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Teens Arrested in MySpace Extortion Scam

Zonk posted more than 8 years ago | from the not-the-brightest-criminals-ever dept.

193

An anonymous reader writes "Two New York teens have been arrested after trying to extort $150,000 from the makers of MySpace, the popular online community site." From the article: " MySpace discovered the intrusion earlier this year and blocked it. The Los Angeles-based company also reported the incident to authorities. During the course of the investigation, threats were made that unless $150,000 was paid, new exploit code would be released, according to the statement. By this time, the sting operation had been set up, so instead of meeting with MySpace late last week, the pair from New York met with undercover officers from the U.S. Secret Service and the Los Angeles District Attorney's Bureau of Investigation. "

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Go to jail (4, Funny)

linvir (970218) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417284)

Go directly to jail. Do not pass Go. Do not collect $150,000.

Re:Go to jail (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15417355)

What the hell are you talking about?

This is Myspace, not Monopoly. Someone mod this offtopic.

Re:Go to jail (0, Troll)

docyahoo (864256) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417357)

Looks like ZDNet is raising the bar on comments to TFA [zdnet.com] :
Thier not hoodlums genius, i live like 20 minutes away from them. thier both straight a students with alot of computer expertise but were using thier skills in the wrong way and tried to make some illegal money off of myspace. Some people need to drop the "everyone from new york is a gangster" stereotype just like they tell us to drop the "anyone not from ny is a redneck" stereotype." Posted by: gtapro91
And, with that eloquent statement, how could I say any more about my edukation dollars at work here in New Yawk. Please don't bother flamebaiting by blaming upstate.

Re:Go to jail (0, Troll)

hutchy (31659) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417419)

And Ye shall be known by your atrocious grammer!

Re:Go to jail (0, Flamebait)

Nightreaver (695006) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417396)

This is yet another example which shows that crime never pays!

In other news, 7391 shashdotters consider acquiring illegal software.

Re:Go to jail (-1, Offtopic)

linvir (970218) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417423)

This is yet another example which shows that crime never pays!

In other news, 7391 shashdotters consider acquiring illegal software.

What the fuck? I see your point, but you're just begging for Offtopic and Troll mods with something like that. If you're going to bitch about warez and insult Slashdotters, you need to be clever about it and only do it in stories about piracy.

Besides that, your comparison is so incredibly unequal that I wonder if you even thought about it beyond "Hey, this'll sound real smart, and them shashdotters sure love to talk about the morality of warez!".

if the story is factual (5, Insightful)

yagu (721525) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417286)

So, two kids hacked MySpace, and threatened further damage unless they were given $150,000, but cry "foul" when lured into a job offer/interview for the purpose of arresting them.

I'm not sure, but I'm willing to bet extortion dollars thay MySpace would not bother luring people into their space if no extortion were there in the first place.

It's pretty amazing how criminals (alleged) cry about violated rights when apprehended. Yeah, there are constitutional procedures to guide law enforcement and judicial, thank goodness for that.

I don't see, assuming these are the kids who did hack MySpace, any impropriety nor violation of their "space".

Re:if the story is factual (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15417461)

So, two kids hacked MySpace, and threatened further damage unless they were given $150,000, but cry "foul" when lured into a job offer/interview for the purpose of arresting them.

Nothing in the article says anything about them 'crying foul'. It mentions that they're pleading 'not guilty' to the charges but nothing else about their reaction.

Re:if the story is factual (4, Informative)

yagu (721525) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417505)

Nothing in the article says anything about them 'crying foul'. It mentions that they're pleading 'not guilty' to the charges but nothing else about their reaction.

My bad, I read a different (additional) article... From this Chicago Tribune article [chicagotribune.com] (possible registration required).

The pertinent text from that article:

...,

The popular social networking site improperly lured Saverio Mondelli, 19, and Shaun Harrison, 18, to Los Angeles with the prospect of a consulting contract, said Mondelli's lawyer, Michael Dowd of Manhattan.

And when they arrived in California last week and sat down for a business meeting with what they thought was a contingent of MySpace employees -- who were actually Secret Service agents and local detectives -- they were arrested without warning, Dowd said.

"The proposition to hire them as consultants was made by MySpace," Dowd said. "This was a naked attempt to lure them into the lion's den and to somehow make an allegation of impropriety against them."

Re:if the story is factual (5, Funny)

suffe (72090) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417690)

Are you insane? Not only did you Read The Fucking Article, you read another fucking article on top of that. Who are you and what are you doing on Slashdot?!

Re:if the story is factual (1)

pete6677 (681676) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417718)

I read this same article, and I'm trying to figure out who is the bigger idiot: these kids or their stupid ass lawyer. I sure hope he has a better argument than this for the judge.

Re:if the story is factual (2, Insightful)

commodoresloat (172735) | more than 8 years ago | (#15418085)

Their "stupid ass lawyer" is just doing his job. Like it or not, one of the drawbacks to having a judicial system that values the rights of the accused, is that the accused will exercise those rights whether or not they are guilty. That is simply the price of justice, and, frankly, I think it's worth it. Due process is not a mere annoyance, nor is the right to confront your accusers -- these things are essential to maintaining a justice system that society can accept. So these kids are probably totally guilty; it is still their lawyer's job to make whatever argument he can that will help them get off.

Re:if the story is factual (2, Insightful)

Nadsat (652200) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417496)

Too bad these hackers were not more interesting. They seem to be simple data miners out for a buck. Script kiddies these day....

Re:if the story is factual (2, Insightful)

dagr8tim (866860) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417509)

It's pretty amazing how criminals (alleged) cry about violated rights when apprehended.

What about the guy who was held hostage [indymedia.org] in his own home by 5 Sheriff Deputies while they dunked his head in a fish tank and a toilet, connected batteries/live electrical wires to his genetals, and put a gun to his head in an attempt to force him to sign a waver to allow them to search his home without a warrent. Funny thing was his wife set a tape recorder in the kitchen before being ordered out of the house.

Ofcouse that was over a year ago and the guy has since been conviced [wbir.com] of unrelated drug charges. Are you saying that because this guy was a drug dealing peice of scum the police were allowed to violate his civil rights?

Re:if the story is factual (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15417581)

He's a drug dealing piece of scum! He doesn't have any civil rights...

What despicable conduct! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15418159)

That is a chilling tape! We're listening to five officers beat him and then put a gun to his head while detailing their cover story to explain his death unless he agreed to sign a waiver of his rights. They swore under oath that they never as much as threatened him until the tape was produced. At least all five officers involved have been setenced to prison [wbir.com] for 4+ years each. Knoxnews has a good page [piratenews.org] about the incident.

Well that violation will happen later (3, Funny)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417533)

Two fresh kids, a warm summer night, a dropped piece of soap, twenty horny harderned criminals.

Ah, young love. Brings a tear to your eye doesn't it.

Re:Well that violation will happen later (1)

grammar fascist (239789) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417596)

Two fresh kids, a warm summer night, a dropped piece of soap, twenty horny harderned criminals.

Ah, young love. Brings a tear to your eye doesn't it.


I'm in utter awe at your sense of fairness and humanity.

In case you couldn't tell, that was sarcasm.

Re:Well that violation will happen later (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15417987)

And we're all in awe of your melodramatic whining. In case you couldn't tell, that was a straight up, no chaser slap to your polyannish and pious face.

A MySpace exploit? Oh noes! (5, Funny)

autophile (640621) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417291)

I feel a disturbance in My Space... as if a million preteen girls all shouted "OMG, poniez!" at once.

--Rob

Re:A MySpace exploit? Oh noes! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15417403)

OMG, poniez!

Re:A MySpace exploit? Oh noes! (5, Funny)

Meagermanx (768421) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417434)

Shows what you know. Preteen girls don't use commas.

Re:A MySpace exploit? Oh noes! (1)

StanVassilevTroll (956384) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417768)

aahh, but preteen boys do. and what do you get when you flip over a preteen girl? that's right. a preteen boy.

Re:A MySpace exploit? Oh noes! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15418105)

I like the way preteen girls taste.

O RLY? YA RLY!

Not surprised (-1, Flamebait)

tysonedwards (969693) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417304)

Well, I definitely have to say that I am not surprised about this one.

American kids thinking that they can get away with anything, interested solely in themselves, and getting something for nothing.

In the end, services like MySpace is one of the signs of the decline of society as a whole.

Look at it, people no longer care about privacy as they are publishing every single aspect of their daily lives for everyone to read about, including things like "My boyfriend dumped me today! I wanna die!"

Re:Not surprised (5, Insightful)

tbmcmullen (940544) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417342)

Yeah, because only American kids think they can get away with anything and are selfish.
Thats just plain stupid.

Re:Not surprised (2, Insightful)

acornboy (920113) | more than 8 years ago | (#15418084)

Yes all teens have selfish tendencies and can be self absorb and haven't developed the capacity to evaluate consequences... so why is it still valid to mention American kids specifically? Because the culture of entitlement has beeen taken to the highest offices of government and the corpoprate world to such an extent that beggars the imagination in comparison to the rest od the so called first world (and most of the rest of the world to!!) this give kids in American an even bigger delusional system to mimic than anywhere else so yeah the kids aren't really to blame, the whole situation is kinda fucked up...

Re:Not surprised (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15417343)

This story should be combined with the last one.

Re:Not surprised (1)

Qacker (658930) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417453)

It's not just American Kids - It's almost every person on the planet.

Re:Not surprised (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15417467)

"American kids thinking that they can get away with anything, interested solely in themselves, and getting something for nothing."

You just made a generalization about over 70 million people based on an article about two people. Congratulations sir, I think you have a career in politics.

Re:Not surprised (2, Funny)

tysonedwards (969693) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417492)

I am already a journalist, somehow I think that politics may be seen as a demotion.

Re:Not surprised (3, Insightful)

laffer1 (701823) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417513)

And? Blogging lowers my stress levels. I get to talk about how shitty my day was and a few people close to me may read it and then we'll have a dialog. If not, i put it somewhere and i can let it go. Not just teens blog. I'm in my late 20s. My mother has a blog too.

Frankly i have less of a problem with blogging than the governments privacy violations with the telephone network. I choose to blog, I didn't choose to let them listen to my calls or view the list of people I called.

Blogging isn't a breakdown in society, its just a new way to communicate information to people you know. (and don't know)

Re:Not surprised (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15417693)

In the 80's and 90's they were called diary's. You could buy a pretty pink one and hide it under your pillow to relieve your stress.

Re:Not surprised (5, Insightful)

Rob Kaper (5960) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417540)

In the end, services like MySpace is one of the signs of the decline of society as a whole.

Look at it, people no longer care about privacy as they are publishing every single aspect of their daily lives for everyone to read about, including things like "My boyfriend dumped me today! I wanna die!"


Since when is a society on the decline when people can express themselves freely without any serious repercussions? The only use for privacy is protection against intolerant people, so societies where people voluntarily do not make use of it are probably very tolerant of individuals. I might have missed a few developments, but I always thought that kind of freedom is one of the things we consider to be a fundamental values of ours?

Re:Not surprised (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15417577)

Nothing like generalising onto the population of American kids from a couple that hacked a website...

But hey, pick your favourite Slashdot generalisations and throw them out there for mod points.

Re:Not surprised (5, Insightful)

MrSquirrel (976630) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417595)

Not to sound like a jerk, but you're dead wrong. "American kids thinking that they can get away with anything, interested solely in themselves, and getting something for nothing." If you said "almost everyone" instead of "American kids", I would have agreed with you, but I have problems with both the "American" and the "kid" parts.

First off, the easy one -- kids. Kids are NOT the only people who try to get away with anything, are interested solely in themselves, or try to get something for nothing -- here are a couple good ones:
news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060527/ap_on_fe_st/he licopter_fireworks (a woman shoots fireworks at a police helicopter because it was annoying her by being there -- now she's charged with a felony),
news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20060525/od_nm/court _strangle_dc (a defendant on trial for murder tries to strangle his own lawyer IN THE COURTROOM),
www.dumbcriminals.com/drugs/dil-doh/ (a couple steals sex toys and enhancement pills repeatedly from an adult store, they end up being caught on one of their many return trips and when they are caught, the "goods" are in a bag NEXT TO THEIR 3 YEAR OLD DAUGHTER),
and last but not least - EVERY drunk driver EVER.

Now for the "American" part. Stupidity is not a trait restricted to Americans -- PEOPLE ALL OVER THE WORLD ARE IDIOTS:
news.com.com/Worm+traps+alleged+child+porn+offen der/2100-7348_3-6002302.html?tag=html.alert (A German child pornographer turns himself in after getting an e-mail virus telling him he was under investigation.

And finally, to prove that not just American kids commit crimes -- www.ananova.com/news/story/sm_1772630.html?menu=ne ws.quirkies.strangecrime (Austrian kids steal a bunch of stuff so they can afford after-school prostitutes).

I think I've made my point. Sorry, I just get a little riled up when people make broad generalizations with negative connotations.

Re:Not surprised (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 8 years ago | (#15418160)

"(a woman shoots fireworks at a police helicopter because it was annoying her by being there -- now she's charged with a felony)"

From the Article: "Thompson is facing a felony charge of shooting or throwing a deadly missile into an aircraft."

You know what's sad? A bottle rocket isn't deadly to a human, let alone a helicopter. What she did was stupid, but ... felony?

Re:Not surprised (4, Insightful)

Kjella (173770) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417708)

Look at it, people no longer care about privacy as they are publishing every single aspect of their daily lives for everyone to read about, including things like "My boyfriend dumped me today! I wanna die!"

If they choose to, what harm is there to that? I mean, there are people starting wtih JennaCam and ending at BigBrother who'd like to be in front of a cam 24/7. Great for them. If they want to keep a public diary (read: blog), go ahead. For the most part I consider it a good thing that people aren't that insanely stuck up with their facade (dunno if that's the right english word) and that they live life with their ups and downs, just like everyone else.

What's important is that things can also be private when you choose to. That you don't feel on display, that people can grope into your private life when you don't want to. If you're a creepy stalker, a marketdroid or the frigging government, I don't like people profiling me, analyzing me, collaborating data. Chances are you'll be able to read out of it more than I want you to. It's well known from intelligence work that a collection of seemingly innocent unclassified information put together can reveal things that are (and should be) classified. Same goes for a personal life.

Even if there's a "breach" of privacy and things are already public, either because you were bloody drunk, your friends decided it'd be fun to surprise you or use a hidden cam, your ex was bitter or for some other reason it's still private. There are some kinds of mistakes or silly and embarrasing situations you wish would go away, or least limited in scope to some good friends and for a limited time. Good luck with that in a digital world though...

Re:Not surprised (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15417717)

American kids thinking that they can get away with anything, interested solely in themselves, and getting something for nothing.

Right, because irrational behavior is unique to solely American teens.

Just stop, you sound like a bitter foreigner.

lol (0, Redundant)

Scott Swezey (678347) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417325)

Haha. Sorry, they had it comming, even people laughing at them. Stupid script kiddies.

One more time for the road: Ha ha.

Re:lol (1)

MrSquirrel (976630) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417483)

I guess they didn't know that meeting the people you're trying to extort in person IS A BAD IDEA!

Re:lol (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15417510)

lol some more..

$150,000? This is 2006; MySpace probably spends that much money on office coffee every year.

Flew out to LA? I couldn't find any details on this, but I'm willing to bet that the two kiddies were given free airline tickets to fly out to LA.

MySpace? It's not much of a challenge breaking that site, right? Seems like there's a new exploit discovered every month. I hope the media doesn't portray them as l33t "hackers".

Straight "A" students? This is a funny comment left on the ZDNET site..

Not hoodlums
Thier not hoodlums genius, i live like 20 minutes away from them. thier both straight a students with alot of computer expertise but were using thier skills in the wrong way and tried to make some illegal money off of myspace. Some people need to drop the "everyone from new york is a gangster" stereotype just like they tell us to drop the "anyone not from ny is a redneck" stereotype.
Posted by: gtapro91 Posted on: 05/27/06

Re:lol (1)

WilliamSChips (793741) | more than 8 years ago | (#15418198)

And I thought education was bad here in the South...

Extort (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15417347)

Hello.

My name is Bajin Urhala. You probably don't know me but I want to tell you that unless you give me $50 USD I will release a worm that will bring down your network. Please send me your credit card. I live in sweden arabia and the ex-predident of the bank died and I must transfer some money to your account.

Thank you and may god bless you.

first post

Re:Extort (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15418024)

Who the hell modded this off-topic? I'ma send 'im my bank stuff... I don't want the internet goin' down. The bank president died... now is the time... I can trust him; he has my email address, so I must know him.

Sucks to be them... (5, Funny)

jonoid (863970) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417353)

If I were them I wouldn't be worried about the press publishing my name in connection with extortion, I'd be more embarassed about people finding out I was involved with MySpace.

Re:Sucks to be them... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15417378)

Yeah, myspace is so dorky...unlike Slashdot, which is very cool!

Re:Sucks to be them... (1)

tysonedwards (969693) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417503)

Yep, saw that one coming.

Why It sucks to be them (1)

climbon321 (874929) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417709)

Ya, I'd be worried about the press publishing my name too because then people could log onto myspace and learn even more about Shaun [myspace.com] and Saverio [myspace.com]

Re:Why It sucks to be them (1)

Silicon Jedi (878120) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417871)

Crap, they live in my town. Ick.

Screw the arrest... (1)

Vo0k (760020) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417356)

...Screw the arrest, the scam, the kiddies... Where's the exploit code?!
(I'd really laugh if the exploit "leaked" now, costing MySpace much more than $150,000 in downtime, lost data and lost crediblity.)

Re:Screw the arrest... (1)

ari_j (90255) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417523)

I somehow doubt that myspace's "data" is worth $150,000.

Re:Screw the arrest... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15417642)

After reading what happened, sounds like $150,000 they wanted was actually two $75,000/yr salaries.. But who knows...
Sounds like they were some pretty good webcoders that went about getting a job the wrong way. If a maid service mailed you pictures of your dirty floors that they took through your windows or from airplanes and then offered to come clean it for you, you'd probably be very creaped out that someone was peeping in your house and not hire them, and maybe call the cops.. Similar to what went down here as it was reported in the news..

The value of Myspace Data (5, Informative)

DaggertipX (547165) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417662)

Are you kidding me? There is a reason that Fox bought myspace - strictly for it's "data" as you put it. Myspace is a site where one of the most profitable(not to mention fickle) demographic in the world voluntarily offer up their likes/dislikes etc to a company in great detail that is easily searched, cross referenced, and advertised to. It is possibly the biggest advertising goldmine I've ever imagined.
It's always baffled me how so many people could miss what is so big and profitable about Myspace. Even if the site itself never made money (which I doubt, as they advertise heavily and widely) - the data they collect is worth millions upon millions of dollars.

Re:Screw the arrest... (1)

aussie_a (778472) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417974)

I somehow doubt they can lose any more credibility.

hacked myspace? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15417361)

someone should hack it to fix the stupid errors that you routinely get while using it and especially the problem when you're subscribed to someone's blog, then you leave myspace. myspace will not let you unsubscribe to that person's blog. you're supposed to unsubscribe before you delete your account. myspace customer service is worthless because when i've emailed them about it, they told me to login to my account and unsubscribe myself...

I DONT HAVE A FUCKING ACCOUNT ANYMORE YOU FUCKING IDIOTS

so every once in awhile, i'll forward an email about a new myspace blog post and change the subject to HELP A MAN IN HIS MID 30S IS TRYING TO GET ME TO RUN AWAY WITH HIM.

still no reply..

myspace is a worthless piece of garbage.

Easier ways to take down myspace (5, Insightful)

Foo2rama (755806) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417383)

Don't mess with Tom!!!! Luckily he is my friendslist, so he is my friend right?


Sad thing is I can think of about 3 ways right now to bring myspace down at least from a users standpoint. The openess of css usage they allow, plus there is a great little expliot making the rounds after you clicked on an outsidelink it takes some actions on your account to propagate itself. You could make a nice cascading corrupted CSS plague, forcing all user pages to crash any browser.

Re:Easier ways to take down myspace (2, Funny)

creeves1982 (880009) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417435)

Yea but who is going to pull up your Myspace page and read it?

MySpace pages already make some browsers crash. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15417562)

Half the MySpace pages I've looked at are so chock full of shit that they cause Safari to freeze so I can't scroll down the page, and then crash, preventing me from reading much of anything.

I look at this as one of its best features, because if I spent more than a minute looking at those horribly-designed pages covered with lame images, I might have to gouge my eyes out in disgust.

Re:MySpace pages already make some browsers crash. (1)

OctaviusIII (969957) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417697)

And yet, they're still better than the geocities and angelfire pages of yore.

Re:Easier ways to take down myspace (1)

paisleyboxers (540253) | more than 8 years ago | (#15418209)

Um... Greasemonkey* + ScriptBlocker = No CSS ALLOWED.

*Greasemonkey must have the appropriate scripts installed to even work

Smart enough... (2, Interesting)

rqqrtnb (753156) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417386)

to hack mySpace but not to devise a better way to transfer the pay-off?

Have these guys never seen a movie? (5, Funny)

llZENll (545605) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417402)

Come on now, a job interview? Don't they know the way a transaction like this goes down is on the docks at night (when its foggy of course). The guy drops the money off in a breifcase, then you zoom by on a motorcycle with a hot chick on the back who picks it up as you fly by at 80mph in black leather jumpsuits.... ...oh I see where the plan fell through, being old enough to reach the shifter on the motorcycle, and knowing a hot chick.

Re:Have these guys never seen a movie? (2, Interesting)

Saeger (456549) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417920)

Nihilist: Ve don't care. Ve still vant ze money, Lebowski, or ve fuck you up.

Re:Have these guys never seen a movie? (1)

zsau (266209) | more than 8 years ago | (#15418191)

Probably it sounds silly but certain parts of English aren't really transparent to English speakers from different parts of the world, and you've said a couple of words that I've wanted to know the meaning of for a while...

So what is a "jumpsuit" and what is a "shifter"? Thanks!

Re:Have these guys never seen a movie? (1)

WilliamSChips (793741) | more than 8 years ago | (#15418226)

Wikipedia [wikipedia.org] is your friend [wikipedia.org] . (I already knew what a jumpsuit was, but not a shifter)

They should have gotten real jobs w/ their skills (0, Redundant)

rqqrtnb (753156) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417415)

Now instead of enjoying the college years they'll be enjoying federal pound me in the ass prison.

Slashdot _would_ love them... (1)

9mm Censor (705379) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417428)

if they simply released the code, and brought myspace to its knees resulting in a increased need for mydeathspace.com

Man..... (0, Offtopic)

madnuke (948229) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417429)

They are so 1337, I wish I could be like that one day.... And why are the Secret Service helping My Space my tin foil hat is tingling with conspiracy theories....

Re:Man..... (1)

tysonedwards (969693) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417530)

Obviously...

If people are sitting around archiving every conversation and every event that ever took place (including the questionable, shady, illegal, very illegal, and WTFFAITYT), then the government only needs to go to someones website to find out that "I raped the head cheerleader last night!"

You see?

Re:Man..... (1)

pawonfire (883016) | more than 8 years ago | (#15418233)

I was curious why the secret service was present for the sting also, and now I'm worried after reading from the USSS website: (www.ustreas.gov/usss) http://www.ustreas.gov/usss/investigations.shtml [ustreas.gov] Since corporations try to claim monetary loss from almost any crime, then it looks like the USSS might have jurisdiction over a whole lot of crimes, especially since 9/11.

Tracker Sites (5, Informative)

P!Alexander (448903) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417444)

I was wondering if Slashdot would ever cover this.

These kids were associated with a site that charged for code that you can add to your MySpace profile which would allow you to see who had viewed your profile, when, and where they got to you from (another friend, search, etc). By my calculations they were making upwards of $20,000/month from their service ($5.00/mo with around 4000 users).

They, and other tracker sites, have been constantly battling with MySpace over the use of the "hacks". Most of the stuff they've used has simply taken advantage of bad programming. The first generation of trackers used a flash file in the profile to read users cookie data. Then MySpace forced all embedded flash objects to disallow the use of actionscript. They moved on to inserting javascript in CSS commands, using image files to capture browser info, etc. MySpace responded by blocking the use of certain domains within profiles. They then bought a bunch of different domains and assigned them randomly to users.

Then there was some random legal trouble that they never really talked about but had apparently moved past. The next planned release was supposed to be "unstoppable". They had promised the release for about a week and a half and it was eventually pushed back to May 19. Then they got arrested. The site, myspaceplus.com, switched over to a basic notice about "info coming soon" and that was it. There was a pretty active forum on there but I think people were starting to sense that there was trouble and/or the two owners (who went by Jack and Jake on the site) were skipping town.

Anyway, it's a really interesting phenomenon, especially considering that other services have built in the ability to see who's viewing you as long as you allow others to do the same when you view their profile (Friendster). Most of the tracker sites now are on a similar model where the tracker will only work with other users ot the service.

So, not really "hacking" per se. It seems that MySpace was most worried about people's IP addresses getting stolen. The sites started hashing them so you couldn't see the actual address. Seems like a weird thing to be worried about on the privacy front if you ask me.

Re:Tracker Sites (1, Redundant)

pimpimpim (811140) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417498)

Thank you for all the info! The way you put it, this doesn't seem to be really 'hacking', everyone is allowed to offer pictures to be included in webpages, and they could ask money for doing it as well, nothing illegal in that! Of course asking 5 dollar/month for the services they offered is a scam, but so is myspace in general, and anyone wasting time and money on all this should just in general be pitied upon :) Furthermore, this doesn't seem to be about "badly written code" in myspace that much, but more about myspace not knowing what their users want. So far, nothing seems to be going on.

But I guess when they start blackmailing for lots of dollars, they just pass a line and it becomes an undisputable illegal activity. Actually it's a shame, they could've keep on earning a lot of money with just offering stupid people what they want, but know they cut in their own fingers...

Re:Tracker Sites (0)

TheAntiCrust (620345) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417555)

How is myspace a scam? It's free.

Re:Tracker Sites (1)

pimpimpim (811140) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417602)

It's a free scam ;)

Re:Tracker Sites (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15417670)

Well, from they way you describe it, the early attempts were cross-site scripting attacks. Stealing cookies is a pretty serious security offense, and unauthorized Javascript can do stuff like vandalize your profile with goatse pix, as well as spreading itself virally. So it's a little more harmful than just tracking IPs, at least before.

Re:Tracker Sites (4, Funny)

Mooga (789849) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417739)

It seems that MySpace was most worried about people's IP addresses getting stolen. The sites started hashing them so you couldn't see the actual address. Seems like a weird thing to be worried about on the privacy front if you ask me.

So you can post your name, age, birthday, address, and all your other personal information for everyone to see on MySpace, but now they wont find your IP address! That's privacy for you!
If people on MySpace wanted privacy, they wouldn't BE on MySpace.

Death sentence an option? (5, Funny)

a_greer2005 (863926) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417445)

They had an opprotunity to take down the most annoying site in the history of the internet and the greedy bastards didnt pull the trigger? HANG 'EM!

The abouve comment is a joke...laugh...

Are you... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15417515)

The abouve comment is a joke...laugh...

Are you French or something (in regards to abouve)? Stick with your Royale with Cheese :)

Re:Death sentence an option? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15417626)

The abouve comment is a joke...laugh...

Humor? On the Interweb? That's no longer allowed! Didn't you get the memo?

Re:Death sentence an option? (1)

WilliamSChips (793741) | more than 8 years ago | (#15418238)

Only on one of the internets(on which there have been rumors) was that banned. This is on the other one.

WTF (2, Informative)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417522)

Okay, first off if the ZDnet story is the true account these kids must surely get somekind of "dumbest criminals" award.

However if you google for other news stories there seems to be more going on.

First of they are not teens. 18 and 19 makes them adult in america doesn't it?

Second is that they apparently ran a website http://myspaceplus.com/ [myspaceplus.com] (wich is still up but empty of content, and horribly laid out on opera/linux). Before this it apparently was a site for some software to hack myspace.

This "first" hack was discovered and plugged. They then apparently tried to extort myspace into paying 150.000 (or get paid to be consultants) and were then trapped by law enforcement officials at a meeting.

A lot of the explenation by the lawyer of the young idiots sound like typical lawyer crap "anything to get my clients off".

The real question is, what was myspaceplus.com about? Is this just a story of two idiots who were to greedy and now can learn a bit about the real world. Or did myspace step over the line in trying to get rid of a couple of hackers by appealing to their greed.

Either way the young aduls are stupid but you can wonder if they really need to spend several years in a federal jail because of it, oh who am I kidding. Fry the suckers.

It just is fucking hilarious. If their attorny is claiming the truth (HA) then you got to admire their lack of common sense. Ooh, yeah we publish a tool to hack myspace. Oh look they are sending us a job offer to advise them for 150.000 dollars. Lets travel across the country to get rich!

By the way doesn't the fact that they travelled across the state border (LA and New York are different parts of america right? You yanks ain't got a monopoly on bad education you know) make it a federal crime?

Oh well, since they are geeks they will at least soon loose their virginity. Squeel piggy, squeel!

Re:WTF (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15417585)

horribly laid out on opera linux!!! what the hell does that mean? opera is a web brouser and linux is just a os wierdo..hmmmm look slashdot is on linux also! it must be a shitty site!!

"They are not teens" (2, Insightful)

jdbartlett (941012) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417597)

"First of they are not teens. 18 and 19 makes them adult in america doesn't it?"

Sorry, could you say that again with numbers in writing? I'll give you a hint: EighTEEN and NineTEEN.

You are correct that they are adults (legally able to sign a contract). They are also teenagers.

Re:"They are not teens" (2, Interesting)

Osty (16825) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417795)

You are correct that they are adults (legally able to sign a contract). They are also teenagers.

I don't know if the OP meant it this way, but I took it as a comment on how US society (or at least the media) tries to excuse behavior. Legally, at 18 you're an adult. The term "teen", while technically referring to someone between the ages of 13 and 19, tends to imply "child". So, are you still a child at age 18? What about at age 25? As an example, the local news continually referred to both the shooter and victims of the recent rave killing [seattleweekly.com] here in Seattle as "kids". The shooter was 28 [thestranger.com] . Some of his victims were 21, 22, 26, and 32. Are those "kids"?

Maybe it's a sign of our aging baby boomer population, who see anybody younger than them as kids. Maybe it's because of our economic climate that keeps "kids" in university until 25 or 26 (and then only graduating with a Bachelor's degree, not even a Master's or better). Maybe it's our "take no responsibility" society that wants to blame anything but the person (thus the person is a "kid" who didn't know any better, rather than an adult). Or maybe I'm just reading too much into it.

Re:"They are not teens" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15418115)

I would say maturity-wise you are still a kid until 25 or so, exactly as you state.

This is not due to an aging population or anything like that. As society and technology advance requiring less responsibily at older and older ages then the "adult" age will continue to creep up. More people are also going to college and such. There is no way in hell you can convince me a 20-somthing fresh-out is not a kid. They are, plain and simple.

Re:"They are not teens" (1)

HappyEngineer (888000) | more than 8 years ago | (#15418181)

You're referring to maturity. People gain maturity by being on their own, independent of others, regardless of age.

When someone refers to someone as a "kid" then there's no way to know the age of the "kid" unless you know if they are referring to biological or mental age. Often it's just a relative term. A 70 year old may well refer to a 40 year old as a kid. I know that parents will refer to their children as their kids no matter how old they are.

On the other hand, I don't know how often people use "teen" to refer to someone between 13 and 19. I'm guessing the most common usage is to use teen to refer to adolescents, but who knows. When it comes to pron, teen will often refer to 25 year olds (or even older).

Language is often not strictly logical. I guess you just have to assume ambiguity. If you want specifics then you need to know the specific age.

Re:WTF (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15417607)

First of they are not teens. 18 and 19 makes them adult in america doesn't it?

Eight-teen. Nine-teen

Re:WTF (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15417873)

Oh well, since they are geeks they will at least soon loose their virginity.

Speaking of bad education... loose is the opposite of tight. Lose is the opposite of win. So unless you were trying to say that they would let their virginity free, may I suggest you buy yourself a fucking dictionary?
 

Re:WTF (1)

slackingme (690217) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417962)

From your comment I can see:

1) You aren't American.
2) You are an idiot.

Thanks for making me feel a little better about living in a country full of idiots--We don't have a monopoly on idiots! YAY! YAAYY!

Clearly not all teens have limited science ability (-1)

aauu (46157) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417531)

At least for computer science. The previous article complains that we do not have sufficient science skills. When such skills are demonstrated in the computer science arena, we slap em down and squelch their entreprenuerial spirit. Where is this country heading?

Re:Clearly not all teens have limited science abil (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15417548)

Hacking up some javescript isn't exactly "computer science".

Heh (5, Funny)

Hawthorne01 (575586) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417576)

And this was posted right above an article about how science learning was down in U.S. schools.

Coincidence? ;-)

Welcome! (5, Funny)

Lip (977477) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417619)

Welcome to MyJailSpace.com!

Re:Welcome! (2, Funny)

commodoresloat (172735) | more than 8 years ago | (#15418103)

Bubba is in your extended network!

Some mothers do have 'em (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15417703)

Hmmm Betty. The cat did a whopsee on my shake down operation.

The Real Deal (5, Informative)

rivetgeek (977479) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417784)

I speak from experience in that I was the one to bring this scam to the attention of myspace in the first place. And I cracked the first several codes they released. ( Having friends that work at myspace helps) They ran a site that released "trackers". These were bits of flash mostly that when loaded onto a users page cause anyone viewing that page to be victimized by a series of css or bad design exploits. These mostly took advantage of css through flash actionscript that was encrypted to obscure the actionscript (swfencrypt). As for their latest "unblockable" code: it was really lame. A flash file on the users page redirects you to a 3rd party site that looks like myspace (think pishing tactics) that then asks you to enter your email address that is associated with your myspace account to view the users page. So now they have your ip and your myspace account and how often you visted the users account. Frankly you'd have to be a moron to fall for this though. For an example check www.blendnet.com/verify.php (though I wouldnt recommend entering a valid email address since these guys still control this server. And should this give anyone an idea, don't bother, it's already been blocked) P.S. If there are any myspaceplus users reading this, you people are some of the dumbest forum posters on earth, we watched you all this entire time and you gleefully gave us everything we needed to find and crack these stupid little codes.

Myspace (2, Insightful)

certel (849946) | more than 8 years ago | (#15417966)

And so it begins. Myspace will be the next online target such as the gambling sites were a couple years ago.

"Myspace.com: error" (3, Funny)

mattpointblank (936343) | more than 8 years ago | (#15418095)

This had to fail, if everyone who found code issues in Myspace's programming wanted $150,000 they'd be bankrupt by Monday.
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