Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

cancel ×

247 comments

Craters Gone Wild? (4, Funny)

rramdin (857005) | about 8 years ago | (#15529109)

Probably about 10 times more interesting but half as riveting as Girls Gone Wild.

Re:Craters Gone Wild? (-1, Offtopic)

PornMaster (749461) | about 8 years ago | (#15529303)

That'd be thins slamming into Uranus.

Endgame (0, Offtopic)

swordfishBob (536640) | about 8 years ago | (#15529441)

It's part of the closing scenes in the table tennis game I just saw advertised at the top of this page.

Bill Cooke (0, Offtopic)

corychristison (951993) | about 8 years ago | (#15529114)

At first I thought it said "Bill Cookie" -- suppose that happens when you haven't eaten enough in the day?

On a side note: this is cool they managed to get a fairly clear video of this... however, why'd they convert it to a GIF image? [ewww..]

Re:Bill Cooke (0, Offtopic)

SockPuppet_9_5 (645235) | about 8 years ago | (#15529515)

No pixels were harmed in the making of that animated graphic... No pixels thrown out, no interpolation between blocks of pixels needed for analysis.

Conspiracy? (2, Funny)

x2A (858210) | about 8 years ago | (#15529115)

What's the bet they're show us more meteorites hitting the moon, so when we discover no evidance of the moon landing, they can blame it on being destroyed by meteorites? ;-)

Re:Conspiracy? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15529140)

You fool. They didn't fake the moon landing. They didn't have to. They travel there on a daily basis with technology reverse engineered from the Roswell crash. They are preparing us for additional "meteor" strikes which will actually be missiles designed to knock out secret alien and ex-soviet moon bases!

Re:Conspiracy? (1)

WilliamSChips (793741) | about 8 years ago | (#15529583)

They travel there on a daily basis with technology reverse engineered from the Roswell crash.
No, the Asgard willingly gave it to us for the Prometheus.

Re:Conspiracy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15529632)

No, no, no. The moon is where NASA keeps all the hot women who love male engineers. They party there all the time. This is probably just a ruse to scare everyone else away.

Re:Conspiracy? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15529167)

More proof that you don't have to make any sense or know decent grammar to be modded high as long as you post early enough in the discussion.

Re:Conspiracy? (1)

x2A (858210) | about 8 years ago | (#15529242)

I typed "they're" instead of "they'll" as I changed my original "showing" to "show" to make it less present and more future tense, to imply that it's going to increase, but forgot to go back and change the tense of the "they" as it's approaching 3am and I'm tired. It was a typing error rather than a gramatical one, and anyone with even as little brains as me at this hour could still make it out, more proof that you have less brains than me :-D

Anyway, don't be bitter my friend, I'm sure you'll manage an "FP!!!11uno" soon.

To the mod - (1)

x2A (858210) | about 8 years ago | (#15529259)

- who modded "flamebait"...

;-) <-- huh?

First Crater (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15529122)

First post?

Re:First Crater (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15529150)

are you asking or telling?

this is why you didn't get first post.. loser.. you suck at life.

Re:First Crater (0, Redundant)

corychristison (951993) | about 8 years ago | (#15529192)

hehe... I love how this got modded "1, Insightful"

Obligatory (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15529124)

wait, I don't understand... how many joules are in a library of congress?

Re:Obligatory (1)

x2A (858210) | about 8 years ago | (#15529126)

12,500, duh. Just ask google.

Re:Obligatory (4, Funny)

igny (716218) | about 8 years ago | (#15529185)

Everyone knows that energy is calculated in BigMacs (229 of delicious kcal). That explosion was mere 17,743 BigMacs.

Re:Obligatory (3, Informative)

kalpaha (667921) | about 8 years ago | (#15529532)

I'm sorry, but you're wrong! Everyone knows mars bars (278 kilocalories) is the real unit of explosion strength.
Google does these kind of calculations very easily: enter
17 billion joules / 278 kilocalories

into google, and you will receive the answer:
(17 billion joules) / (278 kilocalories) = 14 615.4587

So the explosion was ~14615 mars bars.

Re:Obligatory (1)

apoupc (569200) | about 8 years ago | (#15529691)

Would that include the explosions coming from Uranus after you eat 17,743 Big Macs?

Where's the sound? (4, Funny)

SamMichaels (213605) | about 8 years ago | (#15529132)

When it first loaded I thought, "where's the damn sound"?

Then I saw it was a gif...and thought, "why is it an animated picture and not a video with sound?"

Then I realized I needed more caffeine. Oops.

Re:Where's the sound? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15529195)

Maybe you should put down the coffee and do something about the bloated corpse that is Zophar's Domain, eh Sammy?

Re:Where's the sound? (5, Funny)

digitalchinky (650880) | about 8 years ago | (#15529421)

Where is the kaboom? There was meant to be an earth shattering kaboom....

Re:Where's the sound? (1, Funny)

SeanMon (929653) | about 8 years ago | (#15529462)

Don't you mean moon shattering?

Re:Where's the sound? (1)

Dissectional (528344) | about 8 years ago | (#15529440)

To balance out that obvious overdose of alcohol? [newscientist.com]

Re:Where's the sound? In space... (1)

Slashcrunch (626325) | about 8 years ago | (#15529482)


After your 3rd coffee you realised that sound won't travel too well in the vacuum of space.

Re:Where's the sound? (1)

Penguinshit (591885) | about 8 years ago | (#15529534)


In space, no one can hear you scream...

Colony on the moon (5, Interesting)

vldragon (981127) | about 8 years ago | (#15529142)

If a mere 10 inch meteor can create a 4 ton explosion then I don't think it would ever be a good idea to try to put a colony on the moon. If this kind of thing happens often, and the say it does, there would have to be a whole lot of protection for any structure we put on the moon. Or develope shields...

Re:Colony on the moon (1)

Monkeys!!! (831558) | about 8 years ago | (#15529155)

Or we could put all lunar colonies under a good couple of metres of bedrock.

Though, I like your shields idea better :)

Re:Colony on the moon (1)

Ant P. (974313) | about 8 years ago | (#15529162)

They could always build underground.

Re:Colony on the moon (1)

fuzzyfozzie (978329) | about 8 years ago | (#15529179)

Duh, we'd have a force field... Geez, people these days.

Re:Colony on the moon (5, Insightful)

FuturePastNow (836765) | about 8 years ago | (#15529204)

I think a meteorite striking a lunar base would be like shooting at an ant crawling on the side of a barn. From a mile away. With your eyes closed. Of course, the thing about random chance is that it's bound to happen eventually, but I don't think any astronauts will lose sleep over it.

Re:Colony on the moon (2, Funny)

pembo13 (770295) | about 8 years ago | (#15529215)

They'd just wake up dead.

Re:Colony on the moon (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15529380)

As the saying goes, the moon is covered with the results of astronomical odds.

Re:Colony on the moon (1)

lexsco (594799) | about 8 years ago | (#15529450)

....but I don't think any astronauts will lose sleep over it.

Your not an astinaut, are you !

Re:Colony on the moon (1)

boarsai (698361) | about 8 years ago | (#15529580)

I guess the question that begs to be asked is: how big is the ant?

Re:Colony on the moon (2, Interesting)

JerBear0 (456762) | about 8 years ago | (#15529217)

Call the Israelis. That Trophy [defense-update.com] system isn't quite a shield, but it sure looks like one on the video (wmv) [3dg.co.il] .

Re:Colony on the moon (1)

DerekLyons (302214) | about 8 years ago | (#15529250)

If a mere 10 inch meteor can create a 4 ton explosion then I don't think it would ever be a good idea to try to put a colony on the moon. If this kind of thing happens often, and the say it does, there would have to be a whole lot of protection for any structure we put on the moon. Or develope shields...

The moon is big, really, really big. Colonies are small, really, really small.

He lives! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15529289)

The moon is big, really, really big. Colonies are small, really, really small.

Douglas Adams lives!

Re:He lives! (1)

WilliamSChips (793741) | about 8 years ago | (#15529595)

But what about the furry creatures from Alpha Centauri?

Re:Colony on the moon (0)

x2A (858210) | about 8 years ago | (#15529365)

"The moon is big, really, really big. Colonies are small, really, really small"

I can do the maths!

1. Odds of meteorite hitting colony on moon: really small : really big

2. Simplify (divide both sides by really): small : big

3. Calculate chance: small / big = um... profit?

Okay maybe I can't.

Re:Colony on the moon (1)

buswolley (591500) | about 8 years ago | (#15529604)

Sure a lunar base is small in comparison to the moon, but that does not really answer the question.

The comparison should be between the size of the base and the average number of meteorite collisons per sq. meter of the moon's surface in the bases vincinity per year.

Since the moon has no atmosphere, we can expect more collisions with the surface of the moon, of course, than with the Earth's surface, despite the higher gravitation of the earth.

So that's the question. Can anyone answer it?

Re:Colony on the moon (1)

iced_773 (857608) | about 8 years ago | (#15529344)


Meteorites hit Earth all the time, but they burn up in the atmosphere and are reduced to grains of sand by the time they hit the ground. The moon could theoretically hold an atmosphere for a few thousand years, so it shouldn't be a problem.

Re:Colony on the moon (0)

markk (35828) | about 8 years ago | (#15529426)

Any colony on the moon would be under several meters of soil, for solar radiation shielding alone, but also just to help counteract the air pressure inside the colony. If you had 1 atm pressure in the colony then that would be 14 lbs(earth equiv) / square inch, of upward force on the roof. Thick plastic like a balloon would be verry expensive since you would have to bring it all from Earth. Probably you would try to balance the pressure. Less for less air pressure of course, but still a bunch. Maybe using a lava tube so you wouldn't have to excavate much. It would be interesting to figure the effect of a hit like this on a buried structure.

Re:Colony on the moon (1)

Joebert (946227) | about 8 years ago | (#15529499)

It would be interesting to figure the effect of a hit like this on a buried structure.

I'm thinking burried alive.

Re:Colony on the moon (1)

east coast (590680) | about 8 years ago | (#15529500)

I tell you what... You stay back here on the boring old Earth. We're going to the moon, and franly we don't need your bad attitude ruining it for us.

Terrorists on the moon? (5, Funny)

xkr (786629) | about 8 years ago | (#15529143)

Which terrorist group is NASA blaming ?

Re:Terrorists on the moon? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15529235)

I don't think you realize how important this is. Until now, the terrorists have limited their presence to every American household, as demonstrated by the government's choice of surveillance targets. If the terrorists are already on the moon, who can guess when they'll start showing up in the Sun, on Jupiter, or inside our very minds.

No idea, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15529346)

... the Bush administration is talking about Iran hiding weapons of mass destruction in space, and that something must be done about it.

Re:Terrorists on the moon? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15529353)

Not surprising if there were terrorists there to spread their militant version of Islam. They say al-Zarqawi was martyred... he could be up there right now searching for his promised 72 virgins.

Re:Terrorists on the moon? (1)

buswolley (591500) | about 8 years ago | (#15529452)

Slashdot.

Poor servers..

So what are the odds (1)

Drakin020 (980931) | about 8 years ago | (#15529145)

...of that thing hitting us? Surly there had to be that chance of it missing the moon and running into earth right? Makes me wonder what else might be lurking around that could potentially miss the moon and collide with us.

Re:So what are the odds (4, Insightful)

Gabrill (556503) | about 8 years ago | (#15529224)

One Word: Atmosphere. It's why the Earth doesn't look like the Moon.

Re:So what are the odds (1)

evilviper (135110) | about 8 years ago | (#15529313)

One Word: Atmosphere. It's why the Earth doesn't look like the Moon.

Sort of true, but in a very out-of-context way.

Our atmosphere burns up many meteorites, but that's not why we don't look like the moon.

The reason we don't look like the moon is that the atmosphere hides the evidence after the fact. It certainly doesn't protect the Earth from all projectiles.

Re:So what are the odds (1)

zippthorne (748122) | about 8 years ago | (#15529366)

One additional word: vulcanism. Meteor impacts have dropped off exponentially since the formation of the planets. Active vulcanism resurfaces the planet every so often, so the earlier more frequent and larger impacts that we see on the cold, cold moon have been melted away as they fell below the soup-skin that we call the lithosphere.

Re:So what are the odds (4, Funny)

Eideewt (603267) | about 8 years ago | (#15529256)

We should surround the Earth with a protective blanket of some sort to protect ourselves from such an event! Of course, it would need to be transparent and not inhibit our movement. I wonder if we could use gases for that purpose.

Re:So what are the odds (1)

From A Far Away Land (930780) | about 8 years ago | (#15529503)

I know, let's develop a gas sheild for the Moon to save the Martians from extra-terrestrial attacks!

Oh wait...

Re:So what are the odds (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15529697)

Grandparent post... funny; very funny.

Parent post... not so much.

Fireball (1)

Esion Modnar (632431) | about 8 years ago | (#15529148)

Mentioned a fireball, but... no air, no fire, no fireball. Little bit underwhelmed.

Re:Fireball (1)

DigitalRaptor (815681) | about 8 years ago | (#15529181)

The lunar soil is almost 50% oxygen [google.com] , so it wouldn't be hard to get enough "air" for a really good explosion.

Meteors also contain all sorts of stuff from all over the place.

Re:Fireball (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15529453)

And that's mostly in the form of silicon dioxide... I.E. sand.

"that's about the same as 4 tons of TNT" (5, Funny)

zegebbers (751020) | about 8 years ago | (#15529149)

That's all well and good, but how many football fields was the impact?

Re:"that's about the same as 4 tons of TNT" (2, Funny)

DavidD_CA (750156) | about 8 years ago | (#15529309)

What I wanna know.. is how many Libraries of Congress can fit into the new crater?

Re:"that's about the same as 4 tons of TNT" (1)

jmv (93421) | about 8 years ago | (#15529318)

Actually, tons of TNT has become a real way to measure energy (think nuclear warheads in kilotons/megatons).

and in news just to hand... (5, Funny)

Audent (35893) | about 8 years ago | (#15529156)

NASA has released a video clip of its server being struck with 17 billion hits all at the same time.

"That's about the same as 4 tons of TNT, or an entire Slashdot community" says Bill Cooke, the head of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office in Huntsville, AL.

Can't rival earlier calamity (1)

Zhe Mappel (607548) | about 8 years ago | (#15529187)

What is 17 billion joules when mad earthlings have tried to Cyclops you? [wikimedia.org]

Re:Can't rival earlier calamity (1)

buswolley (591500) | about 8 years ago | (#15529469)

That's not funny. That's disturbing.

Do it like they do on the Discovery channel... (4, Interesting)

packetmon (977047) | about 8 years ago | (#15529189)

I've seen a documentary on the Discovery Channel about the possibility of a meteorite hitting earth pretty hard. Come to think of it, last week a meteorite struck finland. [aftenposten.no] What's interesting is the United States Air Force has the following:

6.7 Asteroid Mitigation System
Brief Description
The asteroid mitigation system protects the Earth/Moon system from earth-crossing objects (ECO) by either deflecting or fragmenting ECO they no longer pose a threat. Deflection could be accomplished using nuclear explosive devices.

Capabilities
Deflects or destroys objects in space having the size and trajectory to threaten the Earth/Moon system An Operational Analysis for Air Force 2025: An Application of Value-Focused Thinking to Future Air and Space Capabilities (page 135) [af.mil]

Scientist have been trying to figure out when something big will hit. Imagine if what hit the moon hit a major city... I'd definitely rather see my tax dollars spent on a project to deter meteorites as opposed to seeing money thrown around with people crying "Al Qaeda" anytime.

Re:Do it like they do on the Discovery channel... (1)

Pink Tinkletini (978889) | about 8 years ago | (#15529200)

Article: "Wednesday morning dawned, northern Norway was hit with an impact..."
packetmon: "... last week a meteorite struck finland."

Congratulations--you've just pissed off the entire populations of two countries. Fortunately, those countries are Norway and Finland.

Re:Do it like they do on the Discovery channel... (1)

packetmon (977047) | about 8 years ago | (#15529231)

;) Finland... Norway... Vad gor du!? Om jag kan inte saga...

Re:Do it like they do on the Discovery channel... (1)

JerBear0 (456762) | about 8 years ago | (#15529253)

" I'd definitely rather see my tax dollars spent on a project to deter meteorites as opposed to seeing money thrown around with people crying "Al Qaeda" anytime."

Why not combine the two? A project that deflects meteors into certain areas of the Middle East could kill two birds with one stone. Ok, technically, it would kill one stone and one bird with a hyper-expensive government project, but you know what I mean.

Re:Do it like they do on the Discovery channel... (1)

x2A (858210) | about 8 years ago | (#15529390)

Or launch suspected (that's as close as they get) Al Qaeda members towards the meteorite? Enough of them, hit hard enough, must slow it down, or at least cushion it's landing, what with all that stuff they wear on their heads...

Re:Do it like they do on the Discovery channel... (2, Informative)

NewbieProgrammerMan (558327) | about 8 years ago | (#15529337)

Imagine if what hit the moon hit a major city...
I understand your point - anything large enough to make it through the atmosphere into a city could be mistaken for an attack by terrorists or perhaps another country. However, for a rock of this size TFA actually says:

If a rock like that hit Earth, it would never reach the ground. "Earth's atmosphere protects us," Cooke explains. "A 10-inch meteoroid would disintegrate in mid-air, making a spectacular fireball in the sky but no crater." The Moon is different. Having no atmosphere, it is totally exposed to meteoroids. Even small ones can cause spectacular explosions, spraying debris far and wide.

Re:Do it like they do on the Discovery channel... (2, Insightful)

whoop (194) | about 8 years ago | (#15529427)

Unfortunately, it is far more likely to have a bomb go off in a major city from terrorists than to be knocked in the head by a meteorite. Human behavior is far more unpredictable and imminent than a meteor large enough to survive burn through atmosphere and do significant damage going unnoticed by astronomers worldwide.

Even then, do you want the fear that a meteor is going to kill you in 3 hours 45 minutes or to just live like a normal day, then kaboom?

And I'd rather my tax dollars that do go to NASA be spent on colonization. Inventions, energy sources, etc used to sustain life on the Moon or Mars will get ported back to Earth and help us out in the immediate future.

Re:Do it like they do on the Discovery channel... (4, Informative)

NereusRen (811533) | about 8 years ago | (#15529633)

Imagine if what hit the moon hit a major city...
That small of an object (only 10 inches diameter?) would burn up in our atmosphere. It only struck so hard on the moon because there's nothing slowing it down before it hits the surface. I went over to the trusty Asteroid Impact Simulator [arizona.edu] for a quick comparison. The smallest size you can select is 1 meter in diameter, but here's what it has to say about a fairly average 1m projectile "hitting" earth:

        Energy before atmospheric entry: 2.27 x 10^11 Joules = 0.54 x 10-4 MegaTons TNT [note: the one that hit the moon only had 1.7 x 10^10 Joules of energy... less than one tenth of this hypothetical.]
        The average interval between impacts of this size somewhere on Earth is less than 1 month.
        The projectile bursts into a cloud of fragments at an altitude of 49200 meters
        No crater is formed, although large fragments may strike the surface.


We only need to be worried about meteors a few orders of magnitude larger.

(Hell, TFA even explained that it would burn up, but I guess I can't expect anyone around here to know that...)

Re:Do it like they do on the Discovery channel... (1)

Trogre (513942) | about 8 years ago | (#15529638)

You're forgetting that Al Qaeda would happily obliterate any number of cities if they had the power.

Just because they haven't yet doesn't mean it's through lack of trying.

Slashdotted ? (3, Insightful)

Joebert (946227) | about 8 years ago | (#15529208)

Is it just me, or did NASA just get Slashdotted ?

How the hell do you /. NASA ?!

Re:Slashdotted ? (1)

Firehed (942385) | about 8 years ago | (#15529537)

What, you think cutting the space program back to nil means they can still afford good servers?

Re:Slashdotted ? (1)

Joebert (946227) | about 8 years ago | (#15529564)

What, you think cutting the space program back to nil means they can still afford good servers?

If that's not insightfull, I don't know what is.

Now no excuse to crash a spaceship into the moon.. (1)

ABeowulfCluster (854634) | about 8 years ago | (#15529228)

.. looks like they'll have to land their probes normally now. Or at least, they can send a probe to the new crater to see if there is ice below ground.

That is fake (2, Funny)

SensitiveMale (155605) | about 8 years ago | (#15529252)

I've seen Wile e. Coyote blow stuff up on the moon lots of time and it looks completely different from that obviously faked footage.

Videos make astronomy more tangible and real (2, Insightful)

w33t (978574) | about 8 years ago | (#15529262)

I said it in another thread - but I do love it when we get to see actual video of astronomical footage.

Don't get me wrong, I love astronomy and the photographs gleaned from it are simply the most profound images ever seen by mankind. Please understand the significance of what I mean there.

But when we can actually see these objects in motion, in-vivo so to speak, it's just so remarkable!

I only hope that when the next generation space telescopes are in orbit that they will be able to capture the streams of x-rays shooting from the poles of neutron stars exciting the gas of the surrounding nebula like a gigantic cosmic northern lights.

I *heart* astronomy :]

Re:Videos make astronomy more tangible and real (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15529377)

Man, that was beautiful.

You sure you're posting to the right site?

spon6e (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15529277)

c0ckz0r??? (0, Offtopic)

Hairball6494 (975716) | about 8 years ago | (#15529287)

LMFAO.

"Curator: Bryan Walls
NASA Official: Ron Koczor"


... with a last name like that and his profession, i think he's done his fair share of Venus research. (bottom right corner)

(mod: 1, offtopic, kthx :P )

Over a month since it happened (1)

radical_dementia (922403) | about 8 years ago | (#15529324)

Is there a good reason why this happened on May 2, and only now they are publishing an article about this? Not that I've even been able to see the video yet. NASA can put a man on the moon but they can't keep a server running more than 10 minutes before getting slashdotted.

Re:Over a month since it happened (1)

Gertlex (722812) | about 8 years ago | (#15529544)

More like they USED to be able to put a man on the moon...

Slashdotted NASA (1)

camperdave (969942) | about 8 years ago | (#15529549)

NASA can put a man on the moon but they can't keep a server running more than 10 minutes before getting slashdotted.

Well, let's not forget that NASA is a space agency, not an ISP.

Sagan's account (4, Interesting)

jmichaelg (148257) | about 8 years ago | (#15529361)

Carl Sagan's documentary Cosmos, described an event that happened in the middle ages. Some monks were sitting outside one evening when a meteoroid hit the moon and caused a naked-eye visible fireball. Evidently the event lasted long enough for the entire monastary to see it. If this current one only lasted half a second, the one Sagan described must have been huge. Problem was that the event flew straight in the face of Psalm 119 which reads:

As it was in the beginning, is now, and always shall be: for ever and ever. Amen.

The significance for the monks was that the Bible was telling them that the earth and heavens were unchanged since Creation and would remain unchanged forever after. Here was evidence that what their faith was telling them wasn't true. Sagan said the event caused quite a bit of problems for the monastery as the monks tried to reconcile their faith and reality.

If anyone knows anything more about the event Sagan was talking about, I'd really like to hear it. I've often wondered if the crater it left has been identified.

Re:Sagan's account (2, Insightful)

letxa2000 (215841) | about 8 years ago | (#15529468)

The significance for the monks was that the Bible was telling them that the earth and heavens were unchanged since Creation and would remain unchanged forever after. Here was evidence that what their faith was telling them wasn't true. Sagan said the event caused quite a bit of problems for the monastery as the monks tried to reconcile their faith and reality.


I've been surprised before, but on the face that sounds like hogwash. That a flash of light on the moon (when they didn't know what the moon was nor what the flash of light represented) that was visible for awhile and then disappeared would cause them to question their faith seems silly.

Re:Sagan's account (4, Insightful)

Rimbo (139781) | about 8 years ago | (#15529672)

I think the obvious answer is that getting from here

As it was in the beginning, is now, and always shall be: for ever and ever.


to here

the Bible was telling them that the earth and heavens were unchanged since Creation and would remain unchanged forever after


is a non sequitur... in context, the latter does not necessarily follow from the former.

on NASA and TNT (1)

Frightening (976489) | about 8 years ago | (#15529424)

They've proved us right!

You can think of energy in a kazillion different ways...so why is TNT the first thing to come to mind? Unless NASA is mad about blowing shit up, that is?

Slashdotters are always right 90% of the time.

Re:on NASA and TNT (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15529488)

Because TNT is the general standard to use [wikipedia.org] when talking about the energy of an explosion?

Think of the phrase "10 kiloton nuclear warhead." The ton in there is tons of TNT.

Re:on NASA and TNT (1)

Frightening (976489) | about 8 years ago | (#15529519)

Well I said 90% of the time didn't I? And he could have used calories, which are also standard. /*hides

Thanks for leting us know Nasa , 4 weeks after. (-1, Troll)

delflyzero (706112) | about 8 years ago | (#15529444)

Is this how we will be warned if one is heading to hit the earth ? After the fact ? I don't understand we put so much money into that agency and yet they keep messing up. Come you rocket scentist get your game on.

Re:Thanks for leting us know Nasa , 4 weeks after. (1)

Joebert (946227) | about 8 years ago | (#15529608)

I don't see how they messed up.

Think about it, if NASA would have made an alert about that thing, there would have been widespread panic, it would have still hit the moon, & NASA would be toast.

Obligatory Outer Limits Reference (1)

SlickMcSly (800954) | about 8 years ago | (#15529455)

It's a singularity jettisoned from a deccelerating spaceship as a gift to the earth. It's not an attack, don't shoot them! They come in peace but their voices are garbled by water!!!

"Caught on Video" (5, Funny)

GhaleonStrife (916215) | about 8 years ago | (#15529536)

"Caught on Video" makes it sound like something dirty was happening. "Hot meteorite on Moon action! All caught on video!"

Re:"Caught on Video" (1)

agentdunken (912306) | about 8 years ago | (#15529685)

"meteorite gone wild!"
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...