Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Gold and Helium Combine for Needle-Free Injections

timothy posted more than 8 years ago | from the not-necessarily-pain-free dept.

74

Mr. Jaggers writes "U.K. biotech outfit, PowderMed Ltd., has developed a new method to deliver vaccine using an injector powered by concentrated helium gas. They enclose fragments of virus DNA in tiny gold particles, and use the injector to introduce particles into the body subdermally. Evidently, this has been in the works for some time, but is now ready for human clinical tests. Oh, and this is supposed to be used experimentally to target the H5N1 avian flu, which is also cool, I suppose."

cancel ×

74 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Gold? (1)

jarg0n (882275) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695331)

Why does this sound expensive to me?

Re:Gold? (2, Insightful)

CRCulver (715279) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695350)

The amount of gold we're talking about probably isn't any more than what's in a bottle of Goldschlager [wikipedia.org] , and that only costs a few bucks.

Re:Gold? (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695568)

Ya, but the idea of shitting gold flakes the morning after is COOL!

Re:Gold? (1)

RMB2 (936187) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695787)

Well, now you can poop gold-coated DNA.

Re:Gold? (3, Funny)

Ohreally_factor (593551) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695794)

SCENE 23, DAY INT., DIGISHAMAN HOUSE HALLWAY

Mom: What's the hold up? Why aren't you kids ready for school?

Kids: DigiShaman is hogging the bathroom again. Panning for gold.

DigiShaman [muffled, behind door]: Eureka!!

Re:Gold? (1)

RMB2 (936187) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695781)

I'm pretty sure this is gonna be WAAAY less gold that that. To a lot of scientists, if you can see it, it's a lot.

Re:Gold? (4, Interesting)

n0dalus (807994) | more than 8 years ago | (#15696047)

The amount of gold we're talking about probably isn't any more than what's in a bottle of Goldschlager
How Much is inside a bottle of Goldschlager [cockeyed.com] (Work safe).

Re:Gold? (1)

Walpurgiss (723989) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695357)

While I'm sure it will be expensive; it likely won't be because of the gold content. The amount of gold required to coat a partial virus would be so infintessimly small that its price would be nearly unnoticable. As for why I think this; I point to the Cinnamon flavored liquor, Goldschlaeger. This has many visible flakes of gold in it, and is not noticibly more expensive than most other liquors. So a microscopic amount of gold likely would not add much to the cost of this medical technology. Most of the cost will likely be for its development, rather than the actual materials used.

OOooOOOOoo (2, Funny)

DarkNemesis618 (908703) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695336)

The hypospray, quickly doctor!

Reminiscent of Star Trek?

Re:OOooOOOOoo (1)

earnest murderer (888716) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695352)

Reminiscent of Star Trek?

Or the draft.

Re:OOooOOOOoo (1)

SomeoneGotMyNick (200685) | more than 8 years ago | (#15696982)

Or the draft.

I wasn't drafted, but I had to get the innoculations with the "air guns" while going down an assembly line when I went into the service. For my boney arms (at the time), it hurt only as much as a needle would have, but one of the people administering the shot didn't maintain skin contact for the full duration of the injection. The result was a large enough "hole" in my arm that bled heavily for a few minutes.

Of course, who do you think the sergeants blamed for that happening?

Re:OOooOOOOoo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15695647)

Did you write lipospray?

Re:OOooOOOOoo (1)

0racle (667029) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695839)

I seem to remember in one of the specials on Star Trek that it was said that at some point in time the Military was toying with the idea of hyposprays popularized by Star Trek because of the easy way of delivering injections.

Re:OOooOOOOoo (2, Informative)

Shambhu (198415) | more than 8 years ago | (#15697084)

Jet injectors [wikipedia.org] are fairly commonplace. My dad said they used them on new recruits in Basic, back in the day. He said it was a big thing that you had to lean in to and had a strong kick. Military issue. What's special here is the virus itself, I guess. Maybe use gold particles to carry it and using helium to power it is also new. I don't know.

Re:OOooOOOOoo (1)

teasea (11940) | more than 8 years ago | (#15700301)

Maybe use gold particles to carry it and using helium to power it is also new. I don't know.

Much better than mercury, no?

Maybe I'm to cynical (3, Insightful)

Lord Kano (13027) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695340)

Should we test this on vaccines that we know the side effect for?

I mean, we know what the side effects of the polio vaccination are so maybe that's a better trial for this. It would be truly awful if we created a SuperFlu by playing around with this.

LK

Typo in previous subject. (2, Funny)

Lord Kano (13027) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695351)

I mean "too" instead of "to".

LK

Re:Maybe I'm to cynical (2, Insightful)

eln (21727) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695678)

As others have mentioned, this is not particularly new tech. I'd imagine linking it to the avian flu is just a way to get more exposure, and therefore more grant money, by exploiting the health scare of the moment.

Re:Maybe I'm too cynical (1)

carpecerevisi (890252) | more than 8 years ago | (#15698467)

I don't really see an incredible amount of relation between the two. The technology described is merely a new medium for, in this case, vaccination, not something liable to cause mutational effects in the vaccine itself. Yes, in general, it would seem to be standard procedure to test one and only one new thing at a time, but I believe that, as already mentioned, the link is made purely to boost awareness and interest.

More practitioners (3, Insightful)

andrewman327 (635952) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695355)

I am an EMT but I am not allowed to perform IVs in the field. Only paramedics are allowed to do that (more training). I am licensed to perform intramuscular injections, however (think EpiPen) and I would be allowed to use one of these. The point? If there were ever a need for rapid vacinations, more people would be able to administer using this technology.

Re:More practitioners (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15695488)

Why? Most vacinations are intramuscular injections.

Re:More practitioners (2, Informative)

anoopsinha (685380) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695802)

I do not think there are any vaccines that are given intra-venously, anyway. Most vaccines that I know know of are given by the intra-muscular route, and some by the sub-cutaneous and intra-dermal route. So administering any vaccine should well be within your field of expertise as an EMT.

Re:More practitioners (4, Informative)

Kadin2048 (468275) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695967)

I don't really think this is going to change anything. The injections that this is replacing are mostly intra-muscular, so (assuming they're in your protocols) you could do them right now.

The reason Paramedics drop lines is less to introduce drugs but to add fluid volume, saline or blood. You can't do that intramuscularly, or without a needle. Once you have the line inserted as a way of adding volume, it's an easy way to give drugs (and there are admittedly drugs that are intended for intravascular use instead of IM), but a needle-less IM system wouldn't replace most IV insertions.

Unless you could find some way to continuously pump fluids into a vein without a catheter in place to keep it open, but I don't think anyone has proposed a needleless sytem that does that.

What next? Discovering Polio vaccine? (5, Informative)

megaditto (982598) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695408)

This 'new method' is some 20+ years old.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gene_gun [wikipedia.org]

I'd tell the submitter where to shove such 'new methods', but it appears that has already been done:

Chen et al. Immunity obtained by gene-gun inoculation of a rotavirus DNA vaccine to the abdominal epidermis or anorectal epithelium.Vaccine. 1999 Aug 6;17(23-24):3171-6

Re:What next? Discovering Polio vaccine? (1)

Walt Dismal (534799) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695834)

Letter to researchers: I like my anorectal epithelium as it is, thank you very much. If you have a helium-propelled gold flake viral DNA vaccine, keep it to yourself, and leave my virginal epithelium alone. Signed, Major Chas Crumley, Retired, and nothing to do but write letters and post on Slashdot. Oh, it makes me mad. Mad, I tell you, mad. Mongo, do not kill the customers! And do not touch their anorectal epithelia!

Influenza is an Orthomyxovirus (1)

anoopsinha (685380) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695417)

That means the genetic material of this virus is RNA, not DNA. So what DNA exactly are they using in this vaccine? I did RTFM, but it does not answer this question.

But maybe, they are using DNA that corresponds to the viral RNA.

Re:Influenza is an Orthomyxovirus (5, Informative)

megaditto (982598) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695451)

Need to use DNA because RNA is unstable. RNA and DNA are interconvertible, but the naked RNA molecule will be chopped up and eaten by the cell. Even if it didn't, it would also need (at least) a reverse transcriptase, (an RNA-dependant DNA polymerase enzyme) to go from RNA->DNA before the cell can start making viral proteins.

Since RNA has absolutely no chance for to survive or integrate without the viral enzymes, so gene-guns have to use DNA.

Re:Influenza is an Orthomyxovirus (1)

Twisted64 (837490) | more than 8 years ago | (#15697549)

RNA and DNA are interconvertible, but the naked RNA molecule will be chopped up and eaten by the cell. Even if it didn't, it would also need (at least) a reverse transcriptase, (an RNA-dependant DNA polymerase enzyme)
You... gah... WHAT? WHAT THE HELL? I need that animated cowboy from Jurassic Park back here, STAT!

Re:Influenza is an Orthomyxovirus (1)

Qubit (100461) | more than 8 years ago | (#15698121)

Since RNA has absolutely no chance for to survive

RNA has no chance to survive....take off every telomere for great justice...

(sorry, I just had to say it)

I wonder if its painful? (4, Interesting)

allaunjsilverfox2 (882195) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695420)

If not couldn't it be used for diabetics? Or others that need constanst injections?

Re:I wonder if its painful? (1)

Durrok (912509) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695479)

I doubt it would be more painful then the a shot and most diabetics would welcome it if it left no permanet scars like needles can.

Hell I'd even pay a few extra bucks for this method even if it was more painful. Pain I can stand, the idea of something foreign and large entering my body is another story.

Hell yes - the military uses something like this (4, Interesting)

r00t (33219) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695495)

These guys have added "gold" and "helium" to make things sound cool, but the tech is old.

It hurts like Hell. It leaves a blister or welt, if you are lucky.

Don't flinch. If you move, the device cuts a slot. You need stiches. Then they try again. Remember, don't flinch.

Such devices are being eliminated. Back splatter (tiny droplets of blood) creates a risk of disease transmission. It's also not nice how the device tends to drive skin bacteria into you, more so than a needle would.

Re:Hell yes - the military uses something like thi (1)

Lurker187 (127055) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695594)

Well, the problems are only marginally different than those of using a needle, the issues of infection or injury are pretty much the same, but yes, hyposprays or pneumatic injection guns have been around for decades, and the "no needles!" is just spin, as it's used to imply that it's less painful than a needle, when the only difference is that you're just having a column of liquid pierce your skin instead of a column of metal.

Re:Hell yes - the military uses something like thi (1)

Kaenneth (82978) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695631)

Having been needle-phobic myself, my fear was of the needle breaking off inside.

(mostly over it now, giving myself 2x a week injections)

Re:Hell yes - the military uses something like thi (1)

Ohreally_factor (593551) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695784)

That never bothered me. What sets me on edge is the idea of getting needles jabbed in my eyes.

Re:Hell yes - the military uses something like thi (5, Interesting)

Zemran (3101) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695856)

Several years ago I had a shower of sparks from a grinding machine hit me in the face and I had fine pieces of metal in my skin and eyes. Skin does not matter as the skin will force the metal out itself, but they felt that it was important to get the metal out of my eyes and the pain made me agree. I had to sit still on the wrong end of a sort of magnifying glass while they used hypodermic needles to hook the bits of metal out. As with all eye surgery it is important to remain consious. I could see each needle going into my eye and I could feel the click as they hooked each piece of metal out.

Even worse though, was a friend that was in a car wreck and they took his eyes out, again fully concious, to remove pieces of windscreen. He told me that it was very strange to be looking at his own chest like that while his eyeballs were on his cheeks.

Re:Hell yes - the military uses something like thi (1)

Ohreally_factor (593551) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695919)

You are so EVIL!!!

Hahahahaha, man, that made me cringe reading it. X0

Re:Hell yes - the military uses something like thi (2, Insightful)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 8 years ago | (#15697310)

... and if he hadn't posted thw windscreen part, he would have had a lot of people going.

hint for the next time - magnets work better.

Re:Hell yes - the military uses something like thi (1)

Kymermosst (33885) | more than 8 years ago | (#15696348)

Jeezus.

I really wanted to sleep tonight. You just fucked it up for me.

Re:Hell yes - the military uses something like thi (2, Interesting)

kjdames (588423) | more than 8 years ago | (#15699227)

How would he be able to see if his eyes were outside his skull? I thought the eyeball required light to only enter from the front in order to work. That's why true invisibility would not work - you'd be blind.

Re:Hell yes - the military uses something like thi (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15695795)

Stick a needle in a bar of soap and try to break it off. Those things are tough.

Re:Hell yes - the military uses something like thi (1)

19thNervousBreakdown (768619) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695889)

Thanks. I never thought of that :\

Re:Hell yes - the military uses something like thi (1)

BCW2 (168187) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695648)

Yes, I too went through the line and got pneumaticly injected in both arms at the same time. Navy boot camp, San Diego, 1976. Damn, If I'd stayed in my 30 would have been done in Feb. In other words, nothing new here move along...

Re:Hell yes - the military uses something like thi (1)

quarterbrain (958359) | more than 8 years ago | (#15696907)

Still doing it in '95 in Marine Corps boot camp. Walking through the doorway and getting shot in both arms simultaneously was the last attack in a series of injections both with and without a needle.
If you had stayed in your 30, depending on your MOS you might have been effected by a stoploss. Nothing says thank you for your 30 years like "stick around a few more until we end this war".

Moving along, Aye aye sir.

Re:Hell yes - the military uses something like thi (1)

BCW2 (168187) | more than 8 years ago | (#15703215)

An Auxilaryman (A-gang) on a fast attack sub was THE most critical rate in the Navy in Feb. 80. They tried every trick in the book to get me to ship over. Even threatened involuntary hold, my reply was go ahead and pay the perdium and double my pay! (rules at that time) They let me go.

Fast forward to fall 90. My cousin got drafted in 61 and was then a full Colonel in the Army. Wanted to go to Desert Shield, Army says no, you were just Attache in Tokyo (intelligence officer) you know to much and will never be allowed in the Middle East, for life. Not going to take a chance on you getting picked up over there. He would have been in headquarters briefing stormin Norman, not doing John Wayne stuff. He went to Atlanta and briefed every intelligence officer that went over there. A First Lt from the 101st came in and said "hi Dad whatch ya got for me". When July 91 came around he put in for retirement after his 30. He was finaly released in Aug. 92.

Re:Hell yes - the military uses something like thi (1)

engagebot (941678) | more than 8 years ago | (#15696776)

You're right. My mother has a scar something fierce on her arm from getting one years and years ago.

Re:Hell yes - the military uses something like thi (1)

treeves (963993) | more than 8 years ago | (#15700018)

I remember vividly standing in line and getting pneumatic injections in Navy boot camp - that was 1986 (ooooh, just dated myself).
Yellow Fever vaccination was particularly memorable as it made me really sick for just 24 hrs., then I was fine. They told us not to move as we were getting the shot as it would rip the skin and be much more painful.

Re:I wonder if its painful? (1)

serutan (259622) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695785)

I've heard that the EpiPen is sort of like getting snapped by a rubber band. It's a matter of individual preference. Some people swear by it while others swear AT it.

Re:I wonder if its painful? (2, Informative)

jfsather (310648) | more than 8 years ago | (#15698454)

Since you asked...

Injector pens like this have existed for over 15 years. I currently use a MediJector Vision. Once you've purchased the injector pen, there is an additional cost for the adaptors to go on the insulin vials. You end up using about 10% less insulin per shot. I had one of the first ones produced back in 1990 and haven't had to do a needle injection since then. It feels like a quick pinch.

My shots aren't coated in gold, though.

Google just gives me shopping links, but you can find more details at places like drugstore.com. Even though I use them, I won't pimp them here. This is the type of thing that most local drugstores don't carry, so online is about the only way to get them.

-J

Slashdot down the drain (-1, Troll)

Dis*abstraction (967890) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695492)

You can tell how fast this place is sinking by the spectacle of all the rats swimming away, limbs desperately flailing, hoping to avoid getting pulled under by the final, inevitable gurgle of a once mighty site collapsing into a black whirlpool of its own terrible suckage. I remember the day when my karma'd be at Terrible by now. Mods--those of you worthless creatures left, anyway--do your job.

Star Trek pushes us forward again? (0, Redundant)

RyoShin (610051) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695520)

I remember reading about something like this in Popular Science back in late '05.

Can anyone tell me how close this is to the Hypo-sprays (sp?) from the Star Trek world? Do you still have to place is strategically, or is it a general point-and-click interface?

First comm badges. Then hypo-sprays. Warp speed, here we come!

Re:Star Trek pushes us forward again? (1)

Petersson (636253) | more than 8 years ago | (#15696314)

First comm badges. Then hypo-sprays. Warp speed, here we come!


Isn't it the Zefram Cochran's warp drive first? Then First Contact by those dull Vulcans (actually Borg are first, followed by Enterprise).

Re:Star Trek pushes us forward again? (1)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 8 years ago | (#15697531)

Remember this [fiveminute.net] ?

Old Trick (2, Informative)

teratogenicbenzene (887723) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695524)

This is just a new spin on an old trick. Geneticists have been using tiny gold pellets coated in DNA in so-called "gene guns [wikipedia.org] " for a long time. They're mainly used to transform plant cells, as these cells have tough cell walls.

Using them on the human cells is a logical step, but applicability is going to be rather narrow.

Clinical trials... (1)

The MAZZTer (911996) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695660)

Ok... I don't really care about that... how long before it replaces hypodermic needles and I get to take advantage of this new tech?

Air bubbles? (1)

Schraegstrichpunkt (931443) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695689)

How do they avoid getting air bubbles into the patient's bloodstream?

Re:Air bubbles? (3, Informative)

bobscealy (830639) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695780)

Air bubbles in the blood stream arent that much of a big deal, you need to have quite a bit before it is a problem. I had 4 months of chemotherapy a year back and when they are changing lines etc I was shocked at the amount of air that went in, the nurse said lots of people freak out. The wierd thing is you can feel the air going in, which is a bit spooky.

Re:Air bubbles? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15697548)

So, why do physicians and paramedics always take great care to eliminate any bubbles of air in a newly filled syringe before any sort of injection by holding the syringe with the needle pointed upwards and squeezing the bubbles out of the end of the needle, often gently tapping the side of the syringe to facilitate the dislodging?

Re:Air bubbles? (1)

hob42 (41735) | more than 8 years ago | (#15703672)

As an RN, I do that to make sure I am giving an accurate amount of medication.

Air bubbles in IV fluid lines (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15698482)

A senior hospital physician told me some interesting facts about air bubbles in blood when I asked him what happens to the bubbles in my IV line. Apparently every time a fluid bag is changed and the IV line gets re-connected to the valve port that was put on your arm / chest, an air volume of around 1ml, and sometimes as much as 5ml or more, will enter the bloodstream as bubbles. He said air bubbles that get into the blood can stick to the walls of blood vessels, but generally he would expect the pulsating flow of blood is enough to keep a bubble moving quite freely away from the point of injection along the veins in the return flow to the heart (because vein diameter increases towards the heart), and after reaching the heart, the bubble should be able to get out into the arteries, where eventually, due to arterial branching and narrowing, it would reach a point where the diameter was too small and get stuck there for some time, blocking the flow of blood. His view was that since bubbles slowly disappear as the gases in them dissolve into the blood, a stopped bubble would probably be less serious than having a blood clot, but he did also say there has been little research on the effects of IV bubbles and the issue is still open to debate. He was generous to spare his time to talk to me, so I didn't bother him with any further questions. I wonder how the bubbles actually behave, what their effects are and what studies have been done. I would think a stopped bubble dissolves only slowly because the blood around it is not moving, so dissolved gases can only diffuse, rather than flow, back upstream into the rest of the blood. If sensitive tissue like the brain was involved, presumably any tissue that was downstream would not survive a gap of more than a few minutes in blood supply caused by a slowly dissolving stopped bubble. From what I saw when I was awake, the nurses did remove any large air bubbles in the fluid line before connecting it to the valve port.

Re:Air bubbles in IV fluid lines (1)

hob42 (41735) | more than 8 years ago | (#15703718)

Yeah. Funny thing is, in nursing school, they drilled into us to always remove all the air out of an IV line. In the OR where I work now, the anesthesiologists handle the IV lines, and they don't care a bit aoout air bubbles in the lines. Most say that the air is dissolved in the large veins before it gets anywhere important. (Whether or not there's anything to back up that statement, or if it's just something they believe because it's convenient, I dunno. Some of the docs are very strict about evidence-based practice and standard of care, though.)

Arterial lines and central lines are a different matter, and everyone is pretty picky about keeping air out of those.

Re:Air bubbles? (2, Informative)

A Commentor (459578) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695953)

How do they avoid getting air bubbles into the patient's bloodstream?


Because it's no where near the blood stream. This one is subdermal (just under the skin) not into a vein. For the vein, it would be an IV.

Re:Air bubbles? (1)

Spy der Mann (805235) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695969)

Helium is an inert gas which doesn't trigger any dangerous response in the body. Also remember that helium is one of the gases used in diver tanks.

Re:Air bubbles? (1)

JetScootr (319545) | more than 8 years ago | (#15697680)

They don't get air bubbles cuz stuff hits so hard it comes out the other side of yer arm. Or at least it feels that way.

Re:Air bubbles? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15696054)

I asked my doc about this once when I noticed a bubble in an IV drip heading towards my arm. He told me that with that diameter tubing, it would take a 6ft long air bubble to cause harm.

' thought we HAD needle-free injection systems... (1)

ivi (126837) | more than 8 years ago | (#15695723)


  It seems like decades ago when the first needle-free injecting systems
  were announced. Didn't they work out?

  What're the great new advantages here, not for gold producers but for
  patients and/or medical establishments who fund the injections?

Gold injected breast implants? (1)

mbstone (457308) | more than 8 years ago | (#15696140)

If they could use this method to inject silicone for cosmetic augmentation purposes, would that mean...

... Thar's gold in them there hills?

Dr Who - Cybermen Vaccination (1)

wolverine1999 (126497) | more than 8 years ago | (#15696189)

Sounds like a good vaccination to prevent humans from being Cybernised (converted into Cybermen!) since they are susceptible to Gold!

Needle-Free is 30+ year-old tech (0, Redundant)

dltaylor (7510) | more than 8 years ago | (#15696461)

Back in 1970, I received several immunizations in the U.S. Army from needle-free guns. Only got cut once (out of 8 or 9), and it wasn't me flinching, but a suddenly-distracted tech. Before they worried about blood-spatter spreading pathogens, it was a rapid assembly-line way to perform the task: load a vial onto the gun, and "shoot" several individuals before reloading. I don't remember that version as encapuslating the viral/bacterial bits, though, and I think the pressurization agent was nitrogen, 'cause I remember jokes about "the bends". (I know "the bends" are not funny, but a bunch of 18-22 year old guys standing in lines to get "shots" will make jokes about it.)

Re:Needle-Free is 30+ year-old tech (0, Redundant)

JetScootr (319545) | more than 8 years ago | (#15697575)

They were still using it in 1981, when I went in. They injected so much vaccine in one shot that you'd get a big knot on your arm. Skinny guys had to get it in the upper thigh. I used to have to get massive allergy injections when I was a kid, so I know what a *big* shot feels like. The military's air injected shots hit like a knuckle punch and felt like they were gonna make us immune to everything but bullets. Several guys fainted afterwards.

new??? (1)

dylanduck (866584) | more than 8 years ago | (#15696745)

It was in 1997 [newscientist.com] .

Needless, not painless (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#15698709)

The point of needless immunizations is for performance reasons.

They can do more because there is no need to change needles each time.

It hurts more than a needle injection though and I can't possibly see how it could be sterile since "juice" splatters back against the gun every injection.

Needles for me please.

Prior Art (1)

Jon Luckey (7563) | more than 8 years ago | (#15698738)

The KGB had an injector that used precious metals and compressed gas to deliver its payload long long ago [wikipedia.org] .

Biorad Gene Gun (1)

GeHa (144811) | more than 8 years ago | (#15701054)

Research materials supplier Bio-Rad has had a "Gene Gun" using this method for eons. While not intended for clinical use like the sleek PowderJect device, at least it looks SciFi-ish cool (see http://www.biorad.com/images/gene_gun1.jpg [biorad.com] ).

As has been pointed out by many others here already, the PowderJect device is hardly new as well.

Check for New Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>