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NASA Revives Main Hubble Telescope Camera

Zonk posted about 8 years ago | from the i-can-see-you-again dept.

111

antikarma writes "NASA engineers successfully activated the Advanced Camera for Surveys at 9:12 a.m. EDT Friday aboard the agency's Hubble Space Telescope. Checkout was completed at 10:20 a.m. EDT with science observations scheduled to resume Sunday, July 2. 'This is the best possible news,' said Ed Ruitberg, deputy associate director for the Astrophysics Division at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. 'We were confident we could work through the camera issue, and now we can get back to doing more incredible science with the camera.'"

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111 comments

To Science (4, Insightful)

Ckwop (707653) | about 8 years ago | (#15640411)

Due to Iraq and George Bush , most people in Western Europe have a little distain for the American Government. In fact, where I live, people often break in to an American accent when they do something stupid. I imagine this is because everyone sees Channel 4 news where we see the "Answers from Genesis museum" and thinks: "Only the stupid could indulge such nonsense."

With that necessary rant taken well and truly aside, I want to thank American for doing what no-one else can afford to do: put real science equipment in to space. It's your taxes that pay for the Hubble Space Telescope. This is a project that has furthered science in a very unique way. It is project that Galileo would have dreamed of. It is a marvel, a temple ,even, to science.....

With all the gratitude in my heart, I still feel America confuses me. To paraphrase the film Contact: "It is capable of such beautiful dreams and such horrible nightmares." It is a land of contradiction; of promise and of despair. It is of science,and religion, of the smart and the idiot. It's is so huge that it contradicts and astounds. It is the country where opposites can be equally true.

As a British man, I love America and I hope the feeling is mutual. I raise this glass to the future of Science and hope you will raise your glass too! To Science!

Simon.

Re:To Science (3, Funny)

cheese_wallet (88279) | about 8 years ago | (#15640456)

and europeans think americans are arrogant!

Re:To Science (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15640467)

Since we're in the mood for pointless comments...

Re:To Science (1)

heinousjay (683506) | about 8 years ago | (#15640640)

Nationalism is simply arrogance on national scale. Everyone suffers from it, even the noble Canadians.

Re:To Science (1)

Ohreally_factor (593551) | about 8 years ago | (#15641901)

Wait . . . I thought Canada was the 51st state . . .

Does this mean Mike Myers in an illegal alien?

Re:To Science (1)

chaffed (672859) | about 8 years ago | (#15640463)

I love fish and chips, IPA, bitter, and I love you too!

Re:To Science (4, Funny)

mordors9 (665662) | about 8 years ago | (#15640484)

Gee, so we are complicated ;-) There are still people that think the English are evil because of their conquest of the globe. Anyway, back to the article. I would encourage everyone to check out this month's issue of Scientific American. It has some outstanding photos from Hubble.

Re:To Science (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15641631)

i'm mr clarke,

in response,

what is wrong with the hubblesite dot org?
why go somewhere else to look at hubble images.
http://hubblesite.org/ [hubblesite.org]

Hubble is a joint project by NASA and ESA (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15640487)

It's not all American.

Re:Hubble is a joint project by NASA and ESA (1)

MyLongNickName (822545) | about 8 years ago | (#15640547)

Yes. It is, technically. I believe ESA pays about 1/6th of the cost. Not sure what they have done technically for the project. Anyone have a reference that would detail this?

Re:Hubble is a joint project by NASA and ESA (5, Informative)

HarveyTheWonderBug (711765) | about 8 years ago | (#15640663)

From :
NASA is ESA's partner for the HST. ESA has a nominal 15% stake in the mission and has, among other things, provided the Faint Object Camera, the first two solar panels that powered the spacecraft and a team of space scientists and engineers at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, United States. Astronomers employed by ESA and the European Southern Observatory at the Space Telescope-European Coordinating Facility work with various aspects of HST in Munich, Germany, including the calibration of HST's instruments and public outreach. Europe's contribution to HST entitles European astronomers to 15% of the telescope's observing time.

Re:Hubble is a joint project by NASA and ESA (1)

MyLongNickName (822545) | about 8 years ago | (#15640674)

Thanks. I enjoy learning things like this.

Re:Hubble is a joint project by NASA and ESA (1)

ScottKin (34718) | about 8 years ago | (#15641648)

Amazing how that statement puts the European spin on things - that "NASA is ESA's partner".

More like "ESA is a contributor to NASA's Hubble Space Telescope program". ESA only contributes 15% to HST. Turning that around says that the HST is NASA's by 85%. Also, didn't those Solar Panels get jettisoned years ago in favor of superior panels produced by "someone else" (read "USA")

Utterly Hilarious!

--ScottKin

Re:Hubble is a joint project by NASA and ESA (1)

wierdling (609715) | about 8 years ago | (#15641578)

Check out http://www.spacetelescope.org/ [spacetelescope.org] to see some of what the ESA does. They have lots of images from the Hubble and other cool stuff on their site (although I have to admit I am kind of prejudiced about the ESA as I do some side work on image processing for them).

Re:To Science (1)

kyc (984418) | about 8 years ago | (#15640497)



Maybe it is the Iraqi petroleum that puts the real science equipment into space.

America has lovable and detestable feautures in it, I agree with that but I really don`t think that it is the American people who put the equipment there.

Re:To Science (1, Insightful)

cliffhanger407 (974949) | about 8 years ago | (#15640729)

not to make you think that i support the war in iraq and all the "iraqi oil" we've gained (and also not to be a troll), but it's most definately american people who put the satellite there. the US has lost an absurd amount of money into the war in iraq and has gotten nothing out of it. if we were getting a plethora of oil from iraq, do you really think that we'd be paying $3 a gallon when before the war it was in the mid $1 range? But to the topic at hand. I know that hubble has a great impact on what people think about the astronomy community, but I think that it's necessary to truly assess the benefits of the system before we begin to worship it. The true discoveries are being made by newer, more advanced satellites with higher level optical and radar and x-ray sensors. Sure, Hubble has made some pretty pictures, but it has been a veritable engineering disaster since it was built (remember that whole deal with the mirror not being calibrated correctly on the ground and having to do a spacewalk in order to fix it?), which is part of why NASA was considering taking it out of the sky: it is simply not cost effective, nor is it producing the results necessary to justify its existence. So it's great that we've been able to preserve a relic of the early space-telescope era. But we shouldn't fool ourselves into believing that it will make an enormous difference in current day telescope power. Those discoveries are being made by ground-based telescopes which now have higher refinement than Hubble as well as ESA and new NASA telescopes orbiting the earth. Hubble has become a temple, as another user put it. It is beautiful to look at, but it very rarely produces dramatically pragmatic results which could not be received elsewhere.

Re:To Science (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15641119)

Gas is up at $3.00/gallon... and the oil exectives are making out like robber barons. It's not just the price of raw crude that's driving those prices up. It's also good ol' greed.

Re:To Science (1)

kuldan (986242) | about 8 years ago | (#15642135)

$3.00 per gallon? lets see.. even if you ship me the stuff by (large enough) air mail it should be still cheaper than here around..
we ware more like $8.00 per gallon here in Germany now..and it's rising..

I really should'nt surf slashdot anymore .. those gas prices (and people even complaining over THAT) make me cry ;)

Re:To Science (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15642292)

the US has lost an absurd amount of money into the war in iraq and has gotten nothing out of it

... if you believe that, you need to change your news source. Really.

Re:To Science (2, Funny)

Dasher42 (514179) | about 8 years ago | (#15640512)

As a British man, I love America and I hope the feeling is mutual. I raise this glass to the future of Science and hope you will raise your glass too! To Science!

At long last, some sign of approval [theonion.com] from our parent country after all these long hard years! I'm going to tear up.

But really, cheers! :)

Re:To Science (1)

exp(pi*sqrt(163)) (613870) | about 8 years ago | (#15640557)

Forget Hubble. The greatest thing America has produced is The Onion [theonion.com] .

Re:To Science (1)

Sponge Bath (413667) | about 8 years ago | (#15640516)

It is of science, and religion, of the smart and the idiot.

Sounds like that applies to a wider domain than America.
Maybe even all of /.

Re:To Science (1)

geekoid (135745) | about 8 years ago | (#15640553)

Thank you.

"As a British man, I love America and I hope the feeling is mutual."

err, I love you to, as a friend. Any other kind of love is going to require your sister.

SCIENCE!

Re:To Science (0, Flamebait)

FudRucker (866063) | about 8 years ago | (#15640564)

I have to agree, the USA is a mess right now, as an American i wish to surrender to the British for that trouble we had back in 1776

Re:To Science (4, Insightful)

MyLongNickName (822545) | about 8 years ago | (#15640668)

Or, you could be involved in trying to fix it. Hate to break this to you, but this country has been in worse shape before. Do a google search on the history of this country in the decades after the civil war. Some of the things that went on make today look like a paradise. One state returned multiple sets of electoral college votes. House of Representatives choosing a president in return for agreements to remove troops from Southern states. voting shenanigans that make Deibold look honest.

Yet, this country pulled out of it. We have a system that allows good men to fix their country. As we see today, the Supreme Court acts as a break on a President who runs out of control, or a Congress. We have checks and balances and free speech.

Those tools pulled us out of a deeper bit only 150 years ago. A blip in the history of civilization. We can do the same today. Or we can just bitch and moan and throw up our hands.

The choice is yours.

Fantastic (1)

heinousjay (683506) | about 8 years ago | (#15640818)

Wow. I almost applauded.

I wish I had something more to add. You'll just have to settle for my kudos.

+1 Inspiring (4, Insightful)

quizzicus (891184) | about 8 years ago | (#15641177)

What you say rings true. However, my own interpretation of American history suggests that things will get worse before they get better. The concerned among us are still far too small a percentage of the population to draw the attention of the complacent masses. I mean, look at the issues that incumbents are banking on to get re-elected: Terrorism, Gay Marriage, and Flag Burning. Real issues, such as climate change, health care, and corruption go undiscussed because powerful interests pay an awful lot of money to keep it that way.

No, things will have to get pretty bad before we realize that Jesus isn't coming to fix it for us.

Indeed (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15640574)

No need to raise your glass. We Americans are more than happy to sustain the bulk of the world's scientific, medical, and technogical progress.

Especially to you Brits, it never could have happened if the colonists hadn't rebelled against your Empire and formed the country that would overtake the British Empire and become the most powerful, richest, and successful country in the history of mankind.

Frankly, we don't need your gratitude anymore than when we saved you and your fathers from defeat from Hitler's clutches. You can always count on Americans to dominate world affairs and progress.

Mod This Up!!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15640607)

That was a brutal, vicious thrashing to the Anti-Americanism running rampant on slashdot. I commend you for utterly destroying that kiddie by reminding what a superior country the USA is every respect.

That was a utterly brilliant rope-a-dope to dismantle such idiocy. It makes me proud to be an American. Bravo, AC.

Come on now. (2, Interesting)

Col. Bloodnok (825749) | about 8 years ago | (#15640696)

Always late to a war! :)

As a fellow Brit to the original poster, I'm never going to forget this post (I have it bookmarked), I too was watching a big screen when 9/11 happened:

http://politics.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=15511 1&cid=13001810 [slashdot.org]

Slightly wrong about the BBC whipping up a band - it was the band of the Royal Household Cavalry (I think), ordered by no less than her Maj.

 

MODERATION ABUSE (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15640898)

This is as clear cut a case of moderation abuse as I've ever seen. Gratutious US-bashing is +5 insightful, but any reply that skillfully gives it right back and defends the US is -1 Flamebait. Judging from the replies on this thread, it's obvious which is the flamebait and this comment ain't it.

This is obvious moderation abuse at work here. Moderators, do your fucking job please.

We have an accent? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15640598)

Just kidding. LoL

Here's to science! :)

Re:To Science (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15640605)

There's 300 million Americans. There's all kinds of people in a land of 300 million. What did you expect?

Re:To Science (1)

nacnud75 (963443) | about 8 years ago | (#15640646)

While I agree the US does fund alot of space science so does Europe, ESA funded about 15% of the Hubble. Long may the co-operation continue.

Don't be silly ... (1)

b0r1s (170449) | about 8 years ago | (#15640682)

Space? There's no money in space! The telescope is just making long distance NSFW internet porn NSFW [vobbo.com] easier and easier.

Re:To Science (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15640711)

And we break into a British accent when we want to appear pompus and arrogant. So I guess we're even.

Something to remember... the United States has more people with higher degrees than the UK has in population. So I'm not sure where this stupid tag comes from. You're correct. We'll never understand eachother. That's why you and your family are still in Europe. Honestly, the day Europeans like Americans is the day I become scared.

Re:To Science (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15642142)

the United States has more people with higher degrees than the UK has in population.

Just out of curiosity, do you have any numbers to support this claim? The CIA World Factbook says there's 60 million people living in the UK, 298 million in the US (Wikipedia seems to confirm these numbers). That would mean 1/5, 20% of all americans have a higher degree. Here I stopped my search as the Factbook doesn't discuss education. However, Wikipedia [wikipedia.org] claims that 27% percent of the adult population has a bachelor's degree or higher. Quite impressive. However, the adult population (15 years and more) is only 80% of the population, according to the CIA Factbook. But even accounting for this, it's around 64 million people.

Re:To Science (1)

IcePop456 (575711) | about 8 years ago | (#15640751)

Oddly enough, the smart guys in movies always seem to have british accents...go figure.

To the good ol' USA (-1, Flamebait)

amightywind (691887) | about 8 years ago | (#15640754)

Due to Iraq and George Bush , most people in Western Europe have a little distain for the American Government. In fact, where I live, people often break in to an American accent when they do something stupid. I imagine this is because everyone sees Channel 4 news where we see the "Answers from Genesis museum" and thinks: "Only the stupid could indulge such nonsense."

Mr. Bush thanks the British people for their support in the war on terror in Iraq. When we want to sound adsurd and condescending we Americans naturally break into an English accent.

With that necessary rant taken well and truly aside, I want to thank American for doing what no-one else can afford to do: put real science equipment in to space. It's your taxes that pay for the Hubble Space Telescope. This is a project that has furthered science in a very unique way. It is project that Galileo would have dreamed of. It is a marvel, a temple ,even, to science.....

We do such things for ourselves and for science. Certainly not for Europe.

As a British man, I love America and I hope the feeling is mutual. I raise this glass to the future of Science and hope you will raise your glass too! To Science!

To be honest we don't think much about the rest of the world. There is the US, everything else is target coordinates.

Re:To Science (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15640755)

Thanks for the slam. I forgot for a moment that it WASN'T the USA that had drawing and quartering as a form of capital punishment on its books until the 19th century.

There was no need for that. Pandering to the anti-American contingent isn't necessary.

USA is more like "Europe" than a Country in Europe (4, Interesting)

CFD339 (795926) | about 8 years ago | (#15640792)

Look at the vast geography and the disparity between different groups of people here. You're more likely to understand the USA if you don't consider it in the same light as a single European country -- most of which are the size of one of our states.

In a day, I can travel by car across most of western Europe, through vastly different populations and beliefs. Here, it can take me that long to traverse Texas. Driving 24 hours on, 8 hours off, it took me 3 and half days to drive from Phoenix to Boston. Where would that take you in Europe?

Where I live in Maine, I find great similarities to the Bavarian countryside. You surely couldn't say that about the desert southwest in the USA.

A certain Austrian, having been elected leader of Germany some years back assumed that our differences would prevent us ever even agreeing with each other enough to be a serious player on the world scene -- let alone threaten his plans for world domination. That was as big a mistake as his election in the first place.

Our states and our divergent people are like a big Italian family. There are always some who don't speak to others, big traumatic fights, and long held grudges -- but when faced with a threat from outside, nearly instant, unified, reactionary, over response is close at hand to deal with that threat.

--31

Re:USA is more like "Europe" than a Country in Eur (1)

Ohreally_factor (593551) | about 8 years ago | (#15641906)

I think the guy you are referring to was an Austrian. The world would be a much different place if he had gotten that scholarship to art school!

Re:To Science (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15640967)

With all the gratitude in my heart, I still feel America confuses me. To paraphrase the film Contact: "It is capable of such beautiful dreams and such horrible nightmares." It is a land of contradiction; of promise and of despair. It is of science,and religion, of the smart and the idiot. It's is so huge that it contradicts and astounds. It is the country where opposites can be equally true.

What you have described applies not just to the US, but to the world.

"What hath God wrought?" -- first message sent using the Morse/Vail telegraph

A big pair of... (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | about 8 years ago | (#15640971)

NASA is happy too. I mean, nothing could make a geek more happy than to see a big pair of tits from Hubble.

Oh wait, it's pointed the wrong way. Errr, nevermind.

American Accent??? (1)

iamlucky13 (795185) | about 8 years ago | (#15641051)

HA! I knew it. I keep asking and people keep telling me that most of us don't have an accent to outside people. I couldn't understand how it could be possible that Welshmen sound so funny to us but we don't to them. Then again, Welshman probably sound funny to everybody, and a Texas accent and an American accent aren't the same thing.

Yes the feeling is mutual. If I may comment, however, I think the expectations for America are really high, partially because of our own pride, partially because of a blessedly prestigious history. I think any country is a place that contradicts and astounds in its own ways.

Re:To Science (1)

Frightening (976489) | about 8 years ago | (#15641235)

Dear Sir,

I regret to remind you that America (hence Americans) is also responsible for Microsoft. People around the world don't have to watch channel 4 to hate us. They just have to switch on their PC.

Sincerely,
-F

Re:To Science (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15641457)

I imagine this is because everyone sees Channel 4 news where we see the "Answers from Genesis museum" and thinks: "Only the stupid could indulge such nonsense."

Is that why there obviously is enough of a viewer base to keep broadcasting it on British TV?

When I lived in Europe, Jerry Springer was on TV all the time. I haven't seen his show since...

My point is: Perception based on television shows is usually quite off from the truth.

I'm not saying there are no loonies, but not more than anywhere else. With the size of Hollywood and the U.S. TV industry, it just looks like it is, because it makes money to show the loonies on TV.

Re:To Science (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15641541)

I have news for you, want to know what we think of Brits?

Watch South Park sometime and pay attention how they treat that faggoty kid Pippin. So yeah, a feeling is mutual, just not that one. There is a reason we kicked your asses back in 1776 and again in 1812. So f*** off!

Re:To Science (1)

Runefox (905204) | about 8 years ago | (#15642428)

The War of 1812 was a war between now-Canada and the United States. Officially, the war ended a stalemate. The British colonies had in fact launched successful attacks against US soil, having burned the White House and treasury to the ground. They had also taken Detroit, though it was retaken before war's end. The Americans also caused a great amount of damage, but again, it all ended in stalemate.

All offensive action into Canada taken by the United States was successfully repelled, and so, too, was all retalliatory offensive action into the United States. The War of 1812 was a US military failure; Its main objective was to invade and seize Canada. To that end, it can be seen as a British victory, since their only initial objective was to repel the American advance.

Re:To Science (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15641568)

Take your "science" and bring it home. What have some pretty pictures of nebulas you will never ever visit done for you? Has your bank account grown? Do you have a better job? We're wasting billions looking at the stars when there are people scraping by to get at the end of the month.

Scrap Hubble, scrap the shuttle fleet and scrap the ISS. Shut down the Mars probes. We're living on EARTH, buddy, and your precious data on things too far away to matter aren't simply worth it.

Re:To Science (1)

Runefox (905204) | about 8 years ago | (#15642472)

Science is an extremely necessary step to the evolution of mankind. As a species, we are curious in nature, and we are always striving to understand more and more about our environment; And believe it or not, the universe is our environment.

Instead of scrapping these projects, why not cut the US defense budget? At an excess of $419.3 billion for 2006, I'm sure even if only $20 billion (~10 B-2's or a few ICBM's) was shaved off that, a lot of the problems you describe could be taken care of. NASA's current budget is only $16.5 billion.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/politics/inte ractives/budget06/budget06Agencies.html [washingtonpost.com]

Re:To Science (2, Interesting)

jnhtx (87543) | about 8 years ago | (#15641575)

I guess every /. thread is about bashing America, no matter what the source article is.

As a Texan who had the happiness of owning a home in England for three years, I'd have to say I love the UK but it often disappoints.

The biggest difference between Americans and Brits is the sheep-like willingness of the average Brit to give up a lot of liberty for a little security. England really is a nation of girlie men. That's fine, but then they turn around and and join American moonbats in the ridiculous Bush-Hitler meme.

What would the average /.'er say if President Bush made the following proposals:

1) The police can issue 'control orders' which restrict an individual's rights to travel, own property, associate with others, or hold a passport. Persons under control orders can be electronically tagged. Person under a control act can be detained up to 14 without charges being filed.

2) Cameras will installed on all public roads with software to read license plates. A central database will record the travels of every car in the country.

3) Cars will be fitted with sealed GPS recorders which will send position data to the goverment. Tampering with the gps box will be a felony.

4)If a goverment employee is suspected of leaking goverment secrets, then senior police officers can authorize a search of that person's home without consulting a judge.

5) If a newspaper publishes classified information then the publisher is subject to up to 14 years in jail.

All of the above are in place in the United Kingdom today except for #3, which will happen in the next few years.

Re:To Science (2, Funny)

rolfwind (528248) | about 8 years ago | (#15641946)

Thanks for your informative post, countries like England scare the shit out of me. Police state indeed, sounds like the whole country is one giant prison.

Re:To Science (1)

Nexus Zero (901634) | about 8 years ago | (#15641986)

That's not a sign of us being scared, it's a sign of us being apathetic. It's disgusting, I agree, but democracy is so fucking broken in Britain, as it is in America (Patriot Act anyone?), that we can at most sit back and watch the politicians centralise our lives.

Re:To Science (1)

lophophore (4087) | about 8 years ago | (#15641585)

I don't see what was "necessary" about your rant.

Besides space science, the American taxpayer has paid dearly to protect your sorry asses from totalitarianism at least twice. Most people in Western Europe would be speaking either German or Russian if not for the American government and the American people.

Re:To Science (1)

LinuxLuver (775817) | about 8 years ago | (#15641640)

One should not be confused about America. It's an awesome country full of millions of amazing, clever, talented people.

That explains all that is good - like the subject at hand.

Unfortunately, America is currently being run by a class of lying, corrupt, dishonest, essentially murderous, crooks.....headed by one G W Bush.

This eplains much that is bad - even lethal.

Americans have difficulty changing this situation because:

1. Their highly concentrated (in ownership terms) media support Bush for their own profit, seeking laws that will allow them to further concentrate their control - and enhance their profits.

2. Democracy in the United States hasn't been corrupt and dysfunctional for many, many years. The first past the post voting system in the House and Senate, combined with profound gerrymandering of district boundaries in the House, have resulted in a situation where more than 98% of incumbents to the House are returned each two years. Call it what you like, but that ain't democracy.

So big problems remain unfixed and new ones are created by the corrupt ruling class in their myopic pursuit of short term profit at the expense of the long term health of themselves,their customers....and their nation....and the failure of democracy means virtually all accountability has been snuffed out.

America is going to continue to stubble and decline while it remains in the grip of the the crooks. But even an America in decline is impressive.....and to be admired for what it still manages to acheive despite the draining effect the Republican parasites sucking the life and energy out of the United States, sacrificing its children and treasure in the pursuit of the theft of the oil of others.....for profit.

Re:To Science (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15641694)

Simon, your first paragraph was not only off-topic, but sickens me. As a Brit, you might also remember that your very own Tony Blair was right there along with us signing off on the war...

As for the rest of your post, I agree with you about putting real science into space. What better place for a perfect vacuum experiment than IN a vacuum?

They really had to do this (4, Funny)

roman_mir (125474) | about 8 years ago | (#15640413)

Because all they could see without that telescope camera was this:

Nothing for you to see here. Please move along.

Nothing to see here (1)

erice (13380) | about 8 years ago | (#15640422)

From the "I-can-see-you-now" department, about a camera on the hubble being fixed. Click on story and get "Nothing to see here. Please move along"

Are we sure it's fixed?

Re:Nothing to see here (1)

helioquake (841463) | about 8 years ago | (#15641573)

It's not "fixed". The activation was done using the backup controller (Side 2).

I don't think the engineers know the cause yet. They probably will figure out when the instrument is retrieved from the HST and be brought down to the ground (if that ever happens).

Iiiittt's BaaAAAaaack! It's Scien-terrific! (2, Interesting)

ackthpt (218170) | about 8 years ago | (#15640423)

Let me be among the first to exclaim "Yay!" Like, totally forsooth and verily!

I was just in the biggest funk about this and not just because the DVD on the new Sky and Telescope reminded me of what we'd be missing. I know there's all sorts of swell and really keen new stuff on the way, but I've just got so used to going to bed at night, snug and secure in the knowledge that the big guy was still up there looking for spiffy cosmic phenomena.

I for one rewelcome our HST overlord.

Re:Iiiittt's BaaAAAaaack! It's Scien-terrific! (1)

Bassman59 (519820) | about 8 years ago | (#15640524)

I for one rewelcome our HST overlord."

Hunter S. Thompson?

Re:Iiiittt's BaaAAAaaack! It's Scien-terrific! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15642155)

Hubble Something Thingie!

Re:Iiiittt's BaaAAAaaack! It's Scien-terrific! (1)

solitas (916005) | about 8 years ago | (#15640943)

There's a DVD in the July S&T? What's on it? Worthwhile? Normally I only pick up the January issue for the calendar.

It's Scien-terrific!
Well, at least that's not as bad as " doing [more incredible] science ".. :)

Re:Iiiittt's BaaAAAaaack! It's Scien-terrific! (1)

Ohreally_factor (593551) | about 8 years ago | (#15641928)

At least science isn't yet a verb.

Ex.

Q: Hey, what are you doing? (gestures to lab equipment)

A: I'm sciencing, what does it look like?

OMGWTFBBQ (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15640427)

First Post. I hope.

telescope.google.com (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15640439)

Next big google product could use a series space telescopes but to point to earth and they'd actully let you watch live what 'google earth' shows now.

pure admiration (5, Interesting)

kyc (984418) | about 8 years ago | (#15640471)


Whenever I think of the galaxies, outer space or human observation to these I cannot help the feeling of awe and admiration. I checked out the pictures on the web-site and I felt like I was watching Kubrick`s Oddysey. I imagine and see ( thanks to 10 times more powerful Hubble`s objectives ) the vast galaxies, millions of stars and the light reflected from them and converted to miliwatts of electrical energy in the human brain. I see the real physics out there, intersecting its ways with philosphy. That is really something different from what they do in solid state, or applied physics.

Hubble and its even more powerful descendants will enlighten the secrets of universe, ....and before I get even more theological , let me get out of here

Hyperlink in a quote? (1)

inio (26835) | about 8 years ago | (#15640482)

Did he actually say the "a href" and sutff?

Quote marks are supposed to mean that it's a quote :P

MST3k (3, Funny)

monkaduck (902823) | about 8 years ago | (#15640515)

So Mike didn't break the Hubble after all!

Re:MST3k (2, Funny)

EinZweiDrei (955497) | about 8 years ago | (#15640560)

Good night, sweet Hubble. And a flight of angels sing thee to thy rest.

'This is the best possible news,' ...NOT (4, Funny)

geekoid (135745) | about 8 years ago | (#15640534)

"Today at 10:20 the Hubble main telescope found a planet of supermodels who want to give us a clean power source and worship us like gods."
That's the best possible news.

Re:'This is the best possible news,' ...NOT (1)

alfrin (858861) | about 8 years ago | (#15640632)

"and bring their newfound way of speeding up the Alcohol fermentation process"

Re:'This is the best possible news,' ...NOT (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15640665)

What's wrong with the current fermentation process? Can't you buy prefermented sugars at the grocery and corner stores where you live? If not, is 6 weeks too long to wait to ferment your own good beer?

Do you want a fermicrowavator that you can set to 30 seconds?

Re:'This is the best possible news,' ...NOT (1)

alfrin (858861) | about 8 years ago | (#15640675)

Do you want a fermicrowavator that you can set to 30 seconds?

Yes, yes I do. And if you are ANY american you will want one too.

Re:'This is the best possible news,' ...NOT (1)

geekoid (135745) | about 8 years ago | (#15640744)

" If not, is 6 weeks too long to wait to ferment your own good beer?"

Yes, yes it is.
What would you rather have, A beer in 6 minutes, or the identical beer in 6 weeks?

Re:'This is the best possible news,' ...NOT (1)

NeoSkandranon (515696) | about 8 years ago | (#15641079)

Speaking as an accomplished homebrewer, I'll take my 2 cases of great beer in 4 weeks (not six) for a fraction the cost of comparable commercial brews, thanks for asking ;)

Re:'This is the best possible news,' ...NOT (1)

Ohreally_factor (593551) | about 8 years ago | (#15641935)

I wish there was a faster way to cook baked potatoes in a conventional oven. I don't have a microwave, but I like baked potatoes, and they take too long to make. Sometimes I throw one in the oven, even if I don't want one. By the time it's done, who knows? I throw one in and go on vacation.

Joke stolen from the late great Mitch Hedberg [wikiquote.org] .

Re:'This is the best possible news,' ...NOT (1)

heptapod (243146) | about 8 years ago | (#15640783)

But I'm sober NOW

Re:'This is the best possible news,' ...NOT (1)

The_Wilschon (782534) | about 8 years ago | (#15640922)

It'd be even better if it found it at 4:20.

mod 0p (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15640589)

dying' crowd - world's Gay Nigger [slasHdot.org], as little ov3rhead ago, many of you

Hubble (3, Insightful)

paynesmanor (982732) | about 8 years ago | (#15640633)

Looking back what would have been cheaper? To launch a new better one that don't need costly repairs? Or to keep repairing one that was out of date before it actually worked? Hmm, Where's the math whizz when you need him?

Re:Hubble (1)

heinousjay (683506) | about 8 years ago | (#15640676)

Since option one is imaginary, I'm having a hard time computing the result. Complex numbers are scary, man.

(Shortcut to any offended math geeks: I know my comment makes no sense mathematically. Thanks for eschewing the explanations.)

Re:Hubble (1)

Ohreally_factor (593551) | about 8 years ago | (#15642062)

(Shortcut to any offended math geeks: I know my comment makes no sense mathematically. Thanks for eschewing the explanations.)

It's OK. I just rotated your post 90 degrees to the x, y, and z axes and it made perfect sense.

Re:Hubble (1)

linuxgurugamer (917289) | about 8 years ago | (#15640894)

Ummmm, lets see. First, each service mission costs about 100 million dollars. The Hubble cost between 2 and 3 Billion dollars. It was designed to be serviced and maintained for over 20 years. To build something which wouldn't need servicing for 20 years would probably triple or quintuple the costs. Before you speak (or write), think about what you are about to say or speak. You would look less foolish that way.

Re:Hubble (5, Informative)

Firethorn (177587) | about 8 years ago | (#15641030)

It was actually 1.5 billion, and 100 million is a low ball figure for the cost of a shuttle launch. [nasa.gov]

Being a purely politically funded venture, nailing down the cost is difficult, but varies.

$300 million [futron.com]
$600 million [spaceprojects.com]
$500 million [worldspaceflight.com]
$55 million incremental, $1.3 billion when you include facilities, research, engineering, etc... [worldspaceflight.com]

If you take a rough midpoint and say $500 million per maintenance, the break even point would be three missions. Now, a huge portion of a satellite's cost is the R&D just to design the thing. If you produce multiple ones, the cost drops substantially. Produce multiple hubbles and soon they'd cost under a billion each. Meanwhile you can still do a great deal of updating on the ground.

I'll admit that I'd prefer to scrap the shuttle entirely, replacing it with boosters, dedicated personal carriers, and source maintenance missions from a space station. This would hopefully drastically reduce the cost of maintaining it, and might change the equations again.

Re:Hubble (1)

rapidweather (567364) | about 8 years ago | (#15641088)

They put spinners [westcoastw...actory.com] on it, and they just keep on turning.

Re:Hubble (2, Insightful)

DerekLyons (302214) | about 8 years ago | (#15641129)

Looking back what would have been cheaper? To launch a new better one that don't need costly repairs? Or to keep repairing one that was out of date before it actually worked? Hmm, Where's the math whizz when you need him?

The problem is - it's not a straigtforward black and white accounting problem. There's a fair bit of psychology and politics in there as well.
 
It's easier to get money for a project already in progress, especially one showing results and with a high level of public popularity. It's much more difficult to do so for a 'start-up' project. In addition, the 'new' telescope would have had to weather years of budget cycles, in danger of cancellation each time - when it's constituency is small and there's nothing to show but a PowerPoint or two of what it *might* do. (That's assuming development went smoothly - a decidely dangerous assumption.)

Re:Hubble (1)

paynesmanor (982732) | about 8 years ago | (#15641600)

I found that the total cost for Hubble from conception to present, is about 4.5 billion. The new James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) http://www.jwst.nasa.gov/ [nasa.gov] (Hubble's replacement) has a estimated cost of 4.5 billion.

Ode to the Hubble repair crew (3, Interesting)

davidwr (791652) | about 8 years ago | (#15640989)

[Tune: Amazing Grace]

Eye in space, soon to be gone,
We can't just let it be.
It once was off but now is on
Was blind, but now can see.

Buffet (1)

synonymous (707504) | about 8 years ago | (#15641117)

How about a little injection from the Buffet crew. It would appear that with a tenth of the donation, we could have a couple new and upgraded Hubbles watching the sky. Heck, just about any one of hundreds of companies could give us some. Sure fixing AIDS and having a T-shirt is important considering we have had these luxuries for some time and want the world to stay alive, but what about those of us who are responsible and provide the backbone. Our entertainment surely isn't earthly given the realities. When it comes to living, we don't believe in lines, yet always wait for a turn. Tick tock..

Re:Buffet (1)

Ohreally_factor (593551) | about 8 years ago | (#15642069)

Corporate Sponsorship? A "HomeTown" logo [hometownbuffet.com] painted on the side of the Hubble? That's crazy! Just crazy enough that it might work!

i-can-see-you-again dept. (2, Funny)

glass_window (207262) | about 8 years ago | (#15641186)

Should have been from the "can-you-see-me-now dept"

Re:i-can-see-you-again dept. (1)

mean pun (717227) | about 8 years ago | (#15641883)

Should have been from the "can-you-see-me-now dept"

Or the "how-many-fingers-am-i-holding-up dept"

Slashdot quote (0, Offtopic)

Frightening (976489) | about 8 years ago | (#15641218)

"It's today!" said Piglet. "My favorite day," said Pooh.

Coincidence? I think not!

ah, they "activated" it, did they? (2, Funny)

misanthrope101 (253915) | about 8 years ago | (#15641297)

So that's what we're calling it these days. In reality, they flew someone up there to whack the thingamaflotchit on the side a few times, twist the rabbit-ears to a different position, and if all else failed, a swift kick to the side of the cabinet. All of the above were accompanied by a steady stream of verbal abuse and profanity, followed by pleas of "pretty please, damn you, you piece of..." If there is another way that anything has ever gotten fixed, I am unaware of it. But I guess NASA is facing a budget crisis like everyone else (except Haliburton, natch) so they have to tell us that they "activated" it, via high-tech, very smart methodology and stuff. Thanks for the info, rocket guys. Gotcha. What a bunch of dweebs.

Yay! (1)

pair-a-noyd (594371) | about 8 years ago | (#15641540)

I wish they would find a better and easier way to service Hubble.
Even though it got off to a rough start, it's been one of the best things NASA ever put into space.
Sure, it will be superceded in the future with something better but even so, it's a magnificent tool and
should be kept in service as long as physically possible.

ACS not repaired; revived using the backup mode (3, Informative)

helioquake (841463) | about 8 years ago | (#15641543)

The Hubble's ACS is not repaired; they made the decision that it would not harm the rest of the instrument by activating the backup electronic controller (Side 2).

Historically speaking this marks the half-life time of the mission. It has operated for four years; I expect it to work 3 to 5 more years now.

I don't know if the controllers (Sides 1 and 2) are identical; it wasn't for the STIS and they need to run a series of re-calibration before resuming its science operations. I hope that isn't the case here. I'm supposed to use that camera this month and next.

Re:ACS not repaired; revived using the backup mode (1)

Ohreally_factor (593551) | about 8 years ago | (#15642076)

Jokes on you! This has all been a scam/hoax so that some JPL engineers could watch the World Cup. However, they got so sick of the officiating that they decided to point it back out into space.

mod Up (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15641607)

on an Endeavour [goat.cx]
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