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Short Film About CERN's Large Hadron Collider

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 7 years ago | from the crash-test-donut dept.

179

Lobster911 writes "Seedmagazine.com has posted a new film, Lords of the Ring, about CERN's Large Hadron Collider. NESTA fellow Alom Shaha takes us through the world's largest machine, as he lets the scientists who work at CERN explain the LHC and what they hope to accomplish with it. The highly-anticipated collider is set to start up in 2007, running at full speed by 2008."

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179 comments

You're not alone. (0, Offtopic)

Kesch (943326) | more than 7 years ago | (#15708888)

Ok, show of hands. Who read 'hard-on collider' the first time? (Ouch, that kinda sounds painful)

Re:You're not alone. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15708920)

It's not painful, as the summary says, the hardons start colliding slowly and then ramp up to full speed.

Re:You're not alone. (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15709136)

You're being a major hardon...

Obligatory "Large Hard-on Collider" post (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15708896)

Just getting it out of the way.

Impressive (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15708914)

...though not as impressive as my very own Large Hardon Collider, as many ladies can atest.

Re:Impressive (4, Funny)

RsG (809189) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709017)

Reminds me of an old physics joke:

"I've wanted to do the two-slit experiment for years, but my wife won't let me!"

To which the reply was:

"Good luck with that. Try explaining to her afterwards that you couldn't tell which slit you came through. You'll be sleeping next to the particle collider for a month."

Don't know where this came from though; it's not original to me...

Re:Impressive (3, Funny)

TooMuchEspressoGuy (763203) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709043)

...though not as impressive as my very own Large Hardon Collider, as many ladies can atest.

If all you're colliding with is other hardons, then I don't think it's the ladies you're impressing...

Re:Impressive (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15709062)

Isn't this how the video game FlashBack started?

Shortest Film Ever (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15708938)

Including previews and ads, the film runs approximately 1.67 picoseconds, but at relativistic speeds, it seems like hours.

Re:Shortest Film Ever (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15709007)

Ebert and Roeper: Two thumbs sideways.
Gene Shalit: It was just too long for me.
Rex Reed: Not to New Yorkers' tastes.
Gene Siskel: Made me roll over as I lay.
Leonard Maltin: I'm gonna have to sit on this one a while before giving a verdict.

Re:Shortest Film Ever (2, Funny)

Ohreally_factor (593551) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709623)

You're supposed to fast forward to get to the sexy parts. So, don't blink, or you'll miss the guy with the tremendous hadron.

Low content (5, Interesting)

Umbral Blot (737704) | more than 7 years ago | (#15708952)

The video was a little low on content (I guess it was aimed at a more general audience). I think they should have spent a little more time explaining why re-creating conditions at the big bang will NOT create a second big bang that will obliterate the universe. (yes, some people actually worry about that)

Re:Low content (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15709006)

create a second big bang that will obliterate the universe. (yes, some people actually worry about that)

There is a Visine for that!

Re:Low content (1)

gameforge (965493) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709522)

> > create a second big bang that will obliterate the universe. (yes, some people actually worry about that)

> There is a Visine for that!

Yeah but...can you hear me now?

Basic research is often hard to justify (2, Insightful)

PIPBoy3000 (619296) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709039)

One of the things common with very basic research is that it's hard to justify what benefits will come out of it. The first folks playing with radioactive materials all died of cancer, little knowing their sacrifice would completely change geopolitics for decades to come.

The collider will give us a better view of basic particle interactions. Will it give us anti-gravity or make our teeth whiter? Probably not, but unexpected things will likely come of it.

Re:Basic research is often hard to justify (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15709093)

Your reading comprehension must be low, since the GP didn't mention anything at all about the benifits or lack of benifits of research.

Re:Basic research is often hard to justify (2, Informative)

PIPBoy3000 (619296) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709138)

I decided to expand the topic a bit, talking about both benefits and risks. There has been some discussion about the risks of the collider. From the wikipedia article: [wikipedia.org]
It has been predicted by Savas Dimopoulos and Greg Landsberg that if the scale of quantum gravity is near 1 TeV, then the LHC may produce black holes.[5] Due to a concern for public safety, CERN performed a study to investigate whether dangerous events such as the creation of micro black holes, strangelets, or magnetic monopoles could occur.[6] The report indicates that none of these events will pose any risk: micro black holes are specifically stated to be harmless due to the Hawking radiation process. Frank Wilczek at Princeton University has stated in an article in Scientific American that cosmic ray collisions occur at much higher energies than may be found in manmade particle accelerators today, so it is unlikely that a particle accelerator would produce a dangerous black hole. However, some physicists and members of the general public remain concerned about the safety of the LHC. Wilczek states that strangelet creation and expansion is very improbable but not impossible.[7] John Nelson at Birmingham University stated of the RHIC that "it is astonishingly unlikely that there is any risk - but I could not prove it."[8] In academia there is some question of whether Hawking radiation is correct.[9]
Rumor has it that during the first A-bomb test, the scientists were taking bets on whether they'd ignite the atmosphere. I wonder what the odds of creating a black hole might be?

Re:Basic research is often hard to justify (1)

joshier (957448) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709420)

Why even bother to bet on such a stupid outcome?.. Really, who would actually bet "Yeah, the world will blow up upon running this experiment"; as if there would be a point to that.

Re:Basic research is often hard to justify (1)

nickheart (557603) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709736)

This reminds me of Stephen Hawkings.

He bet that all his life's work was wrong, the reason being: At least if all his life's work was wrong, he's win the bet....

Unimportant (1)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709099)

Some people believed that blowing up a nuclear weapon on this planet could start a world-wide chain reaction that would not stop by itself, we still blew it up :)

Re:Unimportant (4, Informative)

Martin Blank (154261) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709202)

Edward Teller had a concern about atmospheric nitrogen undergoing fusion, essentially igniting the entire atmosphere. He got together with a couple of other Manhattan Project physicists and showed that it was not just unlikely, but impossible. With this concern laid to rest, they knew that it was safe (so to speak) to detonate the bomb.

It was one of the other physicists (not the ones with whom Teller collaborated on the above report) who kept talking about it afterward, and allowed the story to live on, much to the annoyance of a number of Manhattan Project researchers.

Re:Low content (4, Funny)

deft (253558) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709149)

>>> more time explaining why re-creating conditions at the big bang will NOT create a second big bang that will obliterate the universe. (yes, some people actually worry about that)

What, you mean forcing God to do something after an apaprent 2000 year absence (not counting toast apparitions)

It would be awesome if they ran that thing, and God came down from the heavens saying "Dude, I heard that... fricken loud man! I heard it all the way across the universe where I'm creating a planet consisting only of a beer volcano and a stripper factory... check it out".

ramen.

Re:Low content (5, Funny)

geekoid (135745) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709249)

"Dude, I heard that... fricken loud man! I heard it all the way across the universe where I'm creating a planet consisting only of a beer volcano and a stripper factory... check it out".

I am interested in your God and would like to suscribe to your newsletter.

Re:Low content (1)

twofidyKidd (615722) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709222)

That's a silly thing to worry about because if it does, it's not like there's going be some kind of aftermath to be concerned about.

Re:Low content (1)

Umbral Blot (737704) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709250)

Isn't that a bit like putting a gun to your head and pulling the trigger, reasoning: if I'm dead then I won't care about the aftermath, therefore no reason not to!

Re:Low content (1)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709252)

Well, I think you're missing the point. I, for one, still have a lot of great sex ahead of me, and missing out on all that over a slight misunderstanding about the nature of the Universe would just piss me off.

Re:Low content (1)

Ohreally_factor (593551) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709636)

It would be even worse than that. I've been meaning to tell you: sex is even better when you have it with another person! =)

Re:Low content (1)

macron1 (971968) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709489)

What?! i never even thought of that (ie a possible creation of a second big bang)! Now i am worried

Am I the only one... (-1, Redundant)

wiggles (30088) | more than 7 years ago | (#15708954)

who glanced at the title of this and read "Short film about CERN's large hardon collider"?

I did!! (1)

pestie (141370) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709176)

Yup! I always end up reading it that way. I chalk it up to years of exposure to Beavis & Butt-head.

Re:Am I the only one... (1)

Sfing_ter (99478) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709269)

No, you are not alone my perverted friend, it is near the end of the day for me, but I thought, damn, that sounds like a gay porn movie... not that i'd know... of course...

First it goes slow, then fast. (1)

cno3 (197688) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709510)

The short folm begins when CERN "scientist" Candii orders a pizza...

Re:Am I the only one... (1)

Xyrus (755017) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709721)

Proving once again that the quickest route to a nerd's heart is porn and particle physics. :P

~X~

Sense of humour failure (1)

growse (928427) | more than 7 years ago | (#15708971)

The very title of the video indicates that the quirky, sense-of-humour absense is still rife amongst particle physicists.

Re:Sense of humour failure (5, Funny)

Tackhead (54550) | more than 7 years ago | (#15708987)

> The very title of the video indicates that the quirky, sense-of-humour absense is still rife amongst particle physicists.

Quirky? That's strange. If only you'd written it as "quarky", it would have been a truly beautiful and charming joke.

Re:Sense of humour failure (3, Funny)

iced_773 (857608) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709032)


it would have been a truly beautiful and charming joke

Well, that post up there was a strange one. Those of us down here salute you.

Re:Sense of humour failure (1)

Tackhead (54550) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709098)

> > it would have been a truly beautiful and charming joke
>
>Well, that post up there was a strange one. Those of us down here salute you.

That's a strong response, I'd say it's on top. This one is weak by comparison. It wouldn't hit the bottom end of a barn. (The broad sides of the barn of course, having been open to permit the the large rod to pass through it. Honest honey, it's bigger when it's not moving!)

Re:Sense of humour failure (2, Funny)

jd (1658) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709165)

Yeesh, you need to put a different spin on it. Besides, we all know you merely lepton this thread to post someting strange. Oh, incidently, quantum cats muon and on.

Getting it up. (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15708978)

" The highly-anticipated collider is set to start up in 2007, running at full speed by 2008."

So does that mean it will be running half-speed in 2007?

Re:Getting it up. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15708998)

actually, 1/3 speed. 75ns bunch crossing time as opposed to 25ns.

Sounds like Vista (4, Funny)

MarkByers (770551) | more than 7 years ago | (#15708980)

The highly-anticipated collider is set to start up in 2007, running at full speed by 2008.

When I read this I thought they were talking about Windows Vista.

I wrote a little poem... (5, Funny)

Kesch (943326) | more than 7 years ago | (#15708994)

Three particles of neutrons uncharged in our eye,
Seven of electrons with no atoms to call home,
Nine of protons from which Hydrogen we did pry,
One ring for the Physicists on their dark thrones
In the Land of Sweden where the Shadows lie.
One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to collide them,
One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them
In the Land of Sweden where the Shadows lie.

Re:I wrote a little poem... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15709023)

It's Switzerland not Sweden!!!

Re:I wrote a little poem... (4, Informative)

Dusty (10872) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709238)

FWIW Cern [web.cern.ch] is in Switzerland, just outside of Geneva. Although the LHC ring is large enough to cross the border into France.

Re:I wrote a little poem... (2, Informative)

Kesch (943326) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709369)

Switzerland... Sweden... Same diff.

(I actually did look it up while composing, I just wasn't thinking.)

Re:I wrote a little poem... (2, Funny)

Ohreally_factor (593551) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709651)

Big diff. There is no Swiss Bikini Team. So I vote for Sweden, since their Bikini Team will help the hadron collider achieve greater uptime.

Alternative poem (3, Funny)

jd (1658) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709296)

Three rings for the synchotron-kings under the phi,

Seven for the cyclotrons in their shields of stone,

Nine for superconducting supercolliders doomed to die,

One for the CERN Lord in his quark Hadron

In the Alps of Switzerland where the gluons lie.

One Ring to hew them all, One Ring to grind them

One Ring to smash them all and in the black holes slime them

In the Alps of Switzerland where the gluons lie.

switzerland sweden (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15709586)

Don't ever apply for a job at Bomber Command....

Heavy or slow (3, Funny)

martinX (672498) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709001)

The highly-anticipated collider is set to start up in 2007, running at full speed by 2008."

It's going to take a year to get those particles up to full speed? Heavy.

A comment prediction, if I may. (3, Funny)

Jerk City Troll (661616) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709019)

Religious fundamentalists complaining that we do not need to spend billions of dollars figuring out what happened at the so-called “Big Bang” (God created the universe, afterall) and that those funds would be better spent on more ambitious projects [outsidethebeltway.com] that would help save America from immorality and godlessness.

Re:A comment prediction, if I may. (1)

arminw (717974) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709415)

.....figuring out what happened at the so-called "Big Bang" (God created the universe, afterall).....

God doesn't seem to mind scientists trying to figure out how He did it. If He did object to His atoms being smashed, He'd have made them unbreakable. As it is, it appears they are pretty tough little buggers. I know, since I helped build what is still the most powerful electron accelerator. This new collider will however still be far short of the energies God imparts to cosmic rays. The beam current of cosmic rays is unfortunately very low, so doing physics with them is difficult and that's why this collider will likely offer new insights of how this physical world works at the smallest dimensions. Some "events" in particle physics are extremely rare. Thus trillions and trillions of particles are needed to create some of these rare interactions. Getting like charged particles, such as protons and electrons into the intense beams and high energies needed is quite an expensive technological challenge.

Re:A comment prediction, if I may. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15709503)

You knock "religious fundamentalists". I think you are stupid to do so. What happens if 80% of the world is right, and that God does exist? Are you prepared to roast in hell?

If you believe in God, and God doesn't exist, then you've lost what? Next to nothing. A little time hanging out with nice people who have high morals? Hanging out with people who believe in a hard days' work, who are willing to feed themselves and raise their children with a good education and proper values?
 
Or you could go back to whining and complaining about the world, laying on the couch living off government welfare, eating cheesy poofs bought with government food stamps, drinking malt liquor and fortified wine, having abortions, and beating your 4th wife's stepchildren until they can't function in society, and then whine about the poor state of our education system, and then whine about the lack of taxes paid by the rich people.

Good luck in hell. Have fun with all those abortions.

Re:A comment prediction, if I may. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15709655)

Of those 80%, which ones believe in the correct god? What if there are multiple jealous gods and belief in the wrong one will yield a harsher punishment in the afterlife?

And trying to say that belief in god carries no negative consequences is flat out decietful. Religious zealotry brings about or at least gives political strength such atrocities as The Inquisition, caste systems, suicide bombers, holy wars, witch trials, ostracism and a whole host of other negative symptoms of irrational thought. Yes, it is possible for religion to support caring for the sick and downtrodden, feeding the poor, liberating the unjustly oppressed... but technology and free thought have done far more for those causes than religion ever has. The biggest common denominator I have seen with religions is they become a tool corrupted toward the will of the powerful in an attempt to further subjugate others, no matter how benevolent the underlying philosophy is.

And of the negative societal ills you moaned and whined about, the majority are exhibited by a largely religious fiscally impoverished class.

So, to flane back at you with the same sort of generalizations you used: go rot in hell (seeing as how you believe in it) you war-mongering hateful death penalty supporter. And when you follow the "Christian Right" believing that the death penalty is an appropriate punishment be sure to ignore the fact that your lord and savior suffered from the death penalty. WWJD indeed.

Re:A comment prediction, if I may. (3, Insightful)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709754)

If you believe in God, and God doesn't exist, then you've lost what?

Your dignity, and the sense of self required to make the most of the brief life our species enjoys.

A little time hanging out with nice people who have high morals?

I don't think "morals" means what you think it means. Your "morals" are simply your "values." Some people's value systems include the wonderfulness of molesting children, or seriously embracing the sacrificing of chickens to persuade your dead ancestors to alter the weather for your wedding reception. "High" morals doesn't mean anything. You have to identify which morals, and speak to the underlying system of thought - or in the case of religion, childish fantasy - upon which the world view in question, and thus the system of values (morals) that a person develops (or simply takes out of a story book).

people who believe in a hard days' work, who are willing to feed themselves and raise their children with a good education and proper values

The people I know that most fit this description are the least religious. Conversely, the more religious ones tend to keep talking in terms of their food being provided by the mystical personality they pray to before dinner, and indicate that when the going gets tough, it's not hard work or personal accountability, but Jesus(tm) that's actually responsible for everything that happens. What a cheap cop-out.

laying on the couch living off government welfare, eating cheesy poofs bought with government food stamps

Well, at least we can see that you don't belong to one of those charitable churches that does things like collect canned food for people, or shelter lazy homeless women who are running from their abusive husbands, etc. I mean, taking that sort of handout is a sure sign of moral weakness, so any church that would dole out such support is surely a major player in Satan's campaign to make people morally weak. No doubt.

Good luck in hell

Heh! Joke's on you. There isn't one, other than that which you make for yourself while you (meaning, your functioning brain, which pretty much requires you to be alive in order to do things like fire the synapses that allow you to actually be yourself) are actually alive. And since you're so scared of actually living your real life, in the face of a sure eventual death, you're focused on an imaginary afterlife that doesn't exist... and I'd call all of that wasted time and fretting to be a current, living hell that you personally occupy. And when you die, it will end - but you'll never get back the time you spent obsessing over such absurdities as original sin and whether you've properly entertained, through treacly hymns and magic hand-waving, a cruel and capricious god that allows priests to bugger altar boys and beautiful, innocent children to burn alive in crashed church vans or whither away from blood cancer no matter how much everyone prays they won't. Hell's right here, bub, if that's all you can think about... but those of us who don't attach a personality to the laws of physics get to produce our own meaning in life, and live our actual lives undistracted by fairy tales we should have grown out of when we were five years old.

Lords of the Ring? (1)

JerBear0 (456762) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709025)

Does the movie start out
"One Large Hadron Collider to rule them all, one Large Hadron Collider to find them, one Large Hadron Collider to bring the protons, and in the 14 teraelectron darkness bind them" ?

We wonders, precious, we wonders...

OK, jokes are fine, but . . . (3, Interesting)

treeves (963993) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709051)

does anyone have anything interesting to say about it?
I read on a theoretical physics blog (yes, there are such things) that there is a fear that this LHC might actually generate black holes.
link [columbia.edu]
Now that could make things very interesting, for a short time. . .not that I think it's likely to really happen.

Re:OK, jokes are fine, but . . . (1)

InsaneLampshade (890845) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709123)

I also read that in several places.

Do we actually know what would happen if small scale black holes were produced? Could they grow and swallow everything? Or would they only exist for the briefest of moments before disappearing?

Re:OK, jokes are fine, but . . . (5, Insightful)

Chrispy1000000 the 2 (624021) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709164)

If the LHC produces black holes, then we know that black holes are produced when cosmic rays hit the higher reaches of the atmosphere. Same sort of energy levels, just more controlable and repeatable down here. So, by theory of 'we're not gone yet' it figures that we will be pretty safe.

You'd need a nano-blackhole with the mass of everest or so for it not to decay in seconds, iirc. 2 protons don't cut it buddy.

Re:OK, jokes are fine, but . . . (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15709565)

Or so we hope.

Hawking radiation has never been observed (the process which you are betting litteraly Earth on). It stands to reason that the black holes have infinitesimal reaction cross-sections at high velocities (this is your cosmic ray argument), but all cosmic ray events would result in a blackhole with escape velocity and no ability to have an elastic collision to slow it down. But some of the particles from the ring will not have escape velocity and if there is no Hawking radiation, will simply hang around earth until there is no earth or they interact and make the whole place one big black hole.

I'd give better than million to one odds that we will be fine. But judgeing odds that far out gets hard, and the question I have is, why bet the whole place? Why not wait a few centuries and bet mars?

Re:OK, jokes are fine, but . . . (1)

DirePickle (796986) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709595)

IAAP (though just a graduate student), and it's my understanding that any black hole we could possibly create with LHC would have such a small amount of mass that it would evaporate in much, much, (much), less than a second-ie: before swallowing anything at all. And the Earth is not nearly dense enough to give it enough fuel to sustain. Even the core of the Earth isn't dense enough.

Oh... HADRON! (0, Redundant)

eno2001 (527078) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709054)

At first gland I thought it said hardon.

Beavis and Butthead say... (-1, Offtopic)

Powercntrl (458442) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709151)

Looks like the moderators have a hardon for modding down juvenile humor. So here's more:

"Heh heh heh, Butthead, aren't particles like those things in the bottom of the toaster?"
"No assmunch, those are dead bugs."
"Oh yeah, heh heh heh."

EEEEEEE!!! (0, Offtopic)

GET THE FACTS! (850779) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709082)

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Wouldn't it be interesting... (1, Interesting)

potuncle (583651) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709116)

if at the moment they crank this thing up to full speed that the universe is suddently obliterated? Who should then be blamed? The scientists that built this thing that makes Big Bang II or by a god with a really twisted sense of humor?

Umm... (0, Redundant)

danwesnor (896499) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709191)

"Large Hadron Collider"

I had to read that twice to figure out it had to do with physics, not physiques.

a little hasty (4, Interesting)

grahamrow (925526) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709260)

As an undergrad writing software to help align the muon spectrometer, I have been surprised to learn how behind the software is with the hardware. After attending a workshop at Harvard I was informed that segfaulting is normal behavior at the end of a reconstruction run? I will be surprised if everything is working as grandly as this video's creators would have us believe. Also take note that I am an undergrad writing software to align the muon spectrometer, they must be behind...

Re:a little hasty (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15709324)

no, thats typical scientific software.

as long as the math is correct, you can get around those segfaults. :P

Re:a little hasty (1)

pilot1 (610480) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709546)

what language do you write that in? C?
and out of curiousity, where do you go to school?

Re:a little hasty (3, Interesting)

grahamrow (925526) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709646)

I was handed some very Fortran-esque C code (run in several steps) and have been converting that into C++. There is an official framework called Athena, which is written in C++ as well... when I spoke about the drawbacks of the software I was speaking about just that. I have been developing outside of the framework because my work is more geared towards calibration and alignment, and I do not need to take advantage of some of the more finicky functionality supplied by the framework. For those interested... all the muon spectrometer data gets spit out as 32 bit words with various headers. There is lots of interesting computing to be done, since every track fit I am currently doing is "blind" and results in 2^6 * (a few hundred) regressions to find the best candidate (and then 10 billion tracks in a file). Of more interest is the network backbone extending from CERN (tier 0) to Brookhaven Labs (Tier 1) to a few Tier 2 facilities such as BU (where I am.) The sheer volume of data spit out of these detectors requires some very interesting techniques. Sorry that was rambling...

Interesting professional history... (3, Interesting)

PurifyYourMind (776223) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709264)

"...he has also been a physics teacher, television producer, science writer and goat herder."

Re:Interesting professional history... (1)

Sawopox (18730) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709589)

Well, if you can't get goats to move in an orderly fashion, how can you be trusted with high energy quantum particles?!
Seriously, let's use some common sense people...

2008 - Kiss Your Ass Goodbye (0, Redundant)

elgee (308600) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709294)

They will create a black hole that will destroy us all.

I am going to drink beer until then.

Can't play it (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15709301)

Don't use quicktime, it's just garbage. I won't download iTunes just to play movie trailers. Pick an unencumbered format please.

Itunes? (1)

toadlife (301863) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709520)

You don't have to install Itunes to get quicktime. ON the download page, click on the link that says "Quicktime Standalone Installer"

Lest we forget ... (4, Interesting)

dlasley (221447) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709347)

The barren tunnels outside Wakahachie, Texas house a testament to the U.S. attempt:

America's Discarded Superconducting Supercollider: [damninteresting.com]

Anyone know what the total cost will be? The U.S. version was supposed to top $US 8 billion, and I saw something about a U.S. government grant of $US 500 million in the late 90s. Curious to know if there were lessons learned and if the approach wound up making more fiscal sense.

&laz;

Its not the ring that are cool (1)

Lawrence_Bird (67278) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709364)

its the detectors. The size and complexity are amazing and if you have a chance to do a tour of RHIC, FNAL or any of the many others make sure you do.  I do have  photos but I'm not silly enough to post a link to them here ;)

Anri-Matter research (1)

mitherin (988545) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709367)

at last, they will start true research into anti-matter. ive been waiting and watching CERN for awhile now. just think of the possibilities if they can harness the power of antimatter. a somewhat safer alternaitve to nuclear, allthough if it gets out of hand it can be just as devastating...without the nuclerar fallout, though

Re:Anri-Matter research (1)

Gromius (677157) | more than 7 years ago | (#15709633)

Sadly CERN does not research anti-matter in the sense you are thinking of. Anti-matter is unlikely to ever be a source of power as you have to make it. At best you could use it as a battery but thats so far off right now its science fiction because its really really hard to make anti-matter. At CERN's current production rate (people have been making and studing anti-matter for a long time now), we'll have enough anti-hydrogen to fill a ballon in about 25,000,000 billion years [web.cern.ch]

Antimatter and its production mechanisms is fairly well understood with the exception of the matter-antimatter asymmetry we observe in the universe today. And incidently the LHC will be the first particle physics collider (I think, with the exception of heavy ion colliders) that will not use anti-matter particles in either of its two beams. Its a proton-proton collider unlike the Tevatron which is proton-antiproton. It gets round the seeming lack of anti-matter because protons actually contain anti-matter in the form of sea quarks and at high enough energyies you end up probing them rather than the valence quarks.
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