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Millions of King Crabs Turn Sea to Desert

samzenpus posted more than 7 years ago | from the pass-the-butter-and-lemon dept.

175

Reporter writes "Russian biologist, Yuri Illarionovich Orlov, succeeded where Stalin failed by implanting the red king crabs into the Barents Sea. Except now, 40 years later, he's getting worried. Why? The giant crabs are clawing their way along the bottom of the Barents Sea are spreading like wildfire along the northern coasts of Russia and Norway and will continue to spread as far as Gibraltar, the southern tip of the European continent. How come? One female crab can lay 500,000 eggs at a time, of which one or two percent will become crabs. The kicker is that the species is protected by diplomatic accords between Norway and Russia, so fishing quotas are in place. From the article: "The Kamchatka crab, also known as the Alaskan or red king crab, was introduced into the Barents by the Soviets in the 1960s — some 30 years after a first, failed attempt by Stalin — in a bid to bolster Russia's food supplies. ... The crabs weigh up to 12 kilograms (26 pounds) and measure up to two meters (6.5 feet) from pincher to pincher. While they remain far from Europe's tourist beaches for the time being, their impact on the environment is already a major cause for concern in the Arctic"."

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175 comments

I have the solution! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15711090)

And it involves lot of butter ...

Obligatory (5, Funny)

megaditto (982598) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711126)

In Soviet Russia, crabs get you.

Re:Obligatory (0, Offtopic)

Phroggy (441) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711237)

Wow, a Soviet Russia joke that was actually funny! I'm shocked.

Re:Obligatory (1)

gi.net (987908) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711249)

Crab people world domination !
"Crab people, crab people, taste like crab, talk like people." [wikipedia.org]

Re:Obligatory (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15711272)

What's the standard TWT (time without tubgr1) on Wiki links lately?

Re:Obligatory (1)

laejoh (648921) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711581)

In Soviet Russia, crabs butter you.

Also Obligatory (0, Offtopic)

catwh0re (540371) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711614)

I for one welcome our new crab overlords.

Re:Also Obligatory (0, Redundant)

tradiuz (926664) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711841)

Craaaaaaaaaaaaab Peeeeeople
Craaaaaaaaaaaaab Peeeeeople

Re:I have the solution! (3, Funny)

Chapter80 (926879) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711469)

Millions of humans turn desert into dessert...

Re:I have the solution! (5, Funny)

clickclickdrone (964164) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711569)

Nah, just tell the Japanese they're funny looking whales. (the crabs, not the Japanese).

Re:I have the solution! (0)

tonywong (96839) | more than 7 years ago | (#15712107)

Better article here:

Note the date on the article as well.

A good way to lose weight (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15711091)

I know that it is controversial with some dieticians, but I have had great success in keeping off the weight with the low-crab diet.

Re:A good way to lose weight (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711298)

Bah. I tried it for ages, didn't even touch anything that had ANY crab in it and... I gained weight!

That diet's a scam, I tell ya!

Lower the quotas (2, Informative)

Ekhymosis (949557) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711092)

Lower the quotas, bring in a Red Lobster chain in Russia and Norway and problem solved. I hope.

Re:Lower the quotas (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15711116)

And that is a mighty tasty solution! PETA might be annoyed though. But environmentalists will be happy. We're eating them for the good of the planet! Do your part!

Re:Lower the quotas (2, Insightful)

GundamFan (848341) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711487)

PETA is always annoyed, so that isn't a problem.

Re:Lower the quotas (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15711512)

Oh, you meant the *other* PETA. People for Eating Tasty Animals are a happier lot.

Re:Lower the quotas (2, Funny)

wertarbyte (811674) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711122)

Nuke them from orbit. It's the only way to be sure.

Re:Lower the quotas (3, Funny)

Ekhymosis (949557) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711134)

But what happens if the radiation forces a jump in evolution and they evolve into crabzilla or *shudder* politicians?

Re:Lower the quotas (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15711139)

Bad idea! Nuclear weapons sometimes have unforseen consequences [youtube.com] ! Especially when they are used on crabs and lizards.

Re:Lower the quotas (3, Funny)

Bogtha (906264) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711140)

Nah, they just need a fabulous type of gorilla that thrives on crab meat.

Re:Lower the quotas (2, Funny)

Aranth Brainfire (905606) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711234)

I'm completely in favor of aquatic gorillas.

Re:Lower the quotas (5, Funny)

Blob Pet (86206) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711877)

For those who don't get the reference:

Skinner: Well, I was wrong. The lizards are a godsend.

Lisa: But isn't that a bit short-sighted? What happens when we're overrun by lizards?

Skinner: No problem. We simply release wave after wave of Chinese needle snakes. They'll wipe out the lizards.

Lisa: But aren't the snakes even worse?

Skinner: Yes, but we're prepared for that. We've lined up a fabulous type of gorilla that thrives on snake meat.

Lisa: But then we're stuck with gorillas!

Skinner: No, that's the beautiful part. When wintertime rolls around, the gorillas simply freeze to death.

Re:Lower the quotas (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15711171)

Nuke them in garlic butter! You'll need a massive microwave emmiter in orbit, as well as enourmous quantities of butter, but it is doable...

Re:Lower the quotas (1, Funny)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711301)

Watch your B-Movies! It will immediately become obvious that nuking them would be a surefire way to breed the ultimate super-crab that eats us all!

No wait. For that to work, I think it would have to happen in the Japanese Sea...

Re:Lower the quotas (3, Funny)

It's Atomic (986455) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711478)

Would that violate UN sanctions against the use of Weapons for Mass Crustaceans (WMCs)?

Re:Lower the quotas (5, Funny)

dangermouse (2242) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711567)

bring in a Red Lobster chain in Russia and Norway

Jesus. We want to wipe out the crabs, not the Russians and Norwegians.

ok... (0, Offtopic)

slashdotnickname (882178) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711093)

and so began /.'s transition from "news for nerds" to "news for marine biologists"

Re:ok... (2, Funny)

OneManCongaLine (901777) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711158)

But Marine Biologists are Nerds too! ...or at the very least, I'm a Nerdy Marine Biologist you insensitive clod!

Re:ok... (1, Funny)

Alioth (221270) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711185)

What about nerdy marine biologists, you insensitive clod!

Just Like My Ex-Girlfriend (4, Funny)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711096)

Russia has a raging case of crabs!

Re:Just Like My Ex-Girlfriend (1)

grim4593 (947789) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711276)

Bet she would not like to hear that :P

Re:Just Like My Ex-Girlfriend (1)

RsG (809189) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711357)

And just like my ex, if you want to do any business in her, you need to pay the mob...

(Note: the above is purely in jest; everyone knows /.ers don't have girlfriends :-P)

How to solve the problem (0, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15711097)

Fortunately, this is an easy problem. You just have to flip the crabs over and then attack the weak spots for MASSIVE DAMAGE.

Crab problem? (4, Funny)

winmine (934311) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711099)

They should take a cue from Ancient Japan and flip them over and attack its weak point for MASSIVE DAMAGE. [youtube.com]

Re:Crab problem? (-1, Offtopic)

mgabrys_sf (951552) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711563)

I'll play GTA4 on the highest end system on the planet - in the meantime - enjoy your fanboy vids.

Re:Crab problem? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15711893)

lol Grand Theft Auto troll.

Check the rest of this numbskull's comments.

Re:Crab problem? (0, Offtopic)

mgabrys_sf (951552) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711974)

Replying to his video Mr. Troll. What's with the overuse of "laughing out loud" anyway - isn't this term getting beyond lame *chuckles* ((hugs)) >>>Go FistfuckYourGrandmother ? Love Orifice Licking do ya? Like Orgasmic Livers? Lost Orange Lips? LOL!

Check the fuckers link, dumbshit.
Or did your brain blow another fanboy artery over the Wii?

Lord of war (5, Funny)

mfaras (979322) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711103)

I guess the guy was selling them weapons to kill all the sealife!

Yuri Orlov is the guy from Lord Of War [imdb.com]

-- Sig: What sig? Oh, you mean this one? Nah...

Unlikely to reach Gibraltar (4, Informative)

Hrshgn (595514) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711129)

Research already showed that those guys are quite temperature-sensitive. It is rather unlikely that they will be able to leave the artic water and reach as far as Gibraltar.

Re:Unlikely to reach Gibraltar (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711305)

They wouldn't even manage to get past Danmark or Germany. As far as I know they also need fairly clean water...

Re:Unlikely to reach Gibraltar (5, Insightful)

arivanov (12034) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711366)

It will be the same old story as the Black Sea and the Rapana sea snail in the 1970-es. Or the Elodea water weed and the european riverways in the late 19th century. These were thought to be the doom of all sea and water life respectively. It did not happen.

Initially introduced species thrive and go through a growth explosion. After some time their growth drops and they stabilise at some level or even die out to a near extinction. There are multiple reasons for this. First of all nearly all introductions are done with a limited gene pool. If fresh blood is not introduced, problems from inbreeding will quickly erode the invaders advantage. For example the Rapana when introduced in the early 1970s in the Black Sea seamed invinsible. By mid 1990 it nearly disappeared.

Even if the invader "vitality" is not lowered by inbreeding, the ecosystem still balances itself. Diseases adapt to new targets. Predators adapt to new victims. Life goes on until a new equilibrium is reached. End of the day invaders usually wipe out only species with which they are in a direct competition and which occupy the same ecological niche. Off the top of my head I cannot think of anything which occupies the same niche in the Arctic. Further south they will have to fight it with the common lobster. This will definitely suffer.

Dunno, I have seen two such "doom" events in the Black Sea with the introduction of Rapana and Yellow Sea algae and they both came to pass. So will this if we do not poke it at the same time.

Re:Unlikely to reach Gibraltar (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15711622)

Dunno, I have seen two such "doom" events in the Black Sea with the introduction of Rapana and Yellow Sea algae and they both came to pass. So will this if we do not poke it at the same time.

FYI: "Came to pass" means "happened". From context, I think you might mean the opposite.

Re:Unlikely to reach Gibraltar (5, Interesting)

moosesocks (264553) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711832)

Tell that to Australia.

Australia is living proof that these doomsday population explosions CAN AND DO HAPPEN.

Just because it hasn't happened yet in the Black Sea doesn't mean it won't. Such logic is dangerous, and needs to be taken with a *huge* grain of salt.

It's better to err on the side of caution. If you do so, the worst thing that could happen is that the crabs get fished into extinction in the region, and we end up being no worse off than when we started.

Re:Unlikely to reach Gibraltar (3, Informative)

dalutong (260603) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711984)

I don't know of any water-based problems, but there have been plenty of stories of foreign species destroying local populations. The most recent story I've read is about poisonous toads in Western Australia that kills crocodiles (or is it alligators?) who eat them, and many other things. They now have so many they can't get rid of them.

Crabs == oil (5, Insightful)

SgtChaireBourne (457691) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711397)

Research already showed that those guys are quite temperature-sensitive. It is rather unlikely that they will be able to leave the artic water and reach as far as Gibraltar.

It doesn't matter so much. For various reasons, including elevated water temperatures, fish stocks are gone from the sea quite far north. The crabs have been encroaching on the regions containing the last commericial stocks. Even Bergen and Trondheim, which were once great fishing ports, are dead and tropic species are occasionally sighted in the waters.

With the quotas preventing the harvesting of the crabs, they are spreading more widely and more rapidly at an accelerating pace. Eventually the population will level off, but not before the last of the fish stock is ruined. The crabs pretty much wipe all organic matter from the bottom, especially tasty fish eggs. Without the eggs, there are no new fish. Without the fish, no fishing. Without the fishing, there will be no monied interests hindering oil drilling in the Barents.

The Norwegians are in a hard place because of the oil and their ties to the petro dollar. They also can't risk pissing of the last western military power, Russia, over the oil either. They will eventually lose that game, unless they deal with the crabs. Open season and no catch limits on the crabs would give several enviromental and economic boosts to the region. They're quite good eating and can be sold for food, decimating them would help the fishing, but the crabs are just as good as materials for biofuels.

Re:Crabs == oil (4, Funny)

gurutc (613652) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711438)

Aren't these the same crabs that make rich men out of entire crews who risk their lives working on fishing boats in Alaska?

At my local grocer, I can buy a pound of king crab when it's on sale for around $20. I figure a 55 gallon barrel of these guys would weigh close to 500 pounds. Barrel of Sweet Light Crude goes for about $70. Barrel of Sweet Light Crab goes for $10,000. Hmmm... Is there some secret crab cartel, the Alaskan subsidiary of DeBeers, or maybe the Illuminati, arti-fish-ally controlling the market of my favorite crustacean?

Re:Crabs == oil (1)

SgtChaireBourne (457691) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711769)

Yeah. They're expensive as all get out. So the 'economic benefits' from harvesting are a bit of an understatement. But the point is that you don't have to eat them, just get rid of them.

Re:Unlikely to reach Gibraltar (2, Interesting)

tancque (925227) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711456)

They reproduce quite fast, so they only need a short time to adapt to the higher temperature via natural selection. And as the sea-bed will go to waste, the presure to move south will increase, promoting adaptation. It will be intresting to follow the process.

Re:Unlikely to reach Gibraltar (1)

Don853 (978535) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711546)

If this were the case, we'd be finding the Alaskan variety in California. I could be wrong, but I don't think this is the case.

Re:Unlikely to reach Gibraltar (1)

tancque (925227) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711653)

Don't forget that this is an introduced species with as yet no predators and other natural systems which control a population. The Alaskan variety is part of an established ecosystem. The european crabs have as yet the seabed for them self. I can not think of a species that is big enough to pray on adults, but maybe on the eggs, if they are not carried around by mother (of father)

Re:Unlikely to reach Gibraltar (1)

miller701 (525024) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711739)

Well with global warming moving warmenr water north, that'll stop them in their tracks. :-)

Ban It (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15711136)

I suggest the international community places an immeidiate and permanent moratorium on hunting crabs 'unless for scientific purposes'...

Soon Japanese fishing vessels will be serving up crab to Tokoyo's hungry cats and dogs...

Somebody will need to let Green Peace in on the secret though...

The solution (5, Insightful)

ChowRiit (939581) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711142)

Despite the fact it is suggested in jest above, the best solution to most pest problems normally IS a culinary one. These crabs are definately edible, crab is considered somewhat of a delicacy to many (personally, I'm not a fan, but there are loads who love it), so all you need is to agree to remove quoats on this particular animal, or some similar arrangement, between Norway and Russia (the most challenging part) and start to push crab meat as a new big seller in the area.

New Scientist have an article on the subject of eating through invading species, although you'll need a subscription to read it: http://www.newscientist.com/channel/earth/mg187251 61.500.html [newscientist.com]

Re:The solution (3, Interesting)

hazem (472289) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711279)

I seem to recall an article on NPR once about the state of Louisianna issuing free cookbooks for cooking nutria (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nutria [wikipedia.org] ) because they were breeding so fast. They resemble a beaver with a rat's tail.

The best I can find about it is: http://www.nutria.com/site9.php [nutria.com]

Re:The solution (1)

mnmn (145599) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711659)

If there will be a species multiplying uncontrollably, I'd rather it be a good-tasting one.

We're all in agreement, then? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15712109)

We'll make it official: At least at the top of THIS particular food chain is a picture of a man wearing a bib, and in one hand he's holding a knife with a dab of butter?

Always a bad idea (2, Informative)

atomicstrawberry (955148) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711153)

This is just another entry in the long list of 'we probably shouldn't have introduced this species into this environment' stories. Kind of like introducing Rabbits into New Zealand, or Foxes into Australia, or a myriad of other examples. They end up thriving and taking over, to the detriment of the various species that were already there.

Re:Always a bad idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15711168)

Would european count as a species in this case?

Re:Always a bad idea (1)

servognome (738846) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711231)

Kind of like introducing Rabbits into New Zealand, or Foxes into Australia, or a myriad of other examples. They end up thriving and taking over, to the detriment of the various species that were already there.

Why is that necessarily bad?

Re:Always a bad idea (1)

Schraegstrichpunkt (931443) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711255)

It isn't necessarily bad, but it could result in a massive population reduction of other species...

... including Homo sapiens.

Maintaining what has been the status quo for thousands of years is seen as being much less likely to have that kind of effect.

Re:Always a bad idea (5, Informative)

nosfucious (157958) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711441)

The rabbits that were introduced in to Australia have been an environmental nightmare.

In certain conditions they populate so quickly you'll end up with a plague. The munch on all available grass and low level plants. Just leaving sand and soil behind. This valuable topsoil then gets blown away by wind or the occasional storm. Their burrows collapse and cause further run off problems after storms. Much of Australia doesn't have huge trees to bind the soil together. That's just one aspect.

It only took a few rabbits too. Released just near Melbourne. Now they're all over the place.

Mice (at times), Cane toads, Crown of Thorns starfish are all big problems. Foxes are a concern, but not on the same scale, or is that Tassie only? Domestic and stray cats are just as bit a problem in outer suburban/semi-rural areas, going after the native birds and small animals.

All systems will find an equilibrium. Trouble is, that (nearly) isolated systems such as Australia don't have the natrual competitors for introduced species. They would form over time, just not in the short term that we live in and see. Foxes were introduced to try and get the rabbits, Cane Toads to get the Prickly Pear. They just caused thier own problems.

Re:Always a bad idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15711462)

The rabbits that were introduced in to Australia have been an environmental nightmare.

But soooooo cute!

Prevent Hare Loss - Adopt a rabbit!

Re:Always a bad idea (1)

jackb_guppy (204733) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711608)

I know an old woman who swallowed a...
    fly...
    spider...
    mouse...
    cat...
    dog...
    cow...
    horse...
She died of course.

Re:Always a bad idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15711784)

Why don't you teach the plague of stray cats to eat the plague of stray rabbits? Silly POHMs.

Silly rabbit (2, Funny)

krell (896769) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711855)

Don't knock the Australian rabbit plague. Got rid of all that damned Trix cereal, yes it did.

Re:Always a bad idea (2, Interesting)

Like2Byte (542992) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711867)

Let's talk about the solution the Aussies took to rid themselves of the rabbits - Biological Warfare.

The decision to use rodent specific biological warfare (rabbit specific viruses and diseases) is debatable. However, one thing is certain - the rabbits and the viruses/diseases were all "contained" within the continent of Australia.

Using biological warfare against these crabs would be a very bad idea. Oceanic currents would easily carry any bacteria/virus/agent all over the oceans of the world. Non-invasive, non-targetted species would be affected and potentially decimated by, once again, 'man playing God.'

I've got to agree with the first significant post on this thread: http://science.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=191060 &cid=15711090 [slashdot.org] .

If countries were to lift quotas in certain regions for a while we could fish them to extinction in areas the crabs don't belong. Then there's the bonus of eating all that delicious crab meat!

Desert? (3, Insightful)

Threni (635302) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711178)

Only according to someone who catches fish, not someone with any kind of credibility. I think you need some double-quotes in there:

Millions of King Crabs "Turn Sea to Desert"

How do they catch them then? (1)

Pzychotix (949807) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711209)

FTFA:

"We can't use our nets or our deep lines anymore because the crabs claw them and ruin them," complains Arnulf Bertheussen, a fisherman in the Norwegian Arctic village of Honningsvaag.
Seems like a not-so-great situation with a not-so-easy answer now. Aren't nets/deep lines the main ways to catch crabs en masse? Sadly, I fear no answer will come to us, since we're nerds, not fishermen (unless fishermen have become the new nerds of the century).

Re:How do they catch them then? (2, Informative)

AuMatar (183847) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711261)

True nerds watch the Discovery channel. They did a whole thing on Alaskan crab fisherman the past 2 years. YOu catch crabs in metal pots.

Re:How do they catch them then? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15711275)

You catch crabs in crab traps. You cook them in metal pots.

Re:How do they catch them then? (2, Informative)

trewornan (608722) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711481)

Crab traps are known as "pots" - it's a technical term, and yes, mostly they're made of metal.

Re:How do they catch them then? (1)

ceejayoz (567949) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711719)

I'm guessing metal pots are prohibitively costly when the crabs are two meters wide...

Re:How do they catch them then? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15711445)

"Sadly, I fear no answer will come to us, since we're nerds, not fishermen "

What, were we not only recently having a discussion on bacteria-grown carbon nanotubes?

Re:How do they catch them then? (0, Offtopic)

93,000 (150453) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711915)

After some research I have found that you catch crabs in bed. So you are correct -- as nerds we had no way of knowing this.

Why Must I Be A Crustacean In Love (1, Funny)

glowworm (880177) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711259)

"How will I ever get rid of my male jelly now?"

Well, someone had to say it!

Re:Why Must I Be A Crustacean In Love (1)

grim4593 (947789) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711286)

Nice Sig, get laid much?

Mmm... (1)

Catastrophator (919528) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711307)

A sea full of crab dessert... *drool*

Mod Parent Up (1)

gurutc (613652) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711468)

Very nearly as funny as Monty Python's 'killer joke.'

HUGE! (4, Funny)

famebait (450028) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711308)

The crabs weigh up to 12 kilograms (26 pounds) and measure up to two meters (6.5 feet) from pincher to pincher.

-and this increases every time the story is told.

Re:HUGE! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15711405)

Yeah, but that's just the crab's insecurity at work. They have size issues :-P

Error in the original post (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15711428)

Corrected: Millions of king crabs turn sea to dessert

It's Iron Chef time (3, Funny)

Vengeance (46019) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711443)

Today's secret ingredient is: *dramatic pause* *dramatic pose* CRAB INFESTATION!

Deja Vu (1)

SchwarzeReiter (894411) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711491)

This reminds me to the story in the Frank Shatzing's book, The Swarm. Nice book actually, its like Dan Brown, but at least Frank has some idea about technology.

May I be the first... (0, Redundant)

jbarr (2233) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711516)

...to welcome our new crab overlords!

Deadliest Catch (2, Informative)

1WingedAngel (575467) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711539)

The Discovery Channel had a wonderful show on last season about these very crabs called The Deadliest Catch [discovery.com] . It was definitely worth watching.

Re:Deadliest Catch (2, Informative)

dafz1 (604262) | more than 7 years ago | (#15712069)

I'm glad someone mentioned Deadliest Catch! I love that show!

As a country seemingly lacking in AVAILABLE natural resource(oil in Siberia under miles of permafrost in inhospitable conditions isn't available), this could be a boon for the Russian economy. Also, with the introduction of crab quotas, there are a lot of out of work crab boat captains and crew in Alaska. Since they run so close to the Pacific side of Russia, I think most of them would be ok with "fishing" the Barents Sea.

The downside is that this would lead to a price war, if the Russian king crab were put on the global market, which would further negatively affect the Alaskan crab fleet.

500,000 eggs at a time (2, Funny)

corngrower (738661) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711542)

One female crab can lay 500,000 eggs at a time, of which one or two percent will become crabs.

So what do the other 98% of the eggs become, if not crabs?

Re:500,000 eggs at a time (1)

gellenburg (61212) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711562)

Breakfast.

Re:500,000 eggs at a time (2, Funny)

clickclickdrone (964164) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711600)

So what do the other 98% of the eggs become, if not crabs?

It's not often you see these two words together but 'scary omlette'.

Re:500,000 eggs at a time (1)

coffeechica (948145) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711617)

Those 2% of surviving crabs need to eat something. And when you're stranded in a desert, eventually the point comes where your fellow crabs are starting to look rather yummy.

Re:500,000 eggs at a time (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15711667)

Presumably they become lunch.

In Russia? (1)

patio11 (857072) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711672)

Caviar!

Re:500,000 eggs at a time (2, Informative)

DaveV1.0 (203135) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711705)

A snack for other sea critters.

Just like SPAM ! (1)

dvaldenaire (52153) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711616)

One female crab can lay 500,000 eggs at a time, of which one or two percent will become crabs..

I read it many times in "why you should spam to develop your business"-style spam : "send 500,000 mails, if only one percent buy, you're rich."

So it worked for crabs !

So.. what we need.... (1)

Churla (936633) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711757)

Is someone armed with lemons and guns that shoot melted butter...

I have the man for the job! [internationalhero.co.uk]

Somebody will... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15711816)

Somebody will figure out a way to blame GW for this. Just watch.

Another nail in the PS3 coffin. (0, Offtopic)

Vo0k (760020) | more than 7 years ago | (#15711942)

Who would pay $800 to fight a giant enemy crab on screen, if you can do it probably cheaper IRL?

I wonder where their weak spot is.

Imitation fishmeat (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15711957)

So with all these extra crabs we can now have imitation fish meat made with real crab.
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