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World's Fastest Internet Cafe

CmdrTaco posted more than 7 years ago | from the like-i-needed-another-reason-for-coffee dept.

176

Thyrus writes "An internet cafe offering connections 50 times faster than typical broadband services has opened in Cornwall. Computers at Goonhilly satellite station, on the Lizard peninsula in Cornwall, are connected to BT's global internet protocol network. That means users can download data at speeds of up to 100 megabits per second (Mbps). It is thought to be the first time such high speeds have been seen at a UK internet cafe. The service will be free to visitors."

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176 comments

Hmmmmmm too much hype (5, Interesting)

LiquidCoooled (634315) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621341)

First, I am glad they said in the UK, because 100mbit cyber cafes aren't special everywhere [world66.com] .

Also, I notice they have had to tip toe around what it can be used for:

Adrian Hosford of BT said: "It would be possible to use the cafe's computers to download in less than 15 minutes a file the equivalent size of the DVD version of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, with its 19,000 illustrations, 629 audio and video clips and 100,000 articles.

It seems like they are trying almost too hard to explain how quick it is, afterall, I never rate my downloads in terms of how many "dvd copies of a paper encyclopedia with illustrations and video clips" I just say its shit-hot.
We need it in terms we can understand like how many TPG/s can we view?
will google earth run smoothly without appearing to break up or pixelate no matter where I zoom or rotate to?
can I wipe out my friends in CS:S by having a l33t connection?

Another article I was reading earlier about this mentions why the special people were chosen to open it:


The new internet café will be officially declared open by Helston Community College pupils Chloe Smith and James Evans, both aged 17, who have demonstrated outstanding acumen in the field of information technology.

from here [cisco.com] .

(Yes, sisco appear to be hyping this more than the BBC, but then again they supplied some of the high tech equipment.

Re:Hmmmmmm too much hype (4, Interesting)

tomknight (190939) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621482)

But the best part of the Cisco release: "The first antenna, known as Arthur, was built to track the Telstar satellite and received the first live transatlantic television broadcasts from the United States in 1962. Arthur today is a grade II listed building and is still in operational service." Now I might be bit of a saddo but I actually found that interesting.

Re:Hmmmmmm too much hype (2, Funny)

Rob T Firefly (844560) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621523)

It would be possible to use the cafe's computers to download in less than 15 minutes a file the equivalent size of the DVD version of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, with its 19,000 illustrations, 629 audio and video clips and 100,000 articles.
But how much is that in Libraries of Congress?

Re:Hmmmmmm too much hype (5, Funny)

revlayle (964221) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621617)

...I never rate my downloads in terms of how many "dvd copies of a paper encyclopedia with illustrations and video clips"...

That's exactly correct. You measure them in "Library of Congresses"... duh!

Re:Hmmmmmm too much hype (1)

BcNexus (826974) | more than 7 years ago | (#15622163)

Yes, to sum up your point: What is the latency? And besides, the user's experience also depends on the computer on the other end serving the content.

In other news (5, Funny)

utopianfiat (774016) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621342)

The world's biggest Adult Theater is opening up next door. Coincidence?

I think not! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15621423)

You forgot the "I think not!" part :P

Re:In other news (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15621652)

Just remember this inside Goonhilly, BT's hub of international communications. Its in the middle of nowhere (by UK standards) http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&sll=37.0625, -95.677068&sspn=31.371289,62.578125&q=helston,+cor nwall&ie=UTF8&ll=50.049589,-5.179882&spn=0.099205, 0.244446&t=h&om=1 [google.com] . It opens as a tourist attraction 10-6 in summer (and not at all for much of winter). Your hardly going to build anything nearby. Its also a nature reserve!

World's fastest? (0)

kestasjk (933987) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621348)

Is this really the world's fastest? It doesn't seem that fast; in Japan they're getting gigabit connections at home.

Re:World's fastest? (3, Informative)

bcat24 (914105) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621380)

RTFAS (Read The F***ing Article Summary):
It is thought to be the first time such high speeds have been seen at a UK internet cafe.
Emphasis mine.

Re:World's fastest? (2, Informative)

utopianfiat (774016) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621396)

But the article is "World's Fastest Internet Cafe" according to ./ mods. ... but then again we know how reliable they are, eh?

Re:World's fastest? (3, Informative)

bcat24 (914105) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621419)

Damn, "at a UK internet cafe" was supposed to be in italics. Oh well.

Re:World's fastest? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15621561)

You should probably RTFFHFPNTTI (Read The Friendly Formatting Help For People New To Teh Intarweb).

Don't worry, Iin no time at all you too will get a grasp of basic inetrnet-formats like HTML and no longer embarass yourself.

Re:World's fastest? (1)

a_nonamiss (743253) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621625)

RTFAH (Read the f****** article headline)

Sorry, I mean, I know this guy clearly didn't read the summary, but in his defense, the *headline* does say "World's Fastest Internet Cafe." Clearly, the people who write the ./ headlines need to read the article summaries.

Re:World's fastest? (2, Funny)

FrostedWheat (172733) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621752)

Someone's nicked your emphasis, mate. And before you ask, it definitely wasn't me.

Re:World's fastest? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15621882)

World's fastest in the UK! It's like those sports that only one country compete in. Every national champion is automatically a world champion. But UK, sorry to say it, you're not the only one with Internet and netcafes

Re:World's fastest? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15621405)

Is this really the world's fastest?

UK != the_world

Re:World's fastest? (1)

newt0311 (973957) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621687)

stupid US needs to catch up.

*enviously looks in general direction of Japan*

I want GigE internet. I have sooooooooo many uses for it (and not pr0n).

Re:World's fastest? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15621924)

I would like a cite for Gigabit connections in Japan - is this really the download link speed? What kind of pipe are they using for the provider?

Re:World's fastest? (1)

raatti (985607) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621958)

Indeed. What started as a gaming servers and Internet-cafe service (http://www.avatar.fi/) has now evolved into a full-fledged ISP (http://www.tnnet.fi/) with FAST connections. TNNet is FICIX (http://www.ficix.fi) member (Finnish IX point). Requirements include linking onto FICIX-1 and FICIX-2 points, 2 connections and gigabit conn is minimum. So they have atleast 2 Gbps of bandwidth there, also mentioned in http://www.avatar.fi/verkko.html [avatar.fi] where it is introduced in Finnish. Each of the computers at the have have their own, unshared 100Mbit connection. Now thats speed compared to that slow UK Cafe. TNNet as growing local ISP also have gigabits of foreign connectivity bandwidth also avaiable, making the UK place look like 14400bps.

Can't be cheap? (1, Insightful)

neonprimetime (528653) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621367)

The service will be free to visitors.
61 dishes


For how long will it be free? I can't image the 61 dishes being cheap to maintain?

Re:Can't be cheap? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15621402)

How is this rated interesting when poster is comparing Japan home connection to an Internet Cafe. The title specifically states worlds fastest internet cafe.

Re:Can't be cheap? (5, Informative)

LiquidCoooled (634315) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621413)

the 61 dishes were there already.

Its a massive communications centre [wikipedia.org] .
the cafe is just a tiny part of it which they have hooked into the direct net feed.

Like having the microwave at springfield nuclear power plant linked directly to the reactor core.

Re:Can't be cheap? (2, Funny)

hauntingthunder (985246) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621718)

Wow

they finaly got a cafe - a while back the staff used to moan like crasy about the closeure of the staff resturant - I belive all that was left was a chip van that called on wednesdays.

Real question does the caff do engineering breakfasts

Re:Can't be cheap? (1)

Thwomp (773873) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621759)

And here [google.co.uk] is where it is. Although it never used to be that blurry, previously you could just make out some of the dishes.

Not that impressive (5, Insightful)

CBHighlander (925941) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621397)

100Mbps connections are not that uncommon. Besides, it's the overall download speed that counts, and that is often determined downstream from you local connection. The bandwidth bottleneck is rarely (if ever) your local connection speed.

Re:Not that impressive (4, Informative)

rkww (675767) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621522)

According to wikipedia [wikipedia.org] the cafe has a 1Gb pipe. The 100Mbit connections are to the desktop.

Re:Not that impressive (3, Informative)

voice_of_all_reason (926702) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621729)

grandfather poster was pointing out that it doesn't matter what speed the cafe has if you're grabbing a torrent of the latest Harry Potter movie from a 40KB/s source in Bumbleskunk, Ohio.

They forgot... (3, Insightful)

JoeLinux (20366) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621399)

Ok, you have this blazingly fast connection at the internet cafe...

What server, gaming or otherwise, will be able to transfer information that fast back?

I do have to say that this connection would be perfect for the final destination for the "relaying" internet connection in the $100 MIT laptop.

Joe

BitTorrent, of course (2, Informative)

billstewart (78916) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621758)

Haven't you been reading Slashdot recently? There was an article about Bittorrent [datacenterknowledge.com] getting gigabit worth of capacity.

...

Besides, even old people in Korea get gigabit access in their cybercafes these days :-)

Re:They forgot... (2, Informative)

1984 (56406) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621806)

Actually there are a few that can. Our office network is piggybacked on our mid-size data center, which has enough upstream link capacity that the 100Mbit/s desktop LAN is the slow bit. Downloading Apple software updates (Akamai), various Linux ISOs from mirrors (for example) we get several MByte/s throughput onto the desktop. Never *quite* maxing out that 100Mbit/s portion, but above 50Mbit/s.

That's in San Francisco, so YMMV, but there are sites out there that can feed at high rates and don't seem to throttle too much.

Re:They forgot... (1)

flithm (756019) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621808)

Uhh plenty. 100 Mbits isn't all that fast in terms of non-consumer internet connections.

Basically what happens is a game company either brings in a commercial line, or co-locates a server. For smaller titles it's probably the latter in which case they'll likely have anywhere from single OC3 to multiple OC192's worth of bandwidth (but pay per byte).

If it's a big title, they might bring in their own line (I can't say how often this would happen though) in which case they'd have the entire thing to themselves and could saturate connections even better.

Think about it this way. You yourself could colocate a server for 4 or 500 bucks a month that could max out at about 9953.28 Mbit/s (that's 1.2 gigaBYTES per second). Of course if you did that constantly you'd owe your left AND right nuts to the bandwidth usage fairy.

So to sum it all up... almost ANY server will EASILY saturate 100 mbits.

100 mbits is nothing man.

Re:They forgot... (1)

loraksus (171574) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621888)

Ok, you have this blazingly fast connection at the internet cafe...
What server, gaming or otherwise, will be able to transfer information that fast back?


You apparantly haven't used many usenet servers that host binaries ;)

in other news... (4, Funny)

revery (456516) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621407)

In other news, if they notice a suspicious looking network cable snaking out to the curb and in through a barely opened car window, it might mean that this [slashdot.org] former St. Petersburg, Florida resident has moved to the UK, and is, apparently, still not a coffee drinker.

Re:in other news... (2, Funny)

Huff (314296) | more than 7 years ago | (#15622217)

Problem is that the cable would also have to traverse several miles of dirt tracks, cross several miles of sheep infested fields and dodge hundreds of trac'ers and comboine 'arvsters ohh arrr

Huff

100mbit? WHY? (3, Insightful)

Ossifer (703813) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621461)

What's the purpose? Reading emails really quickly? I mean what kind of activity (other than nefarious) does one really need that requires that speed, when sipping coffee?

Re:100mbit? WHY? (1)

bedessen (411686) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621539)

Because it was an already existing center of high speed data connectivity and so they thought it would be a nice perk to set up a few PCs in the lobby and run a free internet cafe. It's not like they took an existing regular internet cafe and then decided it should be 100Mbit.

Re:100mbit? WHY? (1)

DrSkwid (118965) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621602)

One needs 100Mb to the desktop to advertise BT and Cisco's superiority in press releases.

Re:100mbit? WHY? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15621713)

Reading Mail Really Fast? Don't bother to use the internet, just do "rm -rf *"... Sorry, I had to tell.. :-)

Re:100mbit? WHY? (1)

Monster_Juice (939126) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621795)

Win XP Service Pack 3

Re:100mbit? WHY? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15622077)

Well, on my Cable connection it did take me about 3 hours to download XP Service Pack 3, so 100Mbps would help cut that down..

Wait, we're talking about Vista right?

ZING!

Re:100mbit? WHY? (1)

IANAAC (692242) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621843)

What's the purpose? Reading emails really quickly? I mean what kind of activity (other than nefarious) does one really need that requires that speed, when sipping coffee?

So far, everybody's response to you has been sarcastic, but I can see a reason why. With the way cafes are heading now, it's no longer just a place to get a cup of coofee. You can buy music and videos now in some of the cafes in the US. Not to mention the fact that most cafes are already filled with laptop users and not much else. I can imagine a time when IPTV takes hold that you would be able walk in, get your latte and panino/whatever, site down and be entertained over that connection.

Free super-fast internet... (4, Interesting)

celardore (844933) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621477)

But how much does a cup of coffee cost??

Bigger question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15621640)

...And does it run Linux?

It's British Coffee (1)

billstewart (78916) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621715)

Unless they're doing better than average, they'll be stuck with the stereotype that their coffee is as bad as American beer....

Re:It's British Coffee (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15622104)

The British climate is not well suited to growing coffee, so we have to import it all. As a result, we drink the same fucking coffee the rest of the world does - Nescafe, Illy, Starfucks, you name it.

Goonhilly? Lizard Peninsula? (4, Funny)

bunions (970377) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621501)

are you kidding me?

Re:Goonhilly? Lizard Peninsula? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15622225)

"Goonhilly" is actually Cornish [wikipedia.org] for "Hunting Downs", an area of Downland [wikipedia.org] where people would hunt for food.

Yihaa, finally (2, Funny)

Bromskloss (750445) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621507)

...I can download inordinate amounts of images and movies to.. my screen? Or can you take it with you somehow?

Re:Yihaa, finally (1)

MrSquirrel (976630) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621584)

Duh, floppy diskettes. They're small, cheap, durable (just don't put them near magnets, powerlines, or small children... don't drop them... and... basically don't even handle them), and you can hold 1.44 MB per disk!

Re:Yihaa, finally (3, Interesting)

TheBiGW (982686) | more than 7 years ago | (#15622008)

I've been there not so long ago. All the PCs are iMacs (there are about 15 in total). The base units are locked away in a 'pod' display type thing so there is no access to USB ports or floppy discs or anything like that. Whatever you download you can't take with you. Also it's fairly heavily censored using a websense [websense.com] based proxy so don't think for a second you'll be downloading hundreds of megs of mp3s or anthing like that.

Is it still that fast? (2, Funny)

jeffmeden (135043) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621512)

Is it me or does it look like that backhoe just took a big bite out of the dish in that picture? Wonder how many megabits you can get with a a 5' section missing from your receiver?

Net Neutrality (1, Offtopic)

Gotung (571984) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621524)

An internet cafe can find a way to make money while offering service like this for free to it's customers.

And yet the poor ol' telecoms are having such a hard time making money due to Google stealing their bandwidth.

Bandwidth that both Google and end users already pay the telecoms for.

Re:Net Neutrality (1)

RobK (24783) | more than 7 years ago | (#15622179)

Instead of charging google, telcoms should claim they've got the fastest connection to google and yahoo and aol to encourage users to pay for service through them.

I'll tell you I'll vote with my dollars and in time, others will too.

When google video stops working because my ISP is trying to squeeze google, I'll find another ISP.

obquote (5, Funny)

Speare (84249) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621532)

I first heard of Goonhilly from a hardly-noticed story I once read. Not being a European, I had to look it up at the time to see what the hell it was.

The planet beneath them was almost perfectly oblivious of their presence, which was just how they wanted it for the moment. The huge yellow somethings went unnoticed at Goonhilly, they passed over Cape Canaveral without a blip, Woomera and Jodrell Bank looked straight through them -- which was a pity because it was exactly the sort of thing they'd been looking for all these years.

No real relevance, I just like the name Goonhilly.

Re:obquote (1)

booch (4157) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621767)

I was thinking the exact same thing. Us Americans aren't very familiar with the names of British satellite receiving stations. These are the only 2 references I've seen of Goonhilly.

Re:obquote (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15621778)

I doubt being a "European" would help much.

I only know where it is because my family live down the road.

Goonhilly? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15621624)

That's an odd name. I'd have called it "Chazzwazzer".

This screams publicity stunt (4, Funny)

99luftballon (838486) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621683)

Why would you need a connection that fast in an internet cafe? Users will be checking mail and news, not downloading "Cornish gone Wild" Vol 3.

Re:This screams publicity stunt (2, Interesting)

jcern (247616) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621821)

of course it's a publicity stunt, but that's usually what advertising is. judging from the amount of attention it is getting it's probably worth it. i mean, it's free to the users so why should anyone complain. and besides, all things being equal, if you had a choice of two cafes - one with a much faster free connection, and one with normal dsl - most people would tend towards the faster one (assuming the coffee is the same price and quality and that it's not 100x more crowded).

I can't read that. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15621685)

Cornwall. Goonhilly. I kept reading those as Cornhole and Goonwall.

I wonder what the ramifications are... (1)

geerbox (855203) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621716)

It's not purely a 100 mbit thing. But in terms of unaccountable internet usage, internet cafes generally do not record their user's information, and the opportunity for abuse or misuse is certainly there.

Let's say that someone who's created a devastating virus decides to release in the wild. When it gets down to it, when the authorities *really* want to find out the responsible person(s), it's still possible to track the virus back to it's originating source.

What if the person decided to release his virus through an internet cafe? There are no personally identifiable information, especially if the person waltzs into a cafe he/she has never been into, puts down money, and puts up the virus. What happens then? I realise this could happen with unrestricted free wifi, but an internet cafe is a public area that's open for business - with wireless routers strongly recommending passwords before allowing wireless use, the platform for this sort of abuse is lessening (unless of course it gets hijacked, but that's of a different concern then).

What sort of larger abuse could present itself from larger bandwidth? Especially when your infrastructural guru consists of young, unexperienced techs?

Re:I wonder what the ramifications are... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15622206)

geerbox, meet the UK's extremely pervasive use of CCTV systems. CCTV systems, meet geerbox. Internet cafes tend to have cameras. Expensive equipment + random people = need to protect expensive equipment, and in real terms that translates to marking it, locking it up, and pointing cameras at it. And they tend to keep the tapes, at least long enough to notice.

Hell, if you look, there are stories about Nigerian spammers sitting in a cybercafe with their laptop, being clocked in real time by angry sysadmins who happened to be in the neighbourhood, shortly followed by police (said spammer, with SendSafe still running right there in the system tray, then proceeds to unsuccessfully try to eat their USB pendrive).

No. Cybercafes, especially high profile ones like this, are by and large very poor choices of a suitable place to do such a nefarious thing.

Besides, it wouldn't matter worth a damn. Anyone who did their homework has known about Warhol and flash worms for years now, and realises that it's not the upload speed of the initial seed that counts, it's the upload speed of the first tier. You could hypothetically launch stuff through a wardrived wireless LAN, without a problem, or even slower networks; even dialup is enough.

And any VXer working to the current fads would release through a multi-proxy chain to an existing, slowly-infected (sometimes manually-infected) first-tier command-and-control botnet, to the rest of the wider second-tier botnet which would seed the worm's release in a distributed fashion.

And then when they have control of a bunch of machines, they rent it out to spammers, do DDoS extortion with it, and password stealing, and spyware/dialer installation affiliate scams, and credit card fraud, and fly-by-night child pr0n hosting and pretty much every other manner of other nasty stuff you can possibly think of doing with a bunch of random machines. Think distributed computing, only a little dumber, and a lot more nasty.

Oh, wait. That's exactly what they do already. Damn.

So in summary; no, you do not need high bandwidth to do nasty things. It doesn't even really help. You need low profile to do nasty things, and cybercafes are not, despite common misconceptions, really all that low profile. Most of the VXers that have tried releasing from cybercafes got arrested. Enough said.

BT (2, Insightful)

booch (4157) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621736)

BT's global internet protocol network

That may be the most verbose/obscure way of saying "the Internet" that I've ever seen. And why do they imply that BT owns it?

Re:BT (2, Insightful)

lisaparratt (752068) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621887)

Um, you do realise the Internet is made up of more than one network, right? And that many of the networks making it up are own by telecoms companies, like, ooh, I dunno, BT? And that some of these companies are multinational, and so have networks that spread across the globe? These companies also have other networks, running other protocols other than "Internet protocol".

Re:BT (2, Informative)

TheBiGW (982686) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621979)

The whole place is owned by BT. I've visited and there is BT branding everywhere.

The 100mbit is probably with reference to the LAN the PCs are located on. When I surfed on the iMacs there it certainly didn't feel like the fastest internet surfing I've done.

Re:BT (1)

tumbleweedsi (904869) | more than 7 years ago | (#15622232)

That may be the most verbose/obscure way of saying "the Internet" that I've ever seen. And why do they imply that BT owns it?
OK, here's Internet 101.

A network running internet protocol is not necessarily The Internet. The Internet is a network running internet protocol however BT have a network running internet protocol which is part of The Internet and although they do not own The Internet, they own their own internet protocol network.

Let me break it down for the idiots. If you create a network using internet protocol as your method of transporting your data (a company LAN for example) they you have an internet protocol network. If you make that a huge global network using all your own kit they it is a global internet protocol network. If you peer it with other internet protocol networks and allow their traffic to flow over your network and you pass traffic over their network then you become a part of The Internet.

The Internet is made up of a lot of internetworked systems. BT happen to be a tier 1 carrier so they connect up a whole bunch of smaller networks and peer with other large networks. Goonhilly is their main UK satelite earth station where they have loads of large dishes which beam voice and data traffic all over the world. If you are plugged directly into BT's global network you are basically on one of the backbones of The Internet and are as close to the heart of it as most people get allowed to be.

Goonhilly is owned by BT, the BT global IP (internet protocol) network is owned by BT and to a certain extent that whole large chunk of The Internet is owned by BT. Sever BT's network from The Internet and they still have an internet (notice the use of upper and lower case), just not a part of The Internet.

So do you get it? BT don't own The Internet however they do own an internet which is part of The Internet.

-Yawn- (3, Informative)

Reality Master 101 (179095) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621741)

Who cares? I can barely tell the difference between my old 4 megabit connection and my current 10 megabit connection. Servers can't even typically send it that fast. It only comes in handy when I'm doing multiple downloads at the same time.

"The service will be free to visitors..." (3, Insightful)

The MAZZTer (911996) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621770)

The service will be free to visitors.

"Visitors" or "customers"? There is a distinct difference, mainly the latter pays money to the business for some coffee and gets the internet perks along with it.

Re:"The service will be free to visitors..." (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15621853)

"Visitors" or "customers"? There is a distinct difference, mainly the latter pays money to the business for some coffee and gets the internet perks along with it.

The former gets to pay a ~ $12 entry fee.

Article is garbage - don't read it (0, Flamebait)

netpixie (155816) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621792)

I was really hoping this wasn't going to get to Slashdot. A puff peice for a rubbish company's lame attempt to join the 20th century that makes everyone concerned look like a total dick.

"download data at speeds of up to 100 megabits"

Goodness me! Thats almost as fast as the networks in Korea .... 10 years ago.

Those sort of transfer speeds really are making the UK a major player in internet use. I think we're upto 193rd in the world now and with the pace of network acceleration as it is, we should be over taking Eastern Samoa (192nd) sometime within the next decade.

The truth is, network connectivity in the UK is beyond a joke. The easiest way (outside university) to transfer more than a couple of meg is to sent a CD through the post. Even if you are "blessed" with a home wire that can go at more than 56k then you are still stuck with operators who put a ZX Spectrum at the other end and charge you through the nose.

And there's one obvious culprit for who sorry shebang. The same one who restricted the use of ISDN by exorbitant charging, the same one who wants to charge me 100 pounds to "install" a wire I can see already comes into my house, the same one who used to produce CDs that required a full reformat of the hard disk after use, the same one who sat on its fat arse collecting money when the rest of the world was installing better infrastructure. BT.

Re:Article is garbage - don't read it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15622129)

And there's one obvious culprit for who sorry shebang. The same one who restricted the use of ISDN by exorbitant charging, the same one who wants to charge me 100 pounds to "install" a wire I can see already comes into my house, the same one who used to produce CDs that required a full reformat of the hard disk after use, the same one who sat on its fat arse collecting money when the rest of the world was installing better infrastructure. BT.

Huh? I thought slashdotters blamed everything bad on the US.

:D (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15621867)

Goonhilly? Lizard Peninsula? Seriously?

You forgot to mention that this is the first Internet cafe with speeds of up to 100Mbps that is located entirely within a Lemony Snicket novel...

How many LOC (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15621868)

Yes but how many Libraries of Congress can it download in 15 minutes?

I went there last summer (2, Informative)

maw3193 (927455) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621908)

The activity centre was quite boring, as was the tour, and the selection at the cafe. The gift shop was a complete sell-out, they sold telephones! Anyway, the cyber cafe was not a pleasant experience, mainly due to the 'new' keyboards. They're made of pressed metal, like public phones, meaning that you can't achieve any decent typing speed. The keyboard is missing the ALT key, instead they had the bright idea of replacing it with a "www." key. The keyboard was embedded into the wall and was at a very steep slope, making it difficult to get around. There was some arse-backwards system where, if the web browser is closed, it locks out until a technician logs you back in. While the bandwidth makes it seem like a good idea, what good is it, when there is no access to portable media. Quick streaming media is it's only advantage, and when it backs out into the cafe, porn is completely out of the question.

Practical Limitations? (1)

g1gg13r (950003) | more than 7 years ago | (#15621914)

I'm not sure how useful this will be in practice. Just because YOU have the bandwidth to be able to download X bits/second does not mean that the server(s) you are getting data from can upload at that speed. If I could get as much download speed over DSL as my ISP claims, I would be very happy; however, more often than not, the download speed is restricted not by my ISP, but by the server (either due to actual bandwidth restrictions, or due to explicit download rate restrictions enforced by the server).

Even if you could achieve those download speeds, would your hard disk be able to keep up with storing the data that quickly? My computer has trouble keeping up with download speeds of 1 Mb/s.

Re:Practical Limitations? (1)

Zedrick (764028) | more than 7 years ago | (#15622244)

Huh? Even if you mean MB and not Mb, that sounds strange. What kind of computer do you have? Both my current one (which is fairly modern) and my old box (with some 6-year old HD I forgot the specs of) can handle downloads at about 12MB/s without any problem (on my 100Mb connection).

4 gig connection in 2001 (3, Interesting)

skidv (656766) | more than 7 years ago | (#15622064)

A company I worked for (now closed) delivered 4 gigabits of ethernet connectivity to the buildings it lit in 2001. We designed and built our own gigabit ethernet DWDM injectors to link in-building Cisco 3508 switches with Cisco 6509 switches in the CO. One of our customers was Web2Zone (an Internet Cafe) at 62 Coopers' Square. We never saw the kind of bandwidth spike that indicated they used even 1/1000th of the bandwidth, except when they caught code-red or some such Internet worm. We believed that the limitation was the destination server bandwidth. To compensate for slow servers on other providers, we made extensive use of static page caching to speed performance and reduce our bandwidth costs.

Doesn't say how much it costs (0, Redundant)

ravee (201020) | more than 7 years ago | (#15622109)

The article left out one significant item that all are interested in. It doesn't say how much it costs for a person to use their facilities .

I've been (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15622114)

Well, I've been to Goonhilly. It is a tourist attraction. The literature implies that you will be able to see the working equipment and learn about the networks and their history. This is, in fact, not true. There is a short tour, centred on a promotional video that is extremely light on technical content. There is no museum and no opportunity to see any working part of the site. There isn't even an observation window onto the NOC. Even nuclear power stations allow you to see the control centre.

The whole thing is deeply tedious and the thought of a 100Mbit cyber cafe does little to persuade me to return - particularly as the machines will probably be completely locked down and it won't be possible to do much beyond check your BT-Yahoo email. Urgh.

With "Web 2.0", bandwidth doesn't help as much (1)

Animats (122034) | more than 7 years ago | (#15622152)

"Web 2.0" sites tend to constrained by server load, not outgoing bandwidth. With all that extra server-side work, servers are busier than ever. Notice how many more sites load slowly today. Sometimes you'll even see a page load stall because some JavaScript is waiting for an ad server. (Watch the bottom bar in Firefox to see what you're waiting for.)

For overloaded database-driven sites, page load stalls make the Web look like it's 1997 again. Craigslist [craigslist.org] is really hurting during busy periods.

Open for Business (1)

Billosaur (927319) | more than 7 years ago | (#15622196)

The new internet cafe was officially declared open by Helston Community College pupils Chloe Smith and James Evans, both aged 17.

It has been named the Goonhilly House of Porn. Blank CDs and boxes of tissues will be on sale in the lobby.

Cool place to launch something (1)

robmit (985614) | more than 7 years ago | (#15622234)

"Computers at Goonhilly satellite station, on the Lizard peninsula in Cornwall" Is this a real place or a fictional location in a Harry Potter novel?
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