsoft SDK and it removed cleanly

Oh? The control panel. Thanks for that - I would never have thought of that.

3) Limited by the operating system (IIRC). I know I've had at least 4 going at once

*sighs* no - limited by daemon tools to four.

4) None whatsoever

Depends on whether you think whenU is spyware or not.

Re:Skip to Eight: Nautilus Scripts (1)

gid (5195) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301421)

I have daemon tools 4.03H installed and spybot's showing nothing... doing a google search mentions something about a search bar that's bundled with DT, but it's a very simple process to uncheck the box during the install process. I certainly didn't install it.

I personally have never wanted more than one or two images mounted. I just use it so I don't have to play discjockey when I want to play a game. I guess I never found selecting a different image every now and then a big deal.

I don't think I've uninstalled it that much--maybe once before and upgrade... I don't ever remember having a problem.

I've always considered daemon tools one of the great "free" utilities out there.

Why exclude MS and Apple? (1)

Comboman (895500) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301689)

4) There's rumours of spyware (and frankly the fourth one applies to virtual[ly] all closed source software that doesn't come from MS or Apple).

Why exclude MS and Apple? In fact, I'd be more suspicious of software from MS or Apple spying on me since they have intimate access to undocumented holes in the respective operating systems. All other apps trying to "phone home" should be caught by your firewall.

Re:Skip to Eight: Nautilus Scripts (0, Redundant)

Dr. Evil (3501) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301147)

Do you mean like Daemon Tools? http://www.daemon-tools.cc/dtcc/download.php [daemon-tools.cc]

Re:Skip to Eight: Nautilus Scripts (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15301386)

I modded you Informative. Someone had modded you redundant and I can't see how redundant applies when these two posts about Daemon Tools are only a minute or two apart. More likely you were typing when the other poster submitted theirs.

Thanks for the info!

Re:Skip to Eight: Nautilus Scripts (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15301502)

There is nothing more pathetic then someone replying anonymously to their own posts complaining about moderation.

Redundant is a fair mod for the GP. Regardless of the author's intent, it's repeating information.

Re:Skip to Eight: Nautilus Scripts (0, Offtopic)

bombadillo (706765) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301239)

OS X can mount ISO's out of the box. Perhaps Nautilus should include the ISO mounting script with their distro....

Re:Skip to Eight: Nautilus Scripts (1)

gimpimp (218741) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301313)

double clicking an iso will open it as a directory view.

Re:Skip to Eight: Nautilus Scripts (4, Informative)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301322)

OS X can mount ISO's out of the box. Perhaps Nautilus should include the ISO mounting script with their distro.

1) Nautilus is not a distro.
2) All linux distros can mount ISOs out of the box
3) The Nautilus script is a pretty front end to mount, just like OS X (presumably) has a pretty front end to hdiutil (I'm not near a mac machine so I can't check)
4) Thanks for piping up about OS X in a discussion comparing linux to windows! Perhaps you deserve my username [googlepages.com] more then I do?

Re:Skip to Eight: Nautilus Scripts (2, Informative)

NSIM (953498) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301375)

> I looked for equivilant functionality under windows recently & just couldn't find it Check out http://www.gratis-webserver.de/ClonyPage/2.html [gratis-webserver.de] seems to work pretty well.

Nautilus Actions (3, Informative)

tjwhaynes (114792) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301423)

The most useful feature of Nautilus is the scripts functionality, so simple & elegant.

I used to think so but then I discovered Nautilus Actions [grumz.net] and things have been a lot better since then. But don't throw away your Nautilus scripts - you can use them with Actions. The beauty of Actions is that it is sensitive to the current selected file/files/directory/directories/mix so that only Actions that are appropriate are visible.

For example, if you have a script to make a thumbnail of one or more JPEGs, then you can set the criteria for Actions to only show you that action for selections of just JPEGs.

Give it a try - it's a really nice feature. Hopefully it will be part of GNOME 2.16.

Cheers,
Toby Haynes

Re:Nautilus Actions (1)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301614)

Oh - that does look cool [grumz.net]

I hope it makes it into 2.16 too :-) Cheers for the link!

Re:Skip to Eight: Nautilus Scripts (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15301470)

Well said, the scripting is truly handy. I use to do much photography. I created scripts to rotate,scale etc. using xdialog if any user input was needed. One of the most handy scripts I made was one that creates a gallery, making the thumbnails/html etc. I'd just selected the photos I wanted in that gallery then right click, much faster than first moving the files I wanted to a tmp dir.

I truly wish MS had some sort of scripting like this, however I can see how it would/could be abused from the word go due to the overall security model. I'm using winXp right now due to certain music software, as this machine is on it's last legs, perhaps a compromise would be a intel mac triboot? Then I could praise/mock all three systems at once.

Long live Nautilus. -_-

I said it before and I'll say it again (-1, Flamebait)

bogie (31020) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301094)

Dam you Eazel! Dam you to Hell!

Re:I said it before and I'll say it again (1)

From A Far Away Land (930780) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301148)

For the mods:
"Nautilus has something of a colorful past. It was created by a company called Eazel, staffed by ex-Apple programmers that wanted to bring ease of use to the Linux desktop."

I have a touch of old-fogeyism in me, and wish that Linux's file system GUI management tools were all standardized and work as simply as My Computer/Explorer do. But the horrible XP search can be replaced with anything ;-)

Re:I said it before and I'll say it again (1)

kfg (145172) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301546)

I have a touch of old-fogeyism in me, and wish that Linux's file system GUI management tools were all standardized and work as simply as My Computer/Explorer do.

I have a touch of old-fogeyism in me. What the hell is a GUI and why would I want to manage it from the file system?

Also, if Your Computer works so simply, what are you bitching about?

KFG

Fvwm2 forever! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15301103)

Nautilus also sucks all the performance out of your computer.

Still sucks... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15301106)

in terms of functionality and ease of use compared to Konqueror.

10 (0, Troll)

minus_273 (174041) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301112)

It was made by a company that tried to make money while still giving it out for free. It went under (i wonder why).

Re:10 (2)

minus_273 (174041) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301415)

troll? hello? Eazel [wikipedia.org] made natilus and went under immediatly after 1.0 was released.

One thing you should know ... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15301115)

it's really slow !!!

Kan it run in KDE (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15301131)

I use KDE you insensitive clod...

Re:Kan it run in KDE (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15301161)

Don't you mean "insensitive klod"?

As a long-time GNOME user... (4, Funny)

Black Parrot (19622) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301139)

The only thing I've ever bothered to learn about Nautilus is how to disable it after every upgrade.

Re:As a long-time GNOME user... (2, Funny)

stevewahl (311107) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301238)

The only thing I've ever bothered to learn about Nautilus is how to disable it after every upgrade.

Exactly!

What are these file explorer / desktop things for, anyway? A shell window with cd, ls, tab completion, and wildcards usually gets me where I want to be faster, and when I want to look at the file tree in a more "browsing" fashion, I use dirmode in EMACS.

Now I'll go back and RTFA, but if anyone who uses the tools I mention switches to using Nautilus (or similar) for some particular task they find easier there, I'd love to hear about it. Seriously, if I'm missing something, I want to know.

Re:As a long-time GNOME user... (2, Insightful)

BenjyD (316700) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301311)

I'd like to see you select the correct jpeg out of a directory of 500 without an icon preview.

Using a GUI also takes less learning and less mental effort. I'd be intersted to see actual timed comparisons of the two as well, I've read that command line users often think they are being quicker than GUI users, but acutally aren't because of the way the brain senses time.

Re:As a long-time GNOME user... (1)

Neoprofin (871029) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301431)

Not to mention that you can use a mouse effectively with one hand while laying down. I'm not saying people can't type one handed, but I think the performance hit is a little greater. I'm a lazy man and sometimes I need to stretch out for six hours at a time.

Re:As a long-time GNOME user... (2, Insightful)

stevewahl (311107) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301541)

I'd like to see you select the correct jpeg out of a directory of 500 without an icon preview.

That is something I don't do very often, and when I do I use FireFox pointing at my html photo album.

I think what an individual's common activites are may have a lot to bear on this. I'm much more likely to search for a text string in a tree of source code than search for a particular .jpg in a single directory of 500.

e.g. emacs [M-x grep-find "what I'm looking for"] which runs "find . -type f -print0 | xargs -0 -e grep -n -e "what I'm looking for". (Is there an easy way to do that in the typical GUI file browser?)

Re:As a long-time GNOME user... (1)

BenjyD (316700) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301702)

Selecting pictures or movies out of a directory is something I (and I imagine many other people) do all the time. As for your search example, I think most people just use a decent text editor that has that funcionality built in, without relying on arcane command line commands. Textmate has find in project, jEdit has hypersearch and all sorts of options, even SCiTE does find in directory.

Re:As a long-time GNOME user... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15301435)

Well, not sure if its for you, but as far as file managers go, i think the best are: emelfm, rox, and worker.

emelfm (or emelfm2 if you use gtk2) is fast and speedy, contains a builtin console (but you have to use the line input widget to tell it things, i only used it to see whet mplayer crashed), good if you want to use your shell scripts as buttons.

rox, well, thats face it, its another desktop file manager, but at least its not a windows/mac wannabe. Its actual fast, unlike konquer/natilus. The screen layout is also nice, unlike emelfm and worker, its not for command line users to much, but it is fast and simple to use for people that need a simple gui file manager.

worker, thats face it, its the uglyest thing youll ever see. But, once you get around its limited themeability, and strange widget set, youll see its quite fast, and configurable, and, best of all, unlike every other gui file manager for linux i seen, its the only one that can run a file based on its type, and not its name/extention (altho it can also use its name, if you like). I use worker myself, as it gets the job done, and i have LOTS of files that dont have extentions, so the other file managers just cant cut it for me.

All in all, those are the three best gui file managers i used, all are speedy and light.

Oh I'm well aware (1)

GigsVT (208848) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301150)

I hate it when I turn off that Nautilus crap, I lose my desktop background every restart. Have to manually set it with the desktop background tool every restart, so I know Nautilus doesn't need to run for it to get set, they were just lazy.

Re:Oh I'm well aware (1)

clydemaxwell (935315) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301481)

Run the background setter in your .xsession? This is a reasonable approximation of what the nautilus 'crap' does anyway. And for those of us in fluxbox, this is what we do by default. 'fbsetbg -l'

Re:Oh I'm well aware (1)

duffbeer23 (710118) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301649)

Actually, what I think you're running into (because it's happened to me) is that nautilus is attempting to run on your desktop as well. Run nautilus with the "--no-desktop" param and you'll be good. I use enlightenment for my desktop manager but nautilus works when I need it.

Re:Oh I'm well aware (2, Insightful)

HaydnH (877214) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301655)

Nautilus controls the desktop aswell as being a file manager. If you just want the file manager use "nautilus --no-desktop", alternatively set GConf, see this post. [slashdot.org]

bah (0, Troll)

binford2k (142561) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301158)

What a waste of an article. I was hoping to find something new and interesting.

Re:bah (2, Insightful)

tchernobog (752560) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301236)

Yes, it's very basic, targeted mostly at newbies. However, bringing also these articles to the attention of the masses isn't inherently bad. There could be always new ./ visitors who can benefit from a simple tutorial about a (for some of us) well known feature which is obscure to them, or people that can point out a simple article like this to a not-so-tech-savvy friend of theirs.

I would rather complain about the increasingly frequent Slashdot dupes and karma-pumping tabloid stories than these articles (although I admit a less "epic" title from the editor would have been preferred).

GNOME is dead to me and Nautilus is the reason. (-1, Troll)

facelessnumber (613859) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301176)

I think Nautilus is cool for what it is, but it was a lot cooler before we got sent on a trip back to 1995 with the infuriating "spatial" default mode. I think that was the nail in GNOME's coffin for me personally. And when they did that, it also coincided with the release of KDE 3.2, which (imho) finally brought Konqueror to a mature enough state to use as a browser. It was already a kickass file manager, and the main reason for that, aside from its file system transparency, (kioslaves - FTP, NFS, SMB, SSH... All treated just like a folder on a hard drive, and now in tabs too!) is that it doesn't make assumptions about my intelligence. It's built to be simple enough for the majority of users, yet manages not to compromise any of its convenience and power for more advanced users. I really hate it when a tool I like gets dumbed-down for the masses and becomes less functional for me. I used to be a GNOME guy, but because of the very counter-productive "usability" campaign and mass removal/hiding of features, 2.4 was the last great GNOME and everything since then (while I was still bothering to look) has sucked. Konqueror owns Nautlius, and only the rate at which KDE improves its feature set can match the rate at which GNOME reduces theirs. It's really quite sad, 'cause I used to love GNOME.

Re:GNOME is dead to me and Nautilus is the reason. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15301326)

It's really quite sad, 'cause I used to love GNOME.

Did you ever really love GNOME? Judging from your comment history, you seem to be promoting KDE rather frequently. I am not saying that you are a KDE troll, but at least some of your comments look suspicious.

Anyway, I have hated Nautilus since GNOME 2.0 and I ended up disabling it after every upgrade. But now that I am using GNOME 2.14, I kind of like Nautilus. It is reasonably fast, not intrusive and rather convenient to use. Contrary to some users here, I like the spatial mode. Of course I still use the command line for some tasks, but Nautilus has a lot of nice features that make using it more efficient than using the command line (for many tasks, but not all yet).

Re:GNOME is dead to me and Nautilus is the reason. (1)

facelessnumber (613859) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301632)

Did you ever really love GNOME? Judging from your comment history, you seem to be promoting KDE rather frequently. I am not saying that you are a KDE troll, but at least some of your comments look suspicious.

Really, I did love GNOME. I felt like KDE was too bloated, GNOME seemed faster, didn't load me down with stuff I'd never use. And KDE frankly was the gayest looking thing I'd ever seen with it's old default "Keramik" theme and putrid default colors. Thankfully somebody recognized this, and you may or may not like Plastik or Lipstik, but I think it beats the old stuff. No, GNOME was clean and polished at 2.4, KDE was buggy and all fluff at 3.1. The reason you don't see me embracing GNOME in my comment history is that I fully defected to KDE with the release of GNOME 2.6 a couple of years ago. Really it seemed like GNOME just kept getting worse while each thing I didn't like about KDE got fixed. I'm really picky about having an optimal user interface tailored to my habits and needs, and KDE has infinitely configurable behavior. GNOME seems afraid that configurability, versatile UI's and usable file dialogs, will somehow confuse and frighten their users... But come on... These are Linux users. Most of these people are somewhat technical, or at least interested in computers enough to have installed their own operating system. There are exceptions, but for the most part a person with linux on their computer has USED a friggin' computer before and does not need his or her hand held to that degree. People don't switch to Linux for the same reason they switch to Mac. A typical Linux user didn't become one because Windows wasn't easy enough to use and he was afraid of viruses. He switched because he wanted to do more with his computer and the learning curve didn't scare him. That guy is well past the "problems" that GNOME started addressing after 2.4.

Every time I'd upgrade GNOME, I'd comb the system hunting down ways to re-enable what they took out. New features were scarce and it was all about gutting the ones it had. When I install a new KDE, I eagerly comb the system looking for features and improvements and I'm never disappointed. There for a while I was expecting Clippy to show up in the next version of GNOME, but

Many of the same feelings here. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15301344)

I must agree. I was a former GNOME user, as well. But like you, I have since switched to KDE.

It wasn't just the problems with Nautilus that you mentioned. I think it was far more widespread, throughout the GNOME community and implementation. The decentralized community spirit doesn't lead to a highly-coherent, tightly-integrated desktop suite. KDE, on the other hand, does offer just such a collection of programs.

While I can go from one KDE program to another with ease, due to the commonality shared between many of the core programs, I find that that just isn't the case with GNOME. There are too many subtle differences between the packages. And then you get a package like Nautilus, while fantastic in its own right, it just doesn't fit in well with the other pieces of software.

I also must complain about the speed of Nautilus. To have a well-rounded experience, I recently did try Nautilus 2.12.0. Frankly, it's quite slow. At times it can become very frustrating waiting for it to redraw a directory containing several hundred files. It'd be one thing if both Konqueror, Nautilus, and other files managers ran into the same problem. But that just doesn't happen. Konqueror handles the same directory with ease.

Now, I haven't profiled it, or examined the Nautilus source code to find out why it was so much slower. It may very well have been a problem with GTK+ (but it's lack of quality is another discussion). Either way, I likely won't use a product that exhibits such flaws, or is built upon other flawed software.

Re:GNOME is dead to me and Nautilus is the reason. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15301349)

Stop writing such a nonsense. Nothing forces you to use the spatial mode. You can switch the behaviour on and off by clicking on the preferences menu.

Anyway for 99% of all new users spatial mode is the best option.

Re:GNOME is dead to me and Nautilus is the reason. (1)

ramunasg (973228) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301351)

I think they got the right joice, then they switched to the spatial interface. It looks very clean and pleasent and you can consentrate on the subject - the files.

Re:GNOME is dead to me and Nautilus is the reason. (1)

Bastian (66383) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301354)

What's so horrible about having to click a checkbox to make Nautilus not be spatial anymore? Or is browser mode also an example of everything that is and ever has been wrong with the computing industry?

Re:GNOME is dead to me and Nautilus is the reason. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15301357)

Did you try changing the option to "browser" mode? I know, I know, it'd be nice for it to be the default, but technically, it has not been dumbed down. You don't need to be stuck in the spatial world. I sure don't. (and yes I will add my voice to those calling onto the GNOME guys to change the default... though I guess any distro maintainer can do it too)

Re:GNOME is dead to me and Nautilus is the reason. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15301400)

Gnone is reborn for me and the reason is Ubuntu. Even with Gnome's quirks, Ubuntu is great because mostly everything just works. Of course there is also Kubuntu, but the time and effort spent on that distro seems to be considerably less compared to Ubuntu and it shows.

Re:GNOME is dead to me and Nautilus is the reason. (1)

someone300 (891284) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301445)

You know GNOME supports something like kioslaves: GNOME-VFS. SFTP, FTP, CDDA, HTTP, DAV and many other things (apparently on the fly decompression too but I don't know how that works or if that works -- file roller sucks).

I agree in that Konqueror is likely more powerful than Nautilus, however, I very rarely find the need to use many of Konqueror's features, despite being quite a heavy computer user/programmer - most just confuse me or distract me. For anything that requires ungodly amounts of file operations, a quick "Open shell here" and small bash one-liner will often be quicker IMO (yes I find bash less confusing than Konqueror ;))

That said, there is great potential for ease of use and usability in the KDE project, I feel that their UIs could just do with a bit of polish. I find they always have the impression of being tacky, where they do what you want, and you can find most of the features, but it's a bit messy and takes longer to get used to and use than it should.

Re:GNOME is dead to me and Nautilus is the reason. (2, Insightful)

nutshell42 (557890) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301706)

You know GNOME supports something like kioslaves: GNOME-VFS. SFTP, FTP, CDDA, HTTP, DAV and many other things (apparently on the fly decompression too but I don't know how that works or if that works -- file roller sucks).

But I don't think it's as well integrated as kio-slaves. Correct me if I'm wrong but I remember that in one of the Gnome 2.14 new-features articles we had on /. they mentioned that gedit now supports opening ftp etc like local files.

This implies that Gnome-VFS has to be integrated seperately in every app while I can use kio-slaves in every input field that accepts uri's in every app that uses the kdelibs.

Thank you! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15301458)

I never knew you could make remote directories over SSH show up as folders in Konqueror. That's incredibly useful. Thanks!

Re:GNOME is dead to me and Nautilus is the reason. (2, Interesting)

caseih (160668) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301644)

Definitely KDE's io-slaves are very good. Gnome does have the gnome-vfs subsystem, which in theory provides a similar function, but just seems to be lacking any real, useful functionality. I have yet to see gnome-vfs used the way most KDE users depend on io-slaves. There's not even a working fish:/// protocol. There is sftp:/// but I would find fish more useful as it works with servers that may not have sftp working; all it needs is shell access. However, both io-slaves and gnome-vfs have a fatal flaw in that they only are available to apps who know about them (IE linked to the KDE or Gnome libraries). There are a myriad of usability issues to overcome to make this kind of io layer work at the lower levels where all apps could benefit, however. So it is a tough issue. I have used a hack that used fuse to mount a kde io-slave url to a folder that anyone could access. It worked most of the time, but required an X11 connection to display the password dialog boxes.

Since spacial browsing is optional, I don't think that this alone is a valid reason to disparage Nautilus. The tired old argument against Gnome for having reasonable, simple defaults doesn't really fly either. It's all a matter of personal preference. Your need to micromanage the UI doesn't mean that all users want to micromange the UI anymore than my preference of sane defaults that I never have to tweak means everyone should also have the same preference. I don't find either Konqueror or Nautilus to be that useful to me period. My favorite file managers are the bash shell and the venerable Midnight Commander.

Trash Dot (4, Funny)

digitaldc (879047) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301206)

One: Adding Delete
The ~/.Trash directory is where files are moved if you delete local files. On mounted volumes, Nautilus will create a hidden .Trash-uid directory if you move a file to the trash, as long as you have the file permissions.


So will /. sue for copyright infringement? Or is it DRM? Or is it just some Trashy slander?

Re:Trash Dot (1)

Evangelion (2145) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301246)


Slander and libel only apply to untrue statements.

Let's see... (-1, Flamebait)

Evangelion (2145) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301222)

1) It's slow
2) It sucks
3) Here's how you disable it...
.
.
.

Is there anything else you really need to know about it?

Re:Let's see... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15301392)

My point of view:
1) It's fast
2) It doesn't suck (it is actually very nice IMHO)
3) If you want to disable it, just remove it from your session, save your session and there you go! Nothing secret about that.

The only thing one has to know. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15301261)

The only thing one has to know about Nautilus is how to disable it.
Various options are available:
http://www.google.com/search?q=%22disable+nautilus [google.com]

9 things? (1)

jc87 (882219) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301271)

Is just my impression or they forgot to mention Nautilus can be also used to access a ftp ( simple yet useful )?

Re:9 things? (1)

Slashcrap (869349) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301335)

Is just my impression or they forgot to mention Nautilus can be also used to access a ftp ( simple yet useful )?

Midnight Commander running in a text console can do that as well. It can also do many other things and has a distinct advantage over Nautilus in that it isn't a slow, bloated, dysfunctional piece of shit.

I think Nautilus is what put me off of GNOME many years ago. Well, that and its developers.

PS. Konqueror also does FTP and STFP. And so does any KDE app.

Re:9 things? (1)

Short Circuit (52384) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301434)

I was pleasently surprised when the version I recently installed supported ssh.

Setting up an ssh daemon on my computers is much easier, and more secure, than setting up an FTP server. And more convenient than NFS or Samba.

Next gen file manager (4, Interesting)

gimpimp (218741) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301275)

if you like nautilus, but you'd like something faster, smaller etc, take a look at thunar [xfce.org] . It's the file manager for the xfce project. works well in gnome as a nautilus replacement, and where nautilus has extensions(scripts), thunar has plugins. have a look.

One good tip. (2, Interesting)

reed (19777) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301278)

OK, that was a completely useless article.

The nautilus-scripts thing is useful however. There is a script to upload photos to flickr at http://nozell.com/blog/archives/2004/09/04/flickr- upload-for-gnomes-nautilus/ [nozell.com] though the progress bar doesn't update right. I also made some shell scripts that resize images using 'convert' from ImageMagick to thumbnail size and webpage size (e.g. max 700 px wide).

One thing it shows though is that there is still a lot of confusing inconsistency on where Gnome-related applications store preferences and other data. IMO it should *All* be in ~/.nautilus, not scattered between there, ~/.gnome2, ~/.gtk, etc. You probably also have a ~/.gnome too for non-Gnome2 apps.

The global settings for Gnome are also scattered everywhere.

I wish they'd fix that.

Knowledge is Always a Good Thing (3, Interesting)

eno2001 (527078) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301284)

Just a few weeks ago I posted a JE asking people what is so special about the spatial file management metaphor. Not so much because I'm bitching about it, but because I was genuinely curious about how my Slashdot friends feel. I got some good responses as well as some really good conversation going about Nautilus and GNOME. I'd been on a KDE journey (I prefer GNOME and no I don't want a flame fest both environment have their good and bad points) since November to really kick the tires and just switched back to GNOME. I decided to take the suggestions from my friends and post them in another more cohesive JE [slashdot.org] in the hopes that it would be helpful. I have to say with my new found knowledge about Nautilus plus what the article posted on the front page today reveals, I'm really enjoying Nautilus a lot these days.

Re:Knowledge is Always a Good Thing (1, Insightful)

Slashcrap (869349) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301409)

I have to say with my new found knowledge about Nautilus plus what the article posted on the front page today reveals, I'm really enjoying Nautilus a lot these days.

And I'm really enjoying repeatedly slamming my testicles in the refrigerator door.

It's a big change from my previous hobby of not slamming my balls in the door, but I guess that my new hobby and your love of Nautilus proves that people can get used to just about anything.

Although frankly, I think you might be a little bit weird.

Re:Knowledge is Always a Good Thing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15301463)

spoken like a someone who loves the cock from bill gates or steve jobs

nautilus-actions (1)

tvon (169105) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301304)

I'm not really a big fan of anything mentioned in the article, but I love the Nautilus Actions extension:

http://www.grumz.net/node/8 [grumz.net]

In short it lets you configure context menu actions for files based on type/location/etc. It's significantly better than vanilla nautilus scripts.

Re:nautilus-actions [same exists for KDE] (1)

FellowConspirator (882908) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301508)

"Actions" in Nautilus with that extension is equivalent to KDE's "Actions" -- something that I use a lot and think is sorely under-used (in both KDE and GNOME).

For example, adding a context-menu option to rotate images involves nothing more than writing a .desktop entry that identifies the file-types it applies to and doing 'mogrify -rotate 90 %f' to them. That's a simple case, but I use this sort of thing all the time (for example, to publish RPMs to a local repository, to add/remove items from a mirror list, convert data formats, etc.).

Please let TFA say (1)

LittleLebowskiUrbanA (619114) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301309)

that there's tabs or split level viewing SOMEWHERE hidden in Nautilus. I don't see how tabs go against the HIG guidelines but maybe I just don't get it.

People actually use Nautilus? (1)

Penguin Programmer (241752) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301317)

I've been using Linux for a long time, but it was relatively early in my Linux experience that I realized graphical file managers are useless and only serve to slow me down and make me less productive. For years, most *nixes have shipped with an excellent file manager: bash.

I find that after using the commandline for all of my file management for a number of years, it's actually infuriating to try and use a graphical file manager. Nothing works properly, I can't do the things I expect to be able to do easily and it requires extensive use of the mouse.

Call me a purist and a luddite, but I bet I can find and manage my files faster with bash and related utilities than you can with Nautilus.

Re:People actually use Nautilus? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15301566)

Yes, you are mostly correct. But lets take the case of a directory with photos/movie clips and you want to see what they are. Using scripting in Nautilus will make life much smooth, + you need think of people like my mother that use..I mean, try and use computers.

Re:People actually use Nautilus? (1)

h_benderson (928114) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301596)

Scenario: You return from a three week trip, and offload all the pictures from your digicam to your harddrive, with the intention of sorting them and then backing them up. You notice that you haven't offloaded the pictures for quite some time now; thanks to your huge SD Card, the oldest pictures on your cam where taken around X-Mas. The digicam has them stored all in the same directory, which you transfer to your harddrive.

Now convince me that bash is simpler to sort through your pictures than Nautilus/Konqueror/Rox.

The new nautilus (1)

jonesy16 (595988) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301336)

For those still complaining that Nautilus is slow, you're probably the same people that hate Gnome and switched permanently to KDE about 5 years ago. Nautilus, especially in its latest incarnations is extremely fast at file browsing. And I don't know why more people don't mention it, but you can bypass the trash / recycle bin in almost every operating system by pressing "Shift-Delete" when you have a file selected. Works in windows, works in Gnome . . .

I use gnome, but I hate nautilus (2, Interesting)

njcajun (588891) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301364)

Nautilus is one of the most annoying interfaces ever. I generally like a lot of the other gnome apps I use, and find gnome in general to be pretty usable, but I don't rely (knowingly) on nautilus for anything, and I don't go to it as a tool to do anything.

My apologies if this is incorrect, but I believe nautilus is responsible for the disgustingly *bad* interface that pops up when you run firefox under gnome and want to choose an application to open something with. I can't just type in a command and hit enter... that would be too easy. Instead, you have to wait for nautilus to load the entire freakin' /usr/bin directory and then click on the thing you want and click "open" or something. C'mon. That's horrid.

I guess it doesn't fit my brain (what little matter there is of it). But OTOH, doesn't an article showing you the hidden features of nautilus kind of speak to its usability? By the way, aren't these features documented in the Nautilus manual?

Re:I use gnome, but I hate nautilus (1)

illerd (579494) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301561)

That "usability enhancement" is absolutely terrible, I agree. But I think it's GTK's fault. Well, not really, because with other GTK apps (gimp) you can right click and get an "open location" or "open path" option, or something like that, and it gives you a simple text box in which you can type filesystem paths, and even do tab-completion. Of course, the Firefox wizards haven't yet seen the reason to enable this feature. So I guess you have them to blame.

Re:I use gnome, but I hate nautilus (1)

pyros (61399) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301574)

With the current file chooser in GNOME you can just start typing to specify a file in the currently viewed folder. Or you cna hit ctrl+l and type in an absolute path to any file.

Re:I use gnome, but I hate nautilus (3, Informative)

fader (107759) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301603)

My apologies if this is incorrect, but I believe nautilus is responsible for the disgustingly *bad* interface that pops up when you run firefox under gnome and want to choose an application to open something with. I can't just type in a command and hit enter... that would be too easy.

Yup, you're incorrect. That's the GTK2 file dialog, not Nautilus. They look similar because they're both GNOMEish, but the file dialog isn't actually a part of Nautilus. Oh, and you *can* type in a path... did you try to just start typing? As soon as you hit that first /, a textbox will appear. It even automagically completes as you type. It's extremely slick and fast if you already know the path you want.

Hiding the desktop (3, Informative)

xav12 (602450) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301439)

The most useful tip I know for Nautilus is how to stop it drawing the desktop:

Launch GConf (gconf-editor on the Dapper command line), navigate to /apps/nautilus/preferences and uncheck the "show_desktop" option.

This is especially useful if you connect to a Linux box using XDMCP from a machine using a rootless X server. I use Cygwin/X in rootless mode, and this switch means that bringing a Linux application to the top doesn't cause the root window (i.e. the Linux desktop) to be drawn, obscuring the Windows applications behind.

Desktop Community Support? (0, Offtopic)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301533)

Since upgrading Ubuntu 5.04 to 5.10, my desktop has had serious defects in rendering fonts in some apps (Firefox and Evolution), and can't burn audio CDs without refusing, misburning or crashing desktop/OS. The past 7 months of automatic updates, including the latest X.org dump, haven't fixed the problems. I haven't found messages in the Ubuntu forums, GNOME website or elsewhere on the Web indicating others with my problem, or who have solved it. Posting in those Ubuntu and GNOME forums hasn't returned any results. Where do I turn for that kind of support that actually works?

.trash (1)

joe 155 (937621) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301550)

the .trash is just the trash folder which is on the desktop, from what I read in the article i thought it was doing the windows thing of not deleting even after you remove it from the trash can, which is not the case... I don't know why they even bothered to mention it... I suppose it gave me something to do looking for it and then testing my sending something there. One interesting thing I did notice is that when I had what is ostensibly 2 versions of the same folder and deleted a file from one it went from the other in real time. This is certainly an improvement on explorer where you have to refresh everytime you want to see changes...

Confessions from a command hard liner (1)

SpaghettiPattern (609814) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301562)

I remember. People telling people to RTFM. And most people not RTFM.

I tried Nautilus years ago when it bombed constantly. So I never actually used it.

Now I'm pointed at the two options that make it work (view as list and open in browser) I might actually use it. And when my wife calls with a problem I can refer to it.

Thanks again to woz and jobs for coming up with the finder concept.

number 10 (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15301580)

10) it sucks
11) it crashes
12) it's a memory hog
13) use rm, cp, ln
14) it puts crap on your desktop
15) it has cheesy icons
16) it crashes
17) it looks silly
18 the only people who use are developers and noobs

The best file manager is Midnight Commander (1)

sgholt (973993) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301605)

Midnight Commander is in my opinion the best of all file managers. Nautilus' "spatial" browser setting just sucks...unfortunately I have not seen much improvement in Gnome at all in the last few upgrades. I can't say same the same for KDE which IS getting better as is Konqueror. The file manager was perfected with Norton Commander and all of it's clones.

Well, SBM never seems to fail (2, Informative)

Harold of the Rocks (82404) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301619)

I once worked at an unnamed institution which had a large Windoze network and some smaller "research" Linux labs. Just like everyone else's story for the most part the IT guys didn't have a clue about the Linux side of things. For some reason, which I could never figure out, trying to connect to people's Windoze home directories through SAMBA (smbmount) would never work properly--we'd always get some weird auth error or something. Just for kicks I tried to smb://hostname/share one day with Nautilus and it worked without complalint. Don't ask, don't tell I guess, but it sure saved some hassle transfering large files from host to host.

Anyone actually use emblems or notes? (2, Interesting)

reed (19777) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301630)


Does anyone actually use these?

Four things would make them actually useful:

1. The fact that it only displays one emblem in list view mode is unfortunate -- if in list view there was a column for each emblem (or a "subcolumn" for an "emblems" main column), which you could use as a sort criteria, then you could very easily find files with certain emblems.

2. Automatic and dynamic emblems based on combinations of things like current age, original directory of creation, current directory, file type, size, patterns in the filename or grepped from the contents, etc.

3. Ability to create new emblems on the fly, even without an icon (just text), right from a particular files "properties" window or the sidebar. Really they are the same idea as "tags" and you should be able to invent new ones as needed without going through the "miscellaneous file properties" catchall bin that is "Backgrounds and Emblems" in the edit menu.

4. Using emblems when doing a full filesystem search; a seperate catalogue for emblemized items could be kept to make it very fast. If the actual filesystem supports "tags" or "keywords" as metadata for files, then add emblem tags to the files, so non-nautilus aware tools could use these.

number ten (-1, Troll)

Cyno (85911) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301695)

Nautilus had all these features back in '98. They just had to bury them for a while to make it fair for everyone else..

Honestly, why have emblems and then take them away and bring them back? Are emblems confusing for the disabled or something? I'm sure there are reasons to take them away again. And what about web browsing? Everyone knows filemanagers like Explorer are really just web browsers.

GNOME is stupid. It feels like many people are trying to develope this DE by committee. I like the way KDE just quietly makes lots of progress instead of pretending its something its not. I like the way I can right-click and configure it without resorting to gconf-editor or whatever its called now. I have yet to need to edit any sort of KDE database to configure my desktop or apps. Its amazing. Its like it doesn't have a GNOME registry or something. Tell me, was GNOME just trying to be like Windows again? Because this whole registry idea feel very much like Windows. GNOME should be the default desktop for all mainstream linux distros, it suits 'em.

In other news... (1)

msuarezalvarez (667058) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301703)

In other news, the GNOME project has decided to change its logo.

Nine things.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15301721)

I can only think of one thing you should know....IT SUCKS!

changing application - file binding (1)

Dionysus (12737) | more than 7 years ago | (#15301737)

One thing I never got used to (don't know if it is a Nautilus thing or a GNOME thing) is how hard it is to make a new association between a file and an application. Apparently, you have to go to gconf, and create a new association, by extension and type. And I could never get it to stick (as in, log out, go back in, and the association disappeared). And god forbid, if you want to associate xml and xhtml to different applications. In KDE, right-click on the file, open with... option, type in the application, check the "remember application association...". Done and done.
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