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What Hollywood Could Learn From the Gaming Industry

Zonk posted more than 8 years ago | from the it's-called-fun dept.

87

GameDaily's David Radd has up a piece today looking at what Hollywood could learn from the games industry. His main points are that game companies are much more in touch with their customers, do a better job of generating buzz, and utilize the internet as a communications medium more successfully. From the article: "Today, publishers like Activision report that their ad budgets are equal to their game production budgets. But despite this significant increase in the scope of video game advertising, the 'buzz' factor is all important. And with the Internet, viral advertising has a way to touch both groups."

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87 comments

Oh bother. (4, Insightful)

9mm Censor (705379) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482345)

I cant wait till Hollywood learns to charge more for shorter films with better special effects, with less content, and more sequels.

Re:Oh bother. (1)

moranar (632206) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482378)

You've got to look on the bright side: you'll be able to preorder the experience through an internet service, at least.

Re:Oh bother. (0, Redundant)

nEoN nOoDlE (27594) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482424)

I don't know if your comment was supposed to be ironic, but you won't have to wait long since it's been happening for the last 10 years.

Re:Oh bother. (1)

Ruud Althuizen (835426) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482504)

No no no! They need to learn that sex sells. Not that softy stuff where you can barely see a nipple, but the real hard stuff. That way I won't get wierd looks anymore when I go through those bead curtains.

Re:Oh bother. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15482518)

We can have a new Friday Night Lights or Remember the Titans every year with slightly updated actor rosters and better looking uniforms would draw in millions. The only problem is, the DVD's resale value would be next to nothing compared to original movies.

Re:Oh bother. (3, Insightful)

twistedsymphony (956982) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482707)

Well, you might be joking but there ARE things the game industry could learn from the movie industry. For instance the movie industry has a pretty decent indy crowd, and a lot of times that's encouraged (where a lot of time it's shunned in the game industry, particularly on the console side). They also have a good balance between meaningful fresh and unique films and generic "give them what sells" stuff. I think the key is that they have worthwhile awards/awards shows and know how to promote the people behind the film. Writers, directors, producers, staring actors, supporting actors, score composer etc. ALL get a spotlight not just in the awards shows but also on the movie posters, in advertisements, and on the DVD box. Sure there are SOME "superstars" in the game business but it's not too frequent and it's not leveraged in the same way they do it in the film industry.

Any good business will learn from others, what works well, what doesn't, etc.. this applies to individual companies as well as entire industries.

Re:Oh bother. (1)

hpcanswers (960441) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484267)

Mod parent up! The presence of independent filmmaking (that is, not funded by a studio or guaranteed distribution at the time of production) allows for a greater variety of output while at the same time providing a means for artists to break into an ultra-competitive industry.

Add to that the fact that Hollywood has guilds who prevent the studios from causing too much abuse to above-the-line talent and I'd say the gaming industry could actually learn a lot more from movies, not the other way around.

Re:Oh bother. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15489434)

Well they do have awards shows, but it tends to be the suits who go to them, rather than people who were involved with developing the game. Hmm, best marketing campaign in the Middle East Africa Europe region using billboards!

Re:Oh bother. (1)

freshman_a (136603) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482862)


I cant wait till Hollywood learns to charge more for shorter films with better special effects, with less content, and more sequels.

The Lion King 1 1/2 (same story, different POV, because that's exciting)
Bambi 2 (also known as "We're Out of New Ideas")
Jason X (Jason dies for the 10th time)
Halloween H20 (Micheal dies for the 7th time)
The Land Before Time XI (real dinosaurs died out faster than this movie series)

Re:Oh bother. (1)

kthejoker (931838) | more than 8 years ago | (#15487083)

First, you picked three children's series. Children's books have featured serial characters since well before Hollywood (Mary Poppins, Tom Swift, and the Oz books, for example) because children attach more easily to characters than to plots.

Secondly, you picked on the horror genre, which feeds itself on the possibility that no matter how many times you "kill" the monster, he may return - it in fact revels in the immortality of its villains. It's spawned a lot of in-jokes, but the genre has never apologized for this behavior - the killers *are* the stars people pay to see. Again, characters drive these movies, and if characters don't resonate, horror movies flop big-time (witness the remake of The Hills Have Eyes, which despite an excellent premise, featured much-less truly creepy baddies.)

Now back to the topic, if Hollywood could learn anything from the game industry, it's that people like original and inspired characters. Gamers would be quick to name their favorite characters: Mario, Zelda, Solid Snake, Master Chief, Sephiroth. It's hard to find similar affinities within the demands of the 2 hour movie, but when exceptions are made, those characters *really* *really* resonate: a quick look at the top 25 grossing movies in the US of all time reveals:

Jack and Rose.
Star Wars. Luke Skywalker, Darth Vader, Han Solo ...
Shrek, ET, Harry Potter, and Spiderman
the Lord of the Rings. Great characters that translated wonderfully from book to screen.
Jesus Christ (the Passion.)
Captain Jack Sparrow
Forrest Gump

And just below it you see a litany of interesting, riveting characters worth watching over and over again. Even adjusting for inflation, we see characters like Rhett Butler and Scarlett O'Hara, Moses (The Ten Commandments), and Jaws and Captain Quint.

If I haven't said it enough, characters, characters, characters that people can relate to and admire drive all interest in entertainment, both gaming and filmwise. Hollywood has spent too much time lately dredging up characters only a few people were interested in (apologies to the niche markets of Fat Albert, Dukes of Hazzard, and Josie and the Pussycats aficionados) and trying to pass them off as something bigger.

But the truth (of course) is that this is nothing new! Hollywood has been making cheap forgettable pictures since its inception - we just never see the treacle in between all the goodness on the filtered Turner Classic Movies - or even in the bargain bin at Best Buy. Want proof?

Check out the filmography of Andy Clyde. A lifetime vaudevillian at heart, as a bona fide *star* (equivalent to Adam Sandler or at the least Tim Allen) he made 300 (!) movies from 1923 to 1950, mostly playing himself or California Carlson, his alter ego. These movies were made for Columbia Pictures, and were decent draws in their day. Yet I'd be surprised if anyone here had ever heard of Andy Clyde until now.

We can go more modern, too - beach movies from AIP, blaxploitation in the 70s, bad spring break movies of the 80s, it doesn't matter. http://us.imdb.com/company/co0020206/ [imdb.com] There is a link to every movie MGM has put their stamp on. There are of course some great ones, some very good ones, and some average ones. Look at the movies distributed between 1984's excellent The Terminator (#328) and the equally excellent 1986 film Hoosiers (#287). Of those 49 movies, I have seen exactly 4 of them - A Chorus Line, Rocky IV, Poltergeist 2, and Haunted Honeymoon - none of which were that great. The other 45? I've hardly heard of any of them. And you can do this for any era of movies, with any company.

The simple truth is that for every good movie, 20 bad ones are made, at every level, from Hollywood to Bollywood to indie cinema. Sturgeon's Law holds true, and no amount of "learning" from the gaming industry is gonna change that.

Re:Oh bother. (1)

GregStevensLA (976873) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482963)

Based on the other replies, it would seem that you failed to enclose your comment in <sarcasm> tags.

Re:Oh bother. (1)

StikyPad (445176) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484234)

I can't wait until Hollywood is touched by a virus.

And with the Internet, viral advertising has a way to touch both groups.

Alternative lesson (1)

eclectro (227083) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482366)

That downloading the latest blockbuster is a kind of game.

Just saying. I'm going to go and see it anyway.

Different customer base (1)

east coast (590680) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482372)

Perhaps some of this effect is a much different customer base. I think that gamers are more likely to follow the industry as a whole as opposed to the normal movie goer who needs to find out about a film they want to see. I know of tons of video game releases but in all reality I only buy about a dozen games a year and only about half of them do I play to any great extent.

As for movies, I don't really follow new releases for films like I do for games. I need to see a film that interests me before I worry about what's being released this week.

That's Right! (3, Funny)

neonprimetime (528653) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482373)

It seems to me that technologists may have a better idea of how to make entertaining Hollywood properties

That's right, Slashdot should run the world!

WE ARE DOOMED! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15484403)

That's right, Slashdot should run the world!

NO, anything but that! Do you have hate the world or something?

Factor in piracy questions. (1)

hackwrench (573697) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482375)

I see this as definitely a factor in where to draw the line as to which point piracy becomes in essence stealing. When you steal back something that was stolen from you, that's not really stealing. When you steal something in compensation from something that was stolen from you, you have to figure out when you're going too far.

Re:Factor in piracy questions. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15482897)

"When you steal back something that was stolen from you, that's not really stealing. When you steal something in compensation from something that was stolen from you, you have to figure out when you're going too far."

Rephrase of the first sentence:

"When you take without permission or authority something that was taken without permission or authority from you, that's not really taking without permission or authority."

What if the person you take it from is NOT the person who took it from you?

Above and beyond the issue of using a single verb in a fashion clearly indicating you intend distinct meanings, not all of which are actually contained in the dictionary.

Rephrase of the second sentence:

"When you take without permission or authority something in compensation for something that was taken without permission or authority from you, you have to figure out when you're going too far."

I submit that even engaging in this practice is a violation of international law, and thus STARTS as going to far. You do not have a legal right to take something without permission or authority, ever.

Re:Factor in piracy questions. (1)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 8 years ago | (#15490250)

I don't see how the movie industry is stealing back here.

Run by old guys... (4, Insightful)

Manip (656104) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482379)

I don't want to be overly simplistic, but I believe the problem stems from the fact that the movie industry is run by a bunch of 50+ old guys that still think it is 1970, and things work the same way that they did then. Unlike the game industry who's average age is lower than 30... They are in fact their own customers...

It remains to be seem how well they will keep in touch with their customers as the industry ages, but that is neither here nor there.

The music industry changed, but kicking and screaming, they ended up loosing billions because of their inability to change to the new climate. The movie industry still is loosing billions but they aren't ready to change... It's hard to tell if its arrogant, stupidity, or something in the middle of the two.

I think mail order DVDs should be a very clear indication of just how big Internet movie rental and or purchase markets are... It's clearly what the consumer wants... I say they should fire off these old middle managers and hire in some fresh blood...

Re:Run by old guys... (1)

Thing 1 (178996) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484636)

Music industry changed?

I agree that iTunes is a new development; however, the Sony rootkit was years after iTunes was introduced. So I wouldn't say they've changed at all or learned their lessons...

Re:Run by old guys... (1)

lordmatthias215 (919632) | more than 8 years ago | (#15490361)

Like Thing said, the idustry itself has changed very little- iTunes is just an extension of the computer industry that's reselling music. I remember reading an article (I think it was on /.- does anyone have it?) where Jobs stated that as contract renewal time came for many companies, they tried to force him into pricing each song differently based on the artist, album, song, or record company. Thankfully he refused outright. The stupid industry fails to realize that the whole reason iTunes is doing so well is that you can rely on the fact that every individual song costs a flat 99 cents. That's what's made iTunes so popular.

No way (2, Insightful)

hawkbug (94280) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482404)

I strongly disagree - the games industry seems to think they can require an internet connection along iwth insanely over-reaching DRM to play their stuff. There is not a chance in hell that I will ever use a STEAM-based system to play games, so that rules out all Valve options.

Re:No way (1)

Winckle (870180) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482465)

What's wrong with steam?

Re:No way (5, Insightful)

hawkbug (94280) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482532)

The fact that it is required to play games you purchase. Requiring an internet connection to play single player FPS game is just stupid and a sad attempt at over-reaching copy right protection and anti-piracy measures. Soon, we'll see hollywood do the same thing. No thank you.

Re:No way (1)

Winckle (870180) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482576)

I guess, but it doesn't really bother me, I have an always on connection, so I never notice.

Re:No way (1)

rob1980 (941751) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482674)

Why is that sad? Does it damage your computer in some form? Do you not have an internet connection?

Re:No way (1)

DragonWriter (970822) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482889)

Why is that sad? Does it damage your computer in some form? Do you not have an internet connection?
Sometimes, indeed, I do not have an internet connection.

Re:No way (1)

Quince alPillan (677281) | more than 8 years ago | (#15486719)

I don't know about you, but I don't have a cell phone card in my laptop (service is ~$80 for low DSL speeds last I looked) that I can get wireless internet everywhere I go. Admittedly there are lots of places nowadays where you can get a free hotspot, but I don't want to stop at a Starbucks every time I open a game.

Re:No way (1)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 8 years ago | (#15490273)

Student homes often use the University network, many University networks block non-http connections (before you suggest tunnelling, they filter that). Valve knows about that and doesn't want to provide a solution. Don't ask me why they can't seem to implement a simple download service via HTTP, I bought a game online using ReflexiveArcade and that had no trouble working over HTTP.

Re:No way (2, Interesting)

manno (848709) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482706)

Are you sure? I'm fairly sure you can play single player games without an Internet connection or CD. As I have played HL2 on the plane without an Internet connection...

Obviously I need to log onto steam to play Counter-Strike. The only legit complaint I can think of is if they make you log onto steam to play LAN games. That could really present some problems for some users. I wouldn't call it DRM though I'd call it copy protection, and while it helps the content creators, it also has some great features for users too.

For instance I can play steam on any Windows PC I want. Once I purchase a game on Steam itself I have access to all my games even though I don't have the CD's. Meaning that if I visit my family in NY, and they don't have Steam on any computer, I just need to install the Steam client, and it lets me download any game I own on that account to any PC I'm on, without even having an install CD within 3,000 miles of me. This is a feature that has come in handy many-a-time. It's Greatly superior to EA's moronic Battlefield 2 solution that forces you to log onto their central server and have the CD in the tray. Hardly RIAA level of security. I personally like and welcome our new Steam overlords.

Peace,
-manno

Re:No way (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 8 years ago | (#15485140)

I'm fairly sure you can play single player games without an Internet connection or CD

But you need the Internet connection to install the game, even if you bought the CD.

Re:No way (1)

manno (848709) | more than 8 years ago | (#15486507)

I bought the CD, and I don't beleive I needed an internet connection to install the game. I did need the CD in the tray to play it though.

Re:No way (1)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 8 years ago | (#15490310)

The CD data is incomplete and encrypted, you need to download stuff via Steam and let it decrypt the data before you can play. While the installer will complete without the connection, you can't play before Steam has downloaded its 20-odd megabytes for unlocking the game plus whatever patches are available.

Re:No way (1)

Massif (875445) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482746)

I don't want to sound like a Steam fanboy, but here's my two cents: I only have a problem with DRM and copyright protection if it causes me to be inconvenienced or cripples the product in any way. I don't think requiring an internet connection inconveniences or cripples the product at all. Also, I may be wrong but I think you are only required to connect once to actually activate a single player game. Then you can stay in offline mode to play it. On the positive side: 1. Your games are patched instantly. 2. You don't need a cd to play. 3. You don't have to worry about losing the cd in case you need to reinstall.

Re:No way (1)

HTH NE1 (675604) | more than 8 years ago | (#15483333)

But unless you regularly play your games on others' computers, do you remember your Steam ID and password? Are you prepared for when your system dies and takes that information to its grave?

OT:
i, em { font-family: serif; } /* temp. fix for lack of an italic sans-serif */
em, strong { font-variant: small-caps; } /* to distinguish from i and b */

Re:No way (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 8 years ago | (#15485150)

I don't think requiring an internet connection inconveniences or cripples the product at all. Also, I may be wrong but I think you are only required to connect once to actually activate a single player game.

Hypothetical situation: I access Slashdot at a public library on the library's own terminal, and I don't have Internet access at home. Will a typical public library let me cart my PC in and activate the game? Or do you suggest that I pay $239.88 for a 12-month commitment to dial-up Internet access at home?

Re:No way (1)

aero2600-5 (797736) | more than 8 years ago | (#15485773)

I think it's funny that you would go ahead and encourage misconceptions in your post while your sig dispels one.

Or do you suggest that I pay $239.88 for a 12-month commitment to dial-up Internet access at home?

You're kidding, right? I'm going to give you the benefit of the doubt and assume that it's been so long since you've had a dial-up connection that you don't realize that you have no fucking clue what you're talking about. Do you live in a cave? Mom's basement? Prison possibly? Netzero [netzero.net] is still alive and kicking with a $9.95/month offer, with no commitment. There's also PeoplePC Online [peoplepc.com] . Both of these are cheap dial-up.

$9.95 is a hell of a lot cheaper than the $239.88 misconception you were shouting about.

I think I just figured out how your estimate got to be so far off. You're still on AOL, aren't you?

Aero

Long distance (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 8 years ago | (#15486467)

Netzero is still alive and kicking with a $9.95/month offer, with no commitment.

Unless all of NetZero's modems are a long-distance call from your house. I'm not on dial-up anymore, but last time I checked, NetZero didn't have modems in all geographic areas. You still have a point that even with long-distance fees, it won't be more than $12 plus the price of a POTS modem. But is it as cheap outside the United States?

Re:Long distance (1)

aero2600-5 (797736) | more than 8 years ago | (#15487432)

Here's a global solution for you. The cost of one 802.11b wireless modem. There are free wifi spots just about all over, and if there aren't any free ones, there's likely at least one with no security.

As for Netzero's coverage, it seems pretty good. I use Speakeasy, so I don't know personally, but the few phone numbers I did test, were well covered.

Aero

Re:No way (1)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 8 years ago | (#15490377)

Personally I dislike Steam. I don't start it very often and when I do it usually has found a new patch and won't let me play for minutes before it's finished downloading (at which point I've already found another game to play). Also it requires an unrestricted internet connection to work, you may not have that available at all times (especially if your home connection will not let Steam through, happens in student homes). I prefer the system used by Earth 2160 (the retail version, they probably replaced it with Steam for the Steam version), it works like the Windows product activation, one short connection (or a phone call if no connection is available) and it's enabled and won't ever bug you again. No CD needed (in fact there's no copy protection on the CDs so you can make backups if you please), no internet connection needed, no self-updating application needed. Also it's easier to crack so if the servers would cease to exist it's more likely to remain usable than a Steam game.

Re:No way (1)

Emetophobe (878584) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482816)

Valve != The entire games industry.

There are alot of decent companies that don't force you to have an internet connection to play single player mode, such as Oblivion and Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas. Both San Andreas and Oblivion don't even require a cd key when installing the game, no copy protection whatsoever. And you know what, I bought both games to support those two companies since they seem to get it.

Re:No way (1)

corbettw (214229) | more than 8 years ago | (#15483267)

How much did you make from your game subscription engine last year? How much did Valve? Why should we listen to you, exactly?

Just because one dork on Slashdot doesn't do something, doesn't mean the masses won't. Go take some marketing courses and learn something about how business works before making sweeping pronouncements no one will take seriously.

Re:No way (1)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | more than 8 years ago | (#15483915)

> How much did you make from your game subscription engine last year? How much did Valve? Why should we listen to you, exactly?

Right, because we all know money, determines quality [google.ca]

Re:No way (1)

corbettw (214229) | more than 8 years ago | (#15487086)

Right, because we all know money, determines quality

Any amount of money earned on an endeavor makes you an expert in that business area compared to someone who's never earned a dime. If you've never launched a successful business doing X, you are in no position to criticize someone who is running a successful business doing X. They're making money, you're not, so you're in no position to judge.

Games give more. (2, Insightful)

Rachel Lucid (964267) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482410)

It also helps that we get 20-60 hours of content for each purchase, compared to the 2-3 hours Hollywood gives us. Throw in a Wiki for the movies every now and then, will you?

Re:Games give more. (1)

Evangelion (2145) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482425)

20-60 hours?

MMORPGs can accumulate 20-60 DAYS of playtime over the course of a year.

Re:Games give more. (3, Funny)

Rachel Lucid (964267) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482457)

I'm talking for a one-time-price game. An MMORPG is more like a hooker you keep going back to :-p

Speaking of in touch... (3, Interesting)

Mark LeMunyon (977994) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482434)

ValvE, the creators of the Half-Life series, do an excellent job communicating with their fanbase. Gabe Newell, ValvE's director, not only repsonds to fan email, but actively posts on fan forums!

How many film directors or actors do that?

Re:Speaking of in touch... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15482655)

But, you should realize how many people inside the gaming industry are mobbed by the paparazzi? Very little, I think. The actors and directors that make the movies are constantly being harrased by their own fan base! As I said, I don't think that happens to much in the Gaming Industry.

Frankly, I think part of the problem with Hollywood is actually the average joe American consumer, they don't know when to stop the harrasment and they drive away their idols. The "fans" are constantly asking for more; more glamour in the industry, more quality movies, and more "money shots" of their idols. This constant harrasment has pushed the actors so far away it is almost impossible for them to actually know your fan base. Needless to say, the consumers' constant demand for new, and more intrusive, pictures have also left the actors with little to no place to hide. They are constantly losing their privacy and their safety to the paparazzi.

The American consumer also knows very little about technology, other then "Dell is a g0od copmuter!!!1!", and when they see new DRMs and very, very limiting legistlation, they don't realize it and nor do they care. This allows the industry execs to basically do what they want.

So when you say that the Hollywood idols are not in touch with their fan base, I agree. However, it is the fans fault!

-- Greg Vernon

Re:Speaking of in touch... (1)

Hannah E. Davis (870669) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482728)

If actors and directors were more accessible, they would probably have less problems with at least part of their fanbase -- there are an awful lot of folks who stalk famous people because they either want a challenge or are looking for bragging rights/money. By keeping themselves so separate from the rest of the world, famous people are actually making themselves more tempting targets.

Think about it this way: if you were one of the paparazzi, would you spend your time chasing after the star who hides everything, always walks around with bodyguards, and rarely speaks to the public, or the star who'll talk to any old fan on his/her public forum? Who would generate the juiciest gossip that people would actually pay to read?

I don't know about you, but if I ever become famous in any industry (not bloody likely, since I'm just an ordinary computer science student), I'm going to do my best to remain as approachable as possible. Although I've obviously never been in the situation, I would imagine that having a fan approach me at Tim Hortons for a chat would be way less creepy than that same fan hiding in the bushes because I wouldn't let him/her near me otherwise.

Re:Speaking of in touch... (1)

GregVernon (980273) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482756)

That is true, but I think what they have now is an ever growing problem. Actors want to avoid the paparazzi, and the paparazzi will do anything to actually get the photos.

Re:Speaking of in touch... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15482823)

And I thought it was a GOOD thing that most movies didn't have official forums dedicated to them where fans can advise the director on how best to film certain scenes. Truly, art (okay, if you call Hollywood movies art) is not a process that needs to be democratized. Perhaps that's one of the reasons why the gaming industry is finding it hard to be taken seriously by others, as an art form anyway. Public feedback after release is good, public input into the creation of movies is not.

Re:Speaking of in touch... (1)

Emetophobe (878584) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482842)

ValvE, the creators of the Half-Life series, do an excellent job communicating with their fanbase. Gabe Newell, ValvE's director, not only repsonds to fan email, but actively posts on fan forums!
Fuck Valve, what I want from Valve is LESS communicating with their fan base (via forced Steam ads). Maybe Gabe Newell should listen to their fanbase and allow people to play single player games without an internet connection or steam!

Kevin Smith. (1)

EvilCabbage (589836) | more than 8 years ago | (#15486152)

Smith posts on his boards (and others) on a very regular basis.

View Askew boards [viewaskew.com]

What I want in movies today... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15482435)

Starforce.

What Hollywood Could Learn From the Gaming Indust (2, Funny)

OakDragon (885217) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482506)

What Hollywood Could Learn From the Gaming Industry...

More cut scenes?

Re: What Hollywood Could Learn From the Gaming Ind (1)

Kamineko (851857) | more than 8 years ago | (#15483275)

Is that more 'cut scenes' or more scenes that are cut?

Re: What Hollywood Could Learn From the Gaming Ind (1)

Emetophobe (878584) | more than 8 years ago | (#15483416)

What Hollywood Could Learn From the Gaming Industry... More cut scenes?
Obviously you haven't watched^W^W^Wplayed Final Fantasy X.

Ad budgets in line with production budgets? (3, Insightful)

thaerin (937575) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482517)

Today, publishers like Activision report that their ad budgets are equal to their game production budgets.
And as such we have been able to bear witness to the rise of poorly released (i.e. bugs) titles that never see any worthwhile patches because the company is already working on their next over-hyped hit. Under this budget scheme, is it any wonder then that titles such as Call of Duty 2 are full of so many bugs and hacks? I can't recall seeing very many ads for the game, guess they must of been paying the devs in peanuts.

Re:Ad budgets in line with production budgets? (1)

Emetophobe (878584) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482872)

I haven't really seen any bugs or hacks in Call of Duty2, I think it's a great game, the singleplayer missions are awesome too. What bugs/hacks are you speaking of?

Lets hope they learn nothing from the game biz (2, Interesting)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482527)

Or we will have more remakes then you can shake a stick at. If they learned from the game industry we could have Casablanca Original, Casablanca Technicolor, Casablanca Cinemascope, Casablance 3D, Casablanca THX etc etc. Just as the game civilization has gone through numerous versions while the game itself really hasn't changed. Still the same tech tree, still the same endings just using more recent tech to display it.

We would also have movies wich wouldn't have the correct ending until the 3rd patch. George Lucas would love it.

They would give us heroes who remain silent for the entire movie or in extreme cases go back to the dawn of film and force us to read endless cue cards.

You wouldn't be able to stop your video when watching a movie but would be forced to resume from the beginning of the scene because of the lousy save system.

Movies would come with insane copy protection schemes.... oh wait a minute. That they already learned.

But worst of all, if Hollywood learned from the game industry all the movies would be directed by Uwe Boll.

Re:Lets hope they learn nothing from the game biz (1)

ScaryFroMan (901163) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484198)

Original, Casablanca Technicolor, Casablanca Cinemascope, Casablance 3D, Casablanca THX etc etc

Star Wars, Star Wars Box Set, Star Wars Special Editions, Star Wars Special Edition Box Set, Star Wars Remastered Special Special Hayden Christensen Edition, Star Wars Original Release Re-Release.

We're closer than you think.

Seen "Poseidon"? The article has it in reverse (1)

ianscot (591483) | more than 8 years ago | (#15486776)

Or we will have more remakes then you can shake a stick at.

Movies remake almost everything, and really it's only in the past ten years that the production budgets necessary for big release video games have started imitating that. The point is when you have that much money on the table, the producers will tend to play it safe and put their money behind proven winners. That means sequels.

The biggest Xbox360 release title was King Kong: a game based on a lavish remake of a movie. The remake was fabulously larger and more expensive than the original in inflation-adjusted dollars, and... okay, I can't judge it, because I loved the original Kong so much I didn't want to see Peter Jackson's self-indulgent take on it.

Casablanca, to use your example, has been remade [wikipedia.org] in a few different ways, though never as an outright shot-for-shot do-over like the recent Psycho. The most recent version I can think of offhand was "Havana," which was openly acknowledged as having re-set the story in Cuba. (Robert Redford standing in for Bogie -- eck.) Ronnie Reagan was in something that's supposed to be pretty close to Rick's character, too, in 1951. There've been a couple of prequel TV series using the actual characters from the movie.

Every couple of years we get hilarious rumors and spoofs involving today's Hollywood media crushes in an outright remake: Ben Affleck in Bogie's role, or Ashton Kutcher. Thank God those are parodies. Maybe a game studio will use them for the voices in Casablanca Wii, where you wave your Wiimote to hide the travel papers in the piano.

Zonk, your submissions are consistently junk (1)

casualsax3 (875131) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482585)

Between your 3 articles in the last day bashing Sony, and now this - an article suggesting one broken industry take a page out of the playbook of ANOTHER crippled industry, who hardly anyone seems to be happy with at the moment. Everything OK at home?

Whom Hollywood really needs to learn from... (5, Insightful)

TemporalBeing (803363) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482611)

...the Anime industry...duh...

The Anime people use "piracy" to their advantage - you do not seem a lot of marketting for Anime, with the exception of a few places, but those few places are based solely around anime (e.g. Anime Network, Cartoon Network, etc.).

The Anime people rely on customers to do grown-swell marketing for their products, and they respond to the customers. More and more I find myself disliking the movies from Hollywood - okay, they've had a couple good ones lately, but that's out of a ton of bad ones over the last few years - and more in tune with Anime. And guess what I'm generally buying when it comes to DVD's? Anime; entire series introduced by friends and content that Hollywood would likely have deemed "piracy".

And the fans generally respect the companies and get rid of the "piracy" as content becomes available in their own languages and regions. It's a win-win situation.

Now if only Hollywood would learn...

Re:Whom Hollywood really needs to learn from... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15482744)

"And the fans generally respect the companies and get rid of the "piracy" as content becomes available in their own languages and regions. It's a win-win situation."

No, a subset of overly vocal folks "get rid of the piracy". Seriously, go do a search for random anime series that's distributed in the US(tm). You'll have a high-speed torrent within minutes.

What the anime industry realizes is, "Hey! Not everyone wants to spend a ridiculous sum of money on each disc. Look at all this piracy. Why are our revenues going up?" "I bet they're telling their friends that SuperMagical Octopus Girl is totally cool!" "WAIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII! ^___^"

Re:Whom Hollywood really needs to learn from... (1)

Rakshasa Taisab (244699) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482784)

Perhaps you are more in tune with anime because much of it is specifically targeted at 20-25 year old males, those old enough to have lots of free cash to spend and geeky enough to spend it all on dvd's, anime figures, posters and towels. (Oh how I covet the Haruhi towel...)

Re:Whom Hollywood really needs to learn from... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15483113)

Well that's really strange that you would substitute live action movies by award winning actors and directors for badly drawn, badly subtitled, overly violent (to the point of being childish) cartoons which mostly rehash the same revenge plot over and over again. Anime fans have no sense at all.

Re:Whom Hollywood really needs to learn from... (1)

lordmatthias215 (919632) | more than 8 years ago | (#15490454)

Although I am not great fan of anime, I have to note the lack of logic in that post. Who gives the actors and directors their coveted awards? Why, an academy made up of actors and directors! And one needs only drive to the nearest blockbuster to find popular movies such as Kill Bill, ripe with gratuitous violence and revenge, taking the forefront. I fail to see the difference between the illustrious live action industry and the anime industry.

How about... (1)

Illbay (700081) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482628)

...how to stay up REALLY, REALLY late, and still be ready for action the next day.

It's the other way around... (2, Insightful)

creimer (824291) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482837)

I thought it was all the video game companies (at least, the big ones) were flocking to Hollywood to grab the latest license? I get a daily email from http://www.gamejobs.com/ [gamejobs.com] listing most new jobs in Southern California. I don't see any big name Hollywood studios flocking to Texas to get cozy with http://www.idsoftware.com/ [idsoftware.com] .

Re:It's the other way around... (1)

myowntrueself (607117) | more than 8 years ago | (#15482925)

I thought it was all the video game companies (at least, the big ones) were flocking to Hollywood to grab the latest license?

Oh it works both ways;

1. most games are either based on movies or are sequels to earlier games
2. most movies are either based on games or are sequels to earlier movies

Original games and movies are inevitably low budget because investors don't want to take a risk on something that hasn't been tried before.

It is, indeed, teh suck.

Gratuitous Plug (1)

Fishbulb (32296) | more than 8 years ago | (#15483161)

Speaking of viral marketing, you want to watch this movie: http://www.hempmento.com/ [hempmento.com]

WHAT?!? (2, Insightful)

Il128 (467312) | more than 8 years ago | (#15483311)

When's the last time a game made $600,779,824 or even $100,003,492 [imdb.com] ? Movies learn from computer games? LOL,sometimes people try to hard to prove how smart the computer guys are compared to everyone else! This is one of those times.

Re:WHAT?!? (4, Interesting)

psycln (937854) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484457)

If you take the number of employees into account then Valve Corp [valvesoftware.com] with a little more than 70 employees [valvesoftware.com] made $70mil [forbes.com] in 2005. That is $10mil per employee. Compare that to the number of human resources involved in the "Titanic" or "Star Wars" and you get a better picture of who's making a more efficient use of human resources.

Re:WHAT?!? (1)

The_Shadows (255371) | more than 8 years ago | (#15486522)

Sir, your math makes no sense. 70 employees and a revenue of $70 million does not equal "$10mil per employee." 70 / 70 = 1. That's $1 million per employee. Still impressive, granted, but not quite so impressive as your strange math makes it out to be.

Re:WHAT?!? yeah WHAAAT!?!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15486052)

When's the last time a game made $600,779,824 or even $100,003,492? Movies learn from computer games? LOL,sometimes people try to hard to prove how smart the computer guys are compared to everyone else! This is one of those times.

are u sleeping, or u just like seeing your bullshit in print?
just a sample: Valve's Half-Life. Over 20mil copies sold ... multiply with ~40$ per copy ... $800,000,000 !!!
and AFAIK, that's far from being the most succesful game ever (TheSims?) ... plus, the game industry is still a newborn compared to the century old film industry

Re:WHAT?!? yeah WHAAAT!?!? (1)

Il128 (467312) | more than 8 years ago | (#15486683)

You obviously don't understand what you're talking about... Valve has never made $800,000,000 ever or even to date in total sales. What's Valves stock symbol. Doesn't have one? Why on earth wouldn't it with $800,000,000 in sales from chicken pluckers XI! Who is bullshiting and pulling numbers out of their ass? Why just look at patheric old MGM [nyse.com] in comparison to "pick a gaming company".

obvious anwer (1)

Imazalil (553163) | more than 8 years ago | (#15490752)

Perhaps it's not a publicly traded company? I don't actually know, maybe they are. But not being on the stock market doean't really mean anything, especially about how large a company is.

Sequels, sequels, sequels (1)

tooyoung (853621) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484356)

When will Hollywood learn to churn out an endless number of unimaginative sequels, or countless movies all based on the same basic plot device?

Hollywood has already got that shit down cold (0, Redundant)

I Like Pudding (323363) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484592)

Based on the number of sequels and remakes that get shat unto the market on a monthly basis, I don't see how there is much of a difference between the two.

*RELEASE ONLY COMPLETE PRODUCTS* (1)

PurplePhase (240281) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484961)

Am I truly the only one to mention this so far?

Movies start with a story, generate content, and are edited back down to a story. Then on the DVD release we even get the 2-disc set with outtakes, special features, director's cut(s), TV and theatre ads for the movie, ...

Instead they give us a "game" built on one of 4 common rulesets, incomplete, buggy, and leaving out features in order to sell us a new expansion pack in 4 to 8 months. Oh, wait, is that just the movies' Gold Edition?

8-PP

Piracy (1)

Sv-Manowar (772313) | more than 8 years ago | (#15486198)

I can't really see either of them learning much from each other, both sides are facing major issues at the moment (mainly brought on by themselves) which result in the market being unhappy with what is being produced. Maybe hollywood can learn from the games industry to not blame poor sales figures on piracy rather than the low-grade movies they are churning out by the truckload. At least that would be one positive step.

Games tap right into the wire (1)

spyrochaete (707033) | more than 8 years ago | (#15487289)

I went to a rave in Toronto not long after the original Xbox was released, and sitting in baskets on the bar and around the venue were Xbox-branded glowsticks. No sales people getting in partygoers' faces, no marketing wench handing them to every person who walked in the door - just a casual, simple gesture that got the point across.

And that point was "have fun and fit our Xbox into your routine." Absolutely brilliant in my book.

And what has the movie industry thrust down our throats for decades?

"Critics all agree! Durp Da Durp is the #1 movie in Canada! Teetily Tum from the Durp Daily says 'A non-stop thrill ride!' Go see the movie that everyone's talking about!"

Poppycock? (1)

AlzaF (963971) | more than 8 years ago | (#15495911)

As movies are a subjective medium, people discuss movies based on what they got out of it after watching it whereas with games you discuss what cool features you want to be in it. As to Hollywood being out of touch, it has always been the case of movies coming out of nowhere and capturing the peoples imagination.

Ok, maybe they can (1)

AlzaF (963971) | more than 8 years ago | (#15501318)

I had posted a previous one but with certain movies, definately science fiction and fantasy, could do with pre-networking. Science fiction/fantasy films, have a lot of backstory and background that is not or have little time to be explored in the film. If film companies provided more internet content exploring this before the film is released then they could generate more interest i and maybe even make the movie better as some of the plot will make more sense.
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