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Record Meteorite Hits Norway

Zonk posted more than 8 years ago | from the duck dept.

281

equex256 writes "Early Wednesday morning, a meteorite streaked across the sky in northern Norway, near Finland and Russia. A witness (Article in Norwegian) went up the mountain to where it hit and reported seeing large boulders that had fallen out of the mountainside, along with many broken trees. Norwegian astronomer Knut Jørgen Røed Ødegaard told Aftenposten, Norway's largest newspaper, that he would compare the explosive force of the impact with the Hiroshima bomb. This meteorite is suspected to be much larger than the 90-kilo (198-pound) meteorite which hit Alta in 1904, previously recognized as the largest to hit Norway. From the article: 'Røed Ødegaard said the meteorite was visible to an area of several hundred kilometers despite the brightness of the midnight sunlit summer sky. The meteorite hit a mountainside in Reisadalen in North Troms.'"

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Lucifer's tack hammer. (4, Funny)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | more than 8 years ago | (#15506914)

(See Niven and Pournelle for consequences of a larger one.)

Re:Lucifer's tack hammer. (1)

FudRucker (866063) | more than 8 years ago | (#15506922)

loved those books, Niven & Pournelle rock! Lucifer's Hammer & FootFall come to mind...

Re:Lucifer's tack hammer. (1)

qzulla (600807) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507001)

Then you should read The Legacy of Herot. They have a Beowolf cluster of Beowolfs. Which would make it Beowolves, right?

Good reading.

qz

Re:Lucifer's tack hammer. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15506938)

The book by Niven and Pournelle isn't my favourite story about the threat of asteroids. Michael Flynn's future history beginning with Firestar [amazon.com] has an entrepreuner give all she can into private space endeavours out of a fear of The Big One coming. Too bad our current space entrepreneurs are motivated mainly by profit, some fear might do some good.

Oblig. Impact Calculator (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15507005)

Whenever the topic of meteors comes up, someone has to post a link to the University of Arizona impact effects calculator [arizona.edu] . Play with the numbers, see if you can destroy the earth.

Also worth checking out along the Lucifer's hammer line of thought is How to Destroy the Earth [qntm.org]

I tried a quick reverse engineering of the meteor with the calculator. An iron meteor 4.5 meters in diameter moving 20 km/s hitting crystalline rock at 45 degrees will have a yield of 18 kilotons...slightly higher than the atomic bomb detonated over Hiroshima. The average interval of an impact of this size on earth is about once every 5 years. Most go largely unnoticed. The earth is a big place.

Giant Røck (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15506917)

Do meteørites sound different with a slash through the middle?

Re:Giant Røck (3, Interesting)

m0ns00n (943739) | more than 8 years ago | (#15506946)

Hehe, I'm norwegian, but to mee, that sounds really funny!!! =) In norwegian it's "meteoritt" :-) Bøtt ank ju, veldig gudd! :-)

Re:Giant Røck (0)

LocoMan (744414) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507039)

Are you sure that was a meteoritt and not some frozen kenyan pee [weebls-stuff.com] ?... :)

Re:Giant Røck (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15507123)

So what does "Bøtt ank ju, veldig gudd" mean then (in English)?

lutefisk (1, Redundant)

snuf23 (182335) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507253)

It means:

"Please come and eat our gelatinous fish, it's prepared with lye."

Re:Giant Røck (3, Funny)

wildsurf (535389) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507239)

A Meteør once bit my sister... Mind you, Meteør bites Kan be pretty nasti.

Re:Giant Røck (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15507051)

Yea it does. It sonds like metørites rather than meteorites.

Stupid jokes that falls flat aside, the "ø" sounds somewhat like the "e" in "learn" But that's ratter off too. If you're familiar with the german "ö" you're geting close.

Re:Giant Røck (1)

49152 (690909) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507136)

Actually, I think it sounds more like the u in but.

Re:Giant Røck (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15507194)

The "u" in "but" is what I tend to use when someone asks about the "ø." For some reason "learn" was the only thing that popped into my head today.

You are of course quite right.

A møøse... (2, Funny)

dj245 (732906) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507258)

..ønce bit mi sister...

Hmmm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15506919)

Wish it had fallen on my 14 acres... I'd be buyin' a new car!

Re:Hmmm... (1)

creimer (824291) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507010)

Most insurance policies don't cover "acts of God" or even "natural disasters" of this type. The tabloids probably wouldn't pay enough even if you mentioned Michael Jackson's love child was found there. Or were you expecting to mined what was left of the slag?

Re:Hmmm... (3, Interesting)

Dare nMc (468959) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507091)

> The tabloids probably wouldn't pay enough
maybe the tabloids wouldn't, but meteroites are worth more per pound than gold.
if you could recover a couple pounds of those 98 pounds you'll be buying any car you wanted.

Yeah, you'd probably have to... (0)

Cyno01 (573917) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507080)

They're saying it was more as powerful as an atomic weapon.

Obligatory Meteor Video (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15506925)

Yeah its probably fake, but cool nonetheless:
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=4653448813 733199771&q=meteor [google.com]

And for all you language nazis out there, meteorite is a silly word and should be abolished.

Re:Obligatory Meteor Video (2, Informative)

EGSonikku (519478) | more than 8 years ago | (#15506944)

Yup, fake, from a truck commercial (from Toyora I think?) meant to show how tough thier trucks are ;-)

Whoever uploaded that video just cut out the last few seconds where it flashes the manufacturers name.

Re:Obligatory Meteor Video (1)

Nutria (679911) | more than 8 years ago | (#15506963)

Yup, fake, from a truck commercial (from Toyora I think?) meant to show how tough thier trucks are ;-)

Meteors don't trail a huge billowing cloud of smoke behind them.

How could anyone not think it's a fake?

Re:Obligatory Meteor Video (1)

sharkey (16670) | more than 8 years ago | (#15506980)

Well, they DID show this in America. It is at LEAST as believeable as someone hijacking a plane with nothing but an eyelash curler.

Re:Obligatory Meteor Video (1)

Nutria (679911) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507041)

It is at LEAST as believeable as someone hijacking a plane with nothing but an eyelash curler.

I want documentation of that before even beginning to believe that.

Re:Obligatory Meteor Video (2, Funny)

darthgnu (866920) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507184)

Just ask McGuyver (tm)

Re:Obligatory Meteor Video (1)

Firehed (942385) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507105)

Fake? It's proof that God will strike down people who sing tunes that atrociously. :)

Re:Obligatory Meteor Video (2, Funny)

MustardMan (52102) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507053)

PROBABLY a fake?!?

It hits a fucking truck and the yahoos inside drive out hootin' and hollerin' like a buncha texas cowboys, the truck unscathed.

Re:Obligatory Meteor Video (5, Informative)

ACDChook (665413) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507101)

And for all you language nazis out there, meteorite is a silly word and should be abolished.

I think you'll find that by definition, an object is a meteor while it falls through the atmosphere, and the rock that hits the ground is a meteorite. If it burns up in the atmosphere, then there is no meteorite, just a short-lived meteor.

Re:Obligatory Meteor Video (5, Informative)

morcego (260031) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507262)

Actually, you are right:

Metoroid -> Atmosphere -> Meteor -> Ground -> Meteorite

Re:Obligatory Meteor Video (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15507212)

And for all you language nazis out there, meteorite is a silly word and should be abolished.

In the context it was used, yes it's wrong.

An Asteroid is a rock in space.
A Meteor is the same rock travelling through an atmosphere.
A Meteorite is that same rock that has hit and remains in or on the surface of a larger body.

So what did the hitting of Norway was a meteor, and what remains (apart from a frigging big hole) is a meteorite.

Hiroshima? (5, Insightful)

Durrok (912509) | more than 8 years ago | (#15506926)

I guess but if I recall correctly hiroshima did a little bit more then just "blow in some curtains". Even if accurate this is a pretty bad metaphor, the Hiroshima bomb brings on ideas of destruction and chaos. Even if you took the radiation aspect away from the Hiroshima bomb it still would have done far more damage. Guess the whole line of "location, location, location" really is true.

Re:Hiroshima? (5, Interesting)

iamlucky13 (795185) | more than 8 years ago | (#15506959)

Of course the meteor would not have had any noteworthy radioactivity and was not in a populated area. I don't remember exactly how often it's estimated to happen and I can't find any sources, but meteors of this size hit the earth a lot more often than most people realize...something like between once a year and once a decade. The comparison to Hiroshima really is about the energy of the impact, not the destructiveness. Little boy had a yield equivalent to approximately 15,000 tons of TNT.

Re:Hiroshima? (4, Informative)

Silverlancer (786390) | more than 8 years ago | (#15506972)

The curtains were something like 150km away from the meteor impact... I expect Hiroshima would have done similar at that range.

Re:Hiroshima? (2, Interesting)

dwater (72834) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507112)

> Of course the meteor would not have had any noteworthy radioactivity and was not in a populated area

How can you be so sure?

I mean, if some people on Earth (it'd be the USA, of course), fire off a nuclear missile at Mars, I can just hear those Martians say, "It won't be radioactive".

touché (1)

Scrameustache (459504) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507156)

Even if you took the radiation aspect away from the Hiroshima bomb it still would have done far more damage. Guess the whole line of "location, location, location" really is true.
Of course the meteor would not have had any noteworthy radioactivity and was not in a populated area.

Ah, a very insightfull retort.

But you forgot to mention that the radioactive fallout would be much smaller, AND that the coordinates of the impact place it far from any city or industry.

Re:Hiroshima? (1)

Eudial (590661) | more than 8 years ago | (#15506965)

I guess but if I recall correctly hiroshima did a little bit more then just "blow in some curtains". Even if accurate this is a pretty bad metaphor, the Hiroshima bomb brings on ideas of destruction and chaos. Even if you took the radiation aspect away from the Hiroshima bomb it still would have done far more damage. Guess the whole line of "location, location, location" really is true.


Well, I hardly expect those curtains to be at ground-zero.

Re:Hiroshima? (0, Offtopic)

AWhiteFlame (928642) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507003)

> Guess the whole line of "location, location, location" really is true.

I know this is off topic, but is it me, or whenever I hear something repeated 3 times or more, all I'm thinking is "Developers, developers, developers, developers.."

Re:Hiroshima? (4, Informative)

Nutria (679911) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507011)

I guess but if I recall correctly hiroshima did a little bit more then just "blow in some curtains".

If Little Boy was detonated in the far northern mountains of Norway, it also would have had similar minimal effect.

Re:Hiroshima? (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15507126)

If Little Boy was detonated in the far northern mountains of Norway, it also would have had similar minimal effect.

I don't know. I think that might have had a significant effect on American-Norwegian relations, even if Norway was Nazi-occupied at the time. :)

Re:Hiroshima? (4, Informative)

NewmanBlur (923584) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507023)

I've been to Hiroshima. The atomic bomb killed 140,000 people, if you include those who died of bomb-related injuries and illnesses, within (iirc) a year after the attack. If you increase that to five years, the number increases by many thousands, though I don't recall the exact number.

The bomb levelled literally the entire city -- only one building remained, now referred to as the Genbaku Dome [worldheritagesite.org] . It's still standing, but it has been re-inforced with a steel structure to retain the shape it was in after the war.

Anyway, the point is that even if this meteor was "substantially bigger" than the 200-pound record holder, I find it extremely hard to believe that it would do even a miniscule fraction of the what the A-bomb did.

Re:Hiroshima? (3, Insightful)

Schemat1c (464768) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507062)

Anyway, the point is that even if this meteor was "substantially bigger" than the 200-pound record holder, I find it extremely hard to believe that it would do even a miniscule fraction of the what the A-bomb did.

It probably wouldn't be so hard to believe if it hit downtown Manhattan.

Re:Hiroshima? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15507098)

Anyway, the point is that even if this meteor was "substantially bigger" than the 200-pound record holder, I find it extremely hard to believe that it would do even a miniscule fraction of the what the A-bomb did.
Ah, but kinetic energy is proportional to speed squared. A three meter nickel-iron asteroid travelling at 25 km/s has a kinetic energy equivalent to 70 kilotons of TNT. Even a much lighter, slower asteroid can take a big chunk out of a city.

It's how you distribute the energy. (5, Informative)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507056)

There is a difference in how the energy was distributed. With the A-Bomb, it was an atmospheric blast. With the space rock, the energy was absorbed into the Earths crust.

Re:It's how you distribute the energy. (4, Informative)

Deadstick (535032) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507215)

Should be modded up. An airburst sends down a mongo shock wave that flattens structures over a big area (not to mention the radiation that isn't a factor in the case of a meteor impact). A ground impact/explosion "over-destroys" a much smaller area, using its energy to excavate a crater instead of knocking buildings down.

The Tunguska event of 1908 devastated a really big area because it was an airburst: apparently a comet whose ice content flashed into steam when it hit the atmosphere.

rj

Now for the science! (2, Interesting)

gerf (532474) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507187)

Only if the Hiroshima bomb was a dud. Seriously, a bomb unleashing 63 terajoules of energy (from wikipedia). Even if that rock was 300kg, that means that it would have to be travelling at 648,000m/s or about 1,500,000 mph, in order to have the same amount of energy. Heck, that's about .0022c!

To say this guy overstated the impact is an understatement in itself.

Is this real? (1)

neonprimetime (528653) | more than 8 years ago | (#15506935)

I google news searched the topic ... and only got 1 result ... M&C Science & Nature [monstersandcritics.com] ... Is this real?

Re:Is this real? (5, Informative)

49152 (690909) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507032)

Yes, it's real. The impact also showed up on seismic recorders http://www.astro.uio.no/ita/nyheter/ildkule06/ildk ule06.html [astro.uio.no] (You can study the images in this Norwegian article from the University of Oslo).

Re:Is this real? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15507079)

It's on slashdot -- it MUST be real!

Mushrooms. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15506939)

" Norwegian astronomer Knut Jørgen Røed Ødegaard told Aftenposten, Norways largest newspaper, that he would compare the explosive force of the impact with the Hiroshima bomb."

So does that mean they saw a mushroom cloud?

Hmmm... (4, Interesting)

th1ckasabr1ck (752151) | more than 8 years ago | (#15506948)

Was it as big as the one that (supposedly) fell at Tunguska [wikipedia.org] ? Although I'm still pretty sure that was caused by dark matter or a UFO or something.

Rubbish... (0)

Savage-Rabbit (308260) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507026)

Was it as big as the one that (supposedly) fell at Tunguska? Although I'm still pretty sure that was caused by dark matter or a UFO or something.

I beg to differ! Tunguska was quite clearly caused by a colossal supernatural fart.

Re:Hmmm... (5, Interesting)

LaminatorX (410794) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507061)

Actually, I saw a paper presented back in the late 90's that fairly convincingly made the case for a mostly iron meteor. The author's contention was that the object slowed due to air resistance, it would heat up. As is heated, the metal would have softenned. As it softenned, the metal would start to pancake like a dum-dum bullet. As it pancakes, its air resistance increases, causing it to slow down even more and heat up even faster, causing it to pancake even more... until you get an airbirst at an altitude with on the order of magnitude suggested by the tree angles at Tunguska. If you acept his hypothesis about the meteor's composition, there were no major contradictions in the evidence.

Re:Hmmm... (1, Interesting)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507252)

As is heated, the metal would have softenned. As it softenned, the metal would start to pancake like a dum-dum bullet. As it pancakes, its air resistance increases, causing it to slow down even more and heat up even faster, causing it to pancake even more.

I just can't see it working that way. The outer layers of the meteorite would turn to liquid and gas and carry off the heat generated by friction. Thermal conductivity is just too slow to heat up the core of a large body to the point where it will melt in (at most) a couple of seconds.

A better theory about Tunguska is that it was a loosely bound object like a "snowball" comet fragmennt or a "rubble pile" asteroid. Once it started to break up its surface area increased enormously and then it soaked up a lot of heat quickly and exploded.

Yeah, but... (4, Funny)

tool462 (677306) | more than 8 years ago | (#15506950)

he would compare the explosive force of the impact with the Hiroshima bomb.
Yeah, but how many Libraries of Congress is that?

Yeah, but...Blowout at Hiroshima Cafe. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15506969)

More like "how many burritos is that?"

8.5 x 10^-2 bLoC (3, Funny)

TCQuad (537187) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507142)

Yeah, but how many Libraries of Congress is that?

Well, Hiroshima was 15 kilotons [wikipedia.org] or 6.3x10^13 J and one burning Library of Congress is 7.3×10^14 J [slashdot.org] , so ~8.5% of one LoC per meteor strike.

Yeah, I'm going to go pretend I didn't just spend part of my Friday night researching that calculation now...

Re:8.5 x 10^-2 bLoC (1)

Farmer Tim (530755) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507228)

Brilliant calculation, but useless without knowing the meteor's volume in Volkswagens.

Re:Yeah, but... (1)

OldManAndTheC++ (723450) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507214)

Yeah, but how many Libraries of Congress is that?

Well, they sent it back through time, and of course the Library of Congress is much bigger in the future.

So, just one actually.

As to why the Library of Congress was sent back through time, you have to understand that in the future, books are fighting an endless war with Google, which by that time controls all information, or at least, all electronic information. The libraries managed to stop Google's plan to assimilate all printed matter in 2012, and have been fighting back ever since. Sending the Library of Congress back to the past was a desperate maneuver. The idea was to take out Google's campus in Mountain View, California, shortly after they moved there in 2003. A direct strike was calculated to destroy the entire operation, and leave nothing but two wisps of smoke rising from Sergey Brin's charred Birkenstocks. The LOC volunteered for the mission, knowing it was a one way trip.

Sadly, it seems that the books were off in their calcuations not only in space, but also in time. So the future ascendancy of Google is assured.

Re:Yeah, but... (1)

Geoffreyerffoeg (729040) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507275)

Let's see. One Library of Congress (1 LoC) is generally equated with twenty terabytes (20 TB). If we assume that all the data is represented in a standard-font printout, then you can fit about 60 lines per page and about 100 characters per line, giving 6 kB per page. So 20 TB / (6 kB/page) = 3.58 * 10^9 pages. Now we know that a ream of paper weighs about 10 pounds. A ream is 500 sheets, so each kilopage weighs 20 lbs. (Assume we're printing single-sided to make this easier.) So 3.58 * 10^9 pp * 20 lb / kpp = 7.16 * 10^7 lbs, or 3.25 * 10^7 kg. Thanks to Einstein's formula, we can convert this mass into energy (using a nuclear reaction - we're going for a Hiroshima-like explosion anyway). Multiply by c^2 and get 2.92 * 10^28 J.

Now the Hiroshima bombing had an estimated yield of 63 terajoules. If we divide that yield by the previous number, we get 2.16 * 10^-11. The bombing of Hiroshima - and by extension, this meteorite - is barely over a trillionth of the power of the entire Library of Congress converted to PURE ENERGY! <evil laugh> Um. Anyway. You get my point.

The Hit (0, Redundant)

MrEcho.net (632313) | more than 8 years ago | (#15506951)

Im just happy that it didnt hit anywhere else.
Like New York, or any other big city.

Re:The Hit (4, Insightful)

Ironsides (739422) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507111)

Im just happy that it didnt hit anywhere else. Like New York, or any other big city.

I almost (alomst!) wish it landed near enough one to cause some decent damage. Then maybe people would take the threat of a planet killer serious enough to get a properly funded space program going so a some of us could get off planet (like me). AD ASTRA!

Meanwhile in Cupertino... (5, Funny)

daeley (126313) | more than 8 years ago | (#15506958)

Steve Jobs's giant wallscreen sparkles to life. A visibly pale and shaken Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg appears with a panicked situation room full of Norwegian officials behind him.

"Ah, Prime Minister, good," Jobs says with a trademarked smile. "I see you got our little message. Let's finish our chat about DRM regulations...."

(reference [aftenposten.no] )

Someone set up us the bømb (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15507024)

Minion: "The first test of the iMeteor has been successfully completed sir."
Jobs: "Very well."
Ive: "As usual our secret development program has reaped rewards."
Woz: "Hey! No way did I mean to use artificial meteors on real people. The idea was a prank!"
Jobs: "Remove him from the building! Now, to the next targets: Singapore and Redmond."

SHIT (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15506966)

outreach are clear she Wcouldn't

weird names (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15506968)

it would be so much easier to read these reports if the people had the courtesy to have English names without slashed zeros or UTF-8 characters in their names at the least!

How am I to try to read this as a USAian? sheesh!

How about your own brother? (1)

mangu (126918) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507157)

...or is he your cousin? I'm pretty sure that Noël Coward must be some relative of yours, since your last name isn't very common, and he has an ISO-8859-15 character in his first name.

A Meteørite ønce hit my sister (4, Funny)

EGSonikku (519478) | more than 8 years ago | (#15506976)

Nø really! She was carving her initials intø the side øf a røck with a sharpened interspace tøøthbrush given tø her by Svenge -her brøther in law- an an øslø dentist and star øf many Nørweigan møvies: "The Høt Hands øf an øslø Dentist", "Fillings øf Passiøn", "The Huge Mølars øf Hørst Nørdfink"...

Mynd you, Meteørite hits kan be pretti nasti .....

Nice (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15507059)

I knew someone was going to type this out.... you beat me to it! :-D

Pictures (4, Interesting)

ATH500 (872417) | more than 8 years ago | (#15506982)

Here is the website of the newspaper and pictures of the meteorite in the sky and the impact: http://www.aftenposten.no/nyheter/iriks/article134 6820.ece [aftenposten.no]

Re:Pictures (1)

zoloback (785676) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507012)

>>Here is the website of the newspaper and pictures of the meteorite in the sky and the impact: http://www.aftenposten.no/nyheter/iriks/article134 [aftenposten.no] 6820.ece Did anybody else notice the cutie on the bottom of the page?... I'm sorry but i found it "difficult" to concentrate on the pictures of some unsexy meteorite and ended up spending over half an hour looking at the "bilder" posts... Well, i guess that's what slashdot is all about.

Re:Pictures (1)

fafaforza (248976) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507163)

Why look at one meteorite up there in the sky, when you can look at two, right there on her chest, in high resolution!

Re:Pictures (1)

warrigal (780670) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507027)

It's a meteor in the sky; a meteorite on the ground.

Re:Pictures (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15507131)

This must be a fake. The photos were ambiguous and the words were gibberish.

Re:Pictures (1)

ockegheim (808089) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507274)

It looks like the meteor I saw a few years ago on a winter's night in Melbourne. A blazing fireball with a tail streaking across the sky is a very impressive thing to see.

No translation necessary (1)

slowtuna (833901) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507277)

hatt enorm fart

Quote : "Enorm fart." (3, Informative)

kernel panic attack (810175) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507278)

Followed through to the link mentioned earlier: http://www.aftenposten.no/nyheter/iriks/article134 6820.ece [aftenposten.no]

From that article, this one line jumped out at me: "Enorm fart."

Now granted, I don't speak the native tongue up there in Norway, but I think we all can translate that.

Also found this sesmic data on the web: http://www.norsar.no/NDC/bulletins/gbf/2006/GBF061 57.html [norsar.no]

  NORTH OF SVALBARD
            Origin time Lat Lon Azres Timres Wres Nphase Ntot Nsta Netmag
    2006-157:02.13.21.0 83.81 2.84 5.25 0.18 1.49 2 2 1 0.04

    Sta Dist Az Ph Time Tres Azim Ares Vel Snr Amp Freq Fkq Pol Arid Mag
    SPI 668.3 346.0 Pn 02.14.50.4 0.2 349.0 3.0 10.1 5.2 50.5 4.93 1 345124
    SPI 668.3 346.0 Sn 02.15.55.8 0.2 338.5 -7.5 5.8 4.1 34.0 8.43 3 2 345125 0.04

Welcome! (2, Interesting)

joh_tank (856841) | more than 8 years ago | (#15506996)

I for one, welcome our new chondrite overlords!

Good, but... (3, Funny)

nstlgc (945418) | more than 8 years ago | (#15506998)

.. what we're really concerned about: Høw many møøses gøt killed?

Re:Good, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15507045)

Reindeer man, reindeer!

That was no meteor.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15506999)

Thor just dropped his hammer.

similar to Hiroshima or Nagasaki??? (2, Interesting)

EGSonikku (519478) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507002)

Obligatory Star Wars Reference (1)

HunterTelevision (981396) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507072)

"That's funny, the damage doesn't look as bad from out here."

Don't mess with Steve (1, Redundant)

eweu (213081) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507029)

Steve Jobs [slashdot.org] has "contacts" all over the universe, I guess.

Breaking News!! (0, Redundant)

MBC1977 (978793) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507034)

In today's news, "Steve Jobs was arrested for dropping an SAB (Small Apple Bomb), accidently on purpose in Norway, to get them to see things HIS way about iTunes EULA, he was dragged off to a sanitarium, screaming, DRM Rules the planet!! DRM Rules the planet!!" I'm guessing he do not get a FAIRPLAY. MBC

paging Google Earth... (4, Interesting)

TheSHAD0W (258774) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507046)

I wonder (1) how recent and what resolution Google Earth's latest imagery is, and (2) can we get them to take another shot ASAP and compare them?

Ah, Norway! (0, Redundant)

autophile (640621) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507060)

My sister was hit by a meteørite ønce...

--Rob

Fiction or Reality? (2, Interesting)

Yehooti (816574) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507066)

Though we've seen this information posted multiple places on the www, considering the nature of this beast how can anyone know if it's factual or not?

Brightness ... (1)

Barraketh (630764) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507075)

Brightness of midnight sunlit summer sky?

I think something got lost in the translation...

(Yes, i realize that it took place beyond the arctic circle, but it still sounds strange =))

Re:Brightness ... (3, Interesting)

OblongPlatypus (233746) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507260)

What sounds so strange about it?

If you mean linguistically, I guess I can see what you mean - I think they're trying to use "midnight sun" as a single noun, making "midnight sunlit" an adjective.

But yes, the sky really is sunlit 24/7 up there right now.

Knut Jørgen Røed Ødegaard (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15507077)

Knut Jørgen Røed Ødegaard [interaktiv.vg.no] is the only superstar scientist in Norway. Come to think of it, he's the only superstar scientist period. He's constantly on the TV-channel (the state owned TVPrawda), presenting astronomy in an extremely engergetic manner. He's kinda funny for an übernerd. Now you know. Achtung!

Janker dreper, pass på barna deres.

Is it listed on eBay yet? (1, Funny)

elgee (308600) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507092)

Someone could make some SERIOUS money off that meteorite.

fucK! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15507097)

Yes,a I work f+or

Non-ASCII characters? (-1, Offtopic)

TheoMurpse (729043) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507100)

Knut Jørgen Røed Ødegaard
So why can we use these non-English characters, but cannot use Japanese or Korean characters? They, after all, offer as much information to English speakers as "Ø" does. I sure as hell don't know how to pronounce that letter.

Now, if someone says that Norwegians do know the pronunciation, well then I'd counter with the fact that Japanese know how to pronounce Japanese characters, but that never stopped the editors from banning them from Slashdot. Allow all non-ASCII characters, or none at all, please.

And Wikipedia tells me [wikipedia.org] : Ø is basically equivalent to 'o' with an umlaut from German, so I can only deduce that the proper Anglification of the letter would be "oe", as in my last name. This letter does not exist in the English language at all, so I assert that it has as much right to be in English documents as Korean characters do.

Re:Non-ASCII characters? (1)

49152 (690909) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507174)

Perhaps they allow it because the letter Ø tends to be included in almost all 8 bit ascii variants including the US ones. Kanji (Japanese) on the other hand does not.

Re:Non-ASCII characters? (1)

Takuryu (759826) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507240)

My guess would be the reason is because 1) "Ø" is a member of the standard Western character set on most computers and that 2) Japanese and Korean characters are not. The chance of a browser suddenly interpreting everything as garbage characters due to the inclusion of "Ø" would be rather small, whereas my Japanese OS sometimes refuses to accurately represent Japanese characters unless I manually tell it which of the three standards (Shift_JIS, EUC-JP, ISO-2022-JP) it should use. While I can't speak for Korean, Japanese characters also use a two-bit encoding which often cause problems when attempting to use without the relevent language packs installed.

Besides, if you want to use Japanese characters, just go to slashdot.jp [slashdot.jp]

Don't panic (1)

theid0 (813603) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507124)

The sky is falling! The sky is falling!

do they ever sleep? (1)

chienyul (239641) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507145)

"Farmer Peter Bruvold was out on his farm in Lyngseidet with a camera because his mare Virika was about to foal for the first time."

The photo was taken at 2:05am although it looked like they can still play a few rounds of golf before sunset.
I was wondering if the Norwegian (and their horses) ever sleep in summer.

savelivesinmay (1)

geneshifter (411883) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507147)

These weird people are claiming it was some sort of weapon ETs will use to kill us, lol: http://www.savelivesinmay.com/ [savelivesinmay.com]

This happens other places also (3, Interesting)

SpacePunk (17960) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507216)

We had one of these a few weeks ago in south east New Mexico. The explosion shook the house. People that did see it said it was the 'size of a dinner plate' before it exploded. Unfortunately nobody had a camera handy. Didn't get much media coverage at all.

Who is tracking these things? (1)

ManuelKelly (446655) | more than 8 years ago | (#15507244)

I thought NASA was tracking these things. This sounds like it was big enough to be a major disaster if it hit a metropolitan area. Are they just watching for the ones that are big enough to wipe out a state, and not a city?
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