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Congress May Add Record Requirements to MySpace

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the remembering-that-embarassing-photo dept.

343

An anonymous reader writes "CNet is reporting that Congress may be working to extend the record retention requirements they're already working on for ISPs to social networking sites. Sites such as MySpace or FaceBook would be required to hold onto content access records for an unspecified length of time." From the article: "In those meetings, Justice Department representatives went beyond the argument that data retention was necessary to protect children--and claimed it would aid in terrorism investigations as well. During Wednesday's hearing, politicians also claimed that social-networking sites were not doing enough to verify that their users who claimed to be a certain age were telling the truth. (Recent news reports have said that sex predators are using MySpace and similar sites to meet up with teens.)"

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343 comments

Parents? (4, Funny)

andrewman327 (635952) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636042)

While the parents groups were in DC lobbying congress, their children were chatting with this really awesome guy who's only a few years older than they are, honest!

Re:Parents? (5, Insightful)

ppz003 (797487) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636364)

While this may seem funny to some, it is dead on. Why do parents think that everyone ELSE has to watch over their damn kids? In addition to the newly formed Pirate Party, how about we start a "Don't make laws against Darwinism" party?

Re:Parents? (1)

avirrey (972127) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636455)

Parents need to teach their kids not to be so da*n stupid. My mom beat the snot out of me as a kid... now were so buttered up with child protection cr*p that we can't do jack to discipline children. You want my child to listen to me? Let me beat the crap out of him, so I don't have someone outside my household do it. LOL. Something to think about. I actually don't have any kids, but I do think our american children are getting stupider and stupider. Hmm, actually I think we're all getting dumber. I mean senior citizens are getting SPAMED and exhorted like crazy by like foreign terrorist and stuff. There goes my grandpa's life savings... sure I'll give you my account number. **The poster of this comment does not actually beat on any children, but simply uses it as a method to hyperbolize an issue.

Re:Parents? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15636436)

Recent news reports have said that sex predators are using MySpace and similar sites to meet up with teens.

Seriously, parents should have a look at what their kids are doing on MySpace.
It seems to me like teens are using it to meet up with sex predators...

Re:Parents? (3, Funny)

neoform (551705) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636459)

SOMEBODY PLLLLEEEASE THINK OF THE TERRORISTS!

I mean golly, who doesn't know that all the hip cool terrorists out there use MySpace to plan their attacks..

oh yeah, and let's pass laws cause uh, pedophiles also. yeah. (i wonder if there's a way they can sneak abortion into this issue as well..)

LOL (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15636046)

ROFL GR8 IDEA

Something good to retain information on. (0, Troll)

jrmcferren (935335) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636049)

If MySpace is used by predators to target teens, they should have a record retention policy. It also holds people more accountable to law enforcement too. If they have illegal information on there and they "delete" it before the cops see it, they data retention would be the only way for the police to get evidence.

Re:Something good to retain information on. (4, Insightful)

Gr33nNight (679837) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636096)

All teens? Even ones who are 18 and 19? Arnt those legally adults? Should records be kept on those folks as well? How do you prove they are 18 and 19 and not 12 or even 50? Should they then just retain all record for everyone 'just in case'? Sounds to me like it is just more information they want to put in the vast database of everyone in the US.

Re:Something good to retain information on. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15636188)

If Slashdot is used by predators to target geeks, they should have a record retention policy. It also holds people more accountable to law enforcement too. If they have illegal information on there and they "delete" it before the cops see it, they data retention would be the only way for the police to get evidence.

Here is a better idea teach geeks (or teens) that not everything they find online is correct and that there are bad people in this world that would like to take their computer (virginity) away.

How about responsible teens? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15636266)

I know that in many of the blatantly neoconservative states on the US, the trend is to not encourage teens to be responsible. This manifests itself through the drinking age being 21, the age of consent being 18, and so forth. Meanwhile, in Europe and various other nations, such age limits are far lower, or even nonexistant. And what do we often see? Far more responsibility on behalf of those teens from areas where they are treated more maturely.

The problem isn't so much the predators, as it is the teens who have been shielded by their parents, and otherwise kept from learning about responsibility. For the most part, nobody forces them to give out personal information on the Internet. If they do, it's likely something they did completely on their own. If they then proceed to meet up with somebody who isn't a very nice person, that's again something they likely arranged on their own. The only way to stop such activity is to get the teens to smarted up, and to not provide their address to strangers, and to not agree to meet them in alleyways.

In the 1970s, we were always told in school not to get into a car with a stranger. And for the most part, it worked. There were a few stupid fucks who didn't heed such advice, of course. But in general, if you're open and honest with children and teens, they often will understand your concern. It's when you treat them like fools that they truly become fools, as we so often see in extremely restrictive places like Alabama, Arkansas, Oklahoma, and so forth. They won't learn responsibility in such an environment. And passing numerous data retention laws won't have any beneficial effect at all, because the root problem of stupid/ignorant/irresponsible teens is not being addressed.

Re:How about responsible teens? (1)

DesertWolf0132 (718296) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636458)

Had I a mod point to give, I would give it to you. Well thought out and reasoned argument. If only the alarmist parents and media in this country could figure out to teach teens how to avoind these pitfalls through reason and responsibility instead of knee-jerk fear mongering and misinformation and shielding their child from the world.

Re:Something good to retain information on. (1)

Rob T Firefly (844560) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636484)

Ten years ago, people said the same of AOL's chatrooms. Should AOL then have logged every conversation in every chatroom on their service? How about instant messaging, since predators could have spoken to children that way? But, logically, people could just move off AOL onto the real Internet.. so we have to log every convo and PM in every IRC room as well, right? Also every message board, guestbook, IRC channel, blog, and every other site that allows people to comment or contact each other in any way, including this site, and your site. It doesn't matter if it's a site or service intended for kids or not, kids can always lie about their age as they do to get on Myspace, so everyone needs to keep full access records of everything ever.

And it's not just online! What about the phone? Predators use those to talk to kids as well. I propose we let the phone companies... oh, wait, they actually do that already. Nevermind.

Since when did we all become a bunch of pussies? (5, Insightful)

garcia (6573) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636055)

In those meetings, Justice Department representatives went beyond the argument that data retention was necessary to protect children--and claimed it would aid in terrorism investigations as well.

What's going to stop freedom terrorism happening in our country? Bullshit, like this, is eating at the highly regarded morals *I* hold which are being left the fuck alone to do whatever the fuck I like w/o having to wonder "am I a terrorist?!"

The "Republicans" are happy to erode our media's rights to disseminate important information being withheld and to chastise them using "their" news outlets while the rest of us sit here whining in near silence.

I've always said that I'm no better than anyone else as I'm sitting here whining to the Slashdot community and not doing anything but when are we going to stand up and tell the Government to go fuck itself?

Re:Since when did we all become a bunch of pussies (5, Interesting)

purpledinoz (573045) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636156)

Terrorism is their trump card.

They'll keep spewing this BS to get what they want. In the cold war days, it was communism, now it's terrorism. I wonder what's next...

Re:Since when did we all become a bunch of pussies (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15636241)

Apple Fanboyism....haha I am one so I can make fun of it. It's not so much that I worship Steve Jobs, but just offer him human sacrifices.

Re:Since when did we all become a bunch of pussies (1)

miskatonic alumnus (668722) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636287)

You forgot drugs. Remember the Drug Omnibus Bill allowing the cops to confiscate all your property, say that it was used to receive, store, transport drugs, without actually charging you with anything. Then to regain your property, you have to prove its innocence ... good luck with that.

Re:Since when did we all become a bunch of pussies (5, Insightful)

RingDev (879105) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636190)

As per the DOD: Terrorism is "the unlawful use of -- or threatened use of -- force or violence against individuals or property to coerce or intimidate governments or societies, often to achieve political, religious, or ideological objectives."

If Terrorist hate freedom and the Western way of life, it would be their political goal to reduce or remove our freedoms.

And out wonderful government, while attempting to fight against the terrorist have been slowly erroding our rights and freedoms.

So the harder our government fights, the more the terrorist win. Our government has done more to destroy our way of life than any terrorist organization ever could.

-Rick

Re:Since when did we all become a bunch of pussies (1, Insightful)

Jerf (17166) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636303)

While there is some truth to this, the real freedom the terrorists of today want to take away is The Freedom To Be Not Muslim.

This does not immediately "disprove" your argument, but it does show your argument is a radical oversimplification, to the point where it has more rhetorical value than any sort of substantiative policy discrimination value.

Re:Since when did we all become a bunch of pussies (0)

DaggertipX (547165) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636425)

Yeah, I hate how many times I get hassled every day here in the great states about not being Muslim. Oh yeah, I don't. Policies and actions to stop that form of terrorism overseas have no bearing on actions like this. The "terrorism" they are fighting here are the freedoms we rely on them to protect.
Now, if you want to talk about our policies overseas, fine - we can do that. You should also realize that some of us don't agree with the administrations viewpoint that westernizing the world is a proper course of action.

Re:Since when did we all become a bunch of pussies (4, Insightful)

RingDev (879105) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636523)

While I agree that the most desired goal is religiously based, the administration (specificly Pres Bush) has stated that "Terrorists hate our freedom"

Here are a few other ways of looking at it:

Is the real freedom the administration of today want to take away is The Freedom To Not Have Conservative Christian Values?

Or is the administration themselves a terrorist threat as they use the threat of violence against individuals or property to intimidate society to achieve political objectives? True, they themselves are not perpetrating the violence, but they are saying things along the line of "vote for us, or there will be bloodshed." Sure, they wrap it up a little more pleasantly with things like, "Other political parties are pansies, only our political party care for your safety." But that sounds an awful lot like a protection racket coming from a neighborhood gang. "The police can't keep your store from burning down, only the Crazy 88s can protect you."

-Rick

Re:Since when did we all become a bunch of pussies (1)

IAmTheDave (746256) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636476)

As per the DOD: Terrorism is "the unlawful use of -- or threatened use of -- force or violence against individuals or property to coerce or intimidate governments or societies, often to achieve political, religious, or ideological objectives."

And DAMN MySpace for aiding them in the intimidation and upheaval of our government!

Oh, and the children. Won't someone think of them too, when you get a chance.

Hey - any takers on what the next big rally cry will be? It's been:

  • Communism
  • Nuculeaaar War
  • Children, and the thinking of them
  • Flag burning
  • Gay marriage
  • Terrorism (if you haven't been paying attention, they use it a lot)

So what's next?? Because when people are tired of hearing of one thing, they innevitably cry about something else to get what they want.

You americans are being silenced by perpetual war (1)

Potor (658520) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636213)

The administration the other pointed out that the NYT was wrong to publish the SWIFT - Treasury - CIA story because the country was at war.

Clearly, that's the point of the "war" on terrorism - to silence critics. That's why the "war" will never be ended. That's why the gov't will never attempt to end it.

Your gov't has totally taken advantage of your collective love of martial metaphors (war on poverty, drugs, sports doping, whatever).

Re:Since when did we all become a bunch of pussies (1)

TheLinuxSRC (683475) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636214)

FTFA: "Rep. Diana DeGette, a Colorado Democrat, originally proposed legislation (click here for PDF) in April that would require Internet service providers to retain activity logs to aid in criminal investigations, including ones involving child abuse.

Now DeGette and some of her colleagues in the House of Representatives are suggesting that social-networking sites should be required to do the same thing."


From your post: The "Republicans" are happy to erode our media's rights to disseminate important information being withheld and to chastise them using "their" news outlets while the rest of us sit here whining in near silence.

Please berate the appropriate (Democrat) assholes.

Re:Since when did we all become a bunch of pussies (1)

NineNine (235196) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636237)

Dude, it's not the government, it's the people. Most people in the US are too stupid to not believe the government propoganda about a "terrorist" behind every bush. I don't think that there's anything that can be done about it. The stupid people who buy into all of this bullshit are in the majority, and they tend to out-breed those of us who understand what's going on.

I don't know about you, but I'm tired of it, and I'm saving up to leave.

Re:Since when did we all become a bunch of pussies (1)

snsr (917423) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636521)

I felt (and continue to feel) the same way. On the other hand, I am loathe to let a system which was entrusted to /me/ fall into continued irrelevance and disarray. I feel that it's my responsibility in some way to stay and, at the very least, make my voice heard. Hopefully I'll find a way to live my life as well as make an appreciable difference. Where might you head to sheild yourself from this bullshit? This kind of polarity is not going to spare your foreign hideout..

Re:Since when did we all become a bunch of pussies (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15636271)

Don't be a moron, its not just "Republicans" its all of our government officials. The person proposing this legislation is a "Democrat". Bottom line is, everyone in power wants more control over our lives. ALL OF THEM. Open your eyes, look around, stop just seeing Bad=Republicans, Good=Democrats, what are you twelve?

Re:Since when did we all become a bunch of pussies (1)

garcia (6573) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636480)

Open your eyes, look around, stop just seeing Bad=Republicans, Good=Democrats, what are you twelve?

I never said the Democrats were good. I don't believe that the New Aged GOP (aka the "Republicans") or the Democrats are doing anything positive for this country.

Open your eyes and get a clue before spouting off like an uninformed 12 year old.

Re:Since when did we all become a bunch of pussies (1)

aliasptr (684593) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636347)

I'm glad you made this point about "freedom terrorism". First off I want to say that few people, myself included, even understand why organized states support terrorism in the first place or why terrorists even exist. The bottom line tends to be that we pissed a lot of people off by arbitrarily placing governments and geographic boundaries with no respect to the history or culture of the people. All this being said and going back to my original point and that of the parent post, wouldn't we be pretty pissed of if some other country came in and changed our political boundaries and government around? Some people point this out and again I'm not advocating violence in the first place, and I often don't support the way of life most terrorist groups are fighting for ("funny" thing being often times the "normal" people of the terrorist's home country don't support it either. Another point I've seen brought up here and there on is that basing your understanding of a people by the most radical faction would be like judging the entire character of the US by using us geeks as a metric, or extreme religious factions right here in the US... which we do get sometimes but I wouldn't say the majority of our country is well described by these groups... anyway). In the end there are lots of holes in this post but I'm not going to write pages about it because then I'd have to do some serious studying and research (read: I'm lazy) but the main point is if this crap keeps going we're looking at "civil" terrorism and then we'll see how easy profiling gets. Let's hope few people are injured or killed.

Re:Since when did we all become a bunch of pussies (1)

redog (574983) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636354)

I agree. And think that a large part of the problem is that the govenrment tends to think like an overbearing parent. Its a parents job to protect their children not the governments. The government should not legislate irresponsiblity or protect us from ourselves. If social networking sites attract preditors then GREAT! Now they have the fucking bait and the trap set, round up the sickos. As a parent I will decide if and where my child can get online and lie about their age. If they decide to do it without my authority then guess what, they made a bad choice which can lead to horrible concequences. I'm not saying that I would happily accept it, but thus is life. Raise you children properly and maybe the world will be a smarter place.

Imposing burdens on the owners of a social network website because their users might be predators, liers, or unmonitored children is as retarted as requireing the shop-rite to keep records of everyone who shows an ID to buy alcohol or tobacco. What about bar rooms? Should they keep records too? After all underage kids might lie and there could be an intoxicated rapist just waiting to spot a hawt teen slut exposing her self in "public".

I say go after parents and irresponsibility.

Re:Since when did we all become a bunch of pussies (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15636357)

The "Republicans"...

"when are we going to stand up and tell the Government to go fuck itself?"...

You get your chance at election time. It's called democracy. Ever heard of it? Asshole.

Double standard (1)

amightywind (691887) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636434)

What's going to stop freedom terrorism happening in our country? Bullshit, like this, is eating at the highly regarded morals *I* hold which are being left the fuck alone to do whatever the fuck I like w/o having to wonder "am I a terrorist?!"

You realy don't want to be left alone, you want immunity from causing someone else harm. There is a different. Be honest.

The "Republicans" are happy to erode our media's rights to disseminate important information being withheld and to chastise them using "their" news outlets while the rest of us sit here whining in near silence.

Democrats and their media shills (like the New York Times, LA Times, CNN) commit open acts of treason outing effective, classified anti-terror programs and expect immunity. Do you expect it to pass unnoticed? Not this time.

Re:Since when did we all become a bunch of pussies (1)

rbochan (827946) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636448)

George Carlin's been ranting about it for a couple of decades. He call's it the "pussification of America". AKA "WON'T SOMEONE THINK OF THE CHILDREN!!!!11tilde1!!~~!!!!WTFBBQ!!!!!"

Terrorism? (4, Funny)

Andrewkov (140579) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636056)

This will help terrorism? Does Osama have a MySpace profile??

Re:Terrorism? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15636196)

Just look for everyone who has 'Al Quaeda' on their friends list.

Re:Terrorism? (3, Funny)

dr_dank (472072) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636302)

Yes. He ordered the 9/11 attacks after his bitch mom wouldn't give him a ride to the mall. Listening to emo and cutting himself just wasn't doing the trick anymore.

Land of the free... (4, Interesting)

FatSean (18753) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636059)

I think the terrorists may have won, and they only had to kill a few thousand US citizens. What a shame. I wonder when single men will be required to produce ID if they walk past a public place where the children might be or where a terrorist attack would claim many lives.

Re:Land of the free... (1)

joshier (957448) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636103)

Yeah, and remember the famouse quote the news spurted out as to why they hate us (well, not *us* I am not in the US, but the reason why they done it?) The line was "they hate our freedom". Well, the governments are doing a pretty damn good job of making sure that comes true.

Re:Land of the free... (1)

jo42 (227475) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636126)

The did win. They managed to reduce our freedoms and ding us big time in the wallet. This anti-terrorist thing is running close $500 billion in costs so far. Who pays for that? You and me...

Re:Land of the free... (1)

tgd (2822) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636308)

And unfortunately, we've demonstrated that we don't have 1% of the conviction that the "terrorists" have.

We can't even manage to vote a known corrupt government out of office, much less really do something about whats going on.

Its pathetic. We not only lost, we lost, and then locked ourselves up in a a prison of our own making, abused ourselves, then bowed down and asked for more.

Re:Land of the free... (5, Insightful)

KingSkippus (799657) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636131)

I think the terrorists may have won...

Don't be silly. They didn't win. They hated us for our freedom, and we showed 'em good by doing away with it. Problem solved!

Re:Land of the free... (1)

purpledinoz (573045) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636323)

I think everyone should travel to a country which don't have the freedoms that the US enjoys. I've been to Malaysia, where the government is technically a democracy, but the same party gets elected to power everytime. I enjoyed my experience there, but there were a few times where I felt really lucky to be Canadian. I was discussing politics with the locals, in a private room, and they said that the conversation would get them in trouble if the wrong ears heared it. To anyone is a first world country, criticizing your government is part of normal conversation. But in Malaysia, people are afraid to criticize openly.

Re:Land of the free... (1)

Duncan3 (10537) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636328)

I've said it before, if you aren't a 14 year old or a pedophile, why the hell would you want to be on a site like myspace, a site full of 14 year old and pedophiles.

Anyone else should have grown up by now, and have better things to do, like talk to your kids and keep them off sites like myspace!

Re:Land of the free... (1)

Sigl (691196) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636361)

I think the terrorists may have won, and they only had to kill a few thousand US citizens.

That's nothing. The children have already won, and all they had to do is sneak out on a date with a 19 year old.

Re:Land of the free... (1)

jesuscyborg (903402) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636368)

The so-called "terrorists" haven't won anything. Having our freedom stripped away is what the neo-conservatives want, so essentially they're the winners. The terrorists could probably care less about how oppressive our government has become; they just want us to die.

Nothing to do with terrorists. (1)

pavon (30274) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636444)

This whole "think of the children", "I can't watch out for my kids, so the government should do it for me" garbage was around long before 9/11. It around during the seventies, and was in full swing during the Clinton administration.

You can't blame this on terrorists, or the neocons, or the Bush administration. This is something that the people of this country ask, and beg for, and the government is only all to happy to comply.

oh c'mon (5, Funny)

myspys (204685) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636066)

In those meetings, Justice Department representatives went beyond the argument that data retention was necessary to protect children--and claimed it would aid in terrorism investigations as well.

guys, you KNOW you're only required to use one of those. EITHER think of the children OR terrorists

this is over the top. someone might notice your tactics!

In a related story... (5, Insightful)

KingSkippus (799657) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636074)

In other news:

Another bill before Congress requires that all owners of physical bulletin boards hanging in public places such as offices, classrooms, and such be required to retain all materials posted on such bulletin boards for an unspecified period of time. Stricter efforts will also be placed on those responsible for bulletin boards placed in public places to verify the identity of those who post such materials. Any unverified materials being posted will result in the bulletin board and all retain material being immediately seized for investigation of potential terrorist activity, and the owners prosecuted to the full extent of the law.

I hear there's also a bill pending that will make posting fingerpaintings in kindergarten classrooms illegal, and that the Department of Homeland Security will be investigating all reports of graffiti for possible terrorist links.

I just thank god that all of this is making us so much safer and that we can rest assured that we'll never be attacked again. Those weird concepts such as freedom and liberty and privacy have always been overrated anyway.

Re:In a related story... (1)

Rob Riggs (6418) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636262)

I hear there's also a bill pending that will make posting fingerpaintings in kindergarten classrooms illegal

The Dept. of Justice has recently adjusted their tactics to deal with the serious issue of kindergarten fingerpainting. Instead of a ban, it will be asking Congress to require that schools retain all fingerpaintings indefinitely to aid the permanent war on terrorism. There is a gold mine of finger print and psychological data in these paintings which will serve the future generations of Americans in their fight against home-grown terrorists. The Attorney General is expected to testify before Congress later this week that he is certain that both Waco and the Oklahoma City bombing could have been prevented had Homeland Security had these valuable assets in the 1990's.

Responsibility for your own actions people! (5, Insightful)

rbabb (134729) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636087)

I'm sorry, but why are the parents of these kids asking the age old questions of their kids???

Where are you going?
Who are you going with?
Who is going to be there?
What are you going to be doing?
Do I know these people? (If the parent doesn't know them, then they probably shouldn't let their kids hang out with them unsupervised!)

I mean what the hell people! It's not a website's responsibility to keep your kids away from predators, IT'S YOURS!

Re:Responsibility for your own actions people! (0)

purpledinoz (573045) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636193)

And why doesn't the goverment do more to protect the honest man trying to get some poontang, who gets humiliated by some prankster pretending to be a woman.

I would be in full support of the government forcing MySpace to verify gender...

Re:Responsibility for your own actions people! (1)

redog (574983) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636389)

Its not the governments job to set a websites requirements. If you run into a transvestite on a date its your fault for believing them not the govenrments fault for not having some way to reassure you that there isn't a dick down there.

Re:Responsibility for your own actions people! (1)

tehcyder (746570) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636382)

why are the parents of these kids asking the age old questions of their kids???
Er, I don't think they are...

Re:Responsibility for your own actions people! (1)

sowth (748135) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636422)

Apparently not. It looks like the parents who let their kids steal everything and run around naked have taken over.

Rupert Merdock is a marketing genius (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15636100)

Really...he owns myspace and the more myspace horror stories there are, the more it gets in peoples mind, plus it adds sales for his other news corp holdings. Fucking brilliant.

Bless their hearts. (5, Insightful)

Rob T Firefly (844560) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636106)

They really are so cute, so adorably innocent and naive, as they go about their daily business, chatting away to other people, getting crazy naive ideas in their inexperienced little heads. Of course they think what they're doing is right, but they just don't have the capacity or life experience to understand. If only we could gather them around, hug them, tell them it's all going to be okay as long as they stop for a moment and consider what they're doing, and educate them about the full, terrible impact their actions will have not only on themselves, but on everyone else around them. But, of course, they don't want to listen to wisdom, not at their age..

..I'm referring, of course, to the damn fool parents groups and lawmakers.

Verifying age? (2, Interesting)

purpledinoz (573045) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636116)

"During Wednesday's hearing, politicians also claimed that social-networking sites were not doing enough to verify that their users who claimed to be a certain age were telling the truth."

I wonder how politicians expect MySpace to verify a person's age. Perhaps they're going to force them to use the age verification that was used on those OLD Leisure Suit Larry games. If you don't know what I'm talking about, the old Leisure Suit Larry games (I'm talking 286 era) used to ask general knowledge questions before the game started, assuming that a person of 18 years of age or older would be able to answer them, and allow you to play the game if you answered a few questions correctly.

Re:Verifying age? (1)

orielbean (936271) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636343)

Like who was Richard Nixon's Vice President! I remember those. Hilarious and effective. At least effective before google and wikipedia.

In other news... (1)

Spikeman56 (543509) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636123)

"Poking" people on Facebook is found to be a secret form of communication used by Al-Qaeda
Congress held a hearing today on the action of poking, a "feature" in the Facebook social network. According to accounts from industry proffesionals, Al-Qaeda has used such "pokes" as a medium for a system of communication not unlike Morse Code. More details after the break.

lol, parental responsibility (5, Insightful)

aleksiel (678251) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636124)

i can remember a few years back when it was the parent's resonsibility to watch their kid; when they would talk to them about stuff like this just like they would tell them to not talk to strangers, especially ones with candy.

did anyone ever sue a mall for being the place in which their child was abducted/abused/etc?

I whole heartedly agree (3, Funny)

A beautiful mind (821714) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636133)

Those damn kids^Wterrorists with their flash, background music and 32 sized Comic Sans fonts have to be apprehended!

My EYES!

In France... (1)

truthsearch (249536) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636135)

Web sites that operate in the French TLD are required to retain the email address and IP address of anything posted to their sites. I know one web site that gets requests from the police at least once a week. The authorities only get the information if they ask for it but they don't require a warrant.

In the US I don't see this being a problem as long as a warrant is required so there is some police oversight. I do, however, hate to see more regulations. But as long as all the data isn't being fed directly to the government I doubt there will be many abuses.

This ain't France (2, Interesting)

kid_oliva (899189) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636443)

Web sites that operate in the French TLD

There is the first problem, comparing what should be done in America to what is going on in other countries. We have certain rights called the Bill of Rights that have been being overlooked by people scarried of their own shadow because they think some big bad Muslim is going to kill them and their children. Instead of fighting for real protection instead of an illusion of protection, they stick their heads in the sand like an ostrich.

But as long as all the data isn't being fed directly to the government I doubt there will be many abuses.

I guess he doesn't realize that one, the police are part of the government and that two, it is Homeland Security/NSA/FBI that will be requesting the data. If I use or don't My Space or Facebook is none of your fucking business. It is called the first Amendment: "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances." This falls under peaceably to assemble because people meet here to hang out and make friends online. Lets go to the fourh Amendment: "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." First you have to have 'probable' cause and not 'possible' cause, then you can issue a warrant to obtain the information. The right of the people to be secure is of the utmost. Nobody has the right to take my papers/webpages or effects/digital content for their purposes.

We have a voice here at /., maybe we should start to gather and lobby ourselves. And no I'm not a democrat but a republican and Bush's policies suck.

Its So Sad (4, Insightful)

fullphaser (939696) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636159)

That the parents of today are convinced that they are no longer repsonsible for their own children, Why moniter video games when you can penalize the industry making them, why watch what your child does online , when you can simply put that problem off on the webamsters, The parties their blaming have no control over the kids, so... how is it that they can be without the repsonsiblity yet still have the gusto to claim it is someone elses fault? that is just way to lazy

Re:Its So Sad (1)

Jedi Alec (258881) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636263)

Well, here's a business model for you. For a small fee, you can alleviate all of the worries in one fell swoop. Drive up the driveway, pick up computer, place computer in van, drive away. Problem solved...and you get a Beowulf cluster as a bonus.

Where in the Constitution is this allowed? (5, Interesting)

SonicSpike (242293) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636161)

Can someone tell me how this is any of the business of Congress?

According to Article I Section 8 of the US Constitution this is NOT a function of the US Congress.
http://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution/constituti on.articlei.html#section8 [cornell.edu]

And according to the 10th Amendment, "The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people."
http://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution/constituti on.billofrights.html#amendmentx [cornell.edu]

Re:Where in the Constitution is this allowed? (1)

Darkon (206829) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636345)

Can someone tell me how this is any of the business of Congress?

"The Congress shall have power ... to regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among the several states, and with the Indian tribes"

Sadly it's pretty much accepted that internet == commerce.

Re:Where in the Constitution is this allowed? (1)

SonicSpike (242293) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636386)

I think the problem is a bit deeper than that.

The Net was largely setup with public funds and research (think DARPA/ARPA and universities). But more specifically, the issue is that the telco providers have a government granted monopoly on a large portion of the backbone. Therefore the infrastructure of the Net is not really in the "free market" unfortunately. This GREATLY complicates things and whenever the government gets involved, you can be sure that the general public is usually getting the shaft and special interests (read large telcos) are being pandered to.

The solution is to limit the government to its original and minimal functions as set forth by our Founding Fathers in the DoI and US Const.

What do you expect? (1)

Shajenko42 (627901) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636372)

Bush has admitted to flagrantly violating the law, not to mention pushing laws that violate the Constitution. Do you really expect them to think they have any limitations at all anymore?

Re:What do you expect? (1)

SonicSpike (242293) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636508)

What does Bush have to do with this? The issue is about Congress. Bush only has anything to do with this if it passes the legislature and he actually signs it into law.

Legislation should be tied to Art 1 Sec 8 (1)

SonicSpike (242293) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636487)

I think all legislation should have a preface which explains how that specific legislation is within the bounds of Article I, Section 8 of the Const. Being forced to rationalize each piece of legislation and how it is a function of the government as set forth by our founding documents is important. I also think our courts need to have more integrity and overturn ANY legislation that does not have a direct derivation from one of those specific powers.

How Long? (0)

ryanw (131814) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636175)

How long do you think it will take for myspace to go the way of napster? Going from something 'rogue' and home grown, to then shut down by some lawsuit, purchased by some corporate structure thinking they could rescue it and regulate it and bring it back?

Re:How Long? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15636284)

MySpace *IS* already owned by News Corporation. It stopped being Tom's personal site ages ago.

Sometimes things work Sometimes they don't. (2, Interesting)

jchawk (127686) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636200)

The idea of common people making laws for the rest of the "common" folks is interesting and for the most part works. This however is one of those situations where it doesn't work. The common law maker has no idea the techical requirements / money / time / people it takes to store such vast amounts of information. What they are creating is an un-due burden on the service providers.

This is why we have the court system to hash this out. Should someone take this up and go to trail over it they can have experts / witnesses / employees / vendors to try to settle this out and show that it's a crazy request that really should have never passed.

I hope it doesn't get that far, but I still have faith in the "system" in order to right this. The reason I say that is, this is the government asking for something to be implimented, not private business asking for something to be implimented. If it were private businesses they would lobby and spend money to make it happen.

Could this affect slashdot? (1)

LiquidCoooled (634315) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636204)

Afterall it is an online community of folks.
No age restrictions and I'm sure some congress folks could have things to say about the GNAA type trolling.

before you say anything - yes i know the slashdot stereotype doesn't have the same bling factor as myspace in the eyes of the teens, but the principal remains.

Re:Could this affect slashdot? (1)

vishbar (862440) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636473)

Naah, it won't affect slashdot. There aren't any predators here.

Hey, by the way, are you 14 or so? I'm 15...want to meet? I'll show you how to have fun.

Terrorism on myspace? (2, Funny)

MobyDisk (75490) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636227)

Wow, that's a stretch. Does anyone have a link to Osama Bin Laden's myspace profile? Or is he disguised as a 16 year old goth girl?

How about? (5, Interesting)

MikeRT (947531) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636236)

Well start telling these teens that they got what they deserved for being stupid? Blame the victim? Damn straight. If at 13, especially if you're a girl, you don't realize that people who are 20 or older and who are attracted to you and trying to hook up with you are bad people, you are one of hell of a daft future sheeple. You can blame the victim for letting themselves get into the situation while throwing away the key of the rapist who did it. Responsibility can be dispensed 100% for both people involved. The rapist was a POS, the victim not only walked right into it, but probably did their part to instigate it.

The reason that teens don't take responsibility is that we say "no one should ever be a victim." That's all well and good, but the world doesn't work in "shoulds." If you are 14 and hook up with a 25 year old, chances are, he or she wants to screw you silly. This is not an age of innocence. Don't give me that bullshit about teens not understanding sex. The average teen today knows more nuanced things about sex than most adults did 50 years ago!

"Our children" aren't being victimized. Our dumbass, horny teens are. They're old enough to know better. Show me a real kid, ie a person who is a prepubescent 11 year old or younger who has gotten really hurt this way. Where are all of the 7, 8, 9 and 10 year olds getting raped? Uh huh. It ain't children, just adolescents. People who are old enough to understand personal safety, even if they can't fully grok the ramifications of sex.

How do you verify 'under-18' (2, Insightful)

foniksonik (573572) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636255)

It's easy to verify over-18... there are various ids that can be used to provide some record which in 99% of cases will be close enough to the real person as to make it work for validation (think a kid using parents CC # to authenticate.. you can just call the parent up and confirm permission to use).

Under-18 though... there's no common ID in use. Which means that anyone over-18 can pretend to be under-18 at will. SO you can cut off access to adult services from kids... BUT you can't cut off access to kids services from adults.

Without further compromising the privacy and security via obscurity of the children in question.... through elaborate cross checking of credentials... there's no way to verify that a child is a child and not an adult pretending to be a child.

Modest Proposal (2, Informative)

PenrosePattern (460197) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636268)

How about all public corporations & all governments should be forced to record their meetings & keep them for a longer time period.
It seems obvious to me that there is significantly more malfeasance happening within corporate governence and 'coporate' government than is happening at MySpace.

I'd like to have earlier known about Enron, Cheney's secret energy task force meetings, Halliburton's war profiteering, etc.

Going after MySpace for terrorists & pedophiles is mis-directed force.

Re:Modest Proposal (1)

dr_dank (472072) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636430)

It's been made clear time and again that whats good for the goose isn't good for the gander when it comes to government. Government insists on having a growing base of knowledge about the movements of its citizens. When those citizens ask for more oversight and accountability of their government in return, they are told those things are secret, war on terror, or some other nonsense excuse of the day.

Just yesterday, there was a story on Slashdot about a family in New Hampshire arrested for videotaping police on their property. Those who dare to watch the watchers are being dealt with more harshly as time goes on.

Won't somebody please think of the barely legals! (1)

republican gourd (879711) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636283)

So, what happens when a terrorist is 16 years old in this continuum? Do we all self destruct?

Uh oh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15636306)

During Wednesday's hearing, politicians also claimed that social-networking sites were not doing enough to verify that their users who claimed to be a certain age were telling the truth.

Someone alert all women over 40. Suddently, it's a crime to lie about your age.

You failt it (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15636379)

us the courtesy you down. It was to the trAnsmission Little-known up today! If you

So this means (3, Interesting)

Ichigo Kurosaki (886802) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636411)

that the goverment is using the excuse of terrorism to be able to index everything about those who post on social network sites?

scary...

panic is creating a lot of stupid ideas (2, Insightful)

JimBobJoe (2758) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636413)

Time magazine (I believe this week) had an article saying that the state attorney generals were meeting about the social networking issues.

It said that age verfication was a top priority for them and that the Connecticut AG said something like "if we could put someone on the moon, we can surely age verify users."

Just to show the collective brains of the people running the panic-show, they entertained using social security number verification for age verification purposes (the Time article said that the problem with that was the large quantity of non-US users, and that apparently nixed the idea.)

Nevertheless, requiring SSNs to open a Myspace or Xanga account would be a disaster on biblical grounds. Though I have a lot more faith in 14 year olds than the average person, I think having them interact with their SSN at all and needing to take responsibility for it would be problematic...not to mention, SSNs of minors is a phishers dream come true--just think about how many emails you'll get from "myspace" and "xanga" saying you need to verify your age to keep your account, so log in here and enter in your SSN and DOB.

Thankfully this won't happen (1)

tthomas48 (180798) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636427)

The Republican Congress is obviously intent on doing nothing until Elections this fall when they will fall out of power, and we perhaps can start having votes on issues more important than whether they like the media or whether they think the war in Iraq is going well. I think those kind of votes are called legislating, which I think technically is what they're supposed to be doing. Although I guess it's good for the nation that they can't be bothered to actually do that. Now if we could just get them to stop spending money like it's going out of style...

This is GREAT!!! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15636499)


Heck, I'm all for forcing MySpace to verify age and gender of every one with a profile. And clearly posting the true information on their page.

I'm tired of chatting up cute 14 y.o. girls who parents don't understand them, only to find out they are 54 y.o. male FBI agents. Come on MySpace, give a guy some warning!

Well if I had to follow all these requirements or (1)

Maxo-Texas (864189) | more than 7 years ago | (#15636514)

set up shop someplace else I know what I'd do in a heartbeat.

There are many countries that would probably be jumping for joy to get the tax revenue that myspace generates.
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