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Homebrew on Consoles Detailed

CmdrTaco posted more than 8 years ago | from the keep-em-emulated dept.

143

Yoshi writes "DCEmu have released an article detailing the current State of the Homebrew Scene on all consoles from the PSP to GBA and even to the Next Gen Nintendo Wii, the article explains whats needed to run emulators and games and if its worth bothering for each console."

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143 comments

DS Lite? (3, Interesting)

remembertomorrow (959064) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512633)

Will there be anything (expected to be) fundamentally different about the Nintendo DS Lite? I have heard so much good stuff about the DS, I may buy one of the Lite's when they're available.

It's always nice to be able to expand the uses of hardware in ways the developers never intended. :)

Re:DS Lite? (4, Interesting)

demongeek (977698) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512655)

The DS Lite and the DS are the same consoles with certain improvements. Similar to the advancement between the GBA and the GBA-SP, the DS-Lite's screen is much improved and the case is smaller. And I'm sure, sooner or later, we will start seeing a lot more customized case colours (lots have been released in Japan, but only a few select in NA and Eu.

Re:DS Lite? (3, Informative)

Kredal (566494) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512805)

I picked up my DS Lite at 12:04 last night at WalMart. It replaces my original DS, which the wife is getting. The screen is way brighter, the case is a bit smaller, the stylus is larger (1cm longer, and slightly thicker) which makes it easier to hold... the microphone moved to the center of the console, and the status lights are now EASILY visible when the case is closed.

The only minor drawbacks are the new start and select buttons are itty bitty, and require a bit more effort to push accurately.

It was definitely worth the upgrade.

Re:DS Lite? (1)

ponden (977893) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512971)

3 color types are available for DS-Lite currently (original DS have 6 types).
Based the Amazon.co.jp sales ranking, popular color types are as follows.
    (No1.) Crystal White
    (No2.) Enamel Navy
    (No3.) Ice Blue

Yes I think so (3, Informative)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512916)

The DS Lite if I recall correctly requires a newer passkey because they changed something that stopped the old keys from working.

So it is not entirely true as in the article that Nintendo doesn't care about the homebrew scene. Not suprisingly, PSP commercial games often don't fit on its memory stick but most Nintendo handheld games can fit a dozen to a flash card.

This makes it a lot easier to pirate GBA/DS games then PSP games.

The DS had a revision that forced a new key but I am just not sure wether that revision happened to be the DS Lite. For sure the DS Lite is of the new version however so the answer is still yes. If you check the sites you will find some advice on checking wich firmware you got with your DS. Color background in pictochat if I remember correctly.

Re:Yes I think so (3, Informative)

GFLPraxis (745118) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513018)

Actually, any REGULAR DS manufactured after mid-2005 requires the PassKey 2, because of a newer firmware.

The DS Lite has the same firmware as the newer regular DS's, so buy the PassKey 2 either way.

Re:DS Lite? (5, Informative)

Mr. Picklesworth (931427) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513088)

In order to run homebrew, a passthrough device is used (called PassMe - PassKey is a more professionally manufactured device) to boot code from a cart in the GBA slot. This may sound a bit odd, but it has actually become a useful thing, since it means that devices like the GBA Move Player or Supercard CF can be used to run code off of CF or SD cards, which gives us a very big removeable storage medium, making DS homebrew useful for handy things that official software simply would not do.

The DS Lite just requires PassMe2, which is the more effective passthrough device developed a while ago in response to Nintendo's newer firmwares which they were putting in DSs to try to stop piracy. DSLite was released without further enhancements to the firmware's piracy protection stuff, so it is effectively the same thing as a newer regular DS. If you don't like PassMe, the DS card encryption has recently been figured out, allowing for code to be run more comfortably out of Slot-1. As far as I know, there are no available devices to run code straight out of Slot-1, since Slot-2 is just so much nicer... but this means that we can now use a single passthrough device across all DSs. One of these NoPass devices that I know by name is the Max Media Launcher.
Since even a NoPass device is annoying to use (who wants to insert two carts to run homebrew?), Flashme was developed, which is a hacked DS firmware that will boot any code sent to it and has safety measures in place to avoid the DS being bricked. This means that your DS will then gladly run unnoficial DS code from the GBA slot without any extra persuasion. There have been reports of a breaking fuse causing the DS Lite to shut down and brick itself upon attempts to flash its firmware. I am unsure as to whether or not this has been gotten to the bottom of.

Lots of information on DS homebrew is in the Wikipedia article. [wikipedia.org] It's a bit old though, so another good place to look is the DSLinux wiki or the forums at DSDev.org.

Re:DS Lite? (1)

remembertomorrow (959064) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513474)

Thank you for the information

Re:DS Lite? (2, Informative)

stonecypher (118140) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513508)

Other than the drastically improved screen quality, better battery life and smaller form factor, they're identical machines. From the perspective of the software, the *only* difference is the ability to control the backlight brightness. In fact, it takes significant effort just to tell them apart without screwing with the brightness register.

Oy! (5, Funny)

cheebie (459397) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512638)

I mis-read the headline as "The state of Hebrew on Consoles", which would have been just as interesting. The right-to-left reading would be a challenge.

Of course, it's possible this challenge has been met already. Not being a Hebrew-speaker, I never looked into it.

Re:Oy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15513068)

It looked to me like "Homebrew on Consoles Detained"

Horrible Article (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15512640)

This article should not have made it to the front page. It's horribly lacking in information and reads like someone wrote it off the top of their head without any research.

For example, under Nintendo Gamecube it says that you can't run homebrew software without a mod chip. Which is weird, because I've got a port of SNES 9x running on my GC to play old SNES games. No mod chip required. All I have is the Nintendo SD Adapter Card and an Action Replay to boot the contents of the SD card. Not to mention you can alternatively use the broadband adapter with Phantasy Star Online to boot from across the network. This has been commonly known about for some time.

I can't speak for the other consoles but if they're coverage is anything like his GameCube coverage, this article is worthless. Judging by the lack of options for the other consoles I think it's fair to assume that this is the case.

Re:Horrible Article (2, Interesting)

kesuki (321456) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512664)

Well I hadn't been paying attention to the homebrew community lately, so i found all the information about the GPx2 to be quite interesting. :) It would be really nice if could find a way to fit one in my budget, afterall I've loved emulation for a long time. I'm glad that some companies have even found ways to make legitimate money off emulation instead of it staying as an 'illegal' undergound kinda thing.

My keyboard is all screwy, and it took me a long time to type this. sigh. All i wanted to do today was relax :)

Re:Horrible Article (0)

hector_uk (882132) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512673)

i spy a sony fanboy, the PS3 is not the undisputed fastest console, nor is the xbox 360 yet.

Re:Horrible Article (0, Redundant)

apoc06 (853263) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513161)

WTF? who are you talking about?

Re:Horrible Article (1)

Achra (846023) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512681)

But is there any way to access the Disc-drive on the GC yet? Until I can put the NES emulator + every rom ever released onto a single Disc labeled 'NES'.. I'll stick to my Dreamcast for console based emu.

Re:Horrible Article (2, Informative)

Grey Ninja (739021) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512690)

I have GC Linux booting, and running off of an NFS share from my file server. I also hear that the optical drive is accessible from Linux. I'm not sure about regular homebrew, but I would imagine it's not much different. My intention though is to leverage the NFS share for all it's worth, and make my GameCube into a media terminal. I have mostly just been playing around with it though, and haven't gotten it doing anything constructive yet (I'm too lazy to recompile the kernel with the patch for my keyboard). I did buy an 8cm DVD-RW though.

Re:Horrible Article (3, Informative)

billcopc (196330) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512753)

Dude, Xbox.

I've got a couple dozen emus on my Xbox, with rom sets thanks to a hard drive upgrade. The hardest part is figuring out a button layout that's comfortable on the Xbox controller, once that's set up it's smooth sailing.

Horrible Posts. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15512740)

"This article should not have made it to the front page. It's horribly lacking in information and reads like someone wrote it off the top of their head without any research."

Now now, let's not get into the state of slashdot comments.

Horrible indeed (3, Insightful)

Mascot (120795) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512768)

A well researched and comprehensive article can stand the author being lazy on his grammar and spelling. This thing is painfully inarticulate, cursory *and* inaccurate.

If accepted submissions had to pass an editor karma check, this article would have been posted anonymously.

Re:Horrible indeed (2, Insightful)

Osty (16825) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513656)

A well researched and comprehensive article can stand the author being lazy on his grammar and spelling.

No it can't. The author's lack of spelling and grammar knowledge undermines any other work he may have put into the article. You could have the most well-researched and accurate article ever, but if every "paragraph" is a run-on sentence you're still going to look like an idiot. For crap's sake, at least load the article into a word processor and fix what it complains about (run-on sentences, dammit)! I'll forgive an occassional its/it's or their/there mix-up (if you mix up they're, I will hit you). I can even ignore apostrophes to pluralize abbreviations (apostrophes don't pluralize [angryflower.com] , dammit). I can't forgive an article that is screwed up to the point of unreadability, even if the research behind it is good.

Re:Horrible Article (1)

mkw87 (860289) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512943)

This article should not have made it to the front page. It's horribly lacking in information and reads like someone wrote it off the top of their head without any research.

Like anyone here is going to read it anyways?

Re:Horrible Article (4, Informative)

jeremy_dot (734236) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513009)

Mod parent up.

As an amateur Nintend DS developer:
In the "good old days" one could buy a device called a PassMe (a glorified device that performs a JMP into the GBA cartridge's ROM thus executing unencrypted code. They come in several variations such as the PassMe and the SuperPass). Nintendo was not happy with the PassMe and made all the recent DS systems (after and including firmware 4.0) and made the handshaking between the DS and the DS cartridge a bit more complicated and on a game-by-game basis. Now, one needs a device called a PassMe2 which essentially pretends to be a game. Beyond this, there are "NoPass" devices which don't have to do the handshaking with the DS.

As it stands you can't use the rumble addon like the article implies, largely because both slots on the DS are taken up with the current state of homebrew (a GBA cart containing the code you want to run and a PassMe-like device in the DS slot). The DS section of this article is misleading. For more information, I suggest DualScene.net [dualscene.net] and MaxConsole.net [maxconsole.net] for information on homebrew games and programs. One can check DSLinux.org [dslinux.org] for information on, appropriately, DS Linux, and one can check GBADev.org [gbadev.org] for information on DS and GBA development.

The other consoles differ. (2, Informative)

DrYak (748999) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513241)

I can't speak for the other consoles but if they're coverage is anything like his GameCube coverage

What you lack is a frame of reference.

For example, under Nintendo Gamecube it says that you can't run homebrew software without a mod chip. [...] All I have is the Nintendo SD Adapter Card and an Action Replay to boot the contents of the SD card. Not to mention you can alternatively use the broadband adapter with Phantasy Star Online to boot

from across the network.


Read again and compare to the DreamCast entry.

The basic difference is that, on DreamCast, you only need to burn the homebrewed software you need, put it into the DC, and it just-works(tm). Any stock machine is designed in a such way that you can boot anything you want on them. (Maybe it was initially designed so, to enable e-zines to ship CD with their issues. The protection for games is provided by protection code in the games and the fact that games don't come on CD-ROM but GD-ROM which were, at that time and in SEGA's mind, much harder to read - Note: they guessed wrong).
You don't need to buy anything, except empty CD-R to burn whatever homebrewed softs you want to test.

All other home consoles need some hacks to get homebrewed stuff running.
XBox can be hacked in a way that makes it able to boot what ever you want in a persistant way. But :
1- This prevents you from going on XBoxLive.
2- You have to do some hacking, be it chip- or soft- modding, before you get your console permanently in this state.

Your GameCube exemple is worse. If you want to run some homebrewed code, you need to : buy special equipement (either card reader or broadband adapter) and software (either Action Reaplay or a game) and everytime before you run your code, you need to either use something that's basically a soft-mod (Action Replay) or to exploit bugs in a game.
It can't even be made permanent. If you want to be able to boot watever you need (which is the point of this article), your only solution is to put a mod chip inside the box (and thus void the waranty). Otherwise you're stuck at doing obscure voodoo tricks each time you want to run something other than Nintendo-licensed product.

That's their point : in the realm of home console, DreamCast is the only thing that let your run whatever you like. Other consoles don't. You need to either do obscure trick, or do hard/soft modification that can get you expelled (or void your warranty).
So in this perspective, their article doesn't lack that much information. Maybe, it just fails to mention that some hacking technique (soft-mods or bugs exploit) may make the mod-chip un-necessary.

Re:The other consoles differ. (2, Interesting)

tepples (727027) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513404)

in the realm of home console, DreamCast is the only thing that let your run whatever you like.

That's good for gaming in front of a TV. But which handheld system sold in brick-and-mortar retailers in the United States is the same way?

Re:The other consoles differ. (2, Insightful)

cgenman (325138) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513443)

The basic difference is that, on DreamCast, you only need to burn the homebrewed software you need, put it into the DC, and it just-works(tm). Any stock machine is designed in a such way that you can boot anything you want on them. (Maybe it was initially designed so, to enable e-zines to ship CD with their issues.

Bootable multimedia functions for music CD's. [wikipedia.org]

Personally, I thought the Atari Jaguar's went out in style (unlike the rest of it's lifecycle). At the pushing of several developers who had games in development but no remaining company to license through, Hasbro Interactive, who had acquired the rights, simply let them go [atariage.com] . Now anyone who is so inclined can make games for the Jaguar and release them commercially. It's really too bad that such a thing didn't happen with the Saturn or PS1, as you'd see some amazing homebrew games out there. Hasbro Interactive gets lots of points for giving the system back to a tiny community of diehard fans.

Re:Horrible Article (1)

armentage (653987) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513364)

If I had mod points, I'd mod you down to flame bait.

Story Text (-1, Redundant)

demongeek (977698) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512642)

Only two comments and the site is slowing down. Here is the coral cache [nyud.net] .

Because we are the only dedicated Homebrew Network on the web covering just about all scenes (and if not then we will ) i feel its a good time to give a low down on each scene and some pointers about where they are going from my point of view.

First off though lets remind all that Homebrew is not the same as warez, its a shame that so many sites for the want of grabbing visitors post the warezy stuff but this network would rather not get shutdown by the likes of Sony, Nintendo Etc.

Also i would like to point out that each scene owes its life to the many hardware and software hackers who discover the exploits we come to enjoy so much today, they are then followed by the many worldwide coders who make the homebrew scene a free and enjoyable place to hang out and make friends etc.

Lets take a look at each scene.

Sony Playstation Portable

The PSP Homebrew Scene is the one getting the most attention at the moment and rightly so, the ease of getting homebrew to run on this up to the latest 2 firmware releases means millions worldwide can enjoy Games and Emulators for the price of a Memory Card and a copy of Grand Theft Auto Liberty City Stories depending on what firmware is on the PSP, even the latest firmware releases that support Flash only now have releases appearing and in the space of just over a year there has been hundreds of Games, Demos and Emulators. The power of the PSP makes it an awesome machine for Homebrew fans and once Kernal Mode can be accessed on higher firmwares than v1.5 then the possibilities get even better.

The PSP is the biggest homebrew scene for many years and with so many sites, coders and fans it can only get better. The soon to be Undiluted Platinum Modchip will open the door to everyone who wishes to run homebrew on any firmware, it will also open the door to kernal mode for all, so full speed Nintendo 64 and GBA Emulators come a step closer.

Finally later this year Sony themselves are releasing a PS1 emulator for the PSP so expect that to be a major pull for the handheld.

GP2X - The Linux Based Homebrew Console

The GP2X is a console that was made for homebrew fans and coders, it has a worldwide base of people coding Emulators and Games for it and with 2x200mhz cpus and 64megs ram it sure can deliver the goods. After a ropy start with GPL and firmware issues its now flourishing, Its a great console where teamwork has already delivered near on 200 releases for the system, key emulators for now and the future are the excellent Mame4 All emulator which gives you access to hundreds of arcade classics and the Playstation emulator for the GP2X should in time be running most games at near on full speed, great for fans of the original Playstation.

The GP2X with its dual processors in the future will most likely take over as the kingpin of Homebrew because of its pro homebrew stance and not to mention a fantastic community who are driven to make it a success.

The Nintendo DS

The worlds biggest selling console at this time but surprisingly not the most popular for homebrew fans.

Why is that, well most likely people dont realise that all you need to run homebrew on the Nintendo DS is the Console (obviously), and a Passkey/Flash Cart Combo (with mem card).

Once you have the hardware above then the DS with its touch screen is a monster in the waiting, already it has over a hundred homebrew releases for it but with the touch screen, microphone and rumble addon you have an excellent base for games and more, not to mention the wifi mode.

As with the commercial games the DS cant match the PSP for pure power but it can easily bypass it in the innovation dept just like the commercial scene. With the DS you can also play the many hundreds of excellent GBA Homebrew Releases.

The future for the DS looks awesome, Nintendo dont seem to bother too much with Homebrew unlike Sony so once you have your hardware brought then your pretty much set up for life

Dreamcast

The Dreamcast is still the only non handheld Console to gain a massive legal scene without the use of modchips, the releases to date stand at over 500 and amongst them many ports of commercial games and awesome emulators, the scene has slowed a lot in the last year or so but it continues to pump out releases. Because of the fact that you dont have to Chip the console it makes the Dreamcast a cheap system to get emulators etc working on.

GP32

The GP32 is the younger brother of the GP2X, this console had some commercial releases but the main reason for its success was the hundreds of releases for it, this scene has really slowed down since the release of the GP2X with most people going to the new more powerful system, if your looking for a great console to play free games then this is the one for you.

The GBA

The biggest selling handheld of all time (from the GB onwards) and even today we still see many great games being released for it as well as a new Snes emulator just recently, theres hundreds of releases for this console with some of the best homebrew games ever created being released on the GBA, the fact that you only need the console and a GBA Flash Cart makes this a real easy to get into scene, the added bonus of being able to play GBA on the Nintendo DS with your flash cart makes the scene last longer.

Gizmondo

The Gizmondo whilst being a commercial failure despite being a very powerful handheld is now spawning a decent Homebrew scene, in the last few months we have seen the release of around 50 games and emulators, again like the PSP all you need is a Memory card and your ready to go, because there wasnt many Gizmondos made this will never be a massive scene but oncce more is known about the hardware homebrewers should really push the console.

Xbox

The most powerful console for years has a massive range of full speed emulators and ported games for it, The best way to get homebrew to run is with the fitting of a Xbox Modchip, the shame about the Xbox scene is that 99% of the homebrew released is made with the Official SDK, so that means no sites can legally host the releases, at one time there were multiple releases on a daily basis but now its slowed to a trickle, the Xbox really needs the creation of a Legal SDK so that it entices more coders to release projects on the powerful console. If your after full speed emulation then this is the homebrew console to get.

Nokia N-Gage

The homebrew scene for the Nokia seems to have died a death, most likely because Nokia killed the console but it has quite a few decent emulators for it but the longterm future looks very grim, emulation on mobile phones isnt very easy to understand even if you are a pro in the scene. Best to avoid is the answer.

Tapwave Zodiac

Heres a console much like the Nintendo DS with its Touch Screen but its also a Pocket PC type device so you get the best of both worlds, the homebrew scene for this console has dried up massively since Tapwave gave up last year, it does boast some great emulators and games though so if your after a homebrew console and a pocket PC device then this is for you.

Gamecube

To get Homebrew on the Gamecube your gonna need a Modchip, the Gamecube scene is very small compared to most other scenes with only a matter of 30 releases, it does however boast a great N64 and Snes emulator plus if you buy a Gamecube Gameboy player you can play GBA homebrew with a flash cart that way. Long term it doesnt look good for this scene.

PS2

The PS2 Homebrew scene despite being a powerful console and the biggest selling non handheld console of recent years has never really thrived, it has around 30 releases for it similiar to the Gamecube, but the long term prospects dont look great. A modchip is the best way to get homebrew working on this console.

Ipod

The worlds most popular music player in time could be a real contender for mini games and emulation of simple systems, so far it does have some homebrew for it but controls are never going to be easy for it, because of the constant changing of hardware its unlikely to have a strong homebrew following. Best to stick to music

Sega Saturn

The Sega Saturn is another console for which youll need a modchip for, via a coder named Rockin-B the Saturn has a site with nearly 100 homebrew releases and although its never going to be a massive scene its great to see the console still getting some loving.

Xbox360

This will be the next console cracked for homebrew, the hackers are doing a great job at taking it apart and within 6 months i would think homebrew code will be running on this powerful console.

PS3

The most powerful console of the next generation is apparently going to have Linux on it so does that open up the doors to homebrew easily, well we will have to see.

Nintendo Wii

Nintendos Wii console is going to be an emulation fans dream, the ability to play N64, GBA, Snes, Nes, Gamecube, Megadrive and PC Engine on this console will make it a killer buy, if Nintendo somehow allow homebrew to be run on the console then we could be looking at the best homebrew console ever.

Conclusion

I hope i havent bored you too much but theres some opinions and facts about homebrew across the systems, if your looking for a killer handheld homebrew scene then PSP, Nintendo DS or GP2X should be your focus.

Those looking for a Console based scene then the Dreamcast or maybe the Xbox Should be your port of call.

If your an emulation fan and if Nintendo let small time developers use the Wii to create games then Nintendos Wii Console will be the king of Homebrew for the next generation.

Agree or disagree, please

Who bothers? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15512648)

Why spend hundreds of hours making a game that no one can/would use. Seems like alot of work for no gain. Stick to computers for homebrews and cellphones for portables, easier and much bigger audiences.

Re:Who bothers? (4, Insightful)

Grey Ninja (739021) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512712)

Why spend hundreds of hours making a game that no one can/would use. Seems like alot of work for no gain. Stick to computers for homebrews and cellphones for portables, easier and much bigger audiences.

I am the author of Dissonance [drunkencoders.com] . Before developing it, I had a tiny bit of NDS programming under my belt, a moderate amount of GBA, and a fair amount of PC. I am not a licensed developer, which means that my work will eventually... as you mentioned, be viewed by a very small number of people. However, it's not always about that.

I wrote Dissonance first and foremost, for myself. I've wanted a portable internet radio client from day 1. As soon as the homebrew scene got to the point that it was realistic to code one, I wrote it. I worked day and night getting it out the door, and it felt GOOD when I got it out the door. I had overcome many obstacles, and had a whole lot of fun coding for such a well made system. In the end, my product didn't do me a whole lot of good (yet), but it made me happy to code it, and I got to code something useful for the NDS. At the end of the day, isn't that why we code things for free? To have some fun, and try to make something that's useful while we're at it? My main interest just doesn't lie with PCs. I prefer handhelds, and I like to have a little more to work with than a cell phone.

Re:Who bothers? (1)

Orange Crush (934731) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513039)

Why spend hundreds of hours making a game that no one can/would use. Seems like alot of work for no gain. Stick to computers for homebrews and cellphones for portables, easier and much bigger audiences.

"Because it's there."

Why spend hours installing a source-based OS distribution when quicker pre-compiled "ready-to-eat" versions are readily available? Why tinker with anything that works well enough and risk breaking it? Because it's fun! Lots of people have hobbies. Whether it's hacking a console to see how it all works, porting a different platform's games or writing new ones from scratch . . . heck, even knitting a sweater is a long tedious process when there are countless ready-made alternatives. (I can't believe I actually just compared console homebrewing and knitting . . . on Slashdot.) Some people enjoy this stuff. Even if the results turn out kind of crappy, we can still beam with "yeah, well, I *made* that!" pride.

Re:Who bothers? (1)

Psychotext (262644) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513163)

Much the same thing for me. A little while back I was looking up poker timers and found that the ones with any decent sort of functionality were horribly expensive. This kinda annoyed me (this aint rocket science and the hardware is pretty cheap) - so I'm writing one for the Nintendo DS at the moment (it's the only handheld I have).

It'll probably cost me more (in time) in the long run. But at least I'll be able to make it available to people as another option. Will probably write one for mobile phones at some point too.

Re:Who bothers? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15513295)

At the end of the day, isn't that why we code things for free?

You're confusing two things-- why we do things and why we make them free.

You said it yourself:
I wrote Dissonance first and foremost, for myself.

We write software out of a need to scratch an itch. And we do it for selfish reasons. Selfish is not a "bad word" though.

So then the question is, why do make them free? Is it that we think our work is a failure in the end, or is it that we're boasting, or both? Or is it that we look for contributions, job offers, fame and fortune? It has to be one or more of those things...

Re:Who bothers? (4, Insightful)

lord_rob the only on (859100) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512784)

Even if this post is a troll, I'll answer anyway. When I was younger, I managed to download a (warezed) version of psyq, the developpement kit for the Sony Playstation 1. Using this program, I wrote a PSX version of "the snake game", the game you could find on Nokia 3210 cellphones. I was pretty sure, none of my (real life) friends would care of that homebrew game, so I never bothered showing them. Anyway, even if almost no one that owned a PSX was likely to care of such things ("yeah the snake game running on a playstation, jesus it's a playstation, not an Atari 2600 you know ..."), it was fun to do and very instructing about the inner workings of the playstation.

"Seems like alot of work for no gain."

When you do something like that, the gain is mainly personal. It's a bit like gardening : personaly I wouldn't want to waste time to put seeds of vegetables in earth, expecting to get some crop. But some people like that so what ?

Re:Who bothers? (1)

biff_larken (971926) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512862)

It's a gain if you're interested AT ALL in getting a job in the videogame programming field. Anything like this would be at least a bit of help, and/or experience, no?

So how do I afford to move? (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513413)

It's a gain if you're interested AT ALL in getting a job in the videogame programming field.

So how does homebrew help me earn the thousands of dollars that it would cost me to move from Fort Wayne, Indiana, to Greater Seattle, Washington, and live for a few months while I interview at 100 different video game development studios?

Re:So how do I afford to move? (1)

pommiekiwifruit (570416) | more than 8 years ago | (#15514028)

Well when I got into the industry I moved country, let alone state, by buying a one-way ticket to Australia. I did have a letter from a games company though. Apparently a return flight from Fort Wayne to Seattle costs $376+tax (cheapflights.com), and you should claim that against the interviewing company anyway. We've refunded people their train tickets for interviews when they come in (from Scotland to London) - that should be standard practice, but you're much more likely to get that agreed if you submit decent working games or demos as examples. And gamedevmap [gamedevmap.com] shows there are closer cities to you anyway: St Louis, Minneapolis, Iowa City, sheesh Chicago.

Re:Who bothers? (1)

lord_rob the only on (859100) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513691)

It's a gain if you're interested AT ALL in getting a job in the videogame programming field. Anything like this would be at least a bit of help, and/or experience, no?

I suppose it is. This *and* the fact that I am about to get a master degree in computer science :). Do anybody think it would be the kind of thing to put on a CV (the PSX little game thingy not the CS master of course) ?

Spelling? (0, Offtopic)

bsdluvr (932942) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512649)

The author either spent more time gaming than learning how to spell, or none of these devices have a decent homebrew spell checker.

Anyway, I've heard the GP2X isn't really fast, and porting apps to its rather unique architecture is hard. I'd still love to have one though...

Re:Spelling? (3, Insightful)

despisethesun (880261) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512842)

Porting stuff is easy because it's Linux + SDL for the most part. Optimising is the tricky part, and at the moment the second processor in the unit is mostly useless (at least as far as emulation goes) because it has no MMU and a very small cache. It's a fairly capable machine though and I'm pretty happy with mine.

My God! (4, Funny)

Monkeys!!! (831558) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512657)

*throws an editor at the article*

My spelling and grammar are quite bad but the article made me want to gouge my eyes out with a spoon.

Re:My God! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15512877)

the article made me want to gouge my eyes out with a spoon

Well, go on then.

Re:My God! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15512912)

Who would have thought an article about homebrewed console software could have been of such poor quality?

Re:My God! (1)

Sj0 (472011) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513053)

I don't like what you seem to be asserting here. If XBMC is any indication, it's completely possible for homebrew software to utterly pants anything released by a real developer.

Wii (4, Interesting)

hyfe (641811) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512667)

Anybody know if random people will be able to program for it? If we can, I image will see a shitload of cool stuff, as that controller is sooo begging for simple cool games. I mean, just something like pong would be insanely fun :)

The Wii-equivalent of 'Mount and Blade' would utterly, utterly rock (M&B is a simple down-to-earth fighting game RPG'ish which gets simple fight-dynamics sooo right)

Re:Wii (1)

zanglang (917799) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512692)

The Wii-equivalent of 'Mount...

Whoa... um, sorry, lost my concentration there. Phew. Do go on.

Re:Wii (2, Informative)

Simon Donkers (950228) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512841)

I've been looking into the options for this being an indie developer myself. Nintendo mentions on the Wii website [nintendo.com] :
It also will be home to new games conceived by indie developers whose creativity is larger than their budgets.
However I've found no information anywhere other then stating all game developers require to negotiate with Nintendo to get a licence and pay a sum per game assuming you even get Nintendo's approval to appear on the system.
According to rumours dev-kits for the Wii are expected at a mere $2000 while PS3 dev-kits should be in the range of $50000+. Ofcourse these are all rumours and any developer has to sign an NDA. A little bit more info [thewiire.com]

Re:Wii (1)

Merle Darling (33121) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513081)

About a week before E3 '06 I emailed NOA about getting a Wii dev kit in the hope that I could distribute indie games over their Virtual Console service. At that point they still had the same answer as they've always had...

If you're unfamiliar with their stance on indie developers, it's something like, "LOL WTF GTFO NOOB!"

But yeah, it would be really sweet to be able to write code for the Wii. It's a shame they feel the way they do. Once the XNA Framework is done I might have to go with a 360 if I want to tinker with consoles legitimately. The 360 certainly isn't my first platform choice but rumor has it that the 360 dev kits will be ridiculously cheap and MS sure seems to be trying hard to make 360 development easy with this XNA stuff.

Re:Wii (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15513289)

99% sure this will not be an option.

Nintendo is family friendly. What is stopping someone from making a pornographic Wii game? Or even just use the Wii as a vector for pornography of any kind? Is Nintendo responsible if some hack and gore homebrew game is being distributed on their "Connect24" network and played on their consoles? Or what if I write a file sharing application for Wii?

Look at Napster/Kazaa vs MPAA/RIAA. Or look at the rediculous ESRB or Christian censorship groups.

You better believe Nintendo is going to police the content available on the Wii. And since it takes a LOT of money and people to censor it's just easier to only allow official licensed developers to use the online distribution service.

If you want "we don't care, do what you want" mentality keep an eye on the PS3. Sony is the company that has already released consumer dev kits for its previous home consoles. They also jump at games like Grand Theft Auto and Mafia. Like they care about a family friendly image.

Emulators for DS (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15512686)

I picked up a DS for Nintendogs and because I could run Sam and Max Hit the Road via http://scummvm.drunkencoders.com/ [drunkencoders.com] ScummVM DS. The rest of the emulator scene, however, is a little hit-or miss.

The DS benefits because it can also run homebrew that was developed for the GBA, and consoles from the NES and earlier are emulated well. The SNES and Genesis emulators are just in their infancy, however.

Besides the emuilators, there are a lot of good homebrew games and applications, including most of the usual favorites from linux distributions. Congratulations to the coders of the DS homebrew scene for making such progress on a unique system!

Re:Emulators for DS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15513285)

Frankly I'm surprised there's even a Genesis emulator for the DS. The Genesis had a pretty fast processor(in terms of clock cycles), so there's not a lot of overhead to work with on the DS to get all of that done with. Though we'll see if it makes any progress from its infancy, the current emulator is effectively a high-level code port from an emulator for a cell phone, so it seems likely a lot of it is going to need to be ripped up and rewritten in ARM9 assembly code.

As for the SNES emulator, I'm really not sure what's taking so long, the SNES is well understood and not too power hungry, the DS shouldn't be having any trouble emulating it.

Anyone actually using a GP2X? (1)

CarlSagansMyBoy (855955) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512769)

I'm interested in a GP2X, but much more for actually running things (emulators, movies, music) than doing development on it. Does anyone have any experience using one to play games and movies? Are the emulators fast enough? Do the batteries last long enough? I'm all for hobbyist coders, and I'm sure people are doing amazing things, but is much of it far along enough to use regularly? Thanks.

Re:Anyone actually using a GP2X? (5, Informative)

despisethesun (880261) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512866)

I've got one, and I'm pretty happy with it. Right now it's got a pretty good number of emulators running at or near full speed (the Genesis emulator in particular is great, and there's a very accurate PC Engine emulator that just hit 1.0 that does most games full speed with sound). Some emulators are still coming along though, which should be expected somewhat with a machine that's only about 6 or 7 months old. There are also some pretty good "interpreters" out for it (ports of Doom, Commander Keen, Quake, and Duke3D are all notable.) Batteries are a bit of a sore spot for some people, but if you can get your hands on some good 2500mAh NiMH rechargeables, you can expect about 5-6 hours per pair. Not great, but better than a PSP's battery life and you can swap them out when they die. Like I said, I'm happy with mine but it's got its quirks so it's not for everyone. Do a bit of googling and find out if it's for you.

Re:Anyone actually using a GP2X? (1)

TrancePhreak (576593) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513297)

the PSP will get about 7 hours battery life if all you do is homebrew. Most of the power drain for it is the disc reading, so if all you're reading is memory cards it lasts much longer. You can also get extra batteries to swap, but those are expensive.

Misleading (3, Informative)

LocalH (28506) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512778)

The "article" (which is actually a forum thread) says, and I quote, "The State of Homebrew On All Consoles", which is a complete lie. What's missing from the forum thread?

Atari 2600? Check.
NES? Check.
Game Boy pre-GBA? Check.
Sega Master System? Check
Sega Genesis? Check.

And there are probably some that I've forgotten as well, but at least I'll admit it.

"Because we are the only dedicated Homebrew Network on the web covering just about all scenes"? STFU and GTFO, you suck.

NES flash cards? (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512832)

Can the average person just go online and buy rewritable cards for the Atari 2600, NES, 8-bit Game Boy, Sega Master System, and Sega Genesis? Or is it like a lightsaber in the Star Wars universe, where you have to solder one together yourself?

Re:NES flash cards? (1)

GalionTheElf (515869) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512927)

Can the average person do anything with those consoles (not just developing, but running the homebrew titles on them) without going out and buying stuff? I have yet to see the DS PassMe gear on the high street...

(With the exception of the DC)

Re:NES flash cards? (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512954)

Even with the Dreamcast, you need to go out and buy blank CDs.

Re:NES flash cards? (1)

GalionTheElf (515869) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513109)

Ok if you want to be difficult...

But I think going to the shop to buy some blank cd's (you can even buy them in the supermarket ffs) is an order of magnitude easier than buying some electronics off a shifty site in Hong-Kong.

Homebrew may not be for you (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513183)

But I think going to the shop to buy some blank cd's (you can even buy them in the supermarket ffs) is an order of magnitude easier than buying some electronics off a shifty site in Hong-Kong.

If you want to be able to play handheld video games without any mail order, using only products and services available in a brick-and-mortar shop throughout the developed world, then homebrew may not be for you. Stick to PDA software.

Re:NES flash cards? (2, Informative)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512982)

Can the average person just go online and buy rewritable cards for the Atari 2600, NES, 8-bit Game Boy, Sega Master System, and Sega Genesis?

You can purchase 2600 and 5200 homebrews here:

http://www.atariage.com/store/ [atariage.com]

A 7800/2600 "CuttleCart" (which allows you to play games from a MMC card) can be purchased here:

http://www.schells.com/cc2.shtml [schells.com]

You'll note that the CuttleCart3 will be for the Intellivision. There used to be a cart called the "IntelliCart" that used a serial cable, but it's been unavailable for several years. There doesn't seem to be anyone releasing Intellivision homebrew carts despite the thriving homebrew community. So you'll need to find a used IntelliCart, or purchase a CC3 when it comes out.

Homebrew Odyssey^2 games can be purchased on PackRatVG's site here:

http://www.packratvg.com/o2hbrews.html [packratvg.com]

Even more O2 homebrews, along with Colecovision and Vectrex homebrews can be found here:

http://www.classicgamecreations.com/ [classicgamecreations.com]

Note that O2 homebrews tend to be a lot better than many of the original games.

I don't know much about the NES homebrew scene, but I do know there are a lot of them. Look around and you'll probably be able to find carts for purchase.

Using which Google keywords? (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513176)

I don't know much about the NES homebrew scene, but I do know there are a lot of them. Look around and you'll probably be able to find carts for purchase.

I used Google [google.com] , AllTheWeb [alltheweb.com] , Yahoo! [yahoo.com] , and MSN [msn.com] . All the results were for GBA flash carts to which one can write an NES emulator. The only relevant result from the first page of each search engine's results (ars [arstechnica.com] , citing source [ameba.lpt.fi] ) was disappointing: "While you can buy the circuit boards from this guy he's pretty adamant about not selling the finished product". If this product requires soldering, then it is a proof-of-concept, not a finished product. Which other keywords on which search engine should I use, or what other method of "look[ing] around" should I use?

Re:Using which Google keywords? (1)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 8 years ago | (#15514122)

"NES Homebrew Carts" got me this article [siliconera.com] about this device [ameba.lpt.fi] as the second result. A bit more looking found me information about the Devtendo [bripro.com] . I presume that saleable games are produced in the same way they are on other systems: By taking an existing cart and resoldering a new ROM chip.

Re:NES flash cards? (1)

antime (739998) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513133)

ToToTEK [tototek.com] sell flash carts for the Megadrive, Master System and a few other machines. Gameboy flash carts used to be widely available (and were the reason Nintendo shut down the original Lik-Sang) but I don't know where you can get hold of them nowadays.

Re:NES flash cards? (1)

kisrael (134664) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513329)

Can the average person just go online and buy rewritable cards for the Atari 2600, NES, 8-bit Game Boy, Sega Master System, and Sega Genesis? Or is it like a lightsaber in the Star Wars universe, where you have to solder one together yourself?

I guess this has already been answered.
As a guy who has his own 2600 homebrew released and sold, I'm glad at least someone here was pointing out the oversight.

Misconception #552: "Multiplayer console game means split screen."
Fact: It doesn't.


Ah but the converse "Splitscreen != Multiplayer Console Gaming", isn't true. It's a subset.

As someone who vastly prefers "splitscreen" multiplayer games, I've been thinking about the terminology.
"Splitscreen"? (not every game is splitscreen, ala Smash Bros, Bomberman) "Couch"? (too general, a lot of singleplayer gaming happens on couches) "Party gaming"? (too specific, now that it's a subgenre ala Mario Party)

At least Online Console Gaming has a specific term. I guess "splitscreen" is the best to hope for, though a bit inaccurate.

Re:NES flash cards? (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513397)

As a guy who has his own 2600 homebrew released and sold, I'm glad at least someone here was pointing out the oversight.

So how do I get my own NES homebrew released and sold?

"Splitscreen"? (not every game is splitscreen, ala Smash Bros, Bomberman) "Couch"? (too general, a lot of singleplayer gaming happens on couches) "Party gaming"? (too specific, now that it's a subgenre ala Mario Party)

Multiplayer console games that are not split-screen (Smash Bros., Gauntlet, Bomberman) are called "shared-view". The problem is that very few PCs in use have a monitor big enough for shared-view, and independents can't publish on consoles controlled by the cartel, so this restricts freedom of speech.

Re:NES flash cards? (1)

kisrael (134664) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513625)

Don't know how to get your NES game onto hardware, sorry.

AtariAge and a few other sites have been doing it for the Atari for a long time, including I think 5200. I think they sometimes canibalize old super-commons, as well as take advantage of the way Atari used off the shelf compoments for many things.

I'm still looking for a single word that means "shared-view or splitscreen" games. I guess you could say that the overall word is "multiplayer" and then the three subgenres are "online" "shared-view" and "splitscreen"

Re:NES flash cards? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15513946)

I'm just bringing this up to annoy, but what about LAN gaming? GBA link cable multiplayer? Hot seat turn based stuff like Advance Wars, or "two player" mode on NES games where it tracks two sets of scores and you take it in turns to play a level. Play by mail. Final Fantasy: Crystal Chronicles! That's a bastard to classify...

Terminolgise that lot. Anyway, I guess you mean that the type of gaming you enjoy is same-room multiplayer. But then, what about playing Halo splitscreen online?

Re:NES flash cards? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15513487)

No don't! He might put on [pocketheaven.com] a dress [pineight.com]

Re:NES flash cards? (1)

LocalH (28506) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513915)

Atari 2600: Cuttle Cart 2 [schells.com] (although it requires a 7800, it supports 2600 images as well)
Game Boy (Color): any of the numerous GB Xchanger-type copiers
SMS: Tototek SMS-PRO [tototek.com]
Genesis: Tototek MD-PRO [tototek.com]

As far as I know, the only one of those consoles that doesn't have some sort of flash memory, is the NES. The problem, of course, is mapper support. I do seem to remember someone working on a flashcart with support for the most common mappers, but I haven't heard anything recently. Even then, a common cart containing the desired mapper can be modified to accept EPROMs (although this is admittedly harder that merely downloading a ROM to the cart).

Re:Misleading (1)

pla (258480) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512931)

What's missing from the forum thread?

Hmm, I'll take "systems that don't support some form of game storage that non-EEs can readily make use of" for $1000, Alex.

Although the fact that people write "new" homebrew NES games may count as an intellectual curiosity, almost nobody runs them on an actual NES.


"Because we are the only dedicated Homebrew Network on the web covering just about all scenes"? STFU and GTFO, you suck.

Wow, bitter much? Which emu group do you belong to?

I'll grant that the FP link pretty much sucked, giving less info than a quick read through of any given system-specific page on Zophar's; but for a very high-level overview of systems actually running homebrew games today, it does a passable job.

Wii Dev Kit (5, Informative)

Xistic (536149) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512798)

The Wii is interesting because the dev kit is only $2000. That puts it well within the range of an avid hobbiest. If I had a really good idea come to mind about a game using the wiimote I'd consider getting one.

It would be interesting to see what kind of legal agreements come with that dev kit. Can a group a homebrew coders get there hands on one and start churning out free games? Will there be an easy way for us to play these games?

Kyle

Re:Wii Dev Kit (1)

AnyoneEB (574727) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513005)

It sounds like that is what Nintendo is planning for the Virtual Console feature to allow. They have not said anything about posting free games, but they have suggested that smaller games (worth less than a $50 disc) could be posted there by indie (or any) developers. Hopefully, they will allow the posting of free games (most likely they will at least support demos), and they will actually follow through on their talk about wanting to encourage indie developers.

Re:Wii Dev Kit (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15513136)

Why yes, at $2000 it is absolutely a steal! </sarcasm>

Where did you Nintentrolls put your brains? $600, that is way too much for a console, but hey, $2000, "that puts it well within the range of an avid hobbiest"!

We need an ad-block for /. now...

Re:Wii Dev Kit (1)

isolenz (466129) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513258)

first off, you missed the first

second point, this is not a console. It is a dev. kit.
If you think that $2000 is a lot of money for a dev kit, please take a look at your sony/xbox devkit, then prepare to mortgage your house and sell your first born.

I'm all about that cowboyneal shiat
--
isolenz

Re:Wii Dev Kit (3, Informative)

antime (739998) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513154)

I very much doubt Nintendo will sell kits to hobby coders. For one thing they won't allow anything to be released without going through their normal approval process (for image reasons, if nothing else). In the past you have had to present a complete business plan when applying for a license, and I don't think that will change. The big difference will be that online delivery means developers won't have to pay media costs (in advance, for Nintendo-set amounts) which means smaller companies can afford the process.

Writing a business plan? (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513408)

In the past you have had to present a complete business plan when applying for a license, and I don't think that will change.

Do you, or does anybody else reading this, have tips for writing a business plan for a game studio?

Re:Writing a business plan? (1)

k_187 (61692) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513775)

1. Write Games 2. ???? 3. Profit!

Re:Writing a business plan? (1)

I Like Pudding (323363) | more than 8 years ago | (#15514007)

I may not have an MBA, but I think #2 there should be "sell games"

Re:Wii Dev Kit (3, Informative)

idiot900 (166952) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513619)

The Wii dev kit may only be a couple thousand US dollars but Nintendo really wants to know who you are and that you are a legitimate corporate developer:

http://www.warioworld.com/apply/wii.html [warioworld.com]

To even get to the point where they send you an NDA seems pretty tough for the average hobbyist at the moment.

No Dev Kit necessary (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15514037)

I don't have any evidence of this but I honestly don't think that the tiny developers that would be developing for the Virtual Console would actually need a hardware development kit.

Hypothetically speaking, if Nintendo wanted to make a truly viable platform for 2D development they could create a virtual machine which was completely capable of displaying 2D sprite based graphics at (aproximately) 800x600; you could then produce a software development kit to run on your PC along with a boot disc (which would allow you to load your game onto the Wii via SD card) for playtesting. You could sell this entire dev kit for under $100. They could have the restriction that if you wanted to sell it using their online service that it had to gain the Nintendo Seal of Aproval through Nintendo based tests.

You're correct that Nintendo does look for established developers for most development, but the main reason for this is quite different than you think. One of the main reasons that the XBox was hacked so quickly and the Gamecube took so long is Hackers had their hands on XBox dev-kits (and were familiar with the inner workings of the system) months before the system actually released. On the other hand, with the gamecube Hackers had to reverse engineer the system to gain any understanding on how the hardware functioned before they could attempt to circumvent the copy protection. If you're virtual machine is well built, and ultimately hostile to code being run on it you should be able to freely distribute the virtual machine without any fear of it being cracked to alow for piracy.

in short, no... (2, Insightful)

YesIAmAScript (886271) | more than 8 years ago | (#15514055)

The up front fees to become a console dev don't cover the actual cost to the company. The hardware you'll get costs a few bucks, the software costs them a few bucks, and just getting their time so they can get it to you and get you up and running on it costs more than a few bucks.

When selling one of these kits, N is certainly expecting to see some back-end revenue from the license fees when you sell your game. So giving away a game is probably not going to fit into their plan.

Additionally, the legal agreements will restrict you from doing a lot of things, and probably require you to get an ESRB rating (which isn't free). It'll also keep you from sharing info with others, if it's like typical agreements.

Additionally, $2K is a lot, and this is slashdot, people don't even like paying $500 for dev tools (Dev Studio), $2K is far out of the ballpark.

Gamecube Linux (1)

sonixtwo (878390) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512812)

The article mentions you have to have a modchip to run home brew on the gamecube. Taking advantage of the way Phantasy Star Online uses internet play, you can run homebrew software directly off of your computer using an ethernet cable. I have not tested the method with homebrew games, but linux runs great.

http://www.gc-linux.org/wiki/Main_Page [gc-linux.org]

I just picked up a ds lite and hope to check out linux on that too.

PSO is expensive (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512840)

The article mentions you have to have a modchip to run home brew on the gamecube. Taking advantage of the way Phantasy Star Online uses internet play

But then you have to 1. buy a vulnerable version of PSO on eBay, and 2. buy a broadband adapter on eBay. Both can get more expensive over time as collectors snap them up, but so can a modchip.

Re:PSO is expensive (1)

Sappharad (893163) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513213)

No, you don't need to buy the Broadband Adapter from Ebay. For some reason, there has been a common misconception since PSO came out that the Gamecube BroadBand Adapter was discontinued by Nintendo. It has not, and is still available for purchase from Nintendo's online store.
Really long URL link directly to Nintendo's Online store [nintendo.com]

PSO on the other hand, is rather hard to get ahold of, although I know that Play-Asia still has brand new copies of the Japanese version of PSO Episode 3 available for purchase, which are compatible. (If you've got a Japanese Gamecube, of course)

Despite this, you can still get ahold of an Action Replay and a Gamecube SD Card adapter for under $50, which requires no console modification to use SDload.

Re:Gamecube Linux (1)

antime (739998) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513167)

Using PSO to boot is such a pain in the ass that for real work you will want something better.

consoles? (1)

MBuhrow (979212) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512855)

Has anyone even heard of half of these?
The Ipod is a console?
I must need to get out of my basement more often

I wonder (1)

Xyl3ne (802919) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512974)

I wonder how much Wraggster paid someone to get this posted. I'm sure he can use even more ad revenue.

Homebrew refers to beer, not games. (-1, Offtopic)

purduephotog (218304) | more than 8 years ago | (#15512994)

Please. You got me very excited that there was now an integrated controller that I could buy/build to monitor my temperatures- perhaps with logging, a few PWM controls for tank stirring, etc.

Beer is homebrew. Relax. Have a homebrew.

Re:Homebrew refers to beer, not games. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15513134)

Brew = Develop(ed)

From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homebrew_(video_games ) [wikipedia.org]

The term is frequently applied only on video games that are produced on proprietary game platforms - in other words, game platforms that are not typically user-programmable, or use proprietary hardware for storage. Sometimes games developed on official development kits, such as Net Yaroze or PS2 Linux are included in the definition. Some, however, also refer all non-commercial, "home-developed" games for open architectures as homebrew games, though these typically go under more frequently used labels, such as freeware. The term doesn't, however, include commercially sold games that are developed without console manufacturer's license.

Not just for games... (3, Informative)

freeze128 (544774) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513221)

The term Homebrew is probably a holdover from the '70s homebrew computer club, where the likes of Bill Gates, Paul Allen, Steve Jobs, Woz and other mainstream computer founders would get together and display their own computers, or computer programs. It's a part of our computing heritage, so it can easily be applied to computerized games, though I do agree that the term is probably used a little too much in place of DIY.

They forgot the atari 2600! (2, Informative)

Bender_ (179208) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513008)

The granddaddy of all consoles does actually have one of the largest active homebrewing scenes.
Just a random selection of links:

http://www.oreillynet.com/cs/user/print/a/4849 [oreillynet.com]
http://www.atariage.com/2600/programming/ [atariage.com]
http://www.alienbill.com/2600/ [alienbill.com]

Odd that... (2, Informative)

Sj0 (472011) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513020)

They mention that it's unfortunate that there's no legal SDK for the xbox. This is mistaken, there is. OpenXDK isn't perfect, but I've been using it for a while in my quest to get my favourite compiler to create xbox executables natively.

Some Odyssey2 Homebrew stuff (1)

babanada (977344) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513040)

There is some Odyssey 2 console homebrew stuff here [coprolite.com] for those of you interested in that old and often neglected console.

The Zodiac is Palm Based! (2, Informative)

Blue_Nile (793198) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513115)

"but its also a Pocket PC type device so you get the best of both worlds"

did this guy bother to check anything at all? The Zodiac ran Palm OS. It says so right on their front page

Next gen of consoles... (0, Flamebait)

codefungus (463647) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513355)

here is my question:

When will I be able to write a game using Nintendo's Game Development SDK (NSDK), publish it on my Nintendo Net home page, and have my friend download and playin on his Nintendo console? And then when will Nintendo pay me a butt-load of cash for the copyright to make it better and sell it since it's SSOOO AAWEEESOME?

Tomorrow? Tuesday? What about Thursday?

C'mon...we all know that this is where it's going...

Make a PC game then consider porting it to Wii (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 8 years ago | (#15513422)

When will I be able to write a game using Nintendo's Game Development SDK (NSDK), publish it on my Nintendo Net home page, and have my friend download and playin on his Nintendo console?

As soon as you have successfully sold the same title on the Microsoft Windows platform first. Use the mouse to prototype how the Wiimote control would work. You can use sales of the PC version of your game as evidence in a business plan to present to Nintendo.

Detailed? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15513433)

This comment is detailed.

More appropriate title "State of the Warez Scene" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15513631)

Come on, "homebrew" has lost its meaning, all it means now is the ability run emulators loaded up with lots of roms and the ability to run illegally obtained commercial games/software. People care more about running that stuff then some pong-knock-off or an application.

I swear, each time I see an announcement about some sort of PSP related exploit, you get a bunch of fake "this is good news for the homebrew community" BS. Won't see it much on slashdot.org, but a good amount of the comments on other forums/sites consist of people creaming their pants at the possibility of playing the newer games without paying. You get a lot of "OMG YES, NOW MAKE IT WORK WITH ISOS," "Cool, I hope they can get it to work with *Insert-recent-game-here*, etc. That is the real reason people get up in arms each time Sony fixes and locks things down with a patch.

Seriously, most "real" "homebrew" people care about if their new DS Lite will work with brand X cart/dongle, and how good the cart/dongle is at running GBA/DS/etc ROMs(i.e is there a slow down, do they need any patches due to new DS firmware, can they brick my system, etc) then they do about running Linux, some IRC program, a tech-demo or SCUMMVM.....

Now cue the "I use it only for 'homebrew'" posts, but keep in mind that if you are really being truthful(i.e no pirating games, no running emulators with massive amounts of games you probably don't own or dumped yourself), people like you are few and far between.
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