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Creative Commons Add-In for Office Released

ScuttleMonkey posted about 8 years ago | from the newer-friendlier-borg dept.

134

Ctrl+Alt+De1337 writes "Creative Commons has announced the release of an add-in to Microsoft Office that allows the easy addition of a CC license to files created with Word, PowerPoint, or Excel. It was co-developed by Microsoft and Creative Commons and only works in Office XP and Office 2003. It can be downloaded from Microsoft's download center after a validation check, and CNet has a screenshot available of the tool."

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134 comments

it is a crock off shit (1, Insightful)

seanadams.com (463190) | about 8 years ago | (#15579099)

... and it stinketh.

I can't see how anyone could construe this as an endorsement by Microsoft of unconventional copyright terms.

Can anyone explain how this is NOT a thinly-veiled a ruse to encourage use of Microsoft's proprietary file formats for potentially important, widely distributed documents?

Re:it is a crock off shit (5, Insightful)

nuzak (959558) | about 8 years ago | (#15579177)

God forbid that Microsoft should encourage anyone to use their own product or anything. Such a shame that no one is able to write CC-covered material with any other product anymore, thanks to the exclusive arrangement that CC no doubt made with Microsoft.

Re:it is a crock off shit (0)

seanadams.com (463190) | about 8 years ago | (#15579211)

God forbid that Microsoft should encourage anyone to use their own product or anything.


God forbid, indeed. The fact that they're suggesting it does not mean that authors, for the benefit of their readers should buy into it. I see absolutely no benefit to anyone except Microsoft, which is entirely my point, and which you (obliquely) seem to acknowledge.

I refer yout o your sibling post: "the irony of using proprietary formats for such documents, cannot have escaped the Microsoft Humor Department"

Hardy har... Microsoft has a sense of humor?!?!?

Re:it is a crock off shit (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | about 8 years ago | (#15579236)

Since the US Federal government found MS a monopoly, but isn't stopping Microsoft from "encouraging" people to use their software by abusing it, looks like god is the only one left with jurisdiction might actually forbid it.

Re:it is a crock off shit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15579277)

How would federal anti-trust law prohibit this plug-in? And, do you think brown turds are healthier than beige ones?

Re:it is a crock off shit (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15579778)

Hail ye stinky Americunts. What a sad lot ye are. Can't even keep the nigras in line havin' once again to send in your National Guardsmen. What a sad sad bunch. Your New Orleans is more a cesspool than the real Orleans in the even deeper cesspool of France. Its funny, you won't even admit your own problem and deal with your niggers once and for all. Good to see though that at least we over here aren't alone in the mud invasion and multicultural malaise.

Re:it is a crock off shit (1, Insightful)

IWannaBeAnAC (653701) | about 8 years ago | (#15579179)

You have missed the point a bit, I think. Any kind of big media company (Disney especially, but Microsoft is in the same boat), want to actively encourage other people to release their creative works under very free licenses. Preferably, BSD-style. Definitely not share alike (GPL style), but I guess they are prepared to take that gamble?

But I agree, the irony of using proprietary formats for such documents, cannot have escaped the Microsoft Humor Department.

Typical M$. (1)

twitter (104583) | about 8 years ago | (#15579843)

Any kind of big media company ... want to actively encourage other people to release their creative works under very free licenses. Preferably, BSD-style

The old, "What's ours is ours and what yours is ours, thanks for giving" license.

Microsoft and others love that and this tool reflects that love. The choices are restricted and the defaults are just what M$ would like:

  • "Allow commercial use of your work" is first with a default of "yes".
  • "Allow modification of your work" is the ONLY other option, with a default of "Yes"

Attribution choices are missing which would make this a 2.5 license only. Indeed, OO2 shows a link to the 2.5 license page defined by the author. The defaults are very similar to earlier BSD licenses, which Microsoft loves and encourages.

Cnet's description, "This window allows people to set restrictions on use," is amazing because the defaults do everything to strip away all control and allow maximum exploitation.

Re:it is a crock off shit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15579205)

jesus man.. its just a tool to add a simple license to a document.
if you feel the need to complain, then stfu and write your own tool for whatever document editor you use.

i can't stand it when the FOSS posers and tools won't shut up about every little thing a commercial company pushes out the door.

Re:it is a crock off shit (2, Insightful)

cnettel (836611) | about 8 years ago | (#15579239)

Of course MS loves to see massive use of their formats. Can we really blame them for that?

On the other hand, one point with (some of) the CC licenses is continued editing; although another point is to maintain the distinction against public domain with "full edit/no attribution" rights. That is, a PDF version might not technically hinder you from integrating a CC work into your own document, but if you use MS Office (or even OO.org), a MS Office document might mean an easier way to do it. This means that we can't say that distribution in ONLY a highly presentation-centric format like PDF would be a good thing, despite it being open.

Lots of people use MS Office and won't convert to anything else if this "licensing wizard" download was missing. It might encourage a few to license works in a clear and less restrictive manner. I see nothing wrong in that.

Re:it is a crock off shit (2, Interesting)

bi_boy (630968) | about 8 years ago | (#15579361)

Can anyone explain how this is NOT a thinly-veiled a ruse to encourage use of Microsoft's proprietary file formats for potentially important, widely distributed documents?

I like how you started out with an assumption then expect other people to verify that assumption for you. Oh shit I mean.... rawr M$ is teh evil rofl mao

Re:it is a crock off shit (1)

seanadams.com (463190) | about 8 years ago | (#15579464)

I like how you started out with an assumption then expect other people to verify that assumption for you.

Quoi? I clearly challenged anyone to show the contrary...

Perhaps the first statement is not related to the second in the way you think. One refutes their ostensible intent, and the other is my assertion of their actual intent.

Ah the hell with it, I'm all geeked out for today - you win.

Re:it is a crock off shit (1)

NemosomeN (670035) | about 8 years ago | (#15579515)

I had friend who used this. He tried to save it as HTML and it blocked it. The he tried saving it as plain-text and his compute locked up. He finally tried to save as a PDF, and clippy jumped out and stabbed him in the face. Wait, no, none of that happened. (I even made up the "I had a friend who used this" part.) Why license your stuff anyway? Who is going to have such a large volume of people trying to reproduce their material that getting emailed requests would be too burdensome? And in cases where it is, you might as well just do it manually, as it's obviously worth it to you. I only see this bloating documents unnecessarily with license text from the F/OSS crowd. I'm all for Open Source, and I think it's noble. I've used Linux, and I use it (Knoppix/DSL) often for fixing simple issues easily (fdisk, cfdisk, etc.) when the Windows way to do it would be a pain. I use OSX, and I love it. The truth is though, if you use Linux/OSX, I probably won't like you. Most of the F/OSS crowd is an angry, belligerent, and or annoying bunch, and I think that's holding them back. Imagine how many people would just be annoyed by the license text at the bottom of every document from that hairy guy from IT. "I reset your password. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Slovenia License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/si/ [creativecommons.org] or send a letter to Creative Commons, 543 Howard Street, 5th Floor, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA." (Btw, the license is not copy/paste friendly at that link. They should link to legalese, and have a link at the top of that to "English")

Re:it is a crock off shit (1)

Goodgerster (904325) | about 8 years ago | (#15579600)

I had friend who used this. He tried to save it as HTML and it blocked it. The he tried saving it as plain-text and his compute locked up. He finally tried to save as a PDF, and clippy jumped out and stabbed him in the face. Wait, no, none of that happened. (I even made up the "I had a friend who used this" part.) Why license your stuff anyway? Who is going to have such a large volume of people trying to reproduce their material that getting emailed requests would be too burdensome? And in cases where it is, you might as well just do it manually, as it's obviously worth it to you. I only see this bloating documents unnecessarily with license text from the F/OSS crowd. I'm all for Open Source, and I think it's noble. I've used Linux, and I use it (Knoppix/DSL) often for fixing simple issues easily (fdisk, cfdisk, etc.) when the Windows way to do it would be a pain. I use OSX, and I love it. The truth is though, if you use Linux/OSX, I probably won't like you. Most of the F/OSS crowd is an angry, belligerent, and or annoying bunch, and I think that's holding them back. Imagine how many people would just be annoyed by the license text at the bottom of every document from that hairy guy from IT. "I reset your password. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Slovenia License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/si/ [creativecommons.org] or send a letter to Creative Commons, 543 Howard Street, 5th Floor, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA." (Btw, the license is not copy/paste friendly at that link. They should link to legalese, and have a link at the top of that to "English")

Bollocks.

Please stop labelling all of us as Stallmen. It's incredibly annoying, and the simple truth is that except where it is reasonable to expect you to know the subject, Linux people mainly aren't like that any more.

Re:it is a crock off shit (3, Funny)

cammoblammo (774120) | about 8 years ago | (#15579670)

Most of the F/OSS crowd is an angry, belligerent, and or annoying bunch...

No, just the angry, belligerent, and or annoying ones.

Re:it is a crock off shit (1)

NemosomeN (670035) | about 8 years ago | (#15580016)

Most of those who aren't like that are like me, and don't associate themselves with the crowd. I never said all, so I don't see why you feel the need to jump on the defensive personally. I do find it ironic that one of the most laid back, pragmatic people in the Linux crowd is Linus himself. By the way, I don't count Stallman in the group. You can't blame a whole group for the loud extremists.

Re:it is a crock off shit (1)

Mr. Underbridge (666784) | about 8 years ago | (#15579748)

Can anyone explain how this is NOT a thinly-veiled a ruse to encourage use of Microsoft's proprietary file formats for potentially important, widely distributed documents?

Christ, lose the tinfoil hat. I'll explain it: they've made a tool to do a Good Thing with their software. They haven't tried to embrace/extend CC. They are *allowed* to add features to their software.

I've also evidently missed when CC documents became important and widely distributed to lend any credence to your conspiracy theory.

If this had been done by Open Office (or probably Apple) people would be blowing their loads all over the place.

Re:it is a crock off shit (2, Interesting)

WalterGR (106787) | about 8 years ago | (#15579851)

I can't see how anyone could construe this as an endorsement by Microsoft of unconventional copyright terms.

Hrm... Well, then how about these:

"Microsoft today announced the release of its Simple List Extensions specification to RSS under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license." (source [creativecommons.org] )

"The Microsoft-hosted PatternShare community brings together information on software patterns organized by wiki inventor and now Microsoft employee Ward Cunningham." (source [creativecommons.org] )

From Lawrence Lessig's blog: "So we have 10 days left in the Creative Commons campaign. This is not a drill. We are down to the last $100,000, and really need your support..." (source [lessig.org] ) And then a few days later... "At 12:30pm, an envelope from Redmond appeared at the Creative Commons office. Inside, a check for $25,000. From Microsoft." (source [lessig.org] )

And so forth [google.com]

Re:it is a crock off shit (2, Interesting)

Americano (920576) | about 8 years ago | (#15580189)

Do you *really* have any notion of how paranoid you sound? Let's look at the simple facts:
  1. Microsoft does NOT force you to write your documents in Word, PowerPoint, or Excel. There are other non-MSFT alternatives you can choose.
  2. Microsoft does NOT control the terms of the license. The Creative Commons licenses are NOT Microsoft creations.
  3. You are free to NOT INSTALL the Office add-in, if you don't wish to use it.
  4. Given that Office (PPT, XLS, DOC) formats are used *primarily* in business settings, and distributed to a typically very limited audience of interested people, I don't think we'll see many people releasing DOC-formatted CC works to wide-spread fanfare and adulation.

But with all that said, I intend to apply a Creative Commons license to ALL of *my* TPS reports, spreadsheets, and customer presentations that, on a good day, 6 people in the world actually care about.

Mash that up, bitches!

farting (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15579104)

Hey, do you guys smell your farts? I do. I fucking love to smell my farts. Sometimes I put my head in between my legs, sometimes I "waft" with reckless abandon. Sometimes I like to position my hand down the back of my pants beforehand, fingers pressed slightly against my buttcrack. The fart stink can stick to your fingers for hours, perfect for active adults like me, always on-the-go.

I even have discreet "techniques" for enjoying my smells in public. If I fart while I'm standing, I might bend down to "tie my shoes." If I'm sitting somewhere, and I know no one is directly watching me, I'll fan the fart towards my face by opening and closing my legs.

I fucking love smelling my farts.

Reminds me... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15579409)

...of that old folk wisdom: "children are like farts: I barely tolerate my own"...

We'll See (1, Insightful)

jlechem (613317) | about 8 years ago | (#15579105)

I'm sure there's a line in the EULA somewhere about how using that program gives M$ control of your everlasting soul (and your creative work). Of course what M$ would want with the half assed songs I would create with this software is beyond me.

Re:We'll See (2, Funny)

adtifyj (868717) | about 8 years ago | (#15579347)

Of course what M$ would want with the half assed songs I would create with this software is beyond me.

I am sure that Microsoft would want to know about this hidden feature you are using!

Re:We'll See (1)

Geoffreyerffoeg (729040) | about 8 years ago | (#15579510)

In the Visual Studio EULA, you cannot redistribute the "Redistributable Code" and the "freely"-licensed sample code in any license that is a "Prohibited License." A Prohibited License is any one that allows other users to modify your code and recompile.

Re:We'll See (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15579785)

This clause only exists because Smelly Hippie Richard Stallman thought up a way to creatively extend-n-embrace software copyright with his extra-legal notions of derivitive works.

Why do you need an add-in? (5, Insightful)

ThinkingInBinary (899485) | about 8 years ago | (#15579122)

Why would you want a "Creative Commons tool" for Office? Wouldn't it just be easier to add a page after the title page, like the copyright page, but instead explaining the license of the document? Why do you need a program to do it for you?

What would be far more useful would be a way to tag Creative Commons documents in web pages, and then if some search engine (Google? please?) would explicitly label Creative Commons results as such, and encourage people to listen to, view, combine, mash up (shudder), and otherwise use them.

Re:Why do you need an add-in? (5, Insightful)

ReverendLoki (663861) | about 8 years ago | (#15579191)

I for one can see how this would be useful. You see, there isn't one set of terms and conditions, but rather there's a whole range of possible conditions applicable under Creative Commons licensing.

What this looks like is pretty much a wizard that asks you how you would like to allow your work to be used, and then generates the CC license for those conditions. Although a nice add on, it really doesn't look all that complicated. I'm hoping it isn't long until someone makes a good wizard for OpenOffice.org as well.

Re:Why do you need an add-in? (3, Interesting)

HotNeedleOfInquiry (598897) | about 8 years ago | (#15579193)

A total non-event. Just shows that the most mindless gadget or add-in can be news if it's within the open-source/free-software/free-copyright paradigm.

Re:Why do you need an add-in? (5, Informative)

monomania (595068) | about 8 years ago | (#15579209)

"What would be far more useful would be a way to tag Creative Commons documents in web pages, and then if some search engine (Google? please?) would explicitly label Creative Commons results as such..."

There is; on the web badge code, the following (or, depending on the license, something similar) is encapsulated:

<rdf:RDF xmlns="http://web.resource.org/cc/"
        xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/"
        xmlns:rdf="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax -ns#">
<Work rdf:about="">
<license rdf:resource="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/ by/2.5/" />
</Work>
<License rdf:about="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/ 2.5/">
      <requires rdf:resource="http://web.resource.org/cc/Attributi on" />
      <permits rdf:resource="http://web.resource.org/cc/Reproduct ion" />
      <permits rdf:resource="http://web.resource.org/cc/Distribut ion" />
      <permits rdf:resource="http://web.resource.org/cc/Derivativ eWorks" />
      <requires rdf:resource="http://web.resource.org/cc/Notice" />
</License>
</rdf:RDF>

It's up to the browser/search engine/application as to what is done with it.

Re:Why do you need an add-in? (1)

yogikoudou (806237) | about 8 years ago | (#15579358)

> It's up to the browser/search engine/application as to what is done with it.

There is a Firefox extension [mozilla.org] that displays the 3 symbols (By, NC, SA) in your status bar as they are found in an RDF chunk in the page you're visiting.

Re:Why do you need an add-in? (4, Informative)

Geoffreyerffoeg (729040) | about 8 years ago | (#15579424)

then if some search engine (Google? please?) would explicitly label Creative Commons results as such

From advanced search [google.com] :

Return results that are:
- not filtered by license
- free to use or share
- free to use or share, even commercially
- free to use share or modify
- free to use, share or modify, even commercially
More info [google.com]

Google Creative Commons Search = good (1)

ThinkingInBinary (899485) | about 8 years ago | (#15579523)

Yay. So now we need a feature in web site designers/blogging tools to label things. Word documents are islands of text, not interlinked hypertext media. Adding CC license tags to web pages and media files would be far more useful.

Re:Why do you need an add-in? (1)

Grey Ninja (739021) | about 8 years ago | (#15579674)

Wow. Thank you. I always used Yahoo when searching for CC content for usage in my projects. That simple note makes things a whole lot easier. (Although I still wish that there was a special google portal for CC)

Here's why I think it's useful. (1)

kesuki (321456) | about 8 years ago | (#15580042)

Remember, Office documents have DRM capabilities, by having a plug-in that is offficial then people worried about DRM can still use the Creative Commons License to publish writings. Yeah, I'm not a big fan of DRM, but some people ask for it, so now those people can still choose to use the creative commons license with DRM protected office documents.

It's an add-in :) nobody made you download it, if you don't like it someone else already told you what you could copy/paste to acheive a non-drm version of the same thing.

WWOT fp (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15579125)

Why should they need to? (5, Insightful)

Manip (656104) | about 8 years ago | (#15579131)

There is something very wrong with our copyright system when people have to attach a licence to all media they create in order for others to use it... Perhaps I should start wearing a badge that reads "Your eyes and ears have permission to consume my copyright material (e.g. My voice, and face."

Why isn't media created free/public domain unless its creator wants it protected? ... ?

Re:Why should they need to? (1)

FoaadH (983035) | about 8 years ago | (#15579182)

Why isn't media created free/public domain unless its creator wants it protected? ... ? But it is.
If you don't attach a license with your work anyone can do anything with it without you being able to do anything about it.

Re:Why should they need to? (5, Informative)

Ctrl+Alt+De1337 (837964) | about 8 years ago | (#15579240)

If you don't attach a license with your work anyone can do anything with it without you being able to do anything about it.

This is the exact opposite of what the law says. If you create an original work of any kind, whether or not you register it with the copyright office it is still copyrighted to you and no one can do anything with it without your permission. If you don't put a license on it, then it is assumed that you are reserving all of your rights not waiving all of your rights.

Re:Why should they need to? (1)

FoaadH (983035) | about 8 years ago | (#15579278)

And how would you prove that it is an "original work" and you have "created it" if you didn't register it.

Re:Why should they need to? (1)

Qzukk (229616) | about 8 years ago | (#15579300)

And how would you prove that it is an "original work" and you have "created it" if you didn't register it.

Simple, when you get around to wanting to sue someone over it, you file your registration, which you can do at any time.

Re:Why should they need to? (2, Insightful)

FoaadH (983035) | about 8 years ago | (#15579314)

Simple, when you get around to wanting to sue someone over it, you file your registration, which you can do at any time.
Of course if he didn't beat you to it.

Re:Why should they need to? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15579803)

Actually, it is pretty much that easy. From what I gather, you'd merely need proof that you created it. If you just mail a hardcopy of the document to yourself - since all mail is postmarked it should be a mostly valid date. Granted, people might attempt editing the postmark, but odds are that it wouldn't be worth it. Therefore - as long as you do not open the letter, it'd be pretty safe to assume that you did in fact make the copyrighted document on or before the date of the postmark - and therefore be a reasonable way of proving your claim.

You should still register your copyrights anyways.

Re:Why should they need to? (1)

Qzukk (229616) | about 8 years ago | (#15580128)

The postmark thing is generally not acceptable, since they can be faked. You could even mail an empty envelope to yourself and steam it open and reseal it with whatever you wanted at a later date.

As another person alluded, it also doesn't prove that you made the document, only that you (ostensibly) mailed a copy of it.

Re:Why should they need to? (2, Informative)

QuantumG (50515) | about 8 years ago | (#15580202)

The courts don't care. They leave it up to the person being sued to prove they created it. Other than Microsoft, no-one registers copyright, and even when people do register copyright they register so little of the actual work that it's not possible to tell what work it is they are registering. In the case of computer programs, it is typical to register the first and last 3 pages of the source code.. Yes, that's right, pages.. wtf is a page of source code? Who knows.

Re:Why should they need to? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15579391)

If you create an original work of any kind, whether or not you register it with the copyright office it is still copyrighted to you

True.

and no one can do anything with it without your permission.

Depends what you mean by "do". Generally I can "do" whatever I want with it once I purchase it or you give it to me. I can show it to others, sell it, burn it, mock it, and satirize it. I can't make copies of it though (with some exceptions). That's what copyright means.

Re:Why should they need to? (1)

BootNinja (743040) | about 8 years ago | (#15579675)

generally, there will be some sort of record of when you created the work. i.e. a hard drive date stamp, or some such. Additionally, if you have created a work with the intention of distributing it, generally you will have showed it to somebody who can bear witness that you created it first. It is not a sure thing, but it has been upheld in court before.

Re:Why should they need to? (2, Insightful)

cnettel (836611) | about 8 years ago | (#15579192)

Well, if you don't ever intend to use your rights, it's practically in the public domain. Adding a license makes it obvious, you can't go back later and say "hey, I DO want full rights to this". If, on the other hand, everything was free that wasn't explicitly tagged, I think we would run into even more draconian assertions of all material that should be protected: imagine that you see some rather long excerpt where the copyright note is NOT present, and imagine if that meant a practical carte blanche to copy it?

Go back later? (1)

Mateo_LeFou (859634) | about 8 years ago | (#15579260)

I have a question that came up as I encouraged a music-writing partner to license some stuff with BY-SA: how would you go about saying something like "after two years, I reserve the right to forbid commercial users". After some discussion, I talked him out of actually doing this, but I wonder if any CC experts know about the legality/feasibility of that sort of thing?

Re:Why should they need to? (3, Insightful)

QuantumG (50515) | about 8 years ago | (#15579349)

No. You are wrong. All rights are reserved by default. If I create a work that can be covered by copyright, it is covered by copyright, and you have no rights under the law to copy the work without my express written permission (excluding fair use). This is one of the many ways copyright law is draconian.

Re:Why should they need to? (1)

eplossl (242870) | about 8 years ago | (#15579223)

Most media is initially Free or Public Domain. The fact of the matter is that most owners want to protect their rights to their IP. As such, most media becomes copyrighted in some manner or another. This tool just allows an easier method of preparing the necessary paperwork and adding the necessary information to the work to make the copyright stick. I do find it somewhat ironic that this is Microsoft who is purporting an allegedly alternative licencing scheme (non-all rights reserved).

Re:Why should they need to? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15579428)

$ fortune zippy copyright

Wow, what a pile of... (-1, Troll)

Creepy Crawler (680178) | about 8 years ago | (#15579135)

So, is this the kind of offering sthis company is bringing us to? Whatever happened to just plain markup (you know, without ridiculous shit) and letting the lawyers deal with legal issues?

So, any bets on how many hours it will take to "crack it" ?

Not so evil (1)

FoaadH (983035) | about 8 years ago | (#15579137)

I think most of the Creative Commons Licenses [creativecommons.org] aren't evil.
So this can't be hold against Microsoft. Or am I wrong about that, I guess we'll see.

I was wrong (1)

FoaadH (983035) | about 8 years ago | (#15579337)

No matters what Microsoft do it'll always get beaten by slashdoters.

Re:I was wrong (1)

bcat24 (914105) | about 8 years ago | (#15579646)

Amen to that. Come on people, sometimes an addon is just an addon.

Who needs a creative commons add-on (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15579142)

When you can download an entire office suite [slashdot.org] that can already save office documents or even open documents in the createive commons license for free?

Re:Who needs a creative commons add-on (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15579256)

sorry that should be entire office suite [openoffice.org] 'stupid slashdot code' and 'fuck that slow down cowboy shit'.

Re:Who needs a creative commons add-on (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15579820)

David Blaine Fails, GNAA claims responsibility
  David Blaine Fails, GNAA claims responsibility
 
  Dessimat0r - Trollcore, NYC
 

It was revealed today that three minutes before his 'Drowned Alive' was due to end, David Blaine was forced out of his water-filled glass bubble early with an unknown cause.

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As Blaine turned to look at this explicit imagery, he began to have convulsions of the anus as his poop began to flow out of his rectum. This caused the water to turn a muddy-brown colour. Blaine then attempted to take off his oxygen mask, possibly hoping to ingest the diseased water in order to get a real taste of rectal prolapse.

The organisers of the stunt then feared for his safety as Blaine reached for his erect penis, as the palms of his hands were suffering from myosis. With this, two divers jumped into the water to save Blaine before he had a chance to touch his throbbing rod, and succeeded in pulling him out in time. He was out of breath as he was rushed to hospital, suffering from the effects of the stunt upon his body.

When Blaine was interviewed in hospital by the Gay Nigger Association of the America, he had this to say: "JEWS DID WTC".


  About David Blaine:
 

Kike magician.


  About GNAA:
  GNAA (GAY NIGGER ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA) is the first organization which gathers GAY NIGGERS from all over America and abroad for one common goal - being GAY NIGGERS.
 
  Are you GAY [klerck.org] ?
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  • Second, you need to succeed in posting a GNAA First Post [wikipedia.org] on slashdot.org [slashdot.org] , a popular "news for trolls" website.
  • Third, you need to join the official GNAA irc channel #GNAA on irc.gnaa.us, and apply for membership.
Talk to one of the ops or any of the other members in the channel to sign up today! Upon submitting your application, you will be required to submit links to your successful First Post, and you will be tested on your knowledge of GAYNIGGERS FROM OUTER SPACE.
 
  If you are having trouble locating #GNAA, the official GAY NIGGER ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA irc channel, you might be on a wrong irc network. The correct network is NiggerNET, and you can connect to irc.gnaa.us as our official server. Follow this link [irc] if you are using an irc client such as mIRC.
 
  If you have mod points and would like to support GNAA, please moderate this post up.
 
  .________________________________________________.
  | ______________________________________._a,____ | Press contact:
  | _______a_._______a_______aj#0s_____aWY!400.___ | Gary Niger
  | __ad#7!!*P____a.d#0a____#!-_#0i___.#!__W#0#___ | gary_niger@gnaa.us [mailto]
  | _j#'_.00#,___4#dP_"#,__j#,__0#Wi___*00P!_"#L,_ | GNAA Corporate Headquarters
  | _"#ga#9!01___"#01__40,_"4Lj#!_4#g_________"01_ | 143 Rolloffle Avenue
  | ________"#,___*@`__-N#____`___-!^_____________ | Tarzana, California 91356
  | _________#1__________?________________________ |
  | _________j1___________________________________ | All other inquiries:
  | ____a,___jk_GAY_NIGGER_ASSOCIATION_OF_AMERICA_ | Enid Al-Punjabi
  | ____!4yaa#l___________________________________ | enid_indian@gnaa.us [mailto]
  | ______-"!^____________________________________ | GNAA World Headquarters
  ` _______________________________________________' 160-0023 Japan Tokyo-to Shinjuku-ku Nishi-Shinjuku 3-20-2
 

  Copyright (c) 2003-2006 Gay Nigger Association of America [www.gnaa.us]
 

Not Office 2K? (1)

MMC Monster (602931) | about 8 years ago | (#15579154)

What is so special about this macro that it doesn't work in Office 2K or even Office 97?

Re:Not Office 2K? (3, Informative)

cnettel (836611) | about 8 years ago | (#15579252)

Task panes (i.e. non-modal dialog boxes integrated in the window border) were added as a new UI object in Office XP. Quite a lot of things that could have been made into wizards or plain dialog boxes in older versions are panes in XP/2003. I guess this download makes use of that GUI style as well.

"Smart tags" were also introduced in Office XP, the most popular one being the one where you choose the paste settings after you've seen the results of pasting with default settings, but it wouldn't make even less sense to package this functionality as a tag.

Re:Not Office 2K? (1)

cnettel (836611) | about 8 years ago | (#15579275)

Forget it, the CNet screenshot does look like a normal dialog box. Then I guess they are just lazy, or highly speculatively there's some signing of the macros involved that doesn't play well with older versions. I doubt that, though, the point of adding signing was rather to stop macros to autorun in new versions, not stop them in the old ones (like wide-open good old O97).

Direct link to screenshot (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15579166)

Direct URL to screenshot image:
i.n.com.com/i/ne/p/2006/ccprompt_466x359.jpg

What's the point (1, Insightful)

chord.wav (599850) | about 8 years ago | (#15579183)

What's the point of creating a CC licensed file in a propierary format?

Re:What's the point (5, Insightful)

Keeper (56691) | about 8 years ago | (#15579227)

What's the point of posting on a website not under your control?

Re:What's the point (4, Insightful)

Trevahaha (874501) | about 8 years ago | (#15579372)

Because you're licensing the content not the format it's presented in. People generally copyright the text on a website or inside a book, not that the book was printed on white paper using a serif font or that your website is running on Apache or IIS.

Re:What's the point (1)

alshithead (981606) | about 8 years ago | (#15579421)

PR! Good public relations is worth anything. Sell your soul to the devil for good PR! That is how you generate $$$.

I'm assuming you meant proprietary. Sorry, that's the spelling nazi in me.

Alt Pic (Alt Tool) (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15579185)

L'effect de Smashdot, the server she is crunchy.

Alternate pic of The Tool [boingboing.net] .

After Validation? (2, Insightful)

dustwun (662589) | about 8 years ago | (#15579195)

What's this "after validation" business? Doesn't this seem slightly hypocritical when compared to Creative Commons? The xml in the document has 'MICROSOFT" all over the place, so it's not like you can say you didn't make it in an office product.

Re:After Validation? (2, Interesting)

pla (258480) | about 8 years ago | (#15579454)

What's this "after validation" business?

Microsoft has a problem - We hate them, and they fear us.

We have the techology to pirate their products, the motivation to do so even if we don't like using them, and the influence to convince others to either switch to Linux or use the pirated copies we give them rather than buying.

You'll notice that this only works in the two most recent versions of Office. Why, do you suppose, they chose not to include it in all of them? It has nothing to do with XML - All the older Office-native formats have the ability to store metadata (as various companies and governments occasionally discover when someone accidentally starts a "new" document by opening "supersecretespionageplan.doc", deleting everything they see, then saving and releasing the new "happyfunPRcampaign.doc" to the world.

No, they only use the new versions because they want us to update. And they want us to update to a far more restrictive version, that includes at least some smidgeon of DRM, whether online activation or Genuine (dis)Advantage or what-have-you.

Personally, on my machines that run Windows, I have Office 97. Not enough has changed to make cracking a new version worth the effort, and - Did you know, you don't need to install it? Nope - You can literally just copy the CD to your HDD, find "winword.exe" and the rest, and run them without corrupting the rest of your system (including, critically, the ability to do this as a non-admin user!). It will warn you (just once, not even as annoying as most shareware) that it needs repair every time you run it, but I have yet to find a feature actually broken from never bothering to formally install it.


Hmm, I've drifted a bit. Okay, I'll stop here.

Re:After Validation? (1)

Dachannien (617929) | about 8 years ago | (#15579613)

You can't even download the DirectX redistributable package anymore without validation, despite it being on almost every PC game CD I've bought in the past decade.

Why? And what about OpenOffice? (2, Insightful)

rafadev (980736) | about 8 years ago | (#15579213)

I really don't understand why M$ would want to develop such a tool. I guess they want OTHER people to share stuff, NOT them, of course. Its reasonable that the Creative Commons staff would want it to make it easier for people to creativcommonize their documents, but really, supporting a plugin for Office XP and 2003 doesn't actually cope much with the open philosophy. At least they don't ask you to validate your windows version, that would be really funny. I guess it would have been more reasonable if they did such a tool for OpenOffice, or another open office suite, I think that it would be much more usefull than making one such "uncompatible"...

Quoting from the M$ download site:
Microsoft Office productivity applications are the most widely used personal productivity applications in the world, and Microsoft's goal is to enhance the user's experience with those applications. Empowering Microsoft Office users to express their intentions through Creative Commons licenses is another way Microsoft enables users around the world to exercise their creative freedom while being clear about the rights granted to users of a creative work. In the past, it has not always been easy or obvious to understand the intentions of some authors or artists regarding distribution or use of their intellectual creations.
It seems to me that that is the biggest load of lies I've ever heard. It's nearly as missleading as the healthy McDonald's trash. "Microsoft enables users around the world to exercise their creative freedom" Creative freedom?, Microsoft? I guess those terms don't really cope. I think that before releasing such a tool they should try applying some creative freedom themselves.

Re:Why? And what about OpenOffice? (1)

EvanED (569694) | about 8 years ago | (#15579336)

MS has quite a few projects that are out under their own open source license. I forget what it's called, and I think it's incompatible with the GPL, but MS does go OSS when it thinks it will benefit them (which isn't very often).

Re:Why? And what about OpenOffice? (2)

Serapth (643581) | about 8 years ago | (#15579385)

Question for you...

Do you insist on saying M$ because:
a) Your pandering to the Linux Zealot crowd, where as you think any Microsoft bash will result in more Karma coming your way?
or...
b) You are just trying to inform time consumed folks how biased your opinions are, so as to save them from wasting more time reading whatever else it is you have to say?

If its B, I thank you for the courtesy and time savings you have given me!

AutoLawyer (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | about 8 years ago | (#15579224)

Who's got software that automatically reports whether/which CC license is assigned to a given file?

Creative commons isn't a good thing (2, Interesting)

mrcaseyj (902945) | about 8 years ago | (#15579232)

I don't think creative commons is a good thing because only some of its licenses have full freedom. Microsoft has probably released some free software too, but that doesn't mean we should promote Microsoft as free software.

Re:Creative commons isn't a good thing (1)

Ahnteis (746045) | about 8 years ago | (#15579543)

Absolutely. The whole WORLD is black and white. It's either great or horrible. Nothing in between.

Re:Creative commons isn't a good thing (1)

bcat24 (914105) | about 8 years ago | (#15579667)

And in the real world, nobody gives a damn. I like the open source ideology much more than the free software one. Proprietary software is not evil. Neither are non-sa Creative Commons licenses. Licenses are a means, not an end.

Re:Creative commons isn't a good thing (1)

mrcaseyj (902945) | about 8 years ago | (#15579940)

Non-freedom licenses are OK for some things. The only problem with Creative Commons is that it causes a little confusion in that it lumps together free licenses with restricted ones. It tries to take advantage of the goodness of the free licenses rubbing off onto the restricted ones. This is actually a minor flaw. Simply having a different name for the free licenses and the restricted ones would be fine. Of course then the name recognition of "Creative Commons" would be diluted. It's actually a close call, but overall I'd say its not a good thing to lump them all together.

The first method (2, Funny)

Kuku_monroe (753761) | about 8 years ago | (#15579254)

They wanted to paste a "Captain Copyright" logo in everypage.

But of course, the image was copyrighted.

That screenshot is a fake! (5, Funny)

garcia (6573) | about 8 years ago | (#15579264)

CNet has a screenshot available of the tool.

That screenshot looks nothing like Ballmer!

Microsoft...Creative Commons... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15579273)

Does not compute.
Hive mind stack overflow at 0xEE00FF33
Core dumped.

Cats living with dogs!

Seriously, what am I to make of this?
CC muddy themselves by association with the Devil.
M$ send confusing message about IP

Isn't this a little backwards? (2, Interesting)

DittoBox (978894) | about 8 years ago | (#15579290)

Isn't this like asking Satan the story of Jesus or something?

What good is an `open' license if the format in which it's published is closed and restrictive?

Re:Isn't this a little backwards? (1)

bcat24 (914105) | about 8 years ago | (#15579690)

The license covers the content, not the format. Given the right license terms, I can transfer the content to an open format and publish it.

Clue? (1)

Mateo_LeFou (859634) | about 8 years ago | (#15579321)

I'm baffled as to why they would touch this stuff, too. My best guess: "...first document to be CC-licensed using this tool is the text of Brazilian Minister of Culture Gilberto Gil's iSummit keynote speech". Lotta people in Brazil. The Vole's been trying to roll back their F/OSS support for awhile...

Creative Commons or CC content (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15579338)

CC content is nice but having a way to verify authenticity is more important check out numly.com thats what they do, establish authenticity for pubilicy available matreial creative commons or copy righted.

Call me when.. (2)

crabpeople (720852) | about 8 years ago | (#15579439)


They develop a plugin to read ODF files. Thats kind of what I thought this was - by way of gross misunderstanding - and i was about to jump for joy. Then maybe people wont have to keep two versions of a document depending on who they are sending it to.

Re:Call me when.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15579756)

Oh I'm sure they'll love creating a plugin to read ODF documents. Writing them is another story. Once it's in Word it will never export properly to ODF again. It will be just bad enough that people not using Word will be frustrated enough by mysterious formatting issues to just find some way of getting Word so they can read the damn thing.

You know, just like Word works today.

Improper licensing - What if... (3, Interesting)

Tiger4 (840741) | about 8 years ago | (#15579468)

What if I improperly tag a document with a Creative Commons license? For example, say I am an employee in a large office. Lets make it a government office just for spice. I create some document of some importance to my boss. I have done it as a work for hire. I have done it in a government office, but it is not intended for publication. Somehow, I manage to tag this document with a CC license. I send it around for review, and the information in it is rolled up into a document that IS intended for publication. It wasn't my document to license out, but the license is now bundled up in there. What, if anything, happens next?

Re:Improper licensing - What if... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15579952)

Simple, the company or government sues you for any damages they sustain and the world moves on... except you now live in a cardboard box.

Re:Improper licensing - What if... (3, Interesting)

ClamIAm (926466) | about 8 years ago | (#15580063)

This has already happened many times. When George Romero released Night of the Living Dead, they forgot to put a copyright notice on the film [wikipedia.org] . The law back then stated that you must put a copyright notice on your work to maintain copyright. Because of this, this film is now in the public domain.

My example is a bit different, but the main point is this: once something is released to the public, anyone who receives the work gains all the rights of fair use, as well as any others that you give them. The status of your document would be whatever license it got released under. As for you, you would most likely be fired and/or sued for negligence or breach of contract.

You know why? (4, Interesting)

slashflood (697891) | about 8 years ago | (#15579535)

It is there to get you used to the idea of DRM. It is actually part of the DRM system integrated in Office. Sooner or later, users will be presented with a far more complex DRM tool to choose an appropriate license and protection scheme. Standard users are protective about their ideas, thoughts and works. If they are asked by Office, if they want to share it with the rest of the world or put a restrictive license and protection on their creation, they'll click on "It is mine, my IP, nobody else should reuse it".

I really think this is only just the beginning of a broader DRM tool.

Check the license text (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15579540)

Does it require the copyright notice to be retained? I'll bet it does.

If you took one of these Creative Comnmonsified documents and converted to ODF, would the copyright notice remain intact?

Hmmm...

Very smart... (2)

arborlaw (978993) | about 8 years ago | (#15579594)

...great way to start building acceptance for DRM. Attaching a license electronically to the file (even the Creative Commons license) is still attaching DRM. Now, DRM is not all that bad: implemented properly (ie, let the marketplace make its own decisions whether or not to participate in DRM labeling) and it could save hundreds of millions in transactions costs on obtaining permissions. I would love to know what legal terms were attached to a particular item. The problem is, if DRM becomes a mandatory attachment for acceptance of files in general internet traffic (ie, they might not even be accepted without DRM as an email attachment), then fair use really will cease to exist.

Please don't use this! (3, Insightful)

zsau (266209) | about 8 years ago | (#15579740)

Please don't use this plugin if you are releasing your content under a free Creative Commons licence. No document is free if it's encoded in one of Microsoft's proprietry formats. You are much better off to use the online Creative Commons licence chooser, and copy the text to a document written in OpenOffice.org, TeX, Gnumeric, HTML or the like yourself. This way, you will know that all your potential audience is able to read the document (even if they have to download some software first), even in ten years time when Microsoft Office XP is no longer supported and the current version makes a hash of old files.

Re:Please don't use this! (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15579817)

Because, of course, if you're interested in making the document widely available, the alternative document formats are SOOO much better. Last I checked almost nobody has OpenOffice, TeX, or Gnumeric installed on their machines. Conversely, I don't think I know of anybody without access to a machine capable of opening a .DOC file.

What kind of guarntee is there that I will be any more able to open an OpenOffice file 10 years down the road than to open an Office XP file? OpenDocument is a standard, but standards come and go with time. How many bright-and-shining standards do you think have fallen by the wayside since Windows 95 came out just over 10 years ago?

I wonder how many of geniuses at MS... (2)

exp(pi*sqrt(163)) (613870) | about 8 years ago | (#15579805)

...it took to help develop this macro. Inserting text. Not just any old text. English text. Theyt must have hired a bunch of natural language gurus or something. Sounds really hard!

I'm glad I have /. to keep me informed of the latest bleeding edge software development.

Why all the hate? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15579857)

At least now I can tag Word documents with a Creative Commons liscence. Sure tagging an document in a more open format (OpenDocument, HTML, etc) would make more sense, but since when is the addition of metadata a Bad Thing?

I for one applaud Microsoft and Creative Commons for working together to create this plugin. Now lets see the OpenOffice folks start working on it!

Wow (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15580006)

I sort of assumed that everything you wrote using Word was automatically the intellectual property of Microsoft.

I, for one, welcome... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15580140)

our new TPS-sharing overlords.
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