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Intern? Bloggers Need Not Apply

Zonk posted more than 8 years ago | from the keep-off-the-blog-sign dept.

253

westlake writes "Short, funny, and to the point, a good read from the NYT about the realities of blogging in the corporate world." From the article: "Most experienced employees know: Thou Shalt Not Blab About the Company's Internal Business. But the line between what is public and what is private is increasingly fuzzy for young people comfortable with broadcasting nearly every aspect of their lives on the Web, posting pictures of their grandmother at graduation next to one of them eating whipped cream off a woman's belly. For them, shifting from a like-minded audience of peers to an intergenerational, hierarchical workplace can be jarring."

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253 comments

dog in a bathtub (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15405774)

In the GNAA, gay niggers look down on YOU.

Re:dog in a bathtub (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15405784)

rofl

(rofl rofl rofl rofl rofl rofl rofl roflor rolfo lro flrolfo lroflro lforlforl olforlrofl roflro lrof)

Yeah, it's real (5, Funny)

Southpaw018 (793465) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405777)

My coworkers and I were sharing stories at lunch the other day; thankfully, my office is blissfuly absent of corporate culture ("professional, but relaxed"). A coworker who has a daughter my age said that when her daughter started working as a receptionist at a hospital, she came home after a few months on the job and said "Mom...you never told me Dilbert was real..."

Hospitals (1)

Mark_MF-WN (678030) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405910)

Hospitals are notoriously bad about their corporate culture, because there is absolutely NO accountability for ANYONE. Most of the staff is essentially unfireable because their skills are in high demand or they're in a union (or both, as in the unfortunate case of nurses). And most hospitals are effectively a monopoly (ambulances can't exactly perform a credit-check to decide where to take you...) and have a captive market.

I'm sure there are a few corporate environments that are worse, but they're probably degenerate one-off businesses that are in the process of completely disintegrating.

Re:Yeah, it's real (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15405963)

ACs are modded -6. I don't read you, I don't mod you, I don't see you. Don't like it? Don't be a coward.
Pompous weenies are trolled repeatedly. I don't respect you, I don't like you, your parents are probably embarrassed by you. Don't like it? Don't be a pompous weenie.

Re:Yeah, it's real (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15405988)

Apparently, irony is not your strong suit ...

Re:Yeah, it's real (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15406399)

to bad he can't see your post eh?

or better yet, To bad you can't understand words when they are put together.

Re:Work For a Big Tech Co & Your Life Is Publ (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15406203)

From everything that I've seen - and read in numerous books (see the Unwanted Gaze which details many privacy breaches within the MS employee base), working for a large tech company, especially MS, represents the end of your privacy. Managers there very obviously disclose anything about any employee resulting from both private investigators as well as spyware that is implanted on the home computers of those simply checking their mail using a web browser. I've personally heard lots of medical records of spouses and children as well as tons of other slanderous stuff from these tech companies in their zeal to shape their subordinates and influence purchasing decisions.

This article summed up in ten words: (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15405781)

Don't use your real name on your blog, you idiot!

Re:This article summed up in ten words: (4, Insightful)

lottameez (816335) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406166)

I disagree. You should use your real name 'cause it should keep you from saying something too stupid. Sooner or later you'll get outed anyways, and then you'll be wishing you hadn't bragged about doin' the football player's wife.

Also, written content never dies, it just defines you for life. Ask any politician (that can write).

Re:This article summed up in ten words: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15406387)

Or:

"Don't say stupid things on a public forum."

Or both.

Its all mentality (1, Interesting)

Ajehals (947354) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405787)

People shouldnt be surprised, security is 20% technical 80% mentality. The "tell everyone everything" mentality is not good for security.

However, not all bloggers share that mentality. And not all non bloggers are exempt from it so hey.

blogs are at least a fantastic way to vet an employee before hiring.

Reputations are forever... (4, Interesting)

shrdlu (42466) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405897)

I continue to be amazed at the personal details shared across the internet. At one time, I put my phone number, office number, and alternate email addresses, in my signature. That changed significantly after AOL "joined" the internet, of course. With the panic in human resources about providing or receiving references (beyond the dates of employment), things like myspace provde an interesting adjunct to vetting future workers.

It isn't just the inappropriate pictures that will keep you from being employed. It's the evidence that you can't keep quiet about things, that you're not trustworthy, that you're not even very good with grammar and spelling (in the real world, spelling counts). Once upon a time you could move away from a bad reputation, or switch jobs to leave behind a bad experience or two. Now, with things like zabasearch and google hacks to track you down, youthful indescretion becomes a permanent and inescapable brand.

No second chances. Sad.

Re:Reputations are forever... (2, Insightful)

Skim123 (3322) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406037)

Eh, but if everyone in the current generation does it, what choice will employers have in the future? While I agree with your premise, I can't help but think such statements are eerily similar to the admonishons from parents in the 50s - listening to that Elvis Presley music is going to rot your brain and loosen your morals!

Re:Reputations are forever... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15406188)

are eerily similar to the admonishons from parents in the 50s - listening to that Elvis Presley music is going to rot your brain and loosen your morals!

In looking at the history of the 60's and 70's can you say that those parents were wrong?

Re:Reputations are forever... (1)

sgt_doom (655561) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406209)

I definitely disagree with your premise:

that you're not trustworthy, that you're not even very good with grammar and spelling (in the real world, spelling counts).

Puuuhlease....I can't think of any corp. in the last decade or so where ANYBODY could spell or knew proper grammar. And to the point of trustworthiness (and spelling), would you please explain the commander-in-CEO in that sleaze house in Washington, D.C.?????

Can't spell....can't tell the truth about anything....let's see now, as to how many major corporations have had to pay legal penalties for major breaking of the law (price-fixing, RICOH act, etc., etc., ad infinitum): ADM...Boeing...Enron....Microsoft...Oracle...I could go on for almost forever.

Re:Reputations are forever... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15406256)

youthful indescretion becomes a permanent and inescapable brand.
Yeah, look at how it held GW Bush back. The guy should be living life to the fullest, making his mark on the world. But thanks to the indiscretions of his youth, he can only get a job at some porn site. [whitehouse.com]

Re:Reputations are forever... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15406272)

No second chances. Sad.

Considering our president is known to have done coke, abused alcohol, bankrupt his companies, I'm finding it hard to believe that someone's juvenile rantings on MySpace are going to be a big drag on their career

Re:Its all mentality (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15406049)

The "tell everyone everything" mentality is not good for security. However, not all bloggers share that mentality. And not all non bloggers are exempt from it so hey.

Personally, my blog is a pack of lies and has nothing to do about me nor reality. Of course it is easy because I get sent an email from corporate office of ideas and products I should support and those I should denouce. It pays the bills of course.

There are days when I wish I could say my mind and talk about how my cat pees on the furniture or how I want to ask out that cute girl at the Suncoast Video store out of a date... And maybe debate the sad meaning of my pointless emo life, but alas...

Its not easy being a shill.

That MySpace blog is there for everyone to see (3, Insightful)

Jim in Buffalo (939861) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405804)

I don't know if it's all that different from when I was first entering the workplace, but today's youngsters put it all out there. I don't know where kids get the idea that the only ones who would ever look at their MySpace blogs are people in their own age group.

heh (1)

free space (13714) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405909)

I don't know where kids get the idea that the only ones who would ever look at their MySpace blogs are people in their own age group.

Considering the color schemes of most myspace pages and the spelling/grammer, Im surprised anyone looks at myspace blogs :)

Re:heh (1)

needacoolnickname (716083) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406063)

People can blog on myspace?

Re:That MySpace blog is there for everyone to see (1)

kkiller (945601) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406071)

Isn't this kind of problem what LiveJournal's "Friends Only" posting feature meant to tackle? MySpace must have this kind of functionality, surely?

Blackmail (4, Insightful)

KefabiMe (730997) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405823)

I determined a while ago that any private material that becomes public material can be used against you. In about 20 years I expect a metric shit-ton of blackmail material will be available for our future up-and-coming politicians. (Thank you MySpace for embarrassing our future politicians!)

Of course, because I'm smart enough to keep private matters private, I'm automatically disqualified from politics. (Yay!)

Hint: No matter how awesome that frat party was (I don't care *how* crazy those midgets where!), it's probably not a good idea to post those pics until your hangover is gone.

Re:Blackmail (1)

Greventls (624360) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405845)

I can't wait. I imagine it will destroy the religious right when every single politician on their side is discovered to have been a stereotypical frat/sorority type. I just wish the current crop had myspace and facebook as a youth.

Re:Blackmail (2, Funny)

eln (21727) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405862)

But I thought the only reason people joined the Religious Right is because they're bitter that they never got invited to those sorts of parties in college...

Re:Blackmail (2, Funny)

jbrader (697703) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405891)

You appear to have forgotten the history of our current beloved leader.

Re:Blackmail (1)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406075)

Some, yes. For others it's because they're bitter that they've grown older and can't have fun like that anymore. So now they feel they must take it out on everyone and everything.

Re:Blackmail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15405929)

I think it will be more illuminating for *you* to discover that the "religious right" is not a homogenous, influential, or large group. Don't mistake a vocal microminority for a majority. It just makes you look stupid.

Re:Blackmail (1)

creimer (824291) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405960)

It never hurt Bush or his daughters for that matter. I noticed the thing about the religious right over the years is that politics and morality often go in separate and opposite directions from each. It's only when politics and morality are caught in the same bed together that things get really sticky.

Re:Blackmail (2, Funny)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406088)

It's only when politics and morality are caught in the same bed together that things get really sticky.

Thanks for getting that nasty vision stuck in my head...

Re:Blackmail (1)

penguinstorm (575341) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405958)

"Thank you MySpace for embarrassing our future politicians!"

Oh please. As if Arnold Schwarzeneger wasn't enough of an embarassment to our current politicians. Let's not even talk about Gopher, Cooter or Sonny Bono.

Re:Blackmail (1)

Not_Wiggins (686627) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406207)

Black-mail material only has power if:

A) It is something that doesn't fit "the norm"
B) It can be used to set you apart from peers

Bear in mind that in 20 years, most of those bloggers are going to make up a significant (if not majority) chunk of the voting population.

We cannot assume that morality as it applies today will remain unchanged 20 years from now. I mean, there was a time it was indecent for a woman to show any leg above the knee; what won't be taboo in 20 years will probably shock you. And that is, at its base, part of what contributes to a "generation gap."

Re:Blackmail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15406295)

most of those bloggers are going to make up a significant (if not majority) chunk of the voting population.

hahahahahaha...you wish. No in 20 years, the biggest voting block will be retired baby boomers who will insist that the government pay for their boner medication even though they will already be crushing the working population with insane social security taxes. In 40 years...those bloggers still won't be a significant chunk of the voting public. Thankfully most people aren't so self absorbed to think that anyone would want to read about their pointless rambling on the internet. By then offspring of today's illegal immigrants will probably be the biggest voting block unfortunately.

Re:Blackmail (1)

deesine (722173) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406337)

I think that any person in highschool who wants to persue a career in politics already knows not to post their personal details and gossip on places like MySpace.

I remember having a keg party the year after I graduated. The party got big and roudy and eventually the police came. Standard course, but this one guy was totally wigged about the police coming, "They can't know I'm here, this can't be on my record, etc. ".

LOL "Chill out Rob, what's the deal."

"I'm going to be running for county seat in only a couple years and..." blah blah blah.

We never invited him again.

Encourage the rich/connected to Blog/myspace (3, Funny)

hguorbray (967940) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405829)

On the other hand -if we encouraged all of the Poli Sci, Business and Law students to not only blog, but to also to post pictures of their exploits on myspace we might be able to weed out some of our future idiot/corrupt politicos and business people.

Just think if this have been around in the '80s when King George was partying his brains out....

-What's the Speed of Dark?

Re:Encourage the rich/connected to Blog/myspace (1)

WilliamSChips (793741) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405976)

Considering that if Prince Harry were the older one that he'd still become king, not much. Oh, the other King George. He has a rich father. So still not much. I hate nepotism.

Re:Encourage the rich/connected to Blog/myspace (1)

Austerity Empowers (669817) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405980)

And all us geeks know that the poly sci, business and law students had the best parties.

Re:Encourage the rich/connected to Blog/myspace (1)

DigitalHammer (581235) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406134)

And all us geeks know that the poly sci, business and law students had the best parties.

Ya, those molecular bio, zoology, agriculture, and biomedical majors totally know their vodka. ;)

On another note, no wonder science students hate those arts majors. :P

But Whose Belly? (5, Funny)

gazpacho (18802) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405830)

Was the woman his grandmother? I wouldn't hire that dude at all.

in general (0, Redundant)

free space (13714) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405833)

If there is something you don't want your boss, your friends your family or your enemies to know, don't put it online.

If it's really really sensetive, don't write it down either.

If you say "hah...no one will care what I said/wrote anyway", you'd be suprised.

First "First Post"! (1)

Adyhkohl (977163) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405846)

First post!

Re:in general (1)

Anonymous Brave Guy (457657) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405879)

The problem is when somebody else puts it on-line for you...

Totally true (1)

gamepln1 (651612) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405847)

Two weeks after graduating from high school I was hired by a fortune 500 company to work in the bowels of the tech department. Let me tell you that I saw a lot of totally confidential stuff that I thought was awesome and It was hard to not blab about all of the information I was privvy too

News Flash!!! (1)

PepeGSay (847429) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405850)

Acting like an idiot in public can hurt your job prospects. Acting like an idiot in a world wide, semi perpetual, archived and instantly accessible forum can *really* hurt your career.

Lets not couch this in terms of some kind of cultural divide. These people are putting things in public that should be private and then suprised by their own ignorance.

Re:News Flash!!! (1)

Hao Wu (652581) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406129)

This girl who basically hated the world for not being sexually attracted to her (now fired for other reasons, mainly underperformance caused by her medication-induced immaturity) was blogging at work. Total introvert, but online she had no problem extensively psychoanalyzing every boss and coworker she knew.

I am certain that she wanted us to read what she thought of random people - people she judged hard despite having NO relation to. She just didn't have the balls to tell them directly.

The mysterious Step 2. (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405856)

Everybody I've read about that got fired for having a blog is on to such great things," said Kelly Kreth, 36, who was fired from her job as the marketing and public relations director at a real estate firm in Manhattan last fall for blogging about her co-workers.

"I've had my online diary for six years, and it is very important to me," Ms. Kreth said, calling the firing the best thing that happened to her. "It led to me opening my own business and making triple what I was making before."
Step 1. Get Job
Step 2. Blog about it
Step 3. Get fired
Step 4. Profit!!

OTOH, does the same thing apply to kids who get expelled from college/highschool?

Re:The mysterious Step 2. (1)

pluther (647209) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405964)

OTOH, does the same thing apply to kids who get expelled from college...?

You mean, like Steve Jobs, or Bill Gates?

Re:The mysterious Step 2. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15406062)

They weren't expelled. They left to pursue other interests. There's a big difference.

Re:The mysterious Step 2. (1)

sgt_doom (655561) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406250)

Excellent point!!!!

Eons ago...when I was in high school..there was a sweet young girl who sat next to me in math class. One day she disappeared...and no one knew...or would tell...what happened to her.

Turns out she was pregnant and was taken out of school to have her child in secret (she latered married her boyfriend - and they're still married to this day).

Point being: that was considered shameful back then, while today having a monkey-boy deserter/AWOLEE in the White House - who never succeeded at anything in his life, together with his draft-dodging, college-flunkount vice-president, is NOT CONSIDERED SHAMEFUL??????!!!!@##@%$

What's wrong with this picture???

Is this relevant? (0, Offtopic)

Embedded Geek (532893) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405858)

posting pictures of their grandmother at graduation next to one of them eating whipped cream off a woman's belly.

This is Slashdot, people. This is an experience that is absoultely unrelated to anyone that views this website.

I mean, I only got 8 tickets to graduation. You think gram ranks above the guys from the local LINUX group and my WoW guild?

Depends. (0)

jd (1658) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405935)

If your grandmother is the founder and president of the local Linux User Group, the biker chick for the local chapter of Hell's Angels, or (worst of all) beating you in WoW, which she connects to from her OpenBSD system, then you probably would invite her.

Re:Depends. (1)

Ryan Amos (16972) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406093)

Maybe. But only if she eats hot grits off ALL YOUR BASE ARE BELONG TO US.

A chilling future (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Brave Guy (457657) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405864)

OK, I've heard the "information wants to be free" mantra a zillion times, and I've met my fair share of people who think their right to free speech (no matter what they're saying and what the consequences will be) trumps anything else.

I've seen an absurd story on the news today about a British woman who was prosecuted for indecent exposure, because she had the audacity to sunbathe nude in her own garden. (She was acquitted, but the comments by both the public prosecutor and the judge were profoundly inappropriate, and no-one seems to have taken any action against the "offended" neighbour who videoed the nude sunbather without her permission - something that probably is illegal under the recent Sexual Offences Act.)

You know the thing that really scared me today? A professor (in the UK sense, i.e., a very senior academic) talking about the "semantic web" and implying that in a few years, everyone will have a unique "Internet ID", and everything from their personal details to pictures of their wedding will be on-line for all to look up, instantly and reliably.

Choosing to share your personal information with the world is one thing, though I suspect a great many of the enthusiastic youngsters supporting trendy web sites today will regret it one day. Choosing to share others' personal information with the world is an entirely different thing, and I'm not sure I want to live in a world where everything about you is assumed to be public knowledge.

Maybe I'm just biased, since a bitter ex of mine did once post intimate and formerly private personal messages on her blog (but edited and with modified dates). It just seems to me that this sort of thing is happening ever more often: it's assumed that no-one you deal with has a private life, and if you know it, it's perfectly fine to share it with others. I guess the whole posting confidential company information thing is just another nail in the coffin: as the saying goes, privacy is dead, and we have killed it.

It's tragic, and it's even more tragic that most people don't even realise. Yet.

Fantastic. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15405881)

It's not easy being a nigger.

What Would Google Show? (2, Interesting)

Kozar_The_Malignant (738483) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405869)

"What would Google show?" is a question you need to ask yourself when applying for a job. Employers increasingly Google the name of prospective employees. Not for the mail room job, but certainly for management level positions or those with security implications or even just those above some annual salary level. You also need to remember that with huge caches that shit doesn't go away even if you try to disappear it. What you thought was cool at 20 may not seem so to someone you are asking to pay you 100k at 30.

Re:What Would Google Show? (1)

CDarklock (869868) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405919)

Pay attention, boys. Following several mystifying cases where a great job interview was followed by a withdrawal of interest, I went over my blog and carefully chucked all the truly shocking stuff under "offensive post" introductions with a "more" link.

I got a solid offer the next week. Connect the dots.

Re:What Would Google Show? (1)

MurphyZero (717692) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406147)

Fortunately a Google search on my name shows B and C actors that share my name. I am in a technical field, but Googling with more technical terms still pull up a researcher in England that shares my name. I get to stay fairly anonymous on Google, which is a good thing unless you need to be known to be successful (like if you are a writer, actor, politician, musician ...)

Re:What Would Google Show? (1)

SydShamino (547793) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405921)

Yeah, it's funny that the oldest surviving reference to me on the internet - from 1997 - is still the first Google hit on my name. (From the misheard lyric archive.) Fortunately it's not too bad...

The other hits are all from 2000 or later, and all of them are decently respectable.

Re:What Would Google Show? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15406315)

Mine's a usenet post from 1984. Like you, nothing too bad really, but in 1984 I hadn't even begun to imagine that the damn thing would still be around in 2006, and probably 2116 for that matter.

It just wasn't something that occurred to me. I pity the people who posted embarrassing thing under their own names (most people back then posted under their own names). Yes, it's possible to delete it, but it's kind of a PITA if you don't have the original address, which basically nobody does from 1984.

Re:What Would Google Show? (1)

sedyn (880034) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405959)

Just me wondering, how well would a Google bomb work?

Re:What Would Google Show? (1)

mj_sklar (888539) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405998)

WWGS? Is that anything like WWJD? All kidding aside, when I search Google for my name, I get a mixed set of results. One part shows my Lego models that I've published, and the other link to pages about a Broadway musical director who shares both my first and last name.

I wonder if any employers will hire me because they think I was an ex-musical director...

Re:What Would Google Show? (1)

aamcf (651492) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406172)

pages about a Broadway musical director who shares both my first and last name.

I have the same name as a man that photographs "swimsuit and glamour models [amaginations.com] " (possibly NSFW).

Re:What Would Google Show? (1)

mj_sklar (888539) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406194)

Wow, don't you wish you had his job.

Re:What Would Google Show? (1)

FidelCatsro (861135) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406021)

A good rule of thumb , never use your real name online for anything that doesn't need it.
I am fairly open about my life and work, but I am not that open about where and who I am. Change a few details , omit company and private names and you are a bit safer.

Freedom of speech is important, and so is freedom of understanding of said speech. So you will influence peoples opinions of you due to your speech, it is part and package of it. If they don't know who said it, they can't hold it against you.

Re:What Would Google Show? (1)

rjstanford (69735) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406035)

This is one very good reason to create a personal website and keep it full of somewhat useful yet harmless information. That way, when somebody google's you, they get you rather than someone else's opinion about you. Just a thought...

Re:What Would Google Show? (1)

ElleyKitten (715519) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406066)

"What would Google show?" is a question you need to ask yourself when applying for a job.

Googling my name shows a 5th grader who made a garden, some actress who was in a musical with Frank Astaire, there's a font with my name (yay!), and a shitload of genealogy reports of people not related to me.

I've never actually gotten any decent results when googling a random non-famous person I've met, so I'm not sure why HR directors would waste their time bothering.

Re:What Would Google Show? (1)

Kozar_The_Malignant (738483) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406145)

>I've never actually gotten any decent results when googling a random non-famous person I've met, so I'm not sure why HR directors would waste their time bothering.

It really depends on your name. If your name is Jim Smith of Ellen Jones, then Google isn't much good without some additional filter. On the other hand, my real name is unusual, so it's pretty much all me and ten pages worth. Your mileage may vary depending on your name.

Re:What Would Google Show? (1)

AuMatar (183847) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406237)

Depends on the name. I'm probably the only guy in the world with my name, the first several pages are all me. Around page 4 or so it goes to some celebrity in Asia with the same last name.

Why differentiate? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15405876)

What is it about the word "blog" that makes people stupid?

"It is important that corporations make a choice as to what type of blogging they will allow," said Alfred C. Frawley III, director of the intellectual property practice group at the law firm Preti Flaherty in Portland, Me.

Why does blogging need a different set of rules than any other medium for communication?

If there is something your company doesn't want disclosed, have the lawyers draft up the paperwork. Just for kicks, we'll call it a "non-disclosure agreement", or NDA for short. If this NDA is broken, handle accordingly.

You may be within your rights to decide what I am allowed to disclose, but what does it matter how I do it?

Director of the intellectual property practice indeed. Just another moron with a big title that even he doesn't understand.

Bloggers As Celebrities (4, Interesting)

Sentri (910293) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405895)

Someone put forward the theory to me the other day that we like Celebrities (and I use the term 'we' here loosely) because we miss the sense of community our tribal ancestors had. Celebrities fill the gap because they provide a familiarity with faces and shared stories that link us to other people around the world.

Blogging seems to extend this idea (ideal?) by making peoples stories more openly shared. For example, I read http://www.waiterrant.net/ [waiterrant.net] and http://www.oblivio.com/ [oblivio.com] , I know their stories even though they live in new york, and somehow the world feels smaller and less disparate. Added to that, I have a few friends who read the same blogs, we both know their stories (or at least the stories they choose to tell).

It brings back that sense of community a little.

WTF? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15405896)

posting pictures of their grandmother at graduation next to one of them eating whipped cream off a woman's belly

Anyone who does this is a fucking moron. Anyone with such a galactic dearth of common sense deserves to be shut out of the corporate world. And the rest of society for that matter. This is the kind of person that doesn't care when everyone loses their rights to privacy, since they don't use any of theirs. They can all burn in a fiery pit and go straight to hell.

[/rant]

Hierarchical, intergenerational workplace (1)

AK__64 (740022) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405901)

I really thought the part of the blurb that talked about moving from a group of peers to the intergenerational workplace was specially insightful. As a college student, and as a young person, I feel that my peers too often underestimate the culture gap between themselves and their future employers. Many of my fellow students are mature enough to handle the transition well, but not everyone is as capable.

I think blogging about everything is only a single aspect of the vast differences between today's youth and their parents' generation.

Re:Hierarchical, intergenerational workplace (1)

Sentri (910293) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406017)

I think that the people who are most willing to blog in the first place are demonstrating personality traits more suitable to employers who will focus on soft skills, interpersonal skills and being youthful and trendy

For example, marketing, retail and sales

People who blog about personal aspects of their lives should be kept seperate from those who blog about technical aspects of their lives only, if I am hiring and I google someone's name and they have a personal blog page that is full of wicked technical hacks (http://www.sentex.net/~mwandel/ [sentex.net] for example) then how good does that look for them? Very!

But if I google their name and it comes up with something less savoury, or even slihtly unpleasant, well that looks bad. And by the way, it doesnt matter whether the people you worked with last were horrible or not, if you posted about them on your blog, you might post about me if you think I am horrible, I dont want that, so I wont hire you.

Makes selection easier (1)

Marko DeBeeste (761376) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405902)

Stupidity screen. Social Darwinism at work.

missing link. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15405916)

Shouldn't "eating whipped cream off a woman's belly" be a link above?

Re:missing link. (5, Funny)

dema (103780) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406251)

Re:missing link. (4, Funny)

Khaed (544779) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406398)

Omigod.

MOM?!

The problem is with extremes (4, Insightful)

megla (859600) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405922)

Anyone dumb enough to post their company's innermost secrets on their blog deserves exactly what they get.
Similarly, any boss who fires an employee simply on the basis that they have a blog, regardless of content, deserves some sort of dressing down - although this is harder to achieve.

People are too often pushed into very polarised positions on the matter, which helps no-one. There's plenty of acceptable middle ground, if only someone could bring reasonable discussion to the table.

Re:The problem is with extremes (1)

rumblin'rabbit (711865) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406138)

Similarly, any boss who fires an employee simply on the basis that they have a blog, regardless of content, deserves some sort of dressing down - although this is harder to achieve.
I'm guessing that, in most jurisdications, you can't fire someone simply because they have a blog. Now if the blogging uses company resources, or if the blog mentions the company, that's something else.

Perhaps someone can advise on this.

Re:The problem is with extremes (1)

tiocsti (160794) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406204)

Welcome to 'at-will' employment.

Re:The problem is with extremes (1)

rumblin'rabbit (711865) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406265)

That's what I get for being a dumb hockey puck. I had no idea about "at will" employment in the U.S. Had to look it up on Wikipedia.

Looks like you can, in some places, fire someone for blogging at home. Or driving a Ford. Or growing tulips in the backyard. I stand corrected.

Oh god - I hope they don't read /. (2, Insightful)

i am kman (972584) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405934)

Aaaahhh - damn. I knew I shouldn't use my real name when I registered. Oh god, what am I gonna do now - aaaahhhh.

Actually, I think many people invent a psuedo-name and often don't realize when they've crossed the line from anonymous to identifiable when you look at the collection of what they post. The vastness of the internet makes people feel safe even when their standing naked in public.

I've worked with 2 people who were fired over blogs they thought were quite anonymous, but it became quite clear who was writing them when you looked at the collection of posts. They both knew perfectly well if they were caught they'd be fired (and they should've been), but they also felt quite anonymous since they didn't use their 'real names. It's ALOT like folks that post 'anonymous' comments on stock boards.

Re:Oh god - I hope they don't read /. (3, Interesting)

SubRosa (976527) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406052)

I've always wondered... Even if specific, identifiable facts are omitted from "anonymous" online posts, would it be hard for a statistical/Bayesian system to pick out text written by a specific person given a sufficient corpus of material known to be from that person? Seems those techniques do a hell of a decent job with spam. I don't see how normal prose would be any different.

Simply being anonymous may not be enough anymore. You may need to sufficiently change your prose style, which may be very difficult to do, given how each person's vocabulary and grammar skills are unique.

Jeez. Gotta be careful about those intros... (2, Funny)

penguinstorm (575341) | more than 8 years ago | (#15405940)

I thought that said "eating whipped cream off their grandmother's belly."

Come to think of it, gotta be careful what you post at Slashdot: all that anti-Microsoft hatred that can get spewed could be problematic when The (Wo)Man goes to sign a paycheque.

Re:Jeez. Gotta be careful about those intros... (1)

ClassMyAss (976281) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406082)

Of course, one might argue that if you're reading Slashdot and spewing a lot of anti-Microsoft hatred, your sense of morality would prohibit you from accepting a paycheck from anyone who would see that as a problem. True, money is money, but from what I can gather, most people here feel passionately enough about this issue that they would hesitate to take any sort of job that would require them to hide their feelings about M$.

I suppose that's my litmus test - don't put something online that you wouldn't defend to the point of losing your job. If you'd openly stand by your decision to go into a NYC deli at 4 AM wearing nothing but a pink thong with a mini-pumpkin in the crotch, by all means, put the pics up on your MySpace page (true story, not mine - and yes, he does have a "respectable" job). If not, then it's probably not something you should be putting online.

Stand by your convictions until convicted for your stance...

I blame JenniCam (0, Offtopic)

SubRosa (976527) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406008)

You think in 10 years she'll have problems? :) I wonder how her career is doing these days, anyway.

I keep this in mind (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15406022)

When I blog I keep this in mind. My worst enemy will use this against me in my weakest moment to do maximum damage.

Remember, what you blog WILL be used against you. But if you only supply your enemy with Nerf balls it won't be an effective weapon.

And that's why I'm posting anonymously.

job hunting (1)

sl4shd0rk (755837) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406043)

About 5 years ago, I did a search on google for my boss. He did not have a very unique last name, so all I did was narrow searches down to vicinities he was likely to have lived in. It only took a few minutes. He was convinced it would be very difficult to find him on google becuase of his name. Problem is, anyone looking for you on google, would already know a little bit about you, and that is enough to dig up newspaper articles, jail records, resumes, and all sorts of stuff. I would rather not have my future boss finding me on myspace doing keg stands, or mooning someone with a half-shaved-ass. I do/have done stupid shit just for laughs, just like everyone else. That doesn't mean I use the same judgement in a professional setting. I would rather be interviewed without any pre-conceived notions.

Re:job hunting (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15406196)

..mooning someone with a half-shaved-ass. I do/have done stupid shit just for laughs, just like everyone else.
Such as that time you were shaving your ass, and halfway through the process, someone very moon-able walked by.

Re:job hunting (1)

assassinator42 (844848) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406267)

Are you sure it was him and not someone with the same name? I have a relatively uncommon last name, but I know there's at least one person with the same name as me who lives in the same general area.

Totally Misleading Headline (4, Informative)

rjstanford (69735) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406048)

From TFA:

But Comedy Central disagreed, asking him to change the name (He did, to "I'm an Intern in New York") and to stop revealing how its brand of comedic sausage is stuffed.

"They said they figured something like this would happen eventually because blogs had become so popular," said Mr. McDonald, now 23, who kept his internship. "It caught them off guard. They didn't really like that."


So, basically, they objected to him sharing potentially confidential information (fair enough) and to his using their name for his personal (readership/ad) gain. Again, fair enough. He still got to keep the blog, and he's still an intern there. Oh, and he didn't have the blog when he "applied," anyway.

Le sigh. If the editors don't RTFA, what hope is there for the rest of the readership again?

Did anyone else... (1)

Sentri (910293) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406068)

Go and immediately start googling alias's, full names etc of their own to see what pops up?

*hastily edits some forum posts*

*hastily deletes some blog entries*

Re:Did anyone else... (1)

novus ordo (843883) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406149)

You won't like this [archive.org] .

Re:Did anyone else... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15406287)

I monitor my google, 411, yahoo, ask, and about 10 whitepages sites for any personal information.
My robots.txt blogs my blog site.
I limit tastless items on my website to images without useful descriptions.
Most of my site is for close friends - you have to "know" where to go to find it. There are no links deep enough from any public part of the site. I use virtual domains --- a lot. A virtual domain is up for a purpose, used, then removed after a few months.

Really offensive material is password protected.

The internet: a threat to the powerful (1)

bigsexyjoe (581721) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406117)

I think that this shows the power of the internet. Mass communication is a tremendous source of power. It changes government policy and it is also a threat to corporate power and even the power of a school. Here's to the internet! Here's to blogging!

mhmm... (0, Offtopic)

niteice (793961) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406243)

FIRED for having a blog [marriedtothesea.com]


:P

Don't forget to Google(TM) them, too... (1)

jim_deane (63059) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406254)


Your future bosses and the people interviewing you are also online, and may have interesting bits of information floating around there.

If nothing else, it makes sense to include personal information searches in your "company background research" phase of interview preparation. The more you know, the better prepared you are.

Jim

Naivete (1)

xihr (556141) | more than 8 years ago | (#15406285)

I fail to see why bloggers are perennially shocked by this. It really has nothing to do with blogging -- if you talk about company business in public, you're in danger of being fired. It's that simple.

The fact that bloggers seem more inclined to blab publicly doesn't really affect anything to do with this. You talk about company business, you risk being fired. It doesn't matter whether or not you do it by leaking it to a reporter, talk about it in a bar, or post it on the Web for all to see.

The moral indignation of bloggers on this issue is really quite laughable. The very same features of a blog that allow you to get your word out to a wide (but willing) audience easily are precisely the same features that mean it'll be easy for your company to find out you're talking out of turn. That you can do it easily and reach a lot of people quickly doesn't really change the fact that you shouldn't be doing it -- blog or no.

You can't have it both ways.

What's worse is.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15406292)

when someone you know writes details about you in a blog. I agree with the sentiments here about how it is very foolish to put personal details on the web. A lot of youngsters do it today to be 'hip n cool'.

But I feel the issue that is even more disturbing is that if you have friends who blog anyway, then details about you (stuff that you may not wish others to know) will end up on their blog someday.

Imagine some guy whom you went to school with starts to create a blog detailing his entire life and he posts childhood class pictures (with you in them), names everyone in the picture, and even gives a small anecdote about each of them (including you). This is something you have very little or no control of. I could come up with more scenarios but you get the picture.

How does one stop that? Not make friends with someone blogs?
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