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137 comments

I for one . . . (4, Funny)

cashman73 (855518) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403699)

I for one welcome our new mind-reading overlords!

Re:I for one . . . (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15403935)

Not so fast! Rumor has it that putting tinfoil around your head stops the robots!

Viva la resistencia!

Re:I for one . . . (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15404265)

Believe me, we know.

No... Score -1 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15404591)

tired.

At least they aren't thinking for themselves... (4, Insightful)

FrontalLobe (897758) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403701)

On the other hand... I'm sure AI would be more peaceful than some that would get their hands on the technology

Re:At least they aren't thinking for themselves... (4, Funny)

eln (21727) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404046)

My God, you're right! With this technology, someone could poke both of your eyes at once. We must invent a robotic hand we can put up against our noses to block this weapon immediately.

finally! (3, Funny)

dwarfling (977116) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403705)

guess vulcan trekkies have robo friends ;)

Re:finally! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15403738)

I thought that the Vulcan hand sign would be cool \\//, but unfortunately, it's just the V,, (index and middle finger parted, rest curled down).

Re:finally! (1)

dwarfling (977116) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404194)

it was planned , but R&D had some trouble, so this model will be a little late ...

Where's Mitchell Gant when you need him? (2, Funny)

Tackhead (54550) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403713)

"I must think in... Japanese?!?! [imdb.com] "

Re:Where's Mitchell Gant when you need him? (1)

Kuukai (865890) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403986)

And the Japanese must think in... German?!?! [imdb.com]

Re:Where's Mitchell Gant when you need him? (2, Funny)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404197)

Apparently you have to learn German if you want to become a doctor in Japan.

Re:Where's Mitchell Gant when you need him? (1)

DanHibiki (961690) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404545)

It's funny, because Shinji had to think in German when riding back seat in the 02.

Unfortunately... (5, Funny)

GillBates0 (664202) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403715)

...further trials resulted in the robotic hand trying to touch itself every other minute and repeatly making lewd gestures with it's middle finger.

Re:Unfortunately... (1)

Goblez (928516) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404216)

That's because you ordered the robot with the intelligence of a 6 year old ("No means No" ... "Ooooh! A Pool!"). You need to drop the flow to pick up a higher end model.

Re:Unfortunately... (1)

iminplaya (723125) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404408)

..further trials resulted in the robotic hand trying to touch itself every other minute...

So it was actually reading Michael Jackson's mind...

Science Fiction! (1)

InsomniacMK5 (975929) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403728)

It never ceases to amaze me how we have made science fiction from the past possible. Although I am quite curious how "A.I." will play out in the future, I am excited to own my very own, personal, light saber.

Re:Science Fiction! (1)

thebdj (768618) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403761)

It will obviously try to take over and kill us all....I mean that has to be the plot for at least a dozen sci-fi movies, a few of which were actually successful...

It's good to see they're making progress (2, Interesting)

something_wicked_thi (918168) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403731)

A while back, I remember reading that someone had invented a video game that was controlled similarly, but it took a while to train yourself to "think" properly. Having the robot mirror your own movement sounds far superior. If this continues to develop, I have some hope of never developing carpal tunnel syndrome.

Re:It's good to see they're making progress (1)

killqqq (572698) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404212)

That's why we need Newtype!!

Re:It's good to see they're making progress (1)

MBGMorden (803437) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404488)

Except that as developed, your "real" hands would be making the same movements as the robotic ones. No worries though. Once you do get carpal tunnle you can just lob them off and use the robot ones instead :).

Seriously though, this could work wonder for quadraplegics and such, where their real limbs don't work anymore, but they can still make the thoughts that would do so if they did work.

Re:It's good to see they're making progress (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15404580)

So I could make a robot that mows the lawn by mimicing me... mowing the lawn.
Ok...

Re:It's good to see they're making progress (1)

Talchas (954795) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404589)

I know this sort of thing (using electrodes or something more invasive IIRC) has been done in monkeys for a while. They would have the monkeys use a joystick to hit a target, and if they succeeded they got some reward. Meanwhile they were updating the software to properly recognize the movements. Then they cut out the stick and ran it just on the readings. Eventually the monkeys learned that the stick wasn't need to move it.

With mind-reading robots available (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15403733)

...can a Stephen Hawking Transformer be far behind?

Ask and ye shall receive (4, Informative)

spun (1352) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403840)

Here ya go. [theonion.com]

I was thinking of the sex market (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15403736)

Honda could enter the novelty sex market with this, for sure.

With this technology (4, Funny)

donglekey (124433) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403737)

I could steal old people's medicine

Re:With this technology (1)

Shadowlore (10860) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404495)

I could steal old people's medicine

More importantly you could finally get that candy from the baby!

Also found in the news: (2, Funny)

EmperorKagato (689705) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403739)

Venture Capitalists fund $300 billion dollars into a project presented by an organization called NERV.

Ironically (1)

everphilski (877346) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403792)

The venture capitalists, ironically, were part of an organization called STEELE.

Re:Ironically (1)

everphilski (877346) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403843)

The venture capitalists, ironically, were part of an organization called SEELE. SEELE, fat fingers.

seems like they went backwards (1)

musikit (716987) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403750)

arent the robots suppose to learn how to control the human brain?

Re:seems like they went backwards (1)

XMyth (266414) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404094)

Obviously they're only one switch away from that now....just change the direction of the device (point it the other way) and there we go.

So you don' t have to... (1)

Codename.Juggernaut (975811) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403784)

When will honda start implementing this technology into their cars? I can't wait to get cut off in traffic by some jerk while his civic is flipping me off.

basically... (1)

newSlashUser (455811) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403786)

the robot is either saying peace or cursing you out? init?

Prosthetics? (1)

jizziknight (976750) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403787)

This would be really cool to implement in prosthetics. How awesome would it be to get a robotic arm that functioned just like your real arm that got ripped off by another robot when it's AI went nutso instead of a flesh colored piece of plastic?

Just what we need, (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15403794)

More perverted robots.

Let me guess... (1)

Nos. (179609) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403799)

Not available in the USA.

Re:Let me guess... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15403919)

Not available in the USA.

That's right! Becase mind reading robots are against God's will! It's against life because it sucks our souls!

Considering the way our science scores are going down in the USA, and how a bunch of religious fanatics have been successful in getting religion taught in science classes, I'm sure there are quite a few folks here in the good'ol God fear'n USA who'll beleive it!

Who has a billion dollars? (1)

Noishe (829350) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403801)

So now everyone can have their own robot controled by their brain. But there's a catch! (omg) You only need your own billion dollar mri machine!

Re:Who has a billion dollars? (2, Funny)

SeaFox (739806) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404435)

No, the catch is you have to have a brain. That should lower the uptake on this thing.

Behind the curtain (1)

Overzeetop (214511) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403802)

FTA:

In a video demonstration in Tokyo, brain signals detected by a magnetic resonance imaging scanner were relayed to a robotic hand. A person in the MRI machine made a fist, spread his fingers and then made a V-sign. Several seconds later, a robotic hand mimicked the movements. (emphasis mine)

Afterward, a reporter who strayed too far from the crowd was warned by security not to look behind the curtain.

It's probably just latency (3, Informative)

PIPBoy3000 (619296) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404025)

You have to remember how MRI's work [wikipedia.org] :
It has been known for over 100 years (Roy and Sherrington 1890) that changes in blood flow and blood oxygenation in the brain (collectively known as hemodynamics) are closely linked to neural activity. When nerve cells are active they consume oxygen carried by hemoglobin in red blood cells from local capillaries. The local response to this oxygen utilisation is an increase in blood flow to regions of increased neural activity, occurring after a delay of approximately 1-5 seconds.
Add in some computing time to process the image and you've got your latency right there.

Re:Behind the curtain (1)

kalirion (728907) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404054)

I'm glad I'm not the only one who noticed that. It could not possibly have taken that long to decode the brainwaves. At the very least this could mean that it wasn't making the gestures that generated the correct brainwaves. The person had to concentrate on something else afterwards before the robot moved.

Re:Behind the curtain (1)

Overzeetop (214511) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404112)

It was a joke. Really.

Actually, even if the recordation of the brainwaves controlling the motion was instantaneous (which is, apparently, is not - I'm a rocket scientist, not a brain surgeon) I would anticipate a good deal of postprocessing to get the motion reformatted from MRI raw data to motor controls. Actually, I think several seconds is pretty damned good.

Of course, if the sister post here is true (1-5 seconds of delay for O2 variation sensing), we won't see this for any sort of useful controls in real-time equipment. Even for non-critical items (say, controlling your car stereo), the delay will annoy most people enough that they won't like it. Heck, the delay in x-10 lighting signalling (just a couple hundred milliseconds) is enough to put me off.

Re:Behind the curtain (1)

Mr. Slippery (47854) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404146)

It could not possibly have taken that long to decode the brainwaves.

Except they're not reading "brainwaves", i.e. EEG, but MRI. MRI readings lags brain activity.

Technology upgrade! (1)

creimer (824291) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403812)

This is a siginficant technology upgrade from the roboroach [wireheading.com] . Still, I'll wait until SP1 just to make sure all the bugs are out of the system. :P

From Ork (1)

cpopin (671433) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403824)

...then merging that "V" sign with the humans and spouting, "Nanu, nanu."

Quirky Robots (2, Funny)

MrSquirrel (976630) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403983)

I just pray the day never comes when robots learn our most dear secret -- THE SHOCKER. Once they learn how to please our women, we are doomed! What do our fleshy human bodies have to offer a woman that an indestructible killing/loving machine cannot?

I've always thought... (4, Interesting)

Temujin_12 (832986) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403830)

...that it was only a matter of time until we started to see brain-to-machine mappings for communication. The possibilities are very exciting (coding with your brain anyone?). What scares me is when efforts are taken to have machine-to-brain communication. Call me crazy, but I prefer my own synapses to be the only source of thought in my brain. I don't even want to begin to think what it could happen when the machine segfaults (or gets hacked into) while injecting thoughts into my brain.

Re:I've always thought... (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404250)

So, um, do you read stuff?

That's interesting about the machine segfaulting though. I imagine the one that came from the 'It works, holy shit it works!' school of thought would fuck you mightily while the one that came from the "That's what I want it to do." school would do nothing harmful.

Useless! (0)

Garridan (597129) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403835)

They made a left hand? Who the hell uses those, these day?

Re:Useless! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15403957)

You should try it - it feels almost like somebody else is...

oh, nevermind.

Re:Useless! (1)

mwilliamson (672411) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404649)

Uh, over 1/2 of my department is lefthanded. You minority freak northpaw!!!

Tinfoil (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15403857)

And this is why I keep my tinfoil hat [wikipedia.org] on at all times!

Is it just me... (2, Funny)

llvllatrix (839969) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403869)

...or did that have giant fighting robots written all over it?

Re:Is it just me... (1)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404337)

Indeed. I want my HAR fighting league! Sounds like 2097 wasn't such a bad estimate.

I want my EVA! (0)

Nicolay77 (258497) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403876)

Hey, not only 14 year old people have brain waves!

universality? (4, Interesting)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403878)

So, does the MRI interpreting algorithm need to be tailored to each user, or could an 'off-the-shelf' interpreter work for anyone?

While I'm sure that bloodflow signatures for physical movements are similar between individuals, is there too much variability to prevent false recognition of a 'signal'?

Any neurobiologists out there care to help out?

Re:universality? (4, Interesting)

venicebeach (702856) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403998)

So, does the MRI interpreting algorithm need to be tailored to each user, or could an 'off-the-shelf' interpreter work for anyone? While I'm sure that bloodflow signatures for physical movements are similar between individuals, is there too much variability to prevent false recognition of a 'signal'?

At this point, it is surprising that they can even do it for an individual (discerning among these three quite similar hand movements). I am kind of skeptical myself. There is a lot of variability in fMRI signal even within an individual. I would guess the system is trained on a specific individual.

Between individuals you have additional sources of variability; for example, the foldings of the cortex are quite different from person to person. I personally have a very unusual precentral gyrus on the left side. Activity maps are typically aligned to anatomical maps so finding correspondences between individuals has to deal with the challenges of anatomical variability.

For gross things, it can be quite obvious what the person is doing. I can tell by looking at the activations in your brain if you are looking at something versus hearing something. But looking at a duck versus looking at a cow? Much harder. Making a V-sign versus making a fist? I've never seen a paper where someone reported being able to do this. It is theoretically possible, but difficult with a blurry MRI signal that aggregates over populations of neurons. You can certainly do it if you implant electrodes into the brain. Recordings from monkey premotor cortex, for example, find neurons that fire when specific movements are made.

Re:universality? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15404085)

all the images I've seen for fMRI are averaged over many trials to pull the signal out of the noise. The signal is so small, I don't know how they would do this in real-time for one person, and forget about universality (at this point)

Re:universality? (2, Interesting)

Chabil Ha' (875116) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404423)

It's not just the robot being able to interpret your brain waves, but your brain also adjusting to new interface as well. Take for example babies: they often don't have much control of their appendages, not just because of underdeveloped muscles, but the pathways to fine motor control have to be developed as well.

This is also demonstrated to learning to use a joystick or gamepad. Anyone new to a different kind of interface needs to make certain adjustments and brain motor connections to accommodate a new way of manipulating things. I am quite adept at FSP games on the PC, for example, but when I started playing Halo on X-Box, I was running around like a drunken sailor. Overtime, however, my hand and mind became quite accustomed to manipulating the movements on the screen. So would it be with your mind controlling the robot.

hmmmm (4, Informative)

venicebeach (702856) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403890)

I've done some fMRI of motor movements... All these movements, the fist, the V-sign, would activate the hand area, premotor cortex, and some parietal areas... I am very skeptical that you could tell the difference between them. But if they can that is very impressive, especially to do it in real time...

By the way, MRI does not measure "brain waves". It measures blood oxygenation changes, which are related to the firing of neurons.

Re:hmmmm (1)

Roger_Wilco (138600) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404681)

And there's one of the big problems with fMRI:

By the way, MRI does not measure "brain waves". It measures blood oxygenation changes, which are related to the firing of neurons.

It is quite likely that the BOLD signal and neural spiking are related. Everybody believes it, myself included. But there is still not that much evidence of the connection.

Mind Reader (2, Funny)

tgpo (976851) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403943)

I really don't want a Robot acting out what's in my head. The mixture of honey, custard, cucumbers, and Captain Cruch cereal is deadly on robotic moving parts....just trust me on this one.

Get ready for the robot wars... (1)

dfj225 (587560) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403947)

Because that 'V' was for Vendetta.

cool :) (1)

FudRucker (866063) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403969)

i hope this interfaces with my orbiting brain lazor.

Re:cool :) (1)

HumanisticJones (972339) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404161)

As long as it runs on Linux it should interface with said orbiting brain lasers as well as your Beowulf Cluster of Atomic Supermen.

like the monkey stuff from a few years ago (5, Interesting)

kaan (88626) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403970)

About 3 years ago, some scientists hooked up a chimpanzee and captured brain signals to control a robotic arm. Their results were quite a bit more impressive I think, because the robotic arm had full motion control, and was physically located several hundred miles away from the chimp. But still, this stuff from Honda is cool, because it's controlled by humans using mri, not wires plugged into your brain like the monkey stuff. I just hope they don't try to put brain controller stuff in their vehicles...

Here's an article from New Scientist:
http://www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=dn4262 [newscientist.com]

Re:like the monkey stuff from a few years ago (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15404115)

1) No one hooked up a chimp to anything. There is little to no invasive research of this type applied to non-human apes. Monkeys are used.
2) the "monkey" did not control robotic arms hundreds of miles away. The robotic arms hundreds of miles away were moved with signals made in the monkey's brain.

Control implies closed-loop feedback, and those monkeys were completely unaware they were controlled something in Srini's lab in Boston.

The researcher in question, Nicolelis, has more recent work in which closed-loop feedback is used, and also has some human trials going, but that is all more recent developments than the Srini-MIT-connection.

Re:like the monkey stuff from a few years ago (1)

venicebeach (702856) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404237)

2) the "monkey" did not control robotic arms hundreds of miles away. The robotic arms hundreds of miles away were moved with signals made in the monkey's brain.

Sorry, what's the difference?

Promising Research (1)

sidfaiwu (901221) | more than 7 years ago | (#15403993)

I'm really curious about this device. Does the user have to actually have to go through the hand motions or is it sufficient to just think about moving your hand? I'm also interested in how this technology could be used for applications beyond mimicry. The article talks about using the technology to replace keyboards and cell phones, but how can it mimic placing a call? A cell phone is not a natural part of our body that we can manipulate directly with our minds like our hand is.

Also, if they did develop a mind/computer interface, can you imagine how frustratingly slow many software applications would suddenly seem? GUIs would probably require some major overhauls in order to adapt.

Re:Promising Research (1)

venicebeach (702856) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404037)

Does the user have to actually have to go through the hand motions or is it sufficient to just think about moving your hand?

That depends on where they are getting the relevant information from. Imagining a movement and performing it produce overlapping but not identical brain activations. If they can get enough info from just the overlapping areas then conceivably you could do that...

Re:Promising Research (1)

dmitrygr (736758) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404531)

A cell phone is not a natural part of our body
Tell that to my 16-year-old sister

Gesture... (1)

Procrastin8er (791570) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404014)

Can it perform a far more useful gesture, the bird?

New meaning to telecommuting (2, Interesting)

psyklopz (412711) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404042)

Imagine a world where you can go hook yourself into a robotic control chamber and somewhere on the other side of the world, your robotic counterpart begins to walk around, talk, do things, all based on your brainwaves.

Meanwhile, video from teh robot's 'eye' are transmitted to a 3d viewer in front of your face.

Forget star-rek transporters. Thisi s the next best (and plausible) thing.

Very bad implications for crime and terrorism, though.

Re:New meaning to telecommuting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15404188)

There's already been several Neon Genesis Evangelion references in the comments to this story, but I think you've made the first one to Ghost in the Shell.

Re:New meaning to telecommuting (1)

forkazoo (138186) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404565)

Imagine a world where you can go hook yourself into a robotic control chamber and somewhere on the other side of the world, your robotic counterpart begins to walk around, talk, do things, all based on your brainwaves.

Meanwhile, video from teh robot's 'eye' are transmitted to a 3d viewer in front of your face.

Forget star-rek transporters. Thisi s the next best (and plausible) thing.

Very bad implications for crime and terrorism, though.


I don't know that it would be that bad for crime and terrorism. Sure, the robot could carry a bomb, but it would also be a relatively expensive piece of equipment that most private citizens wouldn't own. I imagine companies owning the bots and control booths. Then, people just rent out bots for day trips, or business meetings, etc. Imagine the benefits to tourism, and rapid emergency response. The most qualified experts could "be" at the scene of a disaster in moments. Every firefighter in the country could take over every robot in a city if there was a bombing, etc.

More Links (2, Informative)

vertinox (846076) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404045)

As per the discussion on Digg [digg.com] here is a video of the robot in action with the MRI:

http://www.newlaunches.com/archives/honda_develops _bmi_robot_hand.php [newlaunches.com]

And all the other links that were related:

http://www.engadget.com/2006/05/24/hondas-asimo-ge ts-mind-control-interface/ [engadget.com]

http://www.japancorp.net/Article.Asp?Art_ID=12565 [japancorp.net]

The Japancorp has the most information than both the engadget and then Yahoo.

Obligatory... (1)

talkingpaperclip (952112) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404065)

In Soviet Russia, Honda Robots control Brain Waves!

I, for one, welcome our new shocker-wielding robotic overlords.

I know what they are all thinking (2, Insightful)

sentientbrendan (316150) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404079)

GIANT FIGHTING ROBOTS

Seriously, why else has Japan dumped all this money into robotics and AI over the past 30 years? It's because everyone there grew up on Gigantor http://www.gigantor.org/ [gigantor.org] and Gundom, that's why. They are going to make giant fighting robots if it kills them.

Really though, this is all just trying to fill a void after the death of Godzilla in the late 60's. Substituting one giant stompy thing for another.

If you want to learn more about the life and times of gozilla and natures other lovable giant scamps, then I suggest you check out "Godzilla, Mothra, and King Ghidorah - Gaint Monster All Out Attack an A&E biography."

Re:I know what they are all thinking (1)

HumanisticJones (972339) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404210)

All they need now is a power supply for these robots that runs on pure Fighting Spirit and all my childhood giant robot dreams will come true.

My kids couldn't ever use it. (2, Interesting)

CFD339 (795926) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404100)

They clearly don't have enough organized brainwaves to run the lawn mower.

Kidding aside, I understand that during adolescence the brain completely reorganizes higher functions -- often shifting the center or processing for many of them to entirely different places.

Exactly how would this ASIMO++ handle that?

Oh, and what about blondes?

Re:My kids couldn't ever use it. (1)

llvllatrix (839969) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404271)

Blondes would have to go to Soviet Russia, where Honda Robots control Brain Waves.

So, here's the technical question... (3, Funny)

caudron (466327) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404233)

...is it still called "masturbation" if the robot is the one doing it to you?

Tom Caudron
http://tom.digitalelite.com/ [digitalelite.com]

P.S. I look forward to 15 years from now when my daughter reads this comment after searching on my name. What a proud moment in my history to share with future generations. :(

DO[LL (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15404247)

rules are This outreach are In our group And promOtes our [gay-sex-access.com]?

Flipping off the Brits (1)

austinpoet (789122) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404251)

The human was making a V sign with his hand. The robot hand looks more like its flipping off the Brits.

My reaction to TFA (1)

HunterZ (20035) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404280)

I didn't appreciate it turning into an Asimo ad at the end. Also, it's hard to belive it works very well (or at all) when they report only being able to do one gesture with it. Definitely a cool idea though, and it's good if they're really making progress.

Even more important than robotics would be the application to artificial/cybernetic replacement limbs. If they could miniturize the sensor technology to where it could be embedded in a hat, or (even better) just under the skin of the scalp, it could be used to provide decent motor control for an artificial limb.

Seig Zeon!! (1)

CharAznable (702598) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404319)

With this technology I shall build an army of Zakus [mahq.net] and I will defeat Amuro Ray once and for all!!!

Movie references... (1)

mangu (126918) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404321)

So many movie references, and nobody mentions Dr. Strangelove? [imdb.com]


Dr. Strangelove's unruly prosthetic arm is what always comes to my mind when someone mentions artificial limbs or humanoid robots. Besides, how can anyone forget a movie that has a character named "General Jack D. Ripper"? I guess I must be getting old... =8(

Re:Movie references... (1)

transparentsea (955303) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404686)

Dr. Strangelove. They're japanese. Think Ghost in the Shell.

Domo arigato, Mr. Roboto (1)

Loquax (921849) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404372)

Now I've got that damn song running through my head. I wonder what the system does when it enounters Stxy based brain waves.

After the first demo... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15404387)

After the first demo where the robot made a "V" sign, the user made a fist and then extended his index finger to point. A few seconds later the robot made a fist and then extended all its fingers and made a "V" sign. lol.

Great... (1)

kurbchekt (890891) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404400)

Now I guess it's time to get some Old Glory Insurance before they come to eat my medicine for fuel...

Nintendo's next console will use this... (1)

jtnw (781334) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404472)

and then we can finally do away with controllers altogether!

jtnw

oh no! (1)

ezwip (974076) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404629)

This power should never be placed in the hands of a woman. I dread the day that I walk into my house and the robot greets me by nagging non stop.

10 yrs ago... (1)

mwilliamson (672411) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404634)

Some years ago a company came out with a product called "minddrive", and an assortment of computer games / tools. While not directly detecting brainwaves, it did detect skin resistance changes (due to sweat I suppose)...something that some people were evidently actually learning to control.

Here's all I can find of it: http://www.raven1.net/minddriv.htm [raven1.net]

Could be bad... (1)

ickies (966115) | more than 7 years ago | (#15404635)

There are some hand gestures that flash through my head that I'd rather not have a robot execute...
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