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AllofMp3.com Breaks Silence

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 8 years ago | from the other-side-of-the-coin dept.

666

An anonymous reader writes "The controversial Russian music site AllofMp3.com has fired back a return salvo on legality, royalties, and the WTO." From the article: "The entertainment industry however claims the service is flat out illegal. According to the IFPI (International Federation of the Phonographic Industry), AllofMp3.com fails to pay artist royalties - contrary to AllofMp3.com's assertions."

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666 comments

The British BPI say its illegal (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15484516)


and you will be breaking the law by downloading from there

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/entertainment/5051826.s tm [bbc.co.uk]

Re:The British BPI say its illegal (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15484533)

Next up, the British BPI announces a royalty on having a song stuck in your head. Freedom isn't free, chaps!

Re:The British BPI say its illegal (1)

grub (11606) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484633)


So one cold Canadian winter evening some British bobbies will kick in my doors and bust me?

Re:The British BPI say its illegal (1)

Poltras (680608) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484676)

Nah you'll just wake up, open the door and see them cool as dead. Brits aren't as tough as our winters :P

Pirates: Think about the people you're hurting (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15484518)

As a record store owner, my business faces ruin. CD sales have dropped through the floor. People aren't buying half as many CDs as they did just a year ago. Revenue is down and costs are up. My store has survived for years, but I now face the prospect of bankruptcy. Every day I ask myself why this is happening.

I bought the store about 12 years ago. It was one of those boutique record stores that sell obscure, independent releases that no-one listens to, not even the people that buy them. I decided that to grow the business I'd need to aim for a different demographic, the family market. My store specialised in family music - stuff that the whole family could listen to. I don't sell sick stuff like Marilyn Manson or cop-killer rap, and I'm proud to have one of the most extensive Christian rock sections that I know of.

The business strategy worked. People flocked to my store, knowing that they (and their children) could safely purchase records without profanity or violent lyrics. Over the years I expanded the business and took on more clean-cut and friendly employees. It took hard work and long hours but I had achieved my dream - owning a profitable business that I had built with my own hands, from the ground up. But now, this dream is turning into a nightmare.

Every day, fewer and fewer customers enter my store to buy fewer and fewer CDs. Why is no one buying CDs? Are people not interested in music? Do people prefer to watch TV, see films, read books? I don't know. But there is one, inescapable truth - Internet piracy is mostly to blame. The statistics speak for themselves - one in three discs world wide is a pirate. On The Internet, you can find and download hundreds of dollars worth of music in just minutes. It has the potential to destroy the music industry, from artists, to record companies to stores like my own. Before you point to the supposed "economic downturn", I'll note that the book store just across from my store is doing great business. Unlike CDs, it's harder to copy books over The Internet.

A week ago, an unpleasant experience with pirates gave me an idea. In my store, I overheard a teenage patron talking to his friend.

"Dude, I'm going to put this CD on the Internet right away."

"Yeah, dude, that's really lete [sic], you'll get lots of respect."

I was fuming. So they were out to destroy the record industry from right under my nose? Fat chance. When they came to the counter to make their purchase, I grabbed the little shit by his shirt. "So...you're going to copy this to your friends over The Internet, punk?" I asked him in my best Clint Eastwood/Dirty Harry voice.

"Uh y-yeh." He mumbled, shocked.

"That's it. What's your name? You're blacklisted. Now take yourself and your little bitch friend out of my store - and don't come back." I barked. Cravenly, they complied and scampered off.

So that's my idea - a national blacklist of pirates. If somebody cannot obey the basic rules of society, then they should be excluded from society. If pirates want to steal from the music industry, then the music industry should exclude them. It's that simple. One strike, and you're out - no reputable record store will allow you to buy another CD. If the pirates can't buy the CDS to begin with, then they won't be able to copy them over The Internet, will they? It's no different to doctors blacklisting drug dealers from buying prescription medicine.

I have just written a letter to the RIAA outlining my proposal. Suing pirates one by one isn't going far enough. Not to mention pirates use the fact that they're being sued to unfairly portray themselves as victims. A national register of pirates would make the problem far easier to deal with. People would be encouraged to give the names of suspected pirates to a hotline, similar to TIPS. Once we know the size of the problem, the police and other law enforcement agencies will be forced to take piracy seriously. They have fought the War on Drugs with skill, so why not the War on Piracy?

This evening, my daughters asked me. "Why do the other kids laugh at us?"

I wanted to tell them the truth - it's because they wear old clothes and have cheap haircuts. I can't afford anything better for them right now.

"It's because they are idiots, kids", I told them. "Don't listen to them."

When the kids went to bed, my wife asked me, "Will we be able to keep the house, David?"

I just shook my head, and tried to hold back the tears. "I don't know, Jenny. I don't know."

When my girls ask me questions like that, I feel like my heart is being wrenched out of my chest. But knowing that I'm doing the best I can to save my family and my business is some consolation.

Some people are offended by my blacklist system. I may have made my store less popular for pirates and sympathisers, but that's a sacrifice I'm willing to make to save my industry from destruction. I am inspired by artists such as Metallica that have taken a stand against the powerful pirate lobby. When everyone believes 2 + 2 = 5, to simply state the truth, that 2 + 2 = 4, is a courageous act.

Re:Pirates: Think about the people you're hurting (1)

JohnnyBigodes (609498) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484543)

Regardless of the method you choose to use to stop piracy... maybe the problem is that your potential market segment has dwindled? As in... people aren't very interested in "safe" music and or/Christian Rock anymore?

I'm really asking, not stating anything.

Re:Pirates: Think about the people you're hurting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15484544)


oh come on you at least post the "ive been sitting at my Mac" troll or a link to goat.cx

Netcraft confirms it, slashdot trolls are dying

Re:Pirates: Think about the people you're hurting (4, Insightful)

babbling (952366) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484552)

I realise this is a troll, but in this pretend circumstance, "legitimate" music download services like iTunes would do the exact same thing as "piracy" to a music store owner's business.

Re:Pirates: Think about the people you're hurting (4, Informative)

Txiasaeia (581598) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484556)

How original [kuro5hin.org] .

Re:Pirates: Think about the people you're hurting (1)

Silverlancer (786390) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484588)

Mod parent up, mod grandparent down for being a copy-paste troll.

Slashdot confirms: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15484606)

Humor is dying.

ad finium (1)

PlusFiveTroll (754249) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484591)

Your correct, under every pirates are stealing my music, some troll posts this. Whats worse is there is somebody dumb enough to mod it up every time (at least 5 someones). I mean, my goodness, if your going to troll, be orginal.

Re:Pirates: Think about the people you're hurting (1)

Penguinoflight (517245) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484610)

Not only that but the first response is "saw that on slashdot a while ago". This troll (grandparent) duped a kuro5hin article which was duped from slashdot earlier.

Re:Pirates: Think about the people you're hurting (1)

enrevanche (953125) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484638)

It's worse than you think, the comments refer back to Slashdot [slashdot.org] !

Re:Pirates: Think about the people you're hurting (3, Insightful)

neversense (657869) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484558)

If somebody cannot obey the basic rules of society, then they should be excluded from society.
Like assaulting a teenage child, as you just confessed to? Why yes, yes indeed, you should be excluded from society. I'm certainly not condoning copyright infringement, but that doesn't entitle you to commit criminal acts.

Re:Pirates: Think about the people you're hurting (1)

Wes Janson (606363) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484570)

The astroturfing sure is green this time of summer.

Hey, RIAA: Go to hell.

Re:Pirates: Think about the people you're hurting (1)

Donniedarkness (895066) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484572)

So, in your "family record store", you kicked some kid out and called him a "bitch"?

Besides-- record sales are up. Maybe you're just not carrying the types of CD's that people want to buy? Yes, people pirate all types of music, but I'm willing to bet that hip hop/rap/rock gets pirated much more than Christian music....so I don't think pirates are completely to blame for your misfortune.

Also, your whole story sounds like a lie. I could be wrong, but it just does.

Re:Pirates: Think about the people you're hurting (1)

ezwip (974076) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484574)

sell your shop and buy into something else you damn hippie everyone doesn't need to go to jail just so you can sell over priced plastic disks stfu

Yeah, piracy, whatever. (1)

dtmancom (925636) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484587)

I haven't purchased a CD in a store for years, and it isn't because of god damned piracy. It's because I got sick of never being able to find the CD I wanted in archaic brick and mortar stores, and could always find what I want on amazon.com. Waiting a few days was easy to get used to compared to the frustration of going to so-called "obscure music" stores and never finding what I wanted to buy. But no. It's always got to be piracy.

Re:Pirates: Think about the people you're hurting (1)

alphax45 (675119) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484590)

so your business is not doing well, and you have customers in your store willing to buy a cd. Your solution, ban them from your store. So what if they were going to put it on the net? They were in your store and willing to pay you money. Insted of freaking out, why not show them pictures of your kids? The people that would really be hurt by there actions. Just a thought.

Re:Pirates: Think about the people you're hurting (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15484597)

You cite artists as being hurt by piracy, but this is generally untrue. Most of artists income comes from touring, and not from album sales.

I am sorry that you are crying about losing your house but it really has no relevancy to whether or not people are going to pirate. If you really think that people are going to stop pirating because a "clean cut" store is failing to stay in buisiness then I would say you are wasting your time.

One could make the argument that CD sales are dropping because of internet piracy, but if people are legally buying songs more from the internet, such as the iTunes store then that would also cause the same effects. If you are going to say that people who are legally buying from iTunes are immoral because doing so is putting you out of buisiness then you are just a ridiculous person. What I am really trying to say is that a different act with the same end result is not immoral, so the fact that piracy has that end result on you does not necessarily make piracy immoral.

I do agree that piracy is immoral but your post is just ridiculous.

Re:Pirates: Think about the people you're hurting (2, Funny)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484601)

Wait, how did the kid misspell 'leet when he SAID it?

Re:Pirates: Think about the people you're hurting (1)

Bryant68 (978283) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484681)

Funniest fucking thing I've ever read.

Re:Pirates: Think about the people you're hurting (4, Insightful)

Agent Green (231202) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484602)

Deja moo ... I've heard this bullshit before on Slashdot.

To be fair, however, I think the following are more contributing factors to your store's demise than piracy:
* eBay
* half.com
* amazon.com
* Best Buy
* WalMart
* Direct Artist Sales/Websites
* iTMS

Re:Pirates: Think about the people you're hurting (1)

ezwip (974076) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484609)

if i saw him grab a kid in front of me id shove that holy roller cd so far down his throat...

Re:Pirates: Think about the people you're hurting (2, Interesting)

rifkida (979999) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484607)

Bro, Even if there were no pirates in the world at all you would still be losing money. You seriously are out of your mind if you think your store is losing money because of pirates. I'm sure their intention was out to get you. Man I sympathize with you, but this shit happens. You're store has become obsolete. The world just doesn't need it anymore. If you can't keep up with the market then the market does what it did to you. Push you out. Going against pirates isn't going to change anything. Do you think pirates are the people who stopped coming to your store? Man why don't you try some marketing or give people more of a reason to come to your store. Why should I pay 18$ for your CD when I can purchase it online for 8? Doesn't make sense. Simple economics. It's not the pirates, it's you. And your blacklist idea is just as bad as the RIAA. Do you think the RIAA is protecting you? They are out to censor everyone and at the sametime make money off of it. You'll just be another victim sooner or later.

Re:Pirates: Think about the people you're hurting (5, Insightful)

Maxwell (13985) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484612)

Your business model is dead. I would pay as much for a record store as I would for a "previously profitable" door-to-door vacuum cleaner sales route. Both businesses became obsolete.

If your big enough, or know others in your industry in the same boat as you and can join them , set up a commercial web site. If iTunes does not carry the rare stuff you do, you may have a market online for your material. The musicians want to sell it online, your clients want to buy it.

You probably only have a few years left. Get moving now while you have a customer base and cash. Step 1 is realizing that selling CD's is a dead end. Period. Gas Stations don't make any money selling gas. They realized that and now virtually every station has a (profitable) convenient store attached. Records stores don't make any money selling records. The big chain stores have already converted half their floor space to DVD's, MP3 players, electronics and accessories. They only carry CD's to attract browsers who buy profitable items. How much revenue do you make selling MP3 players? memory cards? CD accessories? DVD's? You do sell those, right? Because your customers trust you and are intimidated by the big box stores?

You have a lot of options. Music isn't going away. Quit whining and get to work....

Move with the market or get run over.

JON

Re:Pirates: Think about the people you're hurting (1)

SocialEngineer (673690) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484613)

While your plight is certainly grave, you aren't the only one suffering. What about the artists who aren't getting paid jack? The article says "artist royalties", but truthfully, the artist gets very.. VERY little of that.

Also, I'm sure you understand that business models have to evolve. Switching from indie music to family-oriented stuff is an example - maybe now it is time to make the next leap. For instance, I work at a newspaper - we are slowly changing our focus from print media to online. While the print media isn't going aywhere soon (just like CDs), less and less people want to read a physical paper, since they can get their news online for free. I wish I could offer you a suggestion on what to do, but I'm not a music store owner. That is your job :)

Still, not trying to make your problem seem insignificant - it certainly isn't. However, more has to change than just stopping piracy. Piracy is part of a response to rediculously high CD/online music (as well as tight wad bastages who don't want to pay for music). Not only do we have to make the people in the industry happy, but we also have to focus on priority #1: the customer. In my opinion, any service offered has to be oriented around the consumer, not the producer.

Re:Pirates: Think about the people you're hurting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15484637)

"When everyone believes 2 + 2 = 5, to simply state the truth, that 2 + 2 = 4, is a courageous act."

My my, I do believe someone misinterpreted 1984. Or did you just rip that quote?

CDs are dead.

Re:Pirates: Think about the people you're hurting (2, Interesting)

franksands (938435) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484646)

Have any of you store owners genius thought that the damn thing is too expensive? I will give an example of what happens here in Brazil. A new original CD is about R$50-70, and the pirate is down to R$10, in someplaces you can find for R$5, that's at least 10 times less. Do you see the difference? If the record labels sold the CDs at a competitive price, say R$15-20, almost everyone would buy the legal copies, because it's a bit more expensive, but you are honoring the artist, I don't say "paying the artist" because I know labels pay at most 10% of the CD price, so 99,9% of all artists and bands get their money from the tours. And the labels are not interested in ending, piracy, because then, they wouldn't have any "arguments" to use these absurd prices and to impose "protection measures" such as the wonderful DRM: "Look, I don't want to do this, but the piracy don't let me lower the prices" or "We must use DRM to protect ourselves from piracy", That's bullshit. Mod me down, if you want, but that's still bullshit.

Re:Pirates: Think about the people you're hurting (0, Flamebait)

Tweekster (949766) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484650)

Dude, I wouldnt shop at your store either, you are an asshole...you treat your customers like shit. Dont be suprised that your store fails and it has nothing to do with piracy, it is cause you suck.

oh and just cause you have a family doesnt make you any more noble than someone with out.

Re:Pirates: Think about the people you're hurting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15484661)

Meh, this story deserved to be trolled. It has produced nothing but Slashdotter Chant #21 - "We hate DRM and your business model is dead". And even though it's just pure regurgitation, apparently several people here still don't have the spare system resources to see this audaciously blatant troll for what it is.

And while we sit here on Slashdot badmouthing this whole mess, reacting to each and every troll in our crusade to convert the errant Anonymous Cowards, some people get out there and campaign. And when they do, we once again remain in our seats posting to Slashdot, badmouthing the efforts of the campaigners.

I am having a bad day.

Re:Pirates: Think about the people you're hurting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15484664)

your store is not failing because of priates. it's failing because of online music stores like itunes, amazon, etc. i don't know anyone who buys music from a "store" anymore...

Re:Pirates: Think about the people you're hurting (1)

rts008 (812749) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484691)

All I can say "Clint E." ("I asked him in my best Clint Eastwood/Dirty Harry voice.
"), if it would have been me that you grabbed by the shirtfront as you described, you would not have been able to post your comment until after a long hospital stay- if you were lucky ( if not liucky, you could wait in the afterlife for your revenge!).

With your attitude, I can see why your business is dropping off. Good luck to you in the future, asshat.

Instead of lying to your family ("I wanted to tell them the truth - it's because they wear old clothes and have cheap haircuts. I can't afford anything better for them right now.

"It's because they are idiots, kids", I told them. "Don't listen to them."

When the kids went to bed, my wife asked me, "Will we be able to keep the house, David?"

I just shook my head, and tried to hold back the tears. "I don't know, Jenny. I don't know." ")
why don't you be a man and tell them the truth- that you are trying to shore up a leaky, sinking business model (just like the *AA's) and don't have the sense to adapt to a dynamic world.

Your post makes me want to visit your store- dressed in a pirate's costume (complete with annoying parrot on shoulder) and see if your actions compare with your post...hope you habve a good health insurance plan! ;)

Re:Pirates: Think about the people you're hurting (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15484708)

For every troll who reposts this I must download 10 albums.

WWJD? (3, Funny)

Tim[m] (5411) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484760)

My favorite part of this story is the implication that the good, clean, family-values, Christian types are the ones turning to piracy.

This is scary. (2, Insightful)

babbling (952366) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484524)

It's scary how far the US is willing to go to pressure other countries into changing their laws to suit US interests. I can almost imagine the US going to war with other countries that "don't have the same copyright laws as us".

Re:This is scary. (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15484538)

I can almost imagine that there are fat purple elephants flying around in the sky, but it doesn't mean that it's true.

Ease up on the hyperbole.

Re:This is scary. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15484553)

Uh oh, better flame the anti american!

Re:This is scary. (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15484551)

This is exactly the same kind of intellectual property rights battles that have gone on regarding pharmaceuticals for the past 50 years. The drug companies have historically enjoyed, and still wield today, a great deal of power over the United States' foreign policy. Perhaps the record companies will position themselves in the same level of power in a few years?

It's Hardly Scary (1, Interesting)

rwade (131726) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484562)

The United States feels that it is in its citizen's interests to protect the copyrights created by US citizens and marketed by a multi-billion dollar industry. Not only may the industry collapse, leaving thousands without jobs, but with the availability of cheap music artists lose their incentive to create.

Your assertion that the US would go to war with other countries is ludicris and you know it. Inflamatory remarks like yours serve only to alienate the world community.

Re:It's Hardly Scary (2, Funny)

HardCase (14757) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484585)

Inflamatory remarks like yours serve only to alienate the world community.

I don't think that his remarks alienate the world community, but they are definitely overblown. I'd say, at worst, they make him look kind of stupid. Of course, this being /., it's OK to be that kind of stupid 'cause, you know, the US is evil.

-h-

Re:It's Hardly Scary (4, Interesting)

whereiseljefe (753425) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484645)

On your lines of logic, I could ask what reason does a Law grad have to work at a public defenders all of his life? What reason does an MBA have for helping run a goodwill? But assuming "music is different" (which I'm sure you'll say), to answer your question about what incentive an artist would have to create: artistic passion (some of our greatist artists, not just in music, live and worked in squalor just to do what they loved. Even in science! Albert Einstien worked as a patent office employee, checking patents for chump change), and concerts. Artists make a shitload of money on concerts, and without widely distributed music they won't have enough buzz to put on a concert. As far as the war comment, we woudln't go to war specifically and instantly over such a debate, however a situation like this will breakdown communication (which inevitably leads to war as neither party knows how to think of anything other than themselves).

Re:It's Hardly Scary (4, Interesting)

Dance_Dance_Karnov (793804) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484667)

if you think the United states wouldn't go to war to protect its economic interests you are fooling yourself.

Subconscious copying (2, Insightful)

tepples (727027) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484720)

The United States feels that it is in its citizen's interests to protect the copyrights created by US citizens and marketed by a multi-billion dollar industry. Not only may the industry collapse, leaving thousands without jobs, but with the availability of cheap music artists lose their incentive to create.

Some musicians in the United States have already lost their incentive to create. A songwriter who publishes anything puts himself at risk of being sued if he inadvertently creates and publishes a work that happens to be too similar to a song that was played on the radio a decade ago. Lack of intent is no defense. Bright Tunes Music v. Harrisongs Music and Three Boys Music v. Michael Bolton.

Re:It's Hardly Scary (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15484750)

"Not only may the industry collapse, leaving thousands without jobs, but with the availability of cheap music artists lose their incentive to create."

Give it a rest. These thousands that will be without jobs make more money as it is than most Americans. For almost 2000 years the world got by with just playing the music. No one sued people over playing 'their' song. It just didn't happen. But now you expect us to believe all of a sudden the music well will dry up if Brittney doesn't get her 5mil on the next album. Bullshit.

If the artists lost their incentive to create, fuck em. They are in the wrong biz then. They will just have to live with the fame, fans, and the millions they already made.

I know 'artists' that whittle baubles for minimum wage. People like them have been doing it for thousands of years. Somehow, they have the motivation to carry on, even though they aren't getting rich doing it.

Face it, the industry is fucked up from the top down. Where the fuck is my $5 CD I was promised in the late 80s? I don't mean the bargain bin. How is it possible that 20 years later we still have the same prices as we did then? I smell bullshit.

I think piracy is bullshit, but your argument is too. Get off your high horse asshole.

You also spewed "The United States feels that it is in its citizen's interests to protect the copyrights created by US citizens and marketed by a multi-billion dollar industry."

The fuck are you talking about? It's the citizens that are pirating like crazy. Tell it like it is you corporate whore, it is in the best interests of a select few, so that they may remain overly wealthy while the little man toils to pay for music to play at his party.

Re:It's Hardly Scary (for an Imperialist) (5, Interesting)

enrevanche (953125) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484753)

Let's see,
  • Hawaii
  • Mexico
  • Nicaragua
  • Dominican Republic
  • Iraq
  • Spain for Cuba, Puerto Rico, Phillipines
  • Cuba
  • Native Americans (so many times it's too hard to itemize)
These all were commercial motivated to some degree or another.
Russia is way too big and has too many things that go boom to risk a war with and the copyright thing is probably too minor, but if this were a smaller nation with few friends who knows. Of course it would be over terrorism or for "liberation".
The major record labels are representations of capitalism at it's worse. Their demise might actually bring about a more efficient industry that meets the needs of consumers and artists better.
AllOfMP3 is what these companies deserve after their manipulation of copyright laws and buying congress for the DMCA.

Re:It's Hardly Scary (5, Funny)

virtualchoirboy (717310) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484763)

Britney Spears and every other no-talent hack being forced on the consumers out of a job?

I can live with that.

Re:This is scary. (3, Insightful)

Rick Zeman (15628) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484567)

It's scary how far the US is willing to go to pressure other countries into changing their laws to suit US interests. I can almost imagine the US going to war with other countries that "don't have the same copyright laws as us".

We wouldn't give a shit if it was a Russian site stealing from Russian artists. But since it's a Russian site stealing from US artists/labels (amongst others) that's wholly a different story.

Re:This is scary. (1)

InsaneGeek (175763) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484578)

But are you saying that Russia wouldn't give a shit about about US sites stealing from Russian artists/labels (amongst others)?

Re:This is scary. (1)

Rick Zeman (15628) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484598)

But are you saying that Russia wouldn't give a shit about about US sites stealing from Russian artists/labels (amongst others)?

Now THAT'S a hypothetical if I've ever heard one!

This is not enough (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484739)

But are you saying that Russia wouldn't give a shit about about US sites stealing from Russian artists/labels (amongst others)?
Now THAT'S a hypothetical if I've ever heard one!

You mean like "All the things she said, all the things she said, running through my head, running through my head, running through my head" from that t.A.T.u. song?

Re:This is scary. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15484745)

Search for Tatu mp3s sometime.

Re:This is scary. (2, Funny)

Feanturi (99866) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484710)

No, because in Soviet Russia, artist steals you!

Re:This is scary. (2, Insightful)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484738)

Jesus Christ. How can you make a snide remark about double standards and use the term "stealing" with a straight face.

Re:This is scary. (2, Interesting)

Tezkah (771144) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484634)

Who knows? The copyright industry in Canada is said to contribute about 5% of the economy so its probably slightly more in the US, and with the US outsourcing much of its manufacturing to other countries, maybe copyright will be valuable enough to go to war over someday.

When we run out of oil, we'll probably squabble over other things. Drinking water, copyright, its all possible.

Re:This is scary. (5, Funny)

FSWKU (551325) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484660)

It's scary how far the US is willing to go to pressure other countries into changing their laws to suit US interests. I can almost imagine the US going to war with other countries that "don't have the same copyright laws as us".

Somewhere, this thought is giving an **AA exec a hard-on that even Viagra couldn't achieve...

Re:This is scary. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15484735)

It's scary how far the US is willing to go to pressure other countries into changing their laws to suit US interests. I can almost imagine the US going to war...

Could it be that my fellow Americans are finally understanding why America is disliked so much in the rest of the world? Although this strictly applies to laws regarding copyright, there are dozens of examples since this nation inception where our government flung its military into action to suppress anything that didn't serve our interests. Whether it was invasions (failed or otherwise) for political reasons/ideology, resources, or to support wonky beliefs in the End Days we've done quite a bad. It's only now, 5 years after 9/11 that I feel people are finally getting it. Sure, judging from the respones to your comment, it can be said that there are quite a few more to convince but remember some people will always have a veil over there eyes. Here's to hope that we start changing our foreign policy...

The RIAA's response (5, Insightful)

SirFozzie (442268) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484540)

We don't care who you're paying..... it's not us.

Re:The RIAA's response (2, Informative)

radish (98371) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484583)

And seeing as they're the artists' nominated representitives who are we to argue?

FWIW: none of the 'A's in RIAA stand for 'Artist' (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15484635)

It's the Recording Industry Association of America.

I dare you to go out into the community and ask an artist if they would want to be associated with "industry", any "industry", much less an "industry association", and not at all one without the word "artist" anywhere in the name.

Re:The RIAA's response (3, Informative)

SirFozzie (442268) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484729)

Because the Russian law states they can pay the Russian government who disburses the money to the artists? :D

Time to Change Tactics (5, Funny)

AK Marc (707885) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484550)

Well crap. Now I'll have to make a photocopy of a $20 and send it to the RIAA for every copy of an mp3 I make. A copy for a copy, neither being denied anything, it's only fair, right?

Re:Time to Change Tactics (1, Insightful)

radish (98371) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484600)

It depends - do you mind being paid by your employer in the same photocopied bills? No? Why? Because you did a job and expect to get paid for it? Bingo.

Re:Time to Change Tactics (3, Interesting)

Geoffreyerffoeg (729040) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484622)

It depends - do you mind being paid by your employer in the same photocopied bills? No? Why?

Because when I produce a creative work, my employer gets the rights to it, and I may or may not have a right to license it for my own use. So I want my paycheck, and the employer might get some of it if I decide to invest in them.

But when I buy music online, I get a copy of the music, and the only right I have is to listen to it on that device and make a backup copy. Even if I buy on a CD, I only get those rights. So why shouldn't I send them a copy of my money that they can look at and feel rich, but not give to anyonle else?

Quid pro quo.

Re:Time to Change Tactics (1, Insightful)

DeusExMalex (776652) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484626)

Yeah, I suppose your argument holds water if we had all signed contracts with the RIAA agreeing to pay them for their labor. Fortunately for us, we have entered into no such agreement and are under no obligation to purchase their products. The simple fact that they produce a product should not garuntee their profit. However, I'll be more than happy to enter into such an agreement if I can later fire them for whatever goddamn reason I chose.

Simply doing a job never garuntees that you'll be paid. You have to do it well and it's fairly obvious to anyone who looks that the RIAA isn't doing their job terribly well.

Re:Time to Change Tactics (1)

radish (98371) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484782)

I'm not talking about the RIAA I'm talking about the artist. They produced a creative work, and licensed it under terms which require you to pay them (via their label) if you want a copy of it. Of course you're under no obligation to buy anything, but unless you adhere to the license terms you also have no right to keep a copy of said music.

Sure the artist could have chosen a different distribution method, or different licensing. But they didn't, and we have no right to simply ignore their decision - just as (say) Linksys have no right to ignore the GPL just because want to.

Re:Time to Change Tactics (1)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484788)

The simple fact that they produce a product should not garuntee their profit.

Does that make you comfortable hopping over the fence to sneak into concerts by your "favorite" artist? Are you willing to stand face to face with a musician you claim to like (who has chosen, despite their being other options, to use a publishing company that happens to be an RIAA member) and tell them that a buck a song is too much, and that they don't deserve to be paid? They can produce a recording without any expectation of your wanting it, but if they're only offering it to you in exchange for money, they do have the expectation that you'll either honor their request, or walk away without their work.

Pay attention record labels (5, Insightful)

LockeOnLogic (723968) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484568)

While allofmp3 is probably undercharging what would be profitable in the US, its popularity does exemplify the fact that people are willing to buy alot more music if the price is more reasonable. I for one would probably buy x10 the music I do now if I could download it (sans DRM) for 25 cents a song. When are the record companies going to wake up and smell the profits?

Re:Pay attention record labels (5, Funny)

cpsc2005 (629087) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484617)

When are the record companies going to wake up and smell the profits?

Probably when they stop smelling ass due to the location of their heads.

Re:Pay attention record labels (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15484725)

You can. It's called Emusic.com.

Re:Pay attention record labels (2, Insightful)

Firehed (942385) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484785)

They don't understand that while 99c > 25c, (99c * 1) < (25c * 10). Plus, most songs at 192k MP3 are under 10c, but as it's per meg not per song, you'll still generally pay over a buck an album. Anyways, I agree - I'd buy more music if the price was fair. In fact, the only reason that I don't use AllofMP3 now is because I'm made a bit nervous by giving my financial information to a russian website, and moreover one that's considered a bit sketchy at best and in some legal lukewarm water at the moment. Paying $5-6 for a quasi-legal lossless download bothers me much less than a protected $9.99 lossy copy where most of the money goes to the last people I want having it anyways (while I think 99c/$9.99 at iTunes is too much, I'd be MUCH more inclined to buy if 70% of it didn't go to the RIAA).

But figuring that out would require modifying their business model to fit what people want, and that's the last thing they're going to do.

When will the *AAs learn... (4, Interesting)

Durrok (912509) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484579)

It is time to phase out your old business model. It is obvious from online services like iTunes and Allofmp3 that people are willing to pay reasonable prices to obtain their music online. They also need to learn that CDs are no longer the preferred format people want to listen to their music in. Of the few people I know who do go buy cds the first thing they do is stick it into their PC, rip it to MP3, and toss it either on an MP3 CD or their iPod. I know I'm just talking crazy. It makes way more sense to spend hundreds of millions of dollars greasing politicians hands and suing everyone instead of spending a few million to just design and implement a download system.

Re:When will the *AAs learn... (1)

Ant P. (974313) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484648)

To get the likes of the RIAA to learn anything, you'd have to communicate with them in a language they understand - money, litigation or intimidation.

Re:When will the *AAs learn... (1)

shark72 (702619) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484682)

Your post makes it appear that you believe that the record companies are against online distribution. This is not correct: they are against online piracy. iTunes, Yahoo! Music, Napster, et. al. are not in competition with record companies. They are resellers, just like Amazon, Tower Records, or Best Buy. The record companies don't care how you buy your music, as long as you buy it from a reseller who has paid them for the priveledge. The massive success of the iTMS has been a great thing for record companies; online sales have almost made up for the drop in CD sales.

With all the overhead associated with CDs -- the shipping, the returns, the breakage, the manufacturing costs -- record companies probably make more per track sold via the iTMS than with traditional CDs (although this may be offset by the fact that it's now a lot easier to pick and choose which tracks you want; it's no longer necessary to buy an entire CD if you just want four songs). My guess is that record companies would like online sales to be an even higher percentage of their sales. But, again, let's not confuse online sales with piracy.

Re:When will the *AAs learn... (4, Insightful)

rkcallaghan (858110) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484767)

I'm sorry, but you're wrong on a couple of points. The breakage being the main one -- record companies make extra profit due to this, not less. Which also leads directly in to their main reason for wanting the most obtuse DRM possible. Right now, record companies make money hand over fist on reprints of old music, both on new formats, and on replacements. Digital copies have neither of these problems, and present a problem that they're not equipped to deal with: Not being able to resell the same old shit. Given time, say 10 or 20 years, eventually everyone will have all the old music they want -- and in a format that they never need to replace. This is bad news bears, coupled with the fact that as you mentioned, only a few tracks per album are worth buying, seriously reduces how much actual product they will have in the future.

AllofMp3.com fails to pay artist royalties... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15484586)

Didn't the RIAA/IFPI know that In Soviet Russia, the artist pays YOU?

Yeah,,,, (5, Insightful)

The Bungi (221687) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484595)

I love how they are "bad" because they fail to pay artist royalties.

Of course, they're worried about how much money the artists make. Right. That's their casus belli right there.

Re:Yeah,,,, (4, Informative)

eric76 (679787) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484687)

Would it make the RIAA happy if allofmp3.com contacted the individual artists and paid them their royalties?

Of course not. The RIAA doesn't care a hill of beans about whether the individual artists are ever paid for their work. They just want to make sure that the major record companies get paid.

The Pirates Are Coming (2, Interesting)

wildman6801 (763038) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484599)

Just like the old british empire it's now the RIAA. So what is the RIAA thinking - oh those peskey fools; they foiled us again! What the artist is thinking - The pirates are coming! The pirates are coming! Oh my god the pirates are coming! What the people think - the Records are coming! the Records are coming! Oh my GOD the Records are coming! What the slashdoters think - priceless!

Soooooo, let's see... (1)

threedognit3 (854836) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484659)

I put up a website. Invite all the indie bands to place their music on it. I charged $.49/per track for downloading. They get $.39 of that.

In return I splash their album cover, add some liner comments and give a rave review.

I'm hoping for 500K downloads/month (worldwide).

What????

Just an opinion (3, Interesting)

Quintios (594318) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484674)

I think we all support the artist's right to make money off their music, right? But there's a lot of folks involved in music production, the players, the singers, the writers, the studio (with their expensive equipment), marketing, talent scouts, etc. etc. etc. Lots of people are involved in the production of music and they should, by right, make a "fair wage" off of their work. Wouldn't you agree? The entertainment industry puts up a lot of money to get artists "out there", and I truly feel that they should see some sort of compensation for it.

That being said I hate DRM and wish that whatever media I purchased could be used in my house in any way I see fit, streaming audio, video, etc. I wonder if the RIAA is going to start raiding houses with a Microsoft Media Server. I've never tried ripping a commercial DVD, but I can't imagine there's any DVD's there that don't have copy protection on them. So what are you going to stream with a MS Media Server? Home DVD's and music only? I thought the whole point was to be able to have all your DVD's in a central storage area where you could watch them anywhere in your house or w/e. But I digress.

I would hope that AllOfMyMP3 would be sending money not only to the artists but TO THE PEOPLE WHO SPENT MONEY TO PUT THE ARTISTS WHERE THEY ARE, i.e. the aforementioned producers, studio engineers, studio musicians, and so forth. Like I said, everyone involved in the production of a successful artist should get a cut of the money in some way, especially the artists, of course. I think most folks like the idea of being able to choose whatever format they want at whatever bitrate they want, and I think we're all willing to pay for good music. Difficulties and incompatibilities between MP3 players, software, and DRM makes it difficult as once you pick a hardware device (think iPod) and don't use MP3, you're stuck, or at least you have to re-rip your whole library if you want to use another unit.

So, in the end, the opinion is: AllOfMyMP3: good, but I hope they're really sending the money in...

Re:Just an opinion (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15484786)

I think we all support the artist's right to make money off their music, right?
Actually, no, there is no profession that has a "right to make money" so I don't see why artists should be special in that regard.
But there's a lot of folks involved in music production, the players, the singers, the writers, the studio (with their expensive equipment), marketing, talent scouts, etc. etc. etc.
Yes, there are usually many people involved but not all are benefactors in the grand scheme of things. Singers etc. contribute to the music made, so I would count them to be one of the artists. However, lawyers sueing 12-year-old children are, in my opinion, not beneficial and should be punished not rewarded by society. Also, the so-called talent scouts are part of a system that screws over the artists, see: http://www.negativland.com/albini.html [negativland.com] .

The entertainment industry puts up a lot of money to get artists "out there", and I truly feel that they should see some sort of compensation for it.
"Getting the music out there" reminds me of another group: the marketers. Generally speaking it's not wrong to advertise your music but when you pay radios to play your songs in preference to (possibly more worthwhile) songs from other sources you have crossed the line and do not deserve compensation but punishment.
I would hope that AllOfMyMP3 would be sending money not only to the artists but TO THE PEOPLE WHO SPENT MONEY TO PUT THE ARTISTS WHERE THEY ARE, i.e. the aforementioned producers, studio engineers, studio musicians, and so forth.
I do have my doubts as to where the money is actually going, that's why I don't buy there. I would actually consider it fairer to just download it from some p2p network than to pay someone and the money is going into some pocket that is unrelated to the music/artists.

Re:Just an opinion (1)

shobadobs (264600) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484794)

But there's a lot of folks involved in music production, the players, the singers, the writers, the studio (with their expensive equipment), marketing, talent scouts, etc. etc. etc. Lots of people are involved in the production of music and they should, by right, make a "fair wage" off of their work. Wouldn't you agree?

No. They already are getting a fair wage. If any of those employees feel that they are getting an unfair wage, they're free to quit their job and find a fair wage somewhere else.

What happened to piratebay...? (-1, Offtopic)

suv4x4 (956391) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484690)

Noone seems to talk about that. Are we like those guys we're mocking that put their hands on their ears and shout "LALALALA" ?

The site is not available from several locations I've tried just a day after the "piratebay is back" articles, and was offline ever since.

Info?

Re:What happened to piratebay...? (0, Offtopic)

Digital Vomit (891734) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484707)

The Prate Bay [thepiratebay.org] is alive and well.

BTW, check out the graph on their legal threats page [thepiratebay.org] . Priceless!

Re:What happened to piratebay...? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15484718)

Huh? Its online here.

Why doesn't the RIAA address the real problem? (3, Insightful)

TheChef321 (979436) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484698)

To me, it seems the RIAA is becoming so desperate for money that they're signing on anyone who can belt out a tune. They're doing nothing but churning out garbage and expecting people to buy it. The reality is that artists are pressured to do songs they haven't written and aren't that great just to fill out their albums in time. This makes it so there's really only 1 or 2 good songs on a CD. People are willing to pay for good songs. People aren't willing to pay $15 - $25 for a CD with 2 good songs and 9 that should not be. If the RIAA wants more money, then they'll make it in our best interest to buy CDs instead of individual songs.

Failure to pay royalties? (0, Troll)

clevershark (130296) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484701)

I wonder how much the RIAA or any other of these cartels would be willing to go to prove that they pay royalties to artists in the amounts in which they are contracted to do.

If they do that then, and only then, would I consent to taking any of these gangsters' word for anything.

The law is a ass (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15484702)

The *AA industry is feverishly lobbying the Congress to remove fair-use protections and move media to a licensing model, where the leasees have no ownership of the content they've "purchased". This is deserving of contempt. When people have contempt for the law, it no longer serves it's purpose. I care not for the RIAA, the artists, or the law.

haha (1)

ezwip (974076) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484706)

That guy's a total asshat I'm glad his post got yanked. First he blamed his failing store on people pirating belinda carlisle cds then he went off into some rant about abusing other peoples children. If I was him I'd sell the store and move out of town before the kids dads came looking for me. p.s. I heard the kid d/led the cd off the internet after he went home

lol (0, Troll)

Bryant68 (978283) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484711)

im going to upload my penis to the internet

No permission, fine, but is it legal in Russia? (5, Insightful)

centuren (106470) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484736)

From the IFPI's statement "Allofmp3.com: Setting the record straight":

Allofmp3.com is not a legal service either in Russia or anywhere else.

then:

The site claims to have a licence from ROMS, a Russian organisation that claims to be a collecting society. Yet ROMS has no rights from the record companies whatsoever to licence these pieces of music. ROMS and allofmp3.com are well aware that record companies have not granted authorisation for this service.

So is it legal under Russian law at the moment, or isn't it? If it's legal, then it's the Russian gov't at fault, not the site at all. If AllofMp3 is legal now, and they changes their business practice by the time the law changes, then it seems like they're being unfairly characterized as criminals.

Re:No permission, fine, but is it legal in Russia? (5, Insightful)

flooey (695860) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484770)

So is it legal under Russian law at the moment, or isn't it? If it's legal, then it's the Russian gov't at fault, not the site at all. If AllofMp3 is legal now, and they changes their business practice by the time the law changes, then it seems like they're being unfairly characterized as criminals.

Considering that the Russian police have investigated them before and not filed any charges, it seems to imply that the Russian authorities feel that it's legal. Now, whether it's legal for people outside Russia to purchase music from there is something I haven't seen a lot of discussion about either way, but AllofMP3.com's business certainly appears to be legal to the extent that Russian law covers.

How did this get approved? (2, Interesting)

SinGunner (911891) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484743)

After seeing a typo in the very first sentence of the article, I was forced to look at the site around me. If the linked site were a real world location, it'd be a strip mall in a city that no longer needs them. It had that sort of dirty feel of mid-quality goods.

This is in contrast to the RIAA which feels more like a regular mall. The kids from high school come around and sit at the food court or buy crap, but the only profitable stores are the national chains like PacSun and Hot Topic.

I prefer to buy things at an independent retailer who sells things that are good enough that they can afford to be in a location disassociated with other stores and still get enough business to turn a nice profit. That's how you know something is good. When people come to it for its own sake, not because it's in a convenient location.

I guess I should just put this the easy, well-understood way. RIAA IS OBSOLETE, STORES ARE OBSOLETE, ALL HAIL THE INTERNET.

Guilt trip avoided? (3, Insightful)

Doytch (950946) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484766)

A lot of people download "legal" music because they want to support their artists or because they feel it's wrong to download music for free. Are these people just downloading from AllofMP3 and thinking that they're doing the right thing to alleviate whatever guilt they may feel?

Ignorance is bliss indeed.

The most amazing thing about this (3, Insightful)

layer3switch (783864) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484776)

"The US government officials and politicians have been demanding lately that the Russian authorities shut down allofmp3.com, alleging the site is pirate. Otherwise, they threaten Russia with sanctions, including blocking its entry to WTO."

US trade office is willing to cut off trading relation with Russia over some lousy MP3s? So lets look at this again. What's more profitable and logical? Russia in WTO and suck down RIAA and dumbdown copyright for tit sucking MP3s? or Kick Russia out of WTO and threathen with sanction?

All that in the name of MP3s??? Are we that fucking insane to the point of mental retardation? Oh wait, we are talking about RIAA and politicians.

I think they've got the right idea (4, Insightful)

Matey-O (518004) | more than 8 years ago | (#15484789)

iTunes, et, al. are trying to find the idal price for music from the high end, and AllOfMp3 is approaching it from the bottom. I would be willing to pay $4-$6 for a lossy album, roughly twice what AOmp3 sells them for. I will NOT pay $12 for a digital only, restricted, album with certain songs only available when the full record is purchased.
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