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Nanotube Lube Replenishment for Massive Drives

timothy posted about 8 years ago | from the elderly-celebrity-spokespeople-sought dept.

144

PetManimal writes "Techworld reports that Seagate has just patented something called 'Heat-Assisted Magnetic Recording,' which features nanotechnology and could lead to a 1.46TB 2.5-in. drive. The article says 'Storing data properly in extremely small areas requires the magnetic material to be heated during the writing phase, but this causes the lubricant film deposited on top of the magnetized recording layer to evaporate. Seagate's patent resolves this problem by having a reservoir inside the disk casing that contains nanotube-based lubricant. Some of this is periodically pumped out as a vapor and deposited on the surface of the disk, replenishing the evaporated lubricant.'"

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144 comments

where's the cartoon thing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15668505)

i want to see leaky nanotubes dancing to old music - all while explaining how they work.

Re:where's the cartoon thing? (1)

mypalmike (454265) | about 8 years ago | (#15668844)

Get lubricated?

Modern "Hard Disks"; (2, Funny)

Chonine (840828) | about 8 years ago | (#15669698)

So, first you "get perpendicular",

Then, you "get lubricated".

good idea! (5, Funny)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | about 8 years ago | (#15668511)

Some of this is periodically pumped out as a vapor and deposited on the surface of the disk, replenishing the evaporated lubricant.

Hey, I could use some of this this! Oh wait...it says disk...

Re:good idea! (5, Funny)

op12 (830015) | about 8 years ago | (#15668567)

Yeah, you probably read 2.5in and made a quick logical jump.

...I couldn't help myself - you left the door wide open on that one.

Re:good idea! (4, Funny)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | about 8 years ago | (#15668583)

Hey, they don't call it a nanotube for nothin'...

Re:good idea! (1)

I Like Pudding (323363) | about 8 years ago | (#15669126)

Yeah. Referring to it as a "carbon rod" is just dissembling.

Re:good idea! (1)

Abcd1234 (188840) | about 8 years ago | (#15669891)

Suddenly that Simpsons skit has taken on a whole new meaning...

Re:good idea! (1)

amliebsch (724858) | about 8 years ago | (#15669931)

Well, in the Simpsons skit it was an "inanimate" carbon rod.

Re:good idea! (1)

Punboy (737239) | about 8 years ago | (#15668919)

Well, if you swap the S and the K...

Re:good idea! (1)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | about 8 years ago | (#15668974)

Wow! I didn't even think of that. Good catch!

Lube......replenishment you say? (4, Funny)

LordPhantom (763327) | about 8 years ago | (#15668512)

Lube replenishment?
For.... massive drives?
Some headlines just write themselves. And don't mod me down, you were thinking about how cool it would be to have a peripheral that would do that - this is slashdot, don't lie!

Re:Lube......replenishment you say? (1)

ennadaiit (837188) | about 8 years ago | (#15668623)

And I guess the "nano-tube" is aptly fitting too. (ummm, or not such a good fit. heh)

Re:Lube......replenishment you say? (1)

mooingyak (720677) | about 8 years ago | (#15668715)

I gave it the good ole 'jokefodder' tag.

Re:Lube......replenishment you say? (1)

quantum bit (225091) | about 8 years ago | (#15669629)

I had to go B&B and tag it "hesaidlube"

Re:Lube......replenishment you say? (3, Funny)

russ1337 (938915) | about 8 years ago | (#15668932)

I can see it now...

Tech guy: "Your hard drive is out of oil"

Customer: "what the f*&k? Pull the other one.."

Tech guy:"Yeah, I'm gonna have to take it into the shop and give it an oil change, you know, new nano-tubes... "

Customer "Get the flock outa here and dont come back.... oil... nano.. WTF.."

Re:Lube......replenishment you say? (2, Funny)

TubeSteak (669689) | about 8 years ago | (#15669722)

Tech guy: "Hey, in just the last five years the internet upgraded from nanotubes to fullsize tubes. Look how much faster the internet is and I can upgrade the nanotubes in your hard drive to match"
 

/Note to russ1337: Always upsell the customer.

KY (2, Funny)

tedgyz (515156) | about 8 years ago | (#15668516)

Can I get the KY Jelly version to store all my pr0n?

Re:KY (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15668841)

KY? Jesus man, don't you know Astroglide is _tons_ better?

Oh wait, this is slashdot, I'm probably in the 0.01% of people here who get laid.

Re:KY (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15670170)

Mr. Lefty doesn't count.

Drives needing lube? (4, Interesting)

CRiMSON (3495) | about 8 years ago | (#15668536)

I wonder if this will lower the mean time to failure of these drives? I currently have some old 9G scsi disks that have been running daily since 1998/1999 and still work flawlessly. How much lube are they putting in these drives? It seems to me this could be bad thing(tm) put enough lube in for 3 years, and every 3 years sell new drives.

Re:Drives needing lube? (1)

fuzzix (700457) | about 8 years ago | (#15669055)

I wonder if this will lower the mean time to failure of these drives? I currently have some old 9G scsi disks that have been running daily since 1998/1999 and still work flawlessly. How much lube are they putting in these drives? It seems to me this could be bad thing(tm) put enough lube in for 3 years, and every 3 years sell new drives.
From TFA:
The lubricant reservoirs will be built to last the life of the disk.
Well, duh. I guess you could say "The disk will be built to last the life of the lubricant reservoirs" :-)

Re:Drives needing lube? (2, Interesting)

Gat0r30y (957941) | about 8 years ago | (#15669413)

Seagate has a 5 year warranty on every drive. It is intended that the lube will last the life of the drive.

Yay! (1)

grammar fascist (239789) | about 8 years ago | (#15668541)

Another patent!

Re:Yay! (2, Interesting)

LWATCDR (28044) | about 8 years ago | (#15668799)

Hardware patents == O.K.
Software patents == evil.

At least to the OSS community.

Re:Yay! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15669269)

No.... STUPID and TRIVIAL software patents == evil.

Hardware patents have a greater tendency to be truely innovative and worth protecting. IE, Non-obvious. Not to mention, expensive to develop.

Software patents tend to be trivial things that are a natural evolution along the current path. Nothing ground-breaking, just "hey, everyone else is just about to get to this, quick, patent it so we can charge them huge licensing fees since it's just so OBVIOUS that everyone else will be here in 5 minutes. And to think we only spent $50 R&D budget on all 100 of these patents!"

Re:Yay! (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | about 8 years ago | (#15669686)

"Software patents tend to be trivial things that are a natural evolution along the current path. Nothing ground-breaking, just "hey, everyone else is just about to get to this, quick, patent it so we can charge them huge licensing fees since it's just so OBVIOUS that everyone else will be here in 5 minutes."
The same thing could be said about hardware.
I don't think that you can patent software anymore than you can patent a song, or a story. Those types of works should be copyrighted not patented.
I tend to agree that hardware patents are fine. I better since I have filed one. I don't like software patents at all.

Precisely timed warranties (3, Insightful)

bo0ork (698470) | about 8 years ago | (#15668547)

So when we see the warranty on those disk, it won't be 1 year, it'll be 8760 hours. I mean, talk about throw-away society. These things would come with probably extremely toxic non-refillable containers that are guaranteed to be emptied out at the most inopportune moment.

Re:Precisely timed warranties (2, Funny)

amliebsch (724858) | about 8 years ago | (#15668589)

These things would come with probably extremely toxic non-refillable containers that are guaranteed to be emptied out at the most inopportune moment.

You're not thinking like a businessman. The drives will be cheap - cheaper than the competition, anyways. Enough to make it look like a good deal, anyways. It's the semimonthly proprietary branded cartridges of drive oil that will cost a small fortune...

nanoTUBES? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15668549)

So, my internet will fill this tubes even more fast tahn before!!!
Bad thing !!

PD: F.P.?

Change your oil! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15668550)

Like most people don't have a problem topping off the oil on their car, now we need to do it to our drives?!

so what happens when... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15668556)

so when the resivoir empties, your 1.5TB of data evaporates with whatever is left over of the nanotubes?

Re:so what happens when... (1)

xXBondsXx (895786) | about 8 years ago | (#15669345)

You didn't even need to RTFA!
The summary says the write process needs the super-heating that evaporates the lube, not the read process. I'm sure that Seagate will include some kind of sensor in the reservoir, so when all the lube is gone, the hard drive stops writing and only reads. That way you won't lose 1.5TB of data... which would suck

Re:so what happens when... (1)

RoyGBatty (984246) | about 8 years ago | (#15669925)

I'm sure that Seagate will include some kind of sensor in the reservoir, so when all the lube is gone, the hard drive stops writing and only reads. That way you won't lose 1.5TB of data... which would suck

Right. You'll just suddenly have an inoperable system. Presuming of course that your OS is running on that hard drive. Still not a great situation. Of course, it doesn't really matter because your house already caught on fire during the superheating process.

Kill the sick puppies. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15668558)

Kill the sick ponies, kill the sick bunnies, but most of all -- kill the sick puppies.

Correct me if I'm wrong... (5, Interesting)

The Living Fractal (162153) | about 8 years ago | (#15668573)

.. But, after reading about this days ago, I was under the impression the lubricant itself wasn't 'nanotube based' but rather was distributed across the platters in a controlled fashion via nanotubes. Insofar that the tubes themselves only allow a certain, small, amount of the lubricant to escape and only when the absence of lubricant on the surface produces enough differential pressure to allow it.

And, incidentally, the ten year life of the lubricant reservoir should be sufficient IMHO. I can't imagine in ten years we'll still be using the same hard drives anyway. I think Seagate is banking on it.

TLF

Re:Correct me if I'm wrong... (2, Interesting)

mrxak (727974) | about 8 years ago | (#15668720)

Oh good, at least one person is actually talking about the article. Do you have a link to whatever it was you were reading a few days ago?

I should think that 10 years would be enough, assuming capacities keep going up at about the same rate they have been. However, is this is average usage, or heavy? I tend to give my hard drives a pretty heavy workout, and if that cut the time down to 5 years, I'd be pretty upset.

Re:Correct me if I'm wrong... (5, Informative)

The Living Fractal (162153) | about 8 years ago | (#15668860)

http://www.tgdaily.com/2006/07/04/seagate_leaky_dr ives/ [tgdaily.com]

TG Daily a few days ago.

Perfluoropolyether is the lubricant. And it's not 'nanotube-based' at all. It's delivered via the tubes.

From the article: "Vapor PFPE also surrounds the platter. As the drive spins, areas of the platter will get hot, which will wear out the lubricant. The vapor PFPE deposits on the platter to replace the worn out lubricant. The "condensing" vapor lowers vapor pressure which then draws out lubricant from the CNTs until the pressure is equalized."

It does say the reservoir will provide ten years of 'practical' use. For someone who uses their hard drives a LOT (maybe someone without enough RAM? :)) I could see this lasting only 7-8 years. Still quite a while IMHO.

TLF

Re:Correct me if I'm wrong... (1)

shdragon (1797) | about 8 years ago | (#15669516)

Thanks for the linkage & the good info. Good stuff. I saw some fluff pieces of it on regular news sites & they seemed to be too busy drooling over the word "nano" to deliver any real substance.

Re:Correct me if I'm wrong... (1)

just_another_sean (919159) | about 8 years ago | (#15669801)

Perfluoropolyether is the lubricant. And it's not 'nanotube-based' at all. It's delivered via the tubes.

Hmm... That's interesting. Before I read your post I was imagining it was more like little trucks
driving up to the disk and dumping tubes all over it. But it's the tubes that deliver this lube eh?

Trucks. What was I thinking?

Re:Correct me if I'm wrong... (1)

LoonyMike (917095) | about 8 years ago | (#15669796)

640 days should be enough for everyone

Re:Correct me if I'm wrong... (2, Insightful)

Cheerio Boy (82178) | about 8 years ago | (#15668795)

And, incidentally, the ten year life of the lubricant reservoir should be sufficient IMHO. I can't imagine in ten years we'll still be using the same hard drives anyway.

Remind me to tell that to my DEC RA82 I have at home. ;-)

We have a few 8-year old drives in production (2, Interesting)

wsanders (114993) | about 8 years ago | (#15668845)

These are 1998 vintage Sun 9G and no-name 9G ATA drives. Still running. Many more 1999-vintage 9G's out there, maybe 5% of our total. Still useful for such clusterable "applicance" applications as DNS servers. Nevertheless, when the machine dies (more likely due to a 99-cent CPU fan locking up) we just chuck the whole machine.

Considering that the latest drives are far more reliable than those old crappy things, a finite 10-year life for a disk drive is definitely Planned Obsolescence for Filling Up Landfills. Bah!

If they will offer a liberal trade-in allowance for recycling, then OK. Pretty much 100% of our disks are mirrored anyway.

Re:We have a few 8-year old drives in production (1)

The Living Fractal (162153) | about 8 years ago | (#15669024)

Perhaps it would behoove Seagate to offer a lubricant replenishment program for the drives. I'm not sure it would be that difficult to do, but here is some info about PFPE:

PFPE lubricants aren't all that dangerous. A quick check of the Brayco PFPE lubricant used industrially shows a DOT health hazard risk of 3. Which means the product does pose a moderate health risk but can be handled without problem as long as you use the correct PPE (personal protective equipment) such as goggles and gloves and adequate ventilation.

So the questions I have regarding the these drives are:

- Does ambient pressure affect drive lubrication performance? I.E. if I live in Denver is my drive going to last as long (more DP means more lube lost over time?)

- If I try to refill the lubricant myself, and break the seal so to speak, will I then need to provide a precise operating pressure for the lubricant reservoir?

- Is it really going to be worth my effort to send the drive to Seagate for a refill?

- What am I going to be using ten years from the time I get one of these drives?

TLF
 

Re:Correct me if I'm wrong... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15668862)

And, incidentally, the ten year life of the lubricant reservoir should be sufficient IMHO. I can't imagine in ten years we'll still be using the same hard drives anyway. I think Seagate is banking on it.

Funny you say that, I've got 2 servers, each with a 4 disk raid of 9 GB (quantum atlas) scsi disks that have been in continous operation (with NT server, then 2000 server) since august 1996. Only 1 disk failure in that time.

The servers still work, but we're getting rid of them since they take up too much space in the racks.

Re:Correct me if I'm wrong... (1)

MindStalker (22827) | about 8 years ago | (#15669115)

Like these drives I found when I purchase multiple drives from the same vendor they will often die around the same time. I've once had two drives that lasted 5 years one died then a second died the next day before the raid array could finish rebuilding itself. Talk about a bad day.

Imagine how many pictures of my cock you can store (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15668585)

on that!

Running out of Lube (1, Redundant)

frosty_tsm (933163) | about 8 years ago | (#15668591)

Doesn't this mean that your drive fails when it runs out of lube (and therefore you have to replace the drive)?

I mean, I don't know how many people are going to want to take their hard drives in for the equivalent of an oil change or a fill-up every few months or once a year. We've had cars for 100 years and some car owners still don't understand you have to change the oil every some-odd number of miles. On the other hand, we've had computers for 20 years and some people still think that the computer has a cup holder. (See yesterday's tech support stories discussion).

Re:Running out of Lube (1)

internetdarwin (669976) | about 8 years ago | (#15669630)

Call me crazy but I thought drives were sealed air-tight (or close to it.) Where exactly would the lubricant go if it evaporated off the platter?

My initial impression was that the lubricant was re-collected as it condenses similarly to the oil pump system of a vehicle, but that's just a completely unscientific guess. If that's not the case and the lubricant becomes completely unusable as it evaporates off, does this mean that now there will be a buildup "gunk" in the drive?
I'm all for new storage technologies, however I think the technology should be moving (or trying to move) towards a less mechanically dependent device, rather than a precision (and fragile) mechanical ecosystem.

Vaporware? (4, Funny)

Gates82 (706573) | about 8 years ago | (#15668596)

No release date yet, so can we classify this as vaporware?

--
So who is hotter? Ali or Ali's Sister?

Re:Vaporware? (1)

The Mighty Buzzard (878441) | about 8 years ago | (#15668817)

But of course...

Some of this is periodically pumped out as a vapor and

Replenishing the reservoir (0, Redundant)

Penguin Programmer (241752) | about 8 years ago | (#15668604)

So what happens when your reservoir runs out of nanotubes and can no longer replenish the lube in the drive? You have to buy a new one? I mean, I'm guessing they can put enough nanotubes in there to last longer than the other drive components in the common case, but this could still be a problem.

Sounds like it would be great for Seagate, since their drives could actually expire at a set time, but maybe not so great for consumers.

Re:Replenishing the reservoir (1)

tedgyz (515156) | about 8 years ago | (#15668650)

It depends what you use it for. Great for archives and other infrequent write operations. Not so great for swap space, OLTP databases, etc.

In any case, I can't think of any hard drive that I haved kept in active use for 10 years.

Re:Replenishing the reservoir (1)

rmadmin (532701) | about 8 years ago | (#15668872)

I can!

I used to work at an ISP that has atleast 3 SCSI HDD's there that have been spinning non-stop (sans power outages) since 1993. They are still in production too, which is insane. But, thats not my problem anymore. :)

Re:Replenishing the reservoir (1)

griffjon (14945) | about 8 years ago | (#15668916)

This will rapidly create a new DIY lube-refill industry to parallel the ink kit method.

In fact, the ink-refill-kit people should band together, form a cabal, and get a business process patent ASAP!

Lube tube. (1)

Kesch (943326) | about 8 years ago | (#15668611)

Do you think it will help speeds if I lube my internets before I stick them in the tubes?

Re:Lube tube. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15669026)

LOL.

Re:Lube tube. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15670117)

Unlikely. Trucks need lube jobs, and as we now know the tubes *aren't* like trucks. If you grease an internet, it'll probably just clog up the streaming when you put it in the tubes.

Re: Nanotube Lube Replenishment for Massive Drive (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15668614)

Thank God! As the proud owner of a massive drive, I can't begin to tell you the lube problems experienced over the years...

Message from Sen. Stevens (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15668620)

Hey, you kids stop yer funnin' - we all know that NanoTubes are for very small Internets!

Yer not gonna pull the tecknikal wool over my eyes!

oil changes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15668621)

Does this mean I Have to take my computer down to jiffy lube every 3000 miles? and will the guy there top off the other fluids while hes at it?

New Service Industry (1)

Thunderstruck (210399) | about 8 years ago | (#15668643)

This could spawn a new industry. Our PC's are already going liquid-cooled. Now they'll burn oil too. How long will it be before Jiffy-Lube services both your car and your laptop every 2000 miles?

Re:New Service Industry (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15669072)

No way am I taking my car to Jiffy Lube. Last time they didn't reinstall the oil plug in tightly enough and I had oil all over my garage floor.
I don't need them "maintaining" my laptop in a similar fashion.

Yuck.... (2, Funny)

tktk (540564) | about 8 years ago | (#15668688)

Digital pron? Check
1.46 TB? Check
Lube Replenishment ? Check

Ok, confession time. Who's already masturbating to this article?

Me! Me!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15668917)

...wait, what article?

Re:Yuck.... (2, Funny)

tgd (2822) | about 8 years ago | (#15669385)

I read Slashdot for the pictures.

no new business for jiffylube (2, Interesting)

atarione (601740) | about 8 years ago | (#15668729)

no new business for jiffylube... tubes will be Life of System component (from the Patent)

[0031] The lubricant reservoir 60 may deliver fixed vapor pressure of the saturant into the environment. One embodiment uses a nanoporous material which contains significant porosity and is composed of a non-reactive material. For example, the nanoporous material may comprise carbon nanotubes 70, as illustrated in FIG. 4. Typical dimensions for each nanotube 70 are from about 0.1 to about 10 nm in diameter D and from about 1 to about 50 nm long L. As a particular example, each nanotube 70 can be about 0.7 nm in diameter and about 10 nm long. The number of nanotubes 70 provided in the reservoir 60 may be selected in order to contain a sufficient amount of lubricant for supply to the recording media during the lifetime of the system, e.g., a minimum of at least 5 or 10 years. For example, several hundred thousand or several million nanotubes may be used.
and oh yeah so after whatever date 5 10 yrs (whatever they decided to supply the tubes for the drive will be done it appears.

When you have a HAMR ... (4, Funny)

cylcyl (144755) | about 8 years ago | (#15668742)

everything starts to look like it needs a Nano Assisted Information Lubricant

Re:When you have a HAMR ... (1)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | about 8 years ago | (#15668915)

Motorola has a new phone out?

Hard drive manufacturers are idiots. (4, Insightful)

zymano (581466) | about 8 years ago | (#15668758)

Is density really the problem ?

We need FASTER access times.

We need multiple read/write heads.

Re:Hard drive manufacturers are idiots. (2, Interesting)

Monkelectric (546685) | about 8 years ago | (#15668800)

Smaller = Faster. You can do one of two things to make a HD faster, spin the platters faster, or increase density so more data is passing under the heads.

Re:Hard drive manufacturers are idiots. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15669006)

Gotta agree with you on that one. I'm sorry, but who in the HELL needs or even forsees needing over 1TB worth of storage on a laptop-sized hard drive? Give me faster boot and access times. It's painful enough when our users get 10GB worth of data stolen from their 40GB laptops. Then again, we have companies like Microsoft to thank for needing that much space. Given Vista and MS Office 2007, damn hard drive will be full just in time for that 2GB "critical patch" to come down...

Re:Hard drive manufacturers are idiots. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15669262)

Personally I couldn't disagree more.

I don't need faster access times. I need bigger drives. I would love to be able to chuck out the current 2.5TB I have og raid-5'ed disks and replace them with two .. who's just mirrored.

If you need faster access time, buy yourself a Real disk system with more spindles. A netapp may be a good idea.

Re:Hard drive manufacturers are idiots. (1)

asuffield (111848) | about 8 years ago | (#15669945)

Is density really the problem ?

We need FASTER access times.


Density sells disks in high-street stores. Access times do not. If you want to improve disk bandwidth, you're probably rich and so you can stripe the data over multiple disks. It's a stupid answer but it's the bottom-line answer, so it's the one that the disk makers are interested in.

If you want to improve latency, sorry, you're screwed. Hard disk latency hasn't changed in years, since it's based entirely on spin speed and that hit a practical physical limit ages ago (disks that spin significantly faster than 10kRPM would need to be much stronger to survive, and there's no material that's both strong enough and cheap enough for mass production). Use battery-backed SDRAM instead.

Re:Hard drive manufacturers are idiots. (1)

multipartmixed (163409) | about 8 years ago | (#15670014)

Is that why my Seagate 15K RPM disks (ST318451FC) are failing at what I consider to be an astronomical rate?

MTBF has been observed to be around... Let's see.. 20 disks in three years out of 50 disks.. Umm. Anybody got a calculator?

Re:Hard drive manufacturers are idiots. (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | about 8 years ago | (#15670149)

This sounds about what I've seen from hard drives of all manufacturers in the last few years. It's got to the point where I really don't care about hard drive technology anymore. Once you get to around 100GBish, capacity becomes less important than random access time and reliability. Flash should start wining on both counts soon (and with flash, usually after it's failed you can still read from it, just not write to it). I managed to put a USB flash drive through the washing machine and the tumble dryer a couple of weeks ago, and it still works fine. I can't imagine doing that with a hard drive...

The same thing happened with CPUs. They hit 1GHz, and suddenly power consumption and stability became more important than raw speed.

FINALLY (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15668851)

A nanolube for Microsoft men.

Wow (1)

Shadow Wrought (586631) | about 8 years ago | (#15668879)

So telling users that they have to change their Hard Drive fluid isn't so flippant anymore. Bummer.

Cynicism (1)

tredman (229468) | about 8 years ago | (#15668897)

I'm a cynic as much as the next Slashdotter, but you twits are amazing.

State of the art in 1995 was 2G, according to Wikipedia. How many out there were still using a 2G drive in their systems last year (well, besides me, anyway, I'm not only a cynic, I'm a cheap bastard).

10 years MTBF sounds pretty freakin reasonable to me.

Re:Cynicism (1)

Cartack (628620) | about 8 years ago | (#15669311)

We are talking about Data storage here, not a videocard or some other uncritical pc component. Advancement in PC storage should focus on making them more fault tolerant than they were in the past. Sure they are increasing storage capacity, but this still seems like a step backwards.

Re:Cynicism (1)

Dasaan (644170) | about 8 years ago | (#15669590)

Funnily enough my server is using a pair of 1.5G drives that I was given for free. Are they old enough for you?

Wow. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15668903)

I haven't seen an article headline with that much innuendo in a while.

Don't get all hot and bothered re dem "nanotubes" (1)

Ancient_Hacker (751168) | about 8 years ago | (#15669096)

yes, you could use nanotubes for this. Or anything else with tiny holes in it, such as:

a chunk of foam, or felt, leather, or a small hole,

or just use a lubricant that evaporates at the right rate without needing any porous impediments.

oh, that's just great... (1)

wingbat (88117) | about 8 years ago | (#15669291)

The inkjet cartridge racket is invading our storage! Run away!

return to washing machine drives? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15669295)

Somehow the headline bought a mental image of a return to those washing-machine sized drives we used to use back on PDP-11's. "Nice laptop dude... shame about the size of the drive though..."

Tubes (1)

Spez (566714) | about 8 years ago | (#15669400)

Are those Nanotubes like smaller internets?

I won't buy it. (1)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | about 8 years ago | (#15669491)

There's now way in hell I'm going to bring my properly functioning hard drive to JiffyLube...

I can see it now: "Well, sir, we can just do the nano-lube for $19.99. But when we had your drive open we noticed the, uhhh... tacheon field was misaligned. We can fix that for just $199.99"

But... (1)

Coppit (2441) | about 8 years ago | (#15669655)

I thought the next limiting factor for hard drive densities was the limits of physics with respect to magnetic materials? So there's no need to get perpendicular [hitachigst.com] ?

Flash vs. Magnetic Drive (2, Interesting)

Brit_in_the_USA (936704) | about 8 years ago | (#15669750)

And everyone has been complaining about the limited number of write cycles of flash memory.

Looks like the technogies are reach equivalence by making Hard drives worse !

Eye no knot. (0, Offtopic)

LWATCDR (28044) | about 8 years ago | (#15669751)

Eye do knot no why people can knot spell.
Yes English spelling sucks but like inches, feet, and miles I am afraid we are stuck with them. Before anyone bashes the US for not going metric I have to tell you that I have seen miles, gallons, and pounds used in UK motorcycle magazines. And I bet you don't go to the pub of .5 liters of beer.

Re:Eye no knot. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15669907)

Rawng artikle dum ass.

Re:Eye no knot. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15670479)

no they don't, but you do buy wine by the cc (cubic centimeter, better known as a mili-liter

Where does it Evaporate To? (2, Interesting)

ChronoFish (948067) | about 8 years ago | (#15669772)

I know I'm a little dense, but where would the lubricant evaporate to?

I mean the HDs built today are sealed to prevent dust and moisture from coming in. wouldn't it also prevent moisture from leaving?

If the lubricant condenses to the lid, it would seem there would be a way to capture and recycle it. You shouldn't have to run out.

Better yet let it run in a lubricant bath - then you avoid evaporation and application of it all together.

-CF

Re:Where does it Evaporate To? (1)

CaVp (746780) | about 8 years ago | (#15670285)

Actually, HDs are not air-sealed... they have small holes for filtered ventilation (look after those stickers sayin "Do not cover"...)

the big question is.... (1)

Mister Whirly (964219) | about 8 years ago | (#15669850)

What flavors do the lube come in?? I would like a cherry 1.5TB drive please...

Power consumption? Heat dissipation? (1)

brainnolo (688900) | about 8 years ago | (#15670104)

How much power will the heating process consume? The 2.5" form factor for laptops is pretty meaningless if the drive is going to suck a lot of power and/or run as hot as hell.

How do you fit more data on a disk? (1)

chopper749 (574759) | about 8 years ago | (#15670121)

Use a hammer! (HAMR get it!)

Do we realy need this? (1)

paynesmanor (982732) | about 8 years ago | (#15670233)

I think what we truely need is to get past the PCI, (Pci Express works but there has to be a better way. oh while your at it improve the battery so we can have endlesss power with little weight... Cold fusion would be great while your at it.

Goes to show you (1)

KazerSoza (727306) | about 8 years ago | (#15670327)

Even with 2.5" you still need lubrication
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