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ThePirateBay Will Rise Again?

Zonk posted more than 8 years ago | from the can't-keep-a-good-torrent-down dept.

465

muffen writes "IDG.se has an interesting article up giving more details about the raid on PirateBay, and a little history of the organization. The news organ reports that nearly 200 servers were taken, and many of them had nothing to do with the torrent-serving group. After yesterday's raid, the site is back up with a single page explaining the situation. Brokep, one of the people behind PirateBay, claims that the site will be up and running within a couple of days. He also says that there is no legal basis for the raid against them and that he is certain that the case will not go to trial." From the site: "The necessity for securing technical evidence for the existence of a web-service which is fully official, the legality of which has been under public debate for years and whose principals are public persons giving regular press interviews, could not be explained. Asked for other reasoning behind the choice to take down a site, without knowing whether it is illegal or not, the officers explained that this is normal."

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Cross Link & Clickies (5, Informative)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444066)

I know that yesterday's article [slashdot.org] is most likely linked above but I would like to point out Christian Engström's post [slashdot.org] (the vice chairman of the Piratpartiet) which was in reply to my own post [slashdot.org] .

I myself live in America and the only way I can find information on this political party is online. I wish that there were more official resources in English aside from their site [piratpartiet.se] . There seems to be one page with the content exactly the same as Christian Engström's post.

Is it possible that this party is popular via lack of information? I would like to see them explain their strategy & give very detailed specifics about what they would like to see changed and why. I think that if this was posted, it may cause them to lose some support but would definitely let Sweden & the rest of the world know a lot more about the Pirate Party. I like their desired end results but how to plan to achieve these goals?

I don't want to sound like an ass but in my opinion, having 200 servers of a controversial party raided and confiscated by the local government is one of the best things that could happen to said party. Especially since nothing incriminating was found on them. Do political parties now earn "street cred" like this? Certainly would strike a chord with the youth & idealists.
Asked for other reasoning behind the choice to take down a site, without knowing whether it is illegal or not, the officers explained that this is normal.
Hmmm, sounds like pretty unlawful search and seize action ...

Dennis: Come and see the corruption inherent in the system. Help! Help! I'm being repressed!
King Arthur: *seizes the servers* Bloody file sharers!
Dennis: Oh, what a giveaway! Did you hear that? Did you hear that, eh? That's what I'm on about! Did you see him repressing me? You saw him, Didn't you?

Re:Cross Link & Clickies (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15444148)

Popular via lack of information? It's a Swedish party, for Swedes. If you can't read Swedish, you probably won't be able to vote for them either.

And that's the way it is. There's plenty of information there, but it's in Swedish.

Re:Cross Link & Clickies (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15444298)

True, fellow coward (or paranoid person on an unsecure terminal, like myself. I'm "kinkoblast", but to paranoid to log in) however international support is always good. Also, more brains generaly is equil to more good ideas (and more crap), so it might be to their advantage to encourage non-Swedes to take an interest. Also, their goal is relevent to other nations, too, so encourageing simmiler groups to form in other nations is also a good thing.

Re:Cross Link & Clickies (3, Funny)

Ossifer (703813) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444331)

A møøse once bit my sister.

Re:Cross Link & Clickies (2, Informative)

Vintermann (400722) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444371)

Ø doesn't sound like oo. It sounds like the wovel the Queen of Britain would make if she said "Word. Bird. Nerd. Heard. Turd." And swedes don't write Ø anyway, only danes and norwegians do. They write ö (o with two dots) instead, like the germans.

Re:Cross Link & Clickies (3, Funny)

Ossifer (703813) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444429)

Typiskt svenskt! Ni svenskar som saknar sinne för humor (dvs alla) kan inte låta bli att visa upp det för hela världen. Om du verkligen ska klaga på mitt inlägg, skall du klaga på Monty Python.

Regarding unlawful search and seize (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15444163)

The pigs argue that since all seized servers were in the same serverhall, they could take whatever they wanted. We'll see how that plays out, I suspect they could technically be right even if it would violate the spirit of the law.

Re:Cross Link & Clickies (5, Interesting)

psergiu (67614) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444234)

We would very much like such a party in Romania. It would be hugely popular in the wake of the lastest events: In order to please the EU, the police concluded that all computers connected to local unregistered LANs are used for hosting/trading illegal software/movies/mp3s and began breaking the doors and seizing the computers of anyone not connected to the Cable operators who "sponsored" this operation.
Link Here [gardianul.ro] (in romanian - but the picture is worth a thousands words)
The jail term for software piracy in romania is up to 15 years (more than rape) and in a few days the police arrested almost 100 people for this - with the only proof being an IP address.

Re:Cross Link & Clickies (4, Informative)

ozamosi (615254) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444469)

The Piracy Party has stated that one of their goals is to get into EU, and to get there, they want to help out starting Piracy Parties all over Europe. So you (or other persons interested) should probably contact them if you want to start one in your country.

The the pirate party? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15444363)

Ok, Swedish Gammer Nazi time! ;-)

Piratpartiet means "the Pirate party", with the 'et' at at the end of the word making it definate in Swedish. Therefore there is no need to say 'the' in front. You could either say 'The Piratparti' or 'Piratpartiet' but saying 'the Piratpartiet' is like saying 'The the pirate party'.

In all seriousness of course I didn't expect you to know this but maybe someone will find it interesting nonetheless.

Re:Cross Link & Clickies (1)

udoschuermann (158146) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444368)

Hmmm, sounds like pretty unlawful search and seize action
IANAL, but United States law has a provision that states you are "innocent until proven guilty". The onus is on the accuser to gather sufficient evidence to prove your guilt.

Many other countries do not have this, so you could call in an anonymous report to the police that so-and-so has been using drugs or has nasty stuff on their computer or whatever and it is then up to the victim to prove somehow that the allegations are false.

Where does Sweden fall with respect to this?

Re:Cross Link & Clickies (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15444461)

I think all democratic societies have that policy. I know Sweden does

Re:Cross Link & Clickies (4, Informative)

Oldsmobile (930596) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444398)

"Hmmm, sounds like pretty unlawful search and seize action ... "

Though I am not an expert on Swedish law, I doubt there was anythign exactly illegal in this operation, though it was obviously heavy handed. European law works quite differently compared to US law, so any comparisons are useless.

If there was no reason for this seizure, of course compensation will be paid and if the evidence used to justify it was flawed or faked or the wrong kind, senior police officers may or may not face disiplinary action.

Of course, the police in Sweden have been caught lying and faking evidence before, such as when covering their backs after shooting someone (who was unarmed) in Gothernburg during a demonstration there a few years back.

I'm not sure how that ended up.

Re:Cross Link & Clickies (5, Funny)

wheany (460585) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444447)

I'm not sure how that ended up.

The guy is still dead.

PirateBay will rise again? (4, Funny)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444073)

This looks like a job for Captain Copyright! [captaincopyright.ca]

Seriously - of course the pirate bay will rise again - what they were doing was not illegal under Swedish law.

Re:PirateBay will rise again? (0, Redundant)

91degrees (207121) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444093)

Seriously - of course the pirate bay will rise again - what they were doing was not illegal under Swedish law.

What makes you believe this?

Re:PirateBay will rise again? (4, Funny)

stupidfoo (836212) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444119)

Because the average torrent user is an expert on Swedish law and ThePirateBay, who are a group of well respected Swedish lawyers, said so, so it must be true!

Re:PirateBay will rise again? (1)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444307)

ThePirateBay, who are a group of well respected Swedish lawyers, said so, so it must be true!

*sighs* The piratebay have legal advice saying its OK to link to torrents.

I haven't seen any legal opinions to the contrary (other then from the IFPI, who said it may be a "contributing infringment").

Remember this is a country where personal downloads where not illegal until a year ago....

Re:PirateBay will rise again? (4, Funny)

Ithika (703697) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444126)

Maybe you should tell the people at http://www.google.se/ [google.se] that directing people to copyrighted works is illegal in Sweden.

Re:PirateBay will rise again? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15444174)

There's just a little bit of difference between google and torrent trackers... but I'm sure you have some cute little nuanced opinion as to why they're exactly the same.

Re:PirateBay will rise again? (1)

91degrees (207121) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444180)

Is hosting torrent files legal in the US then?

Re:PirateBay will rise again? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15444396)

Not according to the **AA's interpretation of the DMCA, however, such files were NOT being hosted in the US.

Re:PirateBay will rise again? (1)

91degrees (207121) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444430)

The logic is inconsistent.

The argument was that if google.se is legal under Swedish law, then The Pirate Bay must also be legal.

According to this logic, if google.com is legal under US law, any US torrent hosting site must also be legal.

Re:PirateBay will rise again? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15444245)

what they were doing was not illegal under Swedish law

There is one law and that is the law of the US dollar. Democracy? Sovereign nations? Open your eyes!

Sweden is an outpost in the US empire, just like any other nation in this world. "Why do they hate us?" We hate you because you're our slave masters. You're "spreading democracy", but we're not allowed to vote in the US, the only place where it could have mattered. And in the US, your only choice is to vote for the Republicrats.

Capitalism equals plutocracy.

Re:PirateBay will rise again? (1)

stupidfoo (836212) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444274)

So, did you enjoy your freshman year of college? Sounds like you read some intersting books!

Angst angst!

Re:PirateBay will rise again? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15444403)

Say what you will, we still hate you.

Re:PirateBay will rise again? (1)

Xymor (943922) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444471)

I don't know why, but this sorta reminds me of Comunist Propaganda...

This is bad... (5, Funny)

Quintios (594318) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444077)

I think the selling of Pirates is bad. The site should stay down!

Re:This is bad... (1)

Clazzy (958719) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444231)

Surely it's a good thing? It will help solve global warming, making the world a better place!

Re:This is bad... (1, Funny)

Billosaur (927319) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444238)

I think the selling of Pirates is bad. The site should stay down!

But how can I fight the Ninjas if I can't buy Pirates? I have the right to buy Pirates! It's in the Constitution or something, I think...

Re:This is bad... (2, Funny)

PrescriptionWarning (932687) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444339)

I agree, the pirate slave trade is terrible. Not only are there jobless, legless, eyeless pirates walking the streets, but now they are being sold to the highest bidder for lowly jobs such as cleaning the plank, srubbing the poop deck and purifying the bilge filters with their tongues.

As a record store owner, I hope not (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15444081)

My business faces ruin. CD sales have dropped through the floor. People aren't buying half as many CDs as they did just a year ago. Revenue is down and costs are up. My store has survived for years, but I now face the prospect of bankruptcy. Every day I ask myself why this is happening.

I bought the store about 12 years ago. It was one of those boutique record stores that sell obscure, independent releases that no-one listens to, not even the people that buy them. I decided that to grow the business I'd need to aim for a different demographic, the family market. My store specialised in family music - stuff that the whole family could listen to. I don't sell sick stuff like Marilyn Manson or cop-killer rap, and I'm proud to have one of the most extensive Christian rock sections that I know of.

The business strategy worked. People flocked to my store, knowing that they (and their children) could safely purchase records without profanity or violent lyrics. Over the years I expanded the business and took on more clean-cut and friendly employees. It took hard work and long hours but I had achieved my dream - owning a profitable business that I had built with my own hands, from the ground up. But now, this dream is turning into a nightmare.

Every day, fewer and fewer customers enter my store to buy fewer and fewer CDs. Why is no one buying CDs? Are people not interested in music? Do people prefer to watch TV, see films, read books? I don't know. But there is one, inescapable truth - Internet piracy is mostly to blame. The statistics speak for themselves - one in three discs world wide is a pirate. On The Internet, you can find and download hundreds of dollars worth of music in just minutes. It has the potential to destroy the music industry, from artists, to record companies to stores like my own. Before you point to the supposed "economic downturn", I'll note that the book store just across from my store is doing great business. Unlike CDs, it's harder to copy books over The Internet.

A week ago, an unpleasant experience with pirates gave me an idea. In my store, I overheard a teenage patron talking to his friend.

"Dude, I'm going to put this CD on the Internet right away."

"Yeah, dude, that's really lete [sic], you'll get lots of respect."

I was fuming. So they were out to destroy the record industry from right under my nose? Fat chance. When they came to the counter to make their purchase, I grabbed the little shit by his shirt. "So...you're going to copy this to your friends over The Internet, punk?" I asked him in my best Clint Eastwood/Dirty Harry voice.

"Uh y-yeh." He mumbled, shocked.

"That's it. What's your name? You're blacklisted. Now take yourself and your little bitch friend out of my store - and don't come back." I barked. Cravenly, they complied and scampered off.

So that's my idea - a national blacklist of pirates. If somebody cannot obey the basic rules of society, then they should be excluded from society. If pirates want to steal from the music industry, then the music industry should exclude them. It's that simple. One strike, and you're out - no reputable record store will allow you to buy another CD. If the pirates can't buy the CDS to begin with, then they won't be able to copy them over The Internet, will they? It's no different to doctors blacklisting drug dealers from buying prescription medicine.

I have just written a letter to the RIAA outlining my proposal. Suing pirates one by one isn't going far enough. Not to mention pirates use the fact that they're being sued to unfairly portray themselves as victims. A national register of pirates would make the problem far easier to deal with. People would be encouraged to give the names of suspected pirates to a hotline, similar to TIPS. Once we know the size of the problem, the police and other law enforcement agencies will be forced to take piracy seriously. They have fought the War on Drugs with skill, so why not the War on Piracy?

This evening, my daughters asked me. "Why do the other kids laugh at us?"

I wanted to tell them the truth - it's because they wear old clothes and have cheap haircuts. I can't afford anything better for them right now.

"It's because they are idiots, kids", I told them. "Don't listen to them."

When the kids went to bed, my wife asked me, "Will we be able to keep the house, David?"

I just shook my head, and tried to hold back the tears. "I don't know, Jenny. I don't know."

When my girls ask me questions like that, I feel like my heart is being wrenched out of my chest. But knowing that I'm doing the best I can to save my family and my business is some consolation.

Some people are offended by my blacklist system. I may have made my store less popular for pirates and sympathisers, but that's a sacrifice I'm willing to make to save my industry from destruction. I am inspired by artists such as Metallica that have taken a stand against the powerful pirate lobby. When everyone believes 2 + 2 = 5, to simply state the truth, that 2 + 2 = 4, is a courageous act.

Re:As a record store owner, I hope not (3, Funny)

Quintios (594318) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444122)

Wait wait wait... Is the RIAA posting here now too?

Anyone that grabs someone by the shirt in a store is going to get sued... I don't believe this story is credible. Plus, someone that sells christian music and calls a patron a "bitch". (Not that christians don't cuss, but again, if the guy is having problems clothing his kids I doubt he's scare off a customer.)

Re:As a record store owner, I hope not (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15444179)

WHOOOSH!

Re:As a record store owner, I hope not (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15444450)

WHOOOSH!

Re:As a record store owner, I hope not (1)

gowen (141411) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444230)

Credible? I'd be happy if it had been written by someone with evidence of education above the third grade level.

Mind you, I felt like that about "A Million Little Pieces", too.

Re:As a record store owner, I hope not (1)

Masami Eiri (617825) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444250)

Its an old troll post. I've seen it a few times before.

Re:As a record store owner, I hope not (-1, Offtopic)

MOtisBeard (693145) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444145)

This is the best troll I've ever seen.

Wait... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15444150)

Wait, so I'm supposed to feel bad for you because...

1) Generally most popular music sucks these days. The last CD I bought was back in my high school days in the mid-90's while I was DJing for school rallies.

2) Many people have iPods and other MP3 players so they get their music from iTMS.

3) You gambled and have a business model that hasn't adapted to the internet era.

All three reasons don't give you the right have a gauranteed revenue stream. Either diversify or quit complaining.

Old troll - no longer amusing. (5, Informative)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444160)

Dude, that joke hasn't been funny [kuro5hin.org] for years. (I mean why didn't you pull out BSD is dying?)

Re:As a record store owner, I hope not (1)

Vo0k (760020) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444164)

What kind of idiot buys 1h of music on a disk, when they can get, legally or not, 16, without need to swap the disks? If you were selling vinyl records, you'd be just in the same situation. Compressionless music is in decline. Same as horse coaches replaced by trains. Piracy may have its hand in it but not as much as a source of -free- music but as a source of -music as mp3-.
Damn me if I'm going to waste 60 megabytes of data storage space for one 3-minute song.

Re:As a record store owner, I hope not (1)

Vo0k (760020) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444203)

Oh, and damn me if I'm going to walk over to your store and pick the disk, then fumble through 60 disks to find the song I want, if I can sit in front of my computer at home and just download it (legally or not) without moving my lazy ass off the chair, then quickly find it on a nicely sorted list on my harddrive. And add it to the playlist of 40 favourite of given mood instead of swapping 35 disks filled mostly with crap to get to hear the 40 songs I want.

Re:As a record store owner, I hope not (1)

mitch0 (237776) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444175)

Erm, nice sad story and all, but probably you should just realize that this will only get worse (from your perspective), so you'd better find another business model...

just 2 random thoughts:
  - online music stores make a nice profit
  - CDs are overpriced

regards,
mitch

ps: I know there's a fair chance that I'm replying to a troll, but what the heck ;)

Re:As a record store owner, I hope not (3, Insightful)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444183)

This evening, my daughters asked me. "Why do the other kids laugh at us?"

I wanted to tell them the truth - it's because they wear old clothes and have cheap haircuts. I can't afford anything better for them right now.

"It's because they are idiots, kids", I told them. "Don't listen to them."

When the kids went to bed, my wife asked me, "Will we be able to keep the house, David?"

I just shook my head, and tried to hold back the tears. "I don't know, Jenny. I don't know."
My grandparents and ancesters have been dirt farmers as far back as I know. Now I'm a computer programmer. Why? Because of corporate farming in America.

Boo hoo.

Do I cry that my 5th generation industry was stolen out from under my feet? Do I cry that my grandparents and parents endured hardships? No. They rolled with the punches and my dad worked construction/trucking. Maybe you should look into another industry. You smell the times changing, so react (you are allowed to do that, you know). Here's your plan: Get into another business and do it fast. You can keep your house if you're smart. No one is going to be crying over your family drama on Slashdot. Don't be emotionally soft and don't feel sorry for yourself. Pick yourself up and move on. Sell the store or change your business. It was a fun 12 years but the trend is over.

Re:As a record store owner, I hope not (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15444237)

If you read much, much closer, you'll realize that post is a satyre. It's been reposted on slashdot for a very, very long time. It's subtle, I know, but still.

My Apologies (1)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444249)

Sorry, I must be new here.

Re:As a record store owner, I hope not (0)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444329)

As sorry as I may feel for you, but you have to share the sympathy with all the typesetters, the shoemakers, the tailors, the editors, the layouters and all the others whose profession has become obsolete by technology.

Do you honestly ask for technology to be rolled back so you can keep your job? If so, how far shall we roll back? To the time before computers so we need more traffic cops (no coordinated traffic lights without computers), too? Or before the industrial revolution, so weavers can get back into their profession?

Sorry buddy. Time's past you, learn something that's still in demand if you want to stay in business.

Re:As a record store owner, I hope not (1)

A-Trav (874605) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444353)

Assuming that this is not a fake (which it most likely is), the store was doomed to failure from the start. Here are several basic flaws in your business model:

  1. Clean music, like Christian Rock, does not sell nearly as well as non-clean music
  2. Your store made the same fatal mistake as the entire Music Industry, it attempted to resist the sell of music online.
  3. CD's have not been the perferred way to store music for several years.

As to why you business is in immediate danger:

  1. You should not threaten customers. When word gets around, considering that you sell "Family Music," you will lose about three forths of your business.
  2. If your having money troubles, then you should have let go of some useless employees, scaled back the size of the store, and/or spent more to advertise
  3. Most importantly, if the threatened customer has any sense, you and your business will be charged with assult.

The lesson, dont keep an out of date business plan....

Re:As a record store owner, I hope not (1)

john83 (923470) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444428)

When the kids went to bed, my wife asked me, "Will we be able to keep the house, David?"
I just shook my head, and tried to hold back the tears. "I don't know, Jenny. I don't know."
Man, that had me in stitches.

Yeah! We can all pirate again! (1, Funny)

stupidfoo (836212) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444087)

We can all freely download all those shows and movies and music and software produced by the companies represented by the RIAA and MPAA and BSA! We can continue this amazing paradox in which we bash the quality of their product while we spend exorbinent amounts of time and energy figuring out ways to get it quickly and freely!

Re:Yeah! We can all pirate again! (1, Insightful)

Tibor the Hun (143056) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444395)

Quit your preaching stupidfoo.
The software isn't shitty because it's downloaded for free.

It's shitty because it was designed shitty.
At my workplace we pay for Windows twice for each machine, and it still blows ass.

Are they kidding? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15444129)

...alternatively assisting breach of copy-right law.

Are they seriously saying that they are not guilty of this? They are guilty as hell in spirit if not by the letter of the law.

Re:Are they kidding? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15444199)

Generally speaking, isn't it a good thing that our courts do not interpret the law based on the spirit rather than the letter?

Re:Are they kidding? (1)

Spad (470073) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444214)

The may be "guilty" of it, but there's no law in Sweden that prevents them from doing it.

Re:Are they kidding? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15444407)

I have no problem with torrents or copyright violations and often download stuff I don't want to pay for (Photoshop CS2 springs to mind).

I do have a problem with people pretending they are doing nothing wrong.

They are assisting a huge number of people with copyright violations. They popularity of the internet and P2P networks happened so fast that laws have not been put into place yet. In most democratic countires it takes years to get new laws drafted and then passed through the govement to be signed into law.

Remember, everything was legal at one point or another. Shit, where I live it is legal to have sex with 16 year old girls. Does that make it right, NO but if I did it I wouldn't pretend I was doign nothing wrong, I would simply state that it was legal and thus anyone who didn't like it could go to hell.

It is not the act that bothers me but rather the attitude that they are somehow doing nothing wrong.

"criminal police?" Oo (5, Funny)

plasmacutter (901737) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444130)

from TFS: Swedish National Criminal Police

the police are criminal?
well at least in sweden they tell it like it is.. i guess Oo

Re:"criminal police?" Oo (3, Interesting)

Vintermann (400722) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444410)

That's not the only departement title that comes out disturbing when translated to english. The new government in Norway changed the name of the Ministry of Education and Church Affairs to the Ministry of Knowledge. They then changed the official translation back to education, because they thought the latter sounded to Orwellian (which it does...)

Re:"criminal police?" Oo (1)

Thorwak (836943) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444443)

:-)

Someone did a babelfish-like translation of "kriminalpolisen" it seems (which would translate to "the criminal police" if doing it word bye word) :)

Just like there is a trafikpolis ("traffic police", department(s) that handle traffic rules violations amongst others, not surprisingly) there also is a kriminalpolis.

Sounds familiar... (4, Interesting)

gasmonso (929871) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444176)

"...the site will be up and running within a couple of days" Hmmm, thought I heard that once when ShareReactor got raided a couple years ago.

http://religiousfreaks.com/ [religiousfreaks.com]

STANDBY (-1, Troll)

tomstdenis (446163) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444181)

Attempting to care....FAILED. :-)

Some random website full of 1337 computer wizards who are probably breaking the law or just being annoying gets taken down. Big deal.

How many kids went hungry last night because their parents wouldn't feed them?

How many people died yesterday as a result of war?

etc, etc, etc.

Chances are they are doing something worthy of getting "picked on" and frankly I don't see why anyone should care in the slighest.

Tom

Re:STANDBY (1)

HaydnH (877214) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444454)

If you gon't care about any of this stuff why on earth are you reading /.?!?

Re:STANDBY (1)

base3 (539820) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444468)

What are you doing about all those ills you're judging the rest of us for not helping fix? Besides osting tripe here, I mean.

They were ready (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15444194)

Im sure the folks at TBP were totally prepared for this raid. Their hilarious abrasiveness in the face of criticism only angered and further instigated the detractors. I am confident this group had prepared statements, lawyers already ready for the case, and these guys knew exactly how to react.

At least, I hope so.

Best of luck to them

Don't make me ask (3, Funny)

Fiznarp (233) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444196)

The news organ reports

Exactly where on the author's anatomy is this organ located?

Another mystery solved (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444255)

Hmmm... could it be that the mystery around the phrase "talking out of your a.." could be on the verge of being unveiled?

That depends... (1)

camusflage (65105) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444389)

If it's CNN or NPR, it's in the very tip of the middle finger of the left hand attached to an outstretched arm. If it's the Wall Street Journal, it's somewhere deeply embedded in a rich person's pocket. If it's Fox News, it's in the middle of the brain, but unfortunately, said the head containing it is suffering from a recto-cranial inversion.

MPAA (5, Informative)

muffen (321442) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444200)

The MPAA's statement after the takedown of thepiratebay. [mpaa.org]

Seems like Swedish authorities gave in to the pressure from **AA groups. This may be good as it will put the general public on the side of TPB.

A poll [aftonbladet.se] in the largest evening newspaper in sweden shows what people think of the takedown of TPB. The question in the poll is, is it right to "attack" people that are involved in filesharing. Ja = YES and Nej = NO. The results speak for themselves.

Re:MPAA (2, Interesting)

NeoSkandranon (515696) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444285)

Is attack really the literal translation or are there some subtleties of language lost in the translation? "attack" seems like a loaded word to use in a poll, IMHO.

Re:MPAA (4, Informative)

hanssprudel (323035) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444483)

A better translation of "slå till mot" is "crack down on".

Alternative translation (1)

Bromskloss (750445) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444488)

Is attack really the literal translation or are there some subtleties of language lost in the translation? "attack" seems like a loaded word to use in a poll, IMHO.
I'd rather use "crack down on". But you never know about those pirates, they may have cannons and stuff! So mabye an attack is appropriate after all. ;-)

Re:MPAA (2, Insightful)

MadKeithV (102058) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444489)

You mean like "theft" is a loaded term for copyright infringement?

The Purpose of Copyright (5, Insightful)

amoeba1911 (978485) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444211)

The media companies make it sound like copyright is a way of limiting your rights, but it was created with the intent of creating more diversity in content by limiting the rights of the content distributors (like MPAA). It used to have clauses which ensured the consumer's rights wouldn't be stifled (such as fair use). Why was copyright law created?? Because with the invention of the printing press things could be mass replicated much easier, the idea behind copyright was to limit who could print/sell stuff, taking power from printing press/distributor and giving it back to content creator, to allow people to create and distribute new content instead of letting the printing press have a field day selling us the same old crap making huge profits. Copyright law was created so that the content creator would be properly compensated. So that the consumer wouldn't be subjected to the same crap over and over again with no new works being created. The copyright law was made to protect the content creator and the content user. The copyright law was created to stifle the content distribution companies like MPAA, not the consumer. I don't know when this changed, but whoever had the wonderful idea of copyright would probably jam a sharp stick in his eyes if he saw what crud the content distributors have turned this law into. The copyright law has obviously failed in the past half a century and content distributors have too much power now. It's time for another copyright law with the original intent of protecting the consumer and the content creator and to make sure media conglomerates like MPAA don't make huge profits from nothing. There's no reason why a CD should cost $20 (and only a dime going to the creator) when the manufacturing cost of CD is in pennies... just my two cents. Sharing is caring. Let's try to put an end to the tyrannical misuse of copyright law. Thanks for reading!

WTF? There's no reason why a CD should cost $20 (1, Insightful)

N8F8 (4562) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444365)

If what you seem to be saying were true then the internet and cheap burnable CDs would have wiped out the record industry because there would be no incentived for artists to sign-up. But in the real world it takes losts of advertising, promotion and wheel-greasing to create a snger/band/TV show worth anything. Sure there is the rare case where some pauper creates a brilliant piece of art in their garage that the whole world starts clamoring for....bat that is the exception. In the real world there tons of folks between the artist and the consumer working to sell a product to that consumer. And those folks work to feed their families like you or I. I'm not advocating draconian IP laws here (I think the exact process I mentioned above already protects the artists and corporations), but let's inject a little reality into both sides of the argument.

Re:The Purpose of Copyright (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15444377)

Why was copyright law created?? Because with the invention of the printing press things could be mass replicated much easier, the idea behind copyright was to limit who could print/sell stuff

Almost.. if things were *that* easy to replicate, then there would be even less of a need for copyright law.

No, copyright law was needed at a time when it was *expensive* to replicate things, i.e. when printing presses were huge expensive machines to buy and run. If you had spent a vast fortune of money acquiring the use of a printing press to copy your work, then anyone else who was rich enough to have access to such a machine could undeservedly profit by selling copies of your work too! If that were the case, the incentive to author new works would be reduced.

But now, what is the purpose of copyright? Anyone can easily author, and distribute their works - they are easy to create, be it music, amateur video, or written pieces, and with a digital medium they are incredibly easy to distribute. Some would refer to it as zero-cost distribution.

So, why give such lengthy copyright terms in the modern day and age? Copyright holders should enjoy a short monopoly on the ability to distribute, but today, who can justify needing a period of time longer than a lifetime to recover the costs of developing one's work?

I personally believe that copyright should last somewhere in the region of 10-15 years.

Re:The Purpose of Copyright (1)

Saint Fnordius (456567) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444449)

Your reading of the history is actually wrong. The original copyright laws were codified because of printers protesting about rival print shops merely printing the same book without recompense. The original print shop's expenditures in finding new and original content were then for naught.

The purpose of copyright was to protect the investment of the original commissioner, not the artist. Authors then worked on a commission basis, and weren't able to sell their manuscripts to more than one publisher. It wasn't until much later that limits were set upon copyright.

Copyright in modern sense is supposed to ensure that the author is compensated, but as then it only ensures publishers micromonopolies. It is the loss of this monopoly of distribution that the publishers/studios are afraid of. They aren't so much afraid of bootlegged songs and movies, but of the artists bypassing the studio distribution model altogether. Thus the attack on any distribution scheme that doesn't exist in their realm of control or pay them tithes.

Re:The Purpose of Copyright (1)

Tibor the Hun (143056) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444452)

Well, hate to defend the MAFIAA here, but the content creators gave them the copyright of their own free will.
If an artist so easily releases his copyright, then they're not really an artist, but more like the guy who draws filler animation cells in North Korea.
Just an employee of the company.

Re:The Purpose of Copyright (3, Interesting)

erroneus (253617) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444462)

You know, one thing they might do to return copyright to its original intent is to make it so that copyright cannot be "transferred" as property. There should still be the ability to act on the creator's behalf, but it should be more like an agent or manager.

"Rights" cannot be sold or transferred. If, for example, I decided I never want to vote in a public election again, can I then sell my right to vote to someone who is otherwise not elligible? Could I sell my right to vote to someone so they could vote more than once? Why then can we sell "copyrights"?

The whole idea of intellectual property is really out of control and clearly well beyond its original intent. (In fact, the notion of intellectual/creative property is well beyond the intent of copyright and patent.) Will there come a day when things are restored? Will that pendulum swing the other way?

BAD name (-1, Flamebait)

a_greer2005 (863926) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444243)

Come on, the PIRATES bay?!?!?!?!?

they were just sayin g NA NA NA NA NA NA: you cant catch us!

Now they have been busted and they cry fowl...How immature!

I love torrent, I use it all of the time, and there are freat uses for it, but if you are surprised that a site called the PIRATE bay would last, you are just being foolish

Re:BAD name (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15444361)

Firstly it's "foul", not "fowl". Crying "fowl" only happens if, for example, you are set upon by a chicken of unusual size.


Secondly, are you also amazed that Slashdot has survived this long? After all - slash, it's a bit aggressive isn't it? A bit stabby.
Expecting a site with a name which reminds you of knifing people to last is just being foolish.

Re:BAD name (1)

vrai (521708) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444376)

Cry fowl? In response to their servers being seized they made chicken noises?

Re:BAD name (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15444386)

...cry fowl...

YOU'RE A CHICKEN! You turkey!! You're such a pheasant!!

Re:BAD name (2, Insightful)

Vintermann (400722) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444479)

Sure they were being deliberately offensive, but they had solid, legal swedish case law behind them, so seeing whether they would last was a test of the integrity of the legal system (and the speed of the political system in making what they did actually illegal).

Since when are the **AA confined by mortal laws? (5, Insightful)

Qa1 (592969) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444266)

The MPAA can hack servers and harvest private information [slashdot.org] if it wants; not a single MPAA employee would suffer any sort of police harrassment. But someone ostensibly assists violation of MPAA copyrights and BAM! - 200 servers are confiscated by police authorities.

The reason for this is explained in Sterling's account of the first major institutional crackdown [chriswaltrip.com] on hackers, ezine publishers and other dispensers of information which some powerful corporation don't want to see in the wild. From the text:

Another problem is very little publicized, but it is a cause of genuine concern. Where there is persistent crime, but no effective police protection, then vigilantism can result. Telcos, banks, credit companies, the major corporations who maintain extensive computer networks vulnerable to hacking -- these organizations are powerful, wealthy, and politically influential. They are disinclined to be pushed around by crooks (or by most anyone else, for that matter). They often maintain well-organized private security forces, commonly run by experienced veterans of military and police units, who have left public service for the greener pastures of the private sector. For police, the corporate security manager can be a powerful ally; but if this gentleman finds no allies in the police, and the pressure is on from his board-of-directors, he may quietly take certain matters into his own hands.

So police is acting as mercenaries for the big corporations, since otherwise they'd hire their own. Not a very comforting thought, especially considering you are nowadays likely to be arrested for suspicion of violating corporate copyrights. Remember when police and laws were used to protect citizens, not criminialize millions for hurting corporate profit machines...?

There are NO details in the linked article (0, Redundant)

Lazy Jones (8403) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444275)

so don't bother reading it, we already know that stuff ...

Piratebay should have (1, Insightful)

FudRucker (866063) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444283)

mirrored their data to another machine in another nation where the authorities can not touch it...

Re:Piratebay should have (1)

se7en11 (833841) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444341)

another country?

My mom's basement has tons of space for extra machines.

They did... (1)

The MAZZTer (911996) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444412)

...the country's name was SWEEDEN.

The whole point of it being in Sweeden was that it was untouchable there.

Re:Piratebay should have (1)

Overzeetop (214511) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444445)

Yeah, like Sweden! Oh, right...sorry.

Thank God! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15444287)

This is good news for the RIAA and MPAA.

Without TPD _nobody_ would know, hear or care about their crap^H^H^Hontent and the porn industry would reign the world of entertainment.

Hmmm... maybe this news isn't so good after all.

They were forced to leave DNA (5, Interesting)

eddy (18759) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444305)

The most amazing thing of all is that the persons that were questioned, were forced to leave DNA. That's totally unheard of, and make one think that maybe this was done, and this will sound completely conspiracy nuts, on request from the US ("MPAA"). Collection of DNA has been reserved for severe crimes; Rape, murder, etc.

Personally I believe the goal here is to make an example of the ISP, PRQ. Taking non-related servers makes perfect sense in that context. They want to make sure no one dares host trackers, even if it's found to be legal! I believe the charges as they relate to "TPB" will be dropped, but they'll go ahead with materal found on the suspects home computers (sadly, it seems they weren't smart/careful enough to not sample their own warez, so to speak). However, for PR reasons they'll blur this issue, making a case against the individuals based on their home computers seem like a win against trackers.

Rebuild the servers? (1)

spurtle15 (899792) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444358)

If I were them, I'd rebuild those servers. No telling what backdoors and spy software those RIAA-MPAA goons/law enforcement officials put on the machines while they were searching for incriminating evidence.

Lawyer-fest! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15444372)

After all of the ramifications and harm to innocent people this caused.

Independent artists use TPB. The Swedish record industry supports the raid. Oops?

About 100 to 1000 innocent firms were affected due to the raid by the police. Oops?

The Pirate Bureau which is a political party, was affected by the raid, which means that the media industry uses the Swedish justice system to close it down. Oops?

The legal advisor they used, who had nothing to do with TPB, was interrogated and forced to give his DNA?! WTF?

http://www.vg.no/pub/vgart.hbs?artid=118289 [www.vg.no]

Will rise abroad, they say (0, Redundant)

Bromskloss (750445) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444384)

In a swedish article on the same site, one of the pirates states that they will open again, abroad [www.idg.se] (outside Sweden, that is, duh).

Re:Will rise abroad, they say (1)

muffen (321442) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444484)

Here's a translation of parts of the article.

- Jag blev intagen för förhör, och de började fråga om Pirate Bay; vad jag visste och vad jag hade för kopplingar, säger Gottfrid Svartholm. - Jag fick ingen offentlig försvarare, och mitt ordinarie juridiska ombud hade ju också gripits, så jag sa ingenting överhuvudtaget.

- I was brought in for questions, and they started asking me about TPB; what I knew and what connections I had to TPB, said Gottfrid Svartholm.
I was not given a lawyer, and my ordinary juridical representant had also been arrrested, so I didn't say a single word.

---
Varför nekades du offentlig försvarare? - Enligt poliserna riskerar jag inte fängelse för brottet jag är misstänkt för och då behöver de inte ge någon offentlig försvarare.

---
Why were you denied a public defender?
- According to the police, I am not risking a prison penalty for the crimes I am suspected of, and because of that they do not have to provide me with a public defender.

It will indeed rise again. (1)

base3 (539820) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444388)

As a *AA/police honeypot.

Damn Wiggles (0, Troll)

Medievalist (16032) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444392)


I've had enough of their paedophilic shenanigans... Captain Feathersword? Please!!!

Keep Pirate Bay shut down and put the Wiggles in prison where they belong!

Er, what? Oh... I see. Never mind!

Geek or lawyer? (2, Insightful)

nbuet (944469) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444393)

Now the big question behind all that: if you want to make a living in the computer world as it is today, should you rather be a programmer or a lawyer?

The drama unfolds (5, Interesting)

ch-chuck (9622) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444409)

Yep, just like this old fogie predicted, the piracy issues is evolving along nicely parallel to the 50's-60's "legalize marijuana" drug movement. Good luck, but we already know how it's going to turn out. I admire idealistic youth - they're young, they'll learn.

Pirate bay will rise again (2, Funny)

Strategos (978492) | more than 8 years ago | (#15444438)

What we need is a server in orbit sharing the links on a stealthed satellite. That'll screw them. Try shutting down the bit torrent links then.
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