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Billions Donated to Charity

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 8 years ago | from the put-your-money-where-your-mouth-is dept.

1245

Anonymous Philanthropist writes " Warren Buffet , the world's second-richest man, announced over the weekend that he will soon donate 85% of his entire net worth, weighing in at around $37 Billion, to charities, with over 80% of it going to the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. This makes it the single largest monetary donation in history."

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Antdude (-1, Troll)

CocoDalbert (984936) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601758)

Before you listen to any more drivel by 'AntDude [slashdot.org] ', take a look at who you're dealing with: http://pbx.mine.nu/antdude.jpg [pbx.mine.nu] . The abortion in the center is 'AntDude'. I won't even get into discussion about him listing his 'sex' as 'female' on his SHITTY 'blog' (aqfl.net [aqfl.net] ). This faggot has nothing better to do than sit on the internet and spew worthless garbage. He's the new LostCluster [slashdot.org] when it comes to posting utterly worthless tripe. Not to mention his submitted stories! Every single one of his last 10 or so submissions have been tagged as 'lame' or 'slownewsday'. Why does taco even bother posting his shit. Maybe he gets some tiny deformed chinese cock up his taco ass in exchange for some linkspam with google ads? Do the world a favor and never reply to comments from ANTDUDE and mark him as a FOE [slashdot.org] .

Before anyone asks... (5, Informative)

mjmalone (677326) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601761)

From A conversation with Warren Buffett [cnn.com] :

People will be very curious, I think, as to how much your decision - and its announcement at this particular time - is connected to Bill Gates' announcement in mid-June that he would phase out of his operating responsibilities at Microsoft and begin to devote most of his time to the foundation. What's the story here?

I realize that the close timing of the two announcements will suggest they're related. But they aren't in the least. The timing is just happenstance. I would be disclosing my plans right now whether or not he had announced his move - and even, in fact, if he were indefinitely keeping on with all of his work at Microsoft.

On the other hand, I'm pleased that he's going to be devoting more time to the foundation. And I think he and Melinda are pleased to know they're going to be working with more resources.

Although, it's hard to believe that the timing is entirely coincidental... especially since Bill said he'd be leaving Microsoft over the next two years, and Warren said [cnn.com] :

With so much new money to handle, the foundation will be given two years to resize its operations.

Re:Before anyone asks... (5, Interesting)

maxume (22995) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601858)

Who knows why they each did what they did, but Buffett isn't getting any younger, and he loses a bunch of influence by shedding all those assets, probably something that he is quite happy to do.

Re:Before anyone asks... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15601867)

Not only do they need to scrutinize ops for two years they need to switch to a 64 bit servers for accounting, Linux of course to fill the void. Don't want numeric overflow...

Warren... DUDE.. spare a dime? (1)

ABeowulfCluster (854634) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601765)

No wonder the foundation isn't returning calls.

Re:Warren... DUDE.. spare a dime? (-1, Troll)

livewire98801 (916940) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601784)

The Gates Foundation always struck me as a little . . . odd. Like, they are trying to hide the Evil of MS by saying "Lookie, lookie, we do so much GOOD for the world". Don't get me wrong, the Gates foundation does lots of good things, but I always cringe when I hear about it.

Re:Warren... DUDE.. spare a dime? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15601818)

That just means you are deluded by anti MS rhetoric to realize they have nothing to do with each other. MS bad, Foundation good, they are seperate and honestly have very little to do with each other press wise.

I have no clue where you got that notion though.

Re:Warren... DUDE.. spare a dime? (-1, Flamebait)

Turn-X Alphonse (789240) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601827)

I hate to say this but in many cases it's true. Very evil people quite often do a lot of good things at the same time.

Hitler spends millions taking kids on holidays they could never dream of getting any other way. Sure a lot of it was to train them up as soldiers and fighters, but some of it was also "real" fun and games. That's how he got where he was, he used the carrot while hiding his stick.

I'm not saying Gates is a Nazi, but he's using the same tactic. Instead of showing his evil MS empire he's showing his charitable side and how "MS technology makes everything easy". So while he may screw a lot of us over in the long run (or make a virus industry tick), he also does some good things through his evilness.

So while you may question how much of a charity it really is, don't forget it may just be doing what it says on the box.

That took, like, what? Two minutes? (4, Insightful)

Elemenope (905108) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601896)

Gates isn't a nazi but he uses nazi tactics? Microsoft is evil? WTF??? My parents occasionally give me presents too. Nazi tactics? My boss runs a business that benefits 90% of people who uses her product, but has many unhappy customers due to a bad service ethic...is her company evil? Dude, get some perspective.

Good people do good things. And evil things. Bad people do bad things, and good things. It is not the result that assigns the morality, it is the approbation of the means, the intent, and total content of the person's character. I submit to you that you know basically none of these things about Bill Gates.

Oh, and p.s., Bill Gates, the person, is not isomorphic with Microsoft, the company; hasn't been since the halcyon days of, well, never. The company, if a company can be conceived as a group of people, was always more than him. I also take issue with the idea that a corporation, as an entity in itself, has a moral valence. People are good or evil; corporations are merely a mechanism for a group of people to do something efficiently in a capitalist system.

Re:Warren... DUDE.. spare a dime? (4, Insightful)

lgw (121541) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601906)

Godwin much? Microsoft never hurt anyone. They made crappy products and made those crappy products unfairly dominant in the marketplace, pointlessly annoying millions. Big deal. The Gates Foundation is already saving the lives of thousands of children a year though throwing millions at the "low hanging fruit" of easily preventable deaths from things like diarrhea (which kills more people than any disease but pneumonia and AIDS).

Convincing people to use an annoying product on the one hand, saving thousands of lives a year, proabably hundresed of thousands a year in a few decades on the other. None of the people who's lives are saved by the Foundations efforts give a crap about Windows.

Re:Warren... DUDE.. spare a dime? (2, Funny)

inode_buddha (576844) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601911)

"Instead of showing his evil MS empire he's showing his charitable side and how "MS technology makes everything easy".

Actually, Melinda Gates is showing his charitable side.

Re:Warren... DUDE.. spare a dime? (1)

MSFanBoi2 (930319) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601897)

So, prey tell, what does RedHat, Sun, SuSe, or Oracle, the mighty champions (OK not all of them are...) of the Free Software world do for charity???

seriously (4, Insightful)

FFON (266696) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601768)

this is fucking awesome

Re:seriously (0)

19thNervousBreakdown (768619) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601882)

No kidding man, this guy is a hero.

Sadly (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15601770)

Warren Buffet , the world's second richest man, announced over the weekend that he will soon donate 85% of his entire net worth, weighing in at around $37 Billion, to charities.

And it still won't be enough for Slashdot.

Awesome... (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15601771)

"The man who dies thus rich, dies disgraced,"

--Andrew Carnegie

I think the quote goes... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15601861)

"The man who dies rich, dies thus disgraced."

"Thus" was in the wrong place.

Nice but ... (1, Funny)

dc29A (636871) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601773)

How much of that money is coming from MS using it's monopoly and predatory practices?

$0 (1, Informative)

MarkByers (770551) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601780)

$0

Re:Nice but ... (2, Insightful)

Kizor (863772) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601786)

Don't knock it. Does it matter right now?

Re:Nice but ... (4, Interesting)

mjmalone (677326) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601788)

According to The global force called the Gates Foundation [cnn.com]
To further its work, the foundation currently has just over $30 billion in assets, a purse built up from Bill and Melinda Gates' gifts of $26 billion and appreciation in its broadly diversified investments (which at the moment contain no Microsoft).

I'm not a MS appologist, just thought that was interesting.

Re:Nice but ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15601834)

To further its work, the foundation currently has just over $30 billion in assets, a purse built up from Bill and Melinda Gates' gifts of $26 billion and appreciation in its broadly diversified investments.

Most people in America with any sizeable income know that Bill Gates is the richest man in the world. Apparently, they don't make the connection that when he applies his talent toward making a positive difference in the world, (through the Foundation) he can leverage the money more effectively than "competing" charities -- because if they did, then the foundation would at least get as much money from other sources as it does from Gates' endowment. Why don't people make the connection? This is an honest question.

Similarly, why don't people think that if Google is talented enough to solve incredibly difficult problems in computer science, they can't also solve the incredibly difficult problem of being a huge, publicly-traded company, while living up to their credo "don't be evil". It just doesn't make sense.

If you're one of the best in the world at what you do, in the face of brutal competition, and this involves leveraging billions, then why shouldn't people believe that you will be talented at leveraging toward charitable ends? This is an honest question.

Re:Nice but ... (1)

ksheff (2406) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601913)

but the real question is: How much of that is spent on buying licenses for MSFT software and services?

Re:Nice but ... (1)

John Nowak (872479) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601791)

Who cares? If $37,000,000,000 to charity is the ugly face of Microsoftian capitalism, sign me up!

Re:Nice but ... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15601795)

None of it, Buffett has nothing to do with Microsoft.

Re:Nice but ... (0)

Rik Sweeney (471717) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601835)

How much of that money is coming from MS using it's monopoly and predatory practices?

Seriously, that's not funny. Maybe if their practices weren't so predatory then we wouldn't have to donate so much to charity because the original companies would still be around...

No, it IS funny. And you can't be serious. (5, Insightful)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601917)

Seriously, that's not funny. Maybe if their practices weren't so predatory then we wouldn't have to donate so much to charity because the original companies would still be around...

So, let's see here... the Gates foundation does things like fix up millions of kids with innoculations they wouldn't otherwise get, bringsd truckloads of networking infrastructure to places like New Orleans when the local government doesn't have a chance of procuring it on their own that fast, provides millions for scholarships, and so on. Are you actually suggesting that if Netscape had managed to make a real go at being a stand-alone business, or if BeOS had thrived, that there wouldn't be no place for the billions in philanthropy that Gates is doing?

Are are you certain that part of Netscape's plans included clinics in Africa? Or that despite Novell being largely annoying in so many ways, they would have somehow also gotten into fund raising if they'd pursuaded more people to stick with their NOS? You're trying to set up a false dichotomy just because you like demonizing Bill.

Re:Nice but ... (5, Interesting)

pdclarry (175918) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601851)

None of the $30 billion is coming from Microsoft. It's coming from Warren Buffet's stock in Berkshire Hathaway, the company he founded. The existing endowment of the Gates Foundation comes from Bill Gates' stock in MS, and is a result (if you will) of MS's monopoly and predatory practices.

There is a long tradition of this (supporting charities through monopolistic profits), such as the Carnegie Foundation, the Russell Sage Foundation, the Ford Foundation, etc. Bill and Melinda are following in the footsteps of their capitalist predecessors.

The question of whether a charity should accept money from donors with questionable business ethics has been long debated and never resolved. George Bernard Shaw wrote several plays about this question, and he didn't have an answer. His best was probably Major Barbara, in which the Salvation Army must decide whether or not to accept support from a gin distiller and an arms manufacturer.

Hope it was worth it? (5, Funny)

Philomathie (937829) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601779)

I'd never pay that much to get into the Guiness Book of Records

X-Prize? M-Prize? Granger Prize? Any Prize? (-1, Flamebait)

Baldrson (78598) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601781)

Why is it the billionare philanthropists in the US don't finance prizes for objective criteria?

The X-Prize had an Iranian family of much lesser means providing the critical financing to put it over the top.

I mean it was fine for Paul Allen to invest in Rutan but really -- how is it these people manage to leave the role of king offering the hand of his daughter in marriage to the knight that slays the dragon to Iranians?

So the "Humanity Prize" (5, Insightful)

cybrthng (22291) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601809)

Isn't good enough for you? The prize for abolishing disease, starvation, education and humanity isn't worthy?

come on

Re:So the "Humanity Prize" (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601839)

Isn't good enough for you? The prize for abolishing disease, starvation, education and humanity isn't worthy?

Well, we need to explore space to find more starving, diseased individuals to help.
       

"Objective" (1)

Baldrson (78598) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601865)

Good intentions are just that. Objective criteria for disbursing money leverages the capital and talent of others rather than creating a hierarchy of proposal writers and their beneficiaries who may or may not actually accomplish jack shit.

Saying "prize" doesn't make it objective and a "humanity prize" could mean anything.

Re:So the "Humanity Prize" (0, Troll)

blahplusplus (757119) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601876)

"Isn't good enough for you? The prize for abolishing disease, starvation, education and humanity isn't worthy? come on" If rich people were truly serious about abolishing that, they wouldn't live on anything more then $100,000 until these goals were accomplished.

Re:So the "Humanity Prize" (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15601892)

the process of abolishing education has been going on for 3-4 decades and has been going on quite nicely. The others will be with us as long as humans exist. It's too bad that most charities don't recognise that the best way to address starvation is to let them die so they don't reproduce and create even more starving people.

Old farts go all squishy (2, Insightful)

SlappyBastard (961143) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601903)

Let's face it: this is about legacies. Buffet didn't dump this cash out there 10 years ago for a reason: the money was still worth something to him. Now, he's old, the reaper is at the door, and he is fearful of how history will judge him.

An objective-driven foundation would seem natural for businessmen to push.

It isn't.

Why? Because they're afraid of what setting certain achievable and sustainable marks would do for their reputations.

Re:Old farts go all squishy (1)

cuantar (897695) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601949)

This isn't a troll. If I had mod points, I'd mod the parent post insightful.

Re:So the "Humanity Prize" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15601923)

Morbo doesn't agree with abolishing disease and starvation, but Morbo is all for abolishing education and humanity!

No free rides (5, Insightful)

Valacosa (863657) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601785)

From Wikipedia:
"He is opposed to the transfer of great fortunes from one generation to the next."
That's a stand-up man, right there. It's a sign he believes everyone should earn their own fortune, no free rides - even for his own children.

Bravo, sir.

Re:No free rides (1)

ToddML (590924) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601799)

Well, not quite. He's planning on giving away 85% of a 40 billion fortune. That leaves an estimated six billion dollars to his heirs, who I expect also have their own stakes in the company as well.

Re:No free rides (4, Informative)

mjmalone (677326) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601819)

From A Conversation with Warren Buffett [cnn.com]

This plan seems to settle the fate, over the long term, of all your Berkshire shares. Does that mean you're giving nothing to your family in straight-out gifts?

No, what I've always said is that my family won't receive huge amounts of my net worth. That doesn't mean they'll get nothing. My children have already received some money from me and Susie and will receive more.

I still believe in the philosophy - FORTUNE quoted me saying this 20 years ago - that a very rich person should leave his kids enough to do anything but not enough to do nothing.

I believe he also said that he'd be giving the remaining 15% to charity when he died. Buffett is a pretty good guy, actually.

Re:No free rides (4, Insightful)

3l1za (770108) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601824)

That leaves an estimated six billion dollars to his heirs, who I expect also have their own stakes in the company as well.

Well, not quite. From the article:

Sticking to his long-term intentions, Buffett says the residual 5%, worth about $6.8 billion today, will in time go for philanthropy also, perhaps in his lifetime and, if not, at his death.
Buffett is a genuine iconoclast in this regard (contrast the Sam Waltons family and almost all other precursor generators of real wealth, cf. the The Forbes Richest List [forbes.com] ). It's true his kids will never go hungry but if you read the article his current bequeaths are to their (philanthropic) foundations, not to the kids themselves who will get a modest inheritance.

Re:No free rides (1)

19thNervousBreakdown (768619) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601844)

Actually, if you read the article you'll see that he's giving that away too, just not yet.

Re:No free rides (3, Interesting)

GoofyBoy (44399) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601854)

That leaves an estimated six billion dollars to his heirs,

No thats not true;

From: http://www.nndb.com/people/445/000022379/ [nndb.com]
He's said his children won't inherit any great wealth when he dies. "There's no reason why future generations of little Buffetts should command society just because they came from the right womb. Where's the justice in that?"

And Bill Gates has said similar things also.

Re:No free rides (1)

Joebert (946227) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601871)

I assume Gates kids have a better education than money can buy & a name that is sure to woo any venture capitalist.

I doubt they need 37 billion dollars anyway.

Re:No free rides (5, Insightful)

psychofox (92356) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601925)

You haven't quite got his stance right.

From the article, he says

"I still believe in the philosophy - FORTUNE quoted me saying this 20 years ago - that a very rich person should leave his kids enough to do anything but not enough to do nothing."

A great quote, I think.

[The FORTUNE article was "Should You Leave It All to the Children?" Sept. 29, 1986.]

Re:No free rides (1)

antic (29198) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601939)

I also thought this part was interesting:
Buffett feels that most stock trades are recommended and made primarily to benefit the brokers rather than the investors and has stated that he feels that the world would benefit if each person had a lifetime maximum number of stock trades (e.g. ten or twenty trades).

Put it in AI research (0)

mrcaseyj (902945) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601787)

I wish they would put the money into AI research. If it worked it would help poor people and everyone else more than anything else.

Re:Put it in AI research (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15601814)

If you mean help the poor people by taking their jobs then I agree!

Re:Put it in AI research (1)

mrcaseyj (902945) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601828)

That's the point. It would relieve EVERYONE of their jobs. Then we could do what we want.

Re:Put it in AI research (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15601908)

No offense (yeah, right), but that's fucking stupid.

Re:Put it in AI research (0, Troll)

KiloByte (825081) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601821)

Putting any dough into research; something that can bring any lasting effects? NO WAY!

If your sole concern is getting as good PR as you want, you need to appease Joe Sixpacks. That is, throw the money to the poor who will use it for booze or, in the rare best case, at best eat it off.

Note that this kind of people actively do whatever they can to harm any kind of activity that can actually change the world. What they want, is conserving the current status quo. The scraps thrown to charity are just something to buy the hearts of the mindless crowd.

Re:Put it in AI research (3, Insightful)

mjmalone (677326) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601863)

Are you kidding me? That's absolutely rediculous. As much as I dislike Microsoft's monopoly, and Bill Gates' business practices, his philanthropic activities are much more than 'scraps thrown to charity to buy the hearts'. And Warrenn Buffett is certainly NOT donating 'scraps', he is donating 85% of his net worth, in the form of stock in the company that he spent the last 30 years building.

Moreover, I think the idea of spending that much money on AI research is absolutely ludicrous! You're telling me that AI is going to be more helpful to sick and starving children in Africa and other parts of the third world than medicine and food? The Gateses are actively engaged in curing disease and saving lives and you're suggesting that research into artificial intelligence would be a more intelligent philanthropic investment? If that's actually what you think then for god's sake read something other than Slashdot every once in a while because you have a magnificently skewed view of the world.

Re:Put it in AI research (0, Troll)

KiloByte (825081) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601901)

And Warrenn Buffett is certainly NOT donating 'scraps', he is donating 85% of his net worth, in the form of stock in the company that he spent the last 30 years building.

Buffett is giving that money to Gates' foundation, not to any good cause.

Re:Put it in AI research (1)

mjmalone (677326) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601945)

Explain to me how the Gates foundation is not a good cause. This is an organization that has, among other things, donated billions to prevent and help find a cure for malaria, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis; provided free internect access to thousands of U.S. libraries; has been pushing to find a preventitive AIDS vaccine; has been spending to find a method to prevent malaria infection from mosquitoes; started 900 new schools, and provided financial support for an additional 700.

Just because they are not doing things that you see in your day-to-day life does not mean that they are not doing anything. In fact, they are putting the majority of their money where it will do the most good: in the third world. They are actively saving lives, please tell me how that is "not a good cause."

Re:Put it in AI research (1)

mrcaseyj (902945) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601918)

The responses to my post mostly don't seem to have an appreciation for the importance and massively revolutionary consequences of AI. It would change everything. And I don't mean change a lot, I mean REALLY change everything. For example poverty would be completely eliminated. DEATH would be eliminated. If it's possible in the near future, then it needs to be done as soon as we can. With the billions available, IBM may be able to make a version of Blue Gene optimized for AI that could actually work.

Re:Put it in AI research (0, Offtopic)

Randall Shane (320595) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601950)

The responses to my post mostly don't seem to have an appreciation for the importance and massively revolutionary consequences of AI. It would change everything. And I don't mean change a lot, I mean REALLY change everything. For example poverty would be completely eliminated. DEATH would be eliminated. If it's possible in the near future, then it needs to be done as soon as we can. With the billions available, IBM may be able to make a version of Blue Gene optimized for AI that could actually work.
Uh, exactly HOW is this supposed to work? All we need to eliminate poverty and death is to have something smarter tell us what to do? (Assuming that artificial intelligence would be smarter than the smartest humans, which is Not Necessarily The Case.) Maybe the problems we have can't be cured by just being smarter, anyway.

Mod parent down down down (2, Informative)

giorgiofr (887762) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601880)

That's about the worst thing you could have said. Come back when you have thrown $37 billion ("scraps") at some school system or whatever you think is the best thing to save humanity from its own stupidity. THEN and only then can you talk.
Really you should realize that what "this kind of people" wants has got *nothing* to do with you, they won't even acknowledge your presence because you're a worthless piece of... scrap. Do you really think they *care* about keeping you in line or any of the bullshit you were spewing? Geez, the arrogance. Oh and take the time to do your research before your next idiotic post on /.; the M&B Gates Foundation does not finance alcoholics and good-at-nothings - actually they are one of the few charities that DO follow up on what they finance and they withdraw funding if not satisfied with the results.

Re:Put it in AI research (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15601829)

Yes, I'm sure what poor people all around the world need are robots to help them out with their daily chores.

Why not also spend some money to buy martian carrots to feed all the orphan bunnies living in the moon?

*sigh*

Re:Put it in AI research (2, Informative)

Kainaw (676073) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601856)

I wish they would put the money into AI research. If it worked it would help poor people and everyone else more than anything else.

I live in South Carolina. "Poor" and "AI" are basically the same term. I know the following sounds like a joke or a half-truth, but it isn't. Our "Education Lottery" is primarily used to fund vocational school for prisoners, ex-prisoners, and high-school dropouts. I guess it is a waste of time and money to give them a good education before they turn 18. Instead, train them for a low-paying job after they turn 18.

Regardless (4, Insightful)

jb.hl.com (782137) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601793)

Regardless of any comments about the B&MG foundation or Buffet's motives... ...Jesus Christ, nice going Warren.

This is so wonderful! (4, Insightful)

JebusIsLord (566856) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601794)

I sincerely applaud Both Bill and Warren for their recent contributions. This is SO important, because they will set an example for other wealthy individuals. When the rich (and that means most of us in the West) start to realize that giving(rather than flaunting) wealth garners the most prestige, the world will be a far better place. Bravo!

Re:This is so wonderful! (2, Interesting)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601857)

When the rich (and that means most of us in the West)

The programmers that take our jobs in India often have maids. I would love to have a maid. Don't give me this "in the West" crap.
     

Easy to give money when you are rich (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15601800)

Mark 12: 41-44

41 And he sat down opposite the treasury, and watched the multitude putting money into the treasury. Many rich people put in large sums.
42 And a poor widow came, and put in two copper coins, which make a penny.
43 And he called his disciples to him, and said to them, "Truly, I say to you, this poor widow has put in more than all those who are contributing to the treasury.
44 For they all contributed out of their abundance; but she out of her poverty has put in everything she had, her whole living."

Re:Easy to give money when you are rich (0, Troll)

19thNervousBreakdown (768619) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601868)

Fuck you.

Re:Easy to give money when you are rich (1)

Zephiria (941257) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601873)

Yes and later She'll have to come back for the free soup and bread because she has nothing left with which to take care of herself.
Giving without thought or care to yourself is reckless and foolish.
Its a nice quote, but really stop trying to hate on the guy for giving what he felt he could afford to give.
Or maybe he should just take it all back and buy say, 2 or 3 Stealth bombers ?

parent == sour grapes (4, Insightful)

3l1za (770108) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601875)

This passage is not meant to deride those who have earned much and given generously (as the parent seems to intend for it to do); it is intended to countermand society's view (throughout history, in all of society) which respects those who have power (which in many cases == money) and looked down absolutely upon those of modest means despite whether they are persons of great honor, dignity, and heart.

Certainly if those who have attained great wealth have done so via exploiting others then those wealthy deserve derision. But merely to be successful and powerful is not an indictment. The old camel-through-the-eye-of-a-needle quote is often misinterpreted in the same way. The meaning of that passage is to point out that with wealth comes great power and with great power comes great temptation. So if you don't have the wealth/power, it may be easier for you to live a clean/good life (i.e. to pass into heaven).

Re:parent == sour grapes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15601944)

Actually, it's misinterpreted worse than that, 'eye of the needle' refers to a type of doorway into a walled city, not an actual eye of a needle.

Re:parent == sour grapes (1)

Pecisk (688001) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601953)

I just wanted to add to your thought, that it is VERY hard to be wealthy and powerful, and in same time haven't:
* exploited others;
* lied and cheated;
* broke the law;
* ignored common sense and responsibilities to society;

Let's be at least honest here - in this example, none of these rich people (Bill Gates, Waren) got their monies honestly. Instead of getting super rich, they could spur economical diversity and growth, not frozen it with their business dealings. But hell, who cares, money is there and it impress everyone. So let's give Bill a crown now?

Sorry for this little flamory, but Bill's playing "big good dady" is getting to my nerves - he has done lot of things wrong. Very wrong.

Re:Easy to give money when you are rich (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15601931)

To pu things in perspective, he's donating 85% of his wealth. it would be one thing if he was a gagillionaire and only donated a million, and then went around saying "look at me I'm so awesome I donated a million $ to charity!!" instead, hes donating MOST of what he has. I say good work.

In other words (-1, Troll)

Mensa Babe (675349) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601802)

The second richest man in the world just gave $24050000000 to the richest man in the world. The poor people say: "Thanks!" Film at 11. What an amusing naivette. Dear poor people, read the facts [billparish.com] before you wet your pants. This is not a black-and-white scenerio. We should always analyse such events with a great deal of realism.

Re:In other words (2, Informative)

MSFanBoi2 (930319) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601852)

Get some up to date info please... The last time that the data that page uses was SEVEN years ago. SEVEN.

Re:In other words (1)

Descalzo (898339) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601859)

The second richest man gave a ton of money to a charitable foundation. Is Bill Gates going to see this money?

Unless I missed something, your link didn't say anything to imply anything at all regarding the B&MG Foundation.

Re:In other words (2, Funny)

3p1ph4ny (835701) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601899)

Also note that as much as this guy hates the M$ pyramid scheme, he used Excel 95 to provide his information...

Re:In other words (1)

19thNervousBreakdown (768619) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601909)

Are you trying to discredit Mesna here? Not that it needs it, but damn, if you're actually an example of the smart women in of Mesna, give me a dumb blonde any day.

I really hope this is humor that I'm just smart enough to see where it's supposed to be funny, but not smart enough to laugh at.

Mensa? (1)

mclaincausey (777353) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601912)

Wow. The "Mensa Babe" can't even spell "naïveté" or "scenario." (I'll let "analyse" go under the charitable allowance that you might be using the English spelling). More alarming than the inept spelling, s/he can't figure out how to use a spell checker.

And I haven't even drilled down into the idiocy of the content of the post, for instance, confusing donating money to a CHARITY for donating money to a PERSON.

Buffet has a record of opposing tax cuts that help him stay richer, and of being a conscious and charitable person. So save your sour grapes.

Mensa, my ass.

Sensible CEO salary (4, Interesting)

NexusTw1n (580394) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601807)

Interesting that a guy who clearly has a serious talent for generating wealth, only asks for $100,000 per annum salary.

Puts the salaries of other less talented CEOs who demand far larger pay packets into perspective doesn't it?

Re:Sensible CEO salary (4, Informative)

MarkByers (770551) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601837)

CEOs frequently get only $1 per year. Steve Jobs for example. Their salary is not their largest source of income.

Re:Sensible CEO salary (2, Informative)

Nexx (75873) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601915)

No, a lot of Fortune 500 CEOs get compensation packages that are in the 7-8 figures in cash, as well as stock options. Besides, with the new accounting laws that are put in place, stock options are counted as being much closer to being cash compensation than previously.

Re:Sensible CEO salary (1)

Pink Tinkletini (978889) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601919)

Michael Bloomberg receives a $1 salary, and so does Peter Kalikow, the chairman of the MTA. So do Brin and Page (Google) and Yahoo's Terry Semel.

It's nothing new; I seem to remember Lee Iacocca doing the same thing in the '70s. But among today's CEOs, I'm fairly sure Jobs is the pioneer. >:-)

Re:Sensible CEO salary (1)

NexusTw1n (580394) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601943)

1$ is not a sensible salary. It looks to the outsider to be a tax dodge.

"Oh I only get paid 1$ but I do get a personal Boeing 747 as my deductable company car".

Buffet gets paid a sensible, fair, neither tax dodging nor fat cat salary and it is worth applauding.

if only... (3, Funny)

Pao|o (92817) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601812)

if only they diverted a fraction of that amount to my charity, me. ;)

http://hoopsdonuts.com/ [hoopsdonuts.com]

Pyramid (0)

Joebert (946227) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601815)

Wow, it's going to take alot of work to modify the pyramid to support a new top stone now.

Kudos, but a question (4, Insightful)

Quiberon (633716) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601830)

It's his right to do as he pleases. But donating to the Bill and Melinda show puts rather a lot of financial muscle in one place; with that kind of money he could have established his own foundation, for an independent view of things. Is the Bill and Melinda Foundation able to act in ways which might be other than in the interest of Microsoft ? For example, how would a funding request from Free Software Foundation, or Electronic Freedom Foundation, go down ?

Re:Kudos, but a question (1)

MarkByers (770551) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601853)

with that kind of money he could have established his own foundation, for an independent view of things

Actualy he does have his own foundation, and he intended to give 99% of his wealth to it : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buffett_Foundation [wikipedia.org]

Don't piss off the One Giant Charity. (2, Insightful)

Kadin2048 (468275) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601885)

Yeah, I wondered the same thing. Although we don't often think of charities as something that "compete" with each other, in reality they do; only instead of competing for business, they compete for places to spend money -- that is, projects to work on. They basically compete to out-good each other.

It seems like giving more money to one massive charity, although it might allow them to take on projects that are even larger in scale than before, is not as good for everyone as starting a second charity would have been.

Just think that you're some organization who would like to get some funding for something. Wouldn't it be better if there were two multi-billion-dollar charities you could apply to, instead of just one? That way, if Bill and Melinda had their fill of feeding starving [Asian/African/Mideastern] people this year, there would be another place to apply to. But by giving the money to one giant charity, in effect we create a monoculture: if you don't get any money from the One Giant Charity, or heaven forbid you're doing something that the One Giant Charity doesn't like or doesn't choose to support (cough*OLPC*cough), then you're shit outta luck. Or what if the leadership of the One Giant Charity goes downhill in time? Having two charities might serve as counterpoises to each other, keeping themselves honest. There are lots of reasons why a duopoly is better than a single overwhelming entity, even in the field of charities.

There's room in the world for more than just Bill and Melinda's pet charity...I would have liked to see something set up that could have given funding to the things that they choose not to support.

Re:Kudos, but a question (1)

Kuciwalker (891651) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601947)

Why would the EFF or FSF want their money? They fund medical aid...

Re:Kudos, but a question (3, Informative)

koreth (409849) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601954)

He considered establishing (or rather, expanding) his own foundation, but after looking at what that would take, decided that giving the money to the Gates Foundation would be more effective. That's all in the article, which you might want to check out.

The Gates Foundation is mostly funding public health initiatives of various sorts at the moment. So the FSF and EFF would probably not fare any better than they would if they tried to get money from the Red Cross or the American Cancer Society.

Damn humans' need to wantonly consolidate power (0)

icecow (764255) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601845)

Great, put all the money in one basket and trust the good natured people of the world triumph the mob of money whores trying to get at the money.

It's all bad money anyway; MS made all that money at the expense of innovation. The lost innovation could have cured the problem of ~7,000 children that die each day because of toxic water, the energy problem, the ozone problem, and pretty much everything else. If society simply used the technology avail and ignored the MS's of the world and patent trolls.. the world still wouldn't be perfect, but it wouldn't insanely suck freak dick like gate's.

I'm saying what is common sense, which always has to come off sounding from the far left, or far right, or whatever. In this case the far left. We're doomed by the language we are trapped in.

And in other news (2, Funny)

Eric Coleman (833730) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601850)

In a show of one-upsmanship, the FSF gives away free software to starving children in Africa. And SCO sues the FSF for violating its patent for giving free software to starving children.

taxes are so for the little people (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15601864)

After a lifetime of not paying taxes on the billions, now he's still going to stiff the taxman even after arguing before Congress on what a "critical role" [commondreams.org] estate taxes have.

Nice.

"Can we make soup out of the box?" (0, Troll)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601870)

Yeah, more Windows to starving Africans!

$37 billion is a lot to give to charity, but... (-1, Troll)

spune (715782) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601872)

...does that $37 billion to charity outweight the worlds of damage Warren Buffet has dealt out over his lifetime building up a late-capitalist nightmare? I recognize that Mr. Buffet has lead a modest and respectable lifestyle despite his wealth, and this donation certainly speaks well for him, but he funded and managed monstrous corporate entities such as credit companies which have created a caste of poverty-stricken families. He raised Bershire Hathaway from a dying company to one of the world's largest and most influential conglomerations which extends its tentacles to almost every industry through insurance; these insurance companies have earned universal disapproval for memorably screwing over hundreds of thousands of homeless in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. He owns 7% of Coca-Cola and sat on its board of trustee; Coke is reknowned for having a terrible human-rights record (assassinating union leaders, distributing radioactive and toxic sludge to Indian farmers as 'fertilizer', etc).

He may be a nice man, but his excellent entrepreneurship has left the world in a hole overall.

Re:$37 billion is a lot to give to charity, but... (1)

NevarMore (248971) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601933)

" Coke is reknowned for having a terrible human-rights record (assassinating union leaders, distributing radioactive and toxic sludge to Indian farmers as 'fertilizer', etc)."

Why in the high holy fuck would CocafuckingCola have anything to do with nuclear/toxic waste. They make a soft drink for christsakes.

Gates shoots the moon (5, Interesting)

rifftide (679288) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601883)

Gates is an avid card player so he might even appreciate the analogy. He's done some evil things, but it came out all right in the end because he's donating practically all his winnings to charity, and doing so at a relatively young age. Had he not been so greedy and obsessed, a much broader spectrum of people in the software business might have become wealthy or affluent, and we would undoubtedly have had a more interesting marketplace ecology in the personal computing business over the past 15 years. But I doubt that the incremental contributions to charity would have had nearly the same impact that Gates and Buffett are making now.

He and Buffett will be remembered as great Americans for their charity, while his past role as founder and leader of Microsoft will be debated for decades.

Planned Parenthood (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15601888)

Unfortunately, while the Gates Foundation does do honorable work in Africa to end malaria and other curable diseases, they also make contributions to Planned Parenthood.

If you're not familiar w/ Planned Parenthood, this is a tax-payer funded organization whose primary operation is killing unborn children.

(Margaret Sanger, founder of Planned Parenthood, was an ardent racist, who dreamed of using her abortion-mill to target and eliminate minority races, especially African Americans (sadly, she once convinced Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to speak at a Planned Parenthood opening; presumably Dr. King was unaware of her true intentions)).

Anyhow, I digress. The truly sad part about this amazing donation is it only furthers the society of death propegated by Planned Parenthood.

I ask all Slashdotters to write letters to the Gates Foundation and to Berkshire Hathaway, urging them to not funnel any of Mr. Buffett's generous donation to Planned Parenthood. Let's focus on healing & curing sick children, not killing unborn children.

Signed,

- Atheists for Life
and
- Catholics United for Life

Re:Planned Parenthood (4, Funny)

Deadstick (535032) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601934)

Thanks for the tip...think I'll send them a few bucks myself.

rj

which charity? (2, Interesting)

gbjbaanb (229885) | more than 8 years ago | (#15601922)

Gates obviously was listening when the man in charge of this [openbsd.org] asked for money :)

BILLions? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15601924)

I thought you were talking about Bill Gates.

Kind of disappointing for some reason... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15601927)

I'm glad to see so much money being donated, but I have to admit that I'm a little disappointed in Warren Buffet's choice of charities. I always thought Buffet was concerned that applying his money to numerous differnet causes and charities would be a waste of its potential and that the money would have a greater imapct if all of it was applied to a single cause. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, tackling many different problems like health and education, seems contrary to this idea. I was kind of hoping that he would choose a single cause like HIV/AIDS, Cancer, MS, Alternative Energy, Water Purification Techniques, etc. with the idea that such a large donation would be disruptive in nature and cause a surge in scientific research and even a boost in the number of science-based degrees awarded in higher-ed. Oh well, I'm sure it will still go to good use, so thanks for showing there are still some decent people in the world Warren!
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