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Indian Scientists Develop Vaccine for Bird Flu

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the smart-folks dept.

145

William Robinson writes "Indian Scientists have succeeded in developing a vaccine against the bird flu disease that has affected poultry business in many parts of the world. This was formally announced, and ICAR Director-General Mangala Rai described this as a big step forward in tackling the highly pathogenic avian influenza, commonly called the bird flu. Indonesia, who has recently reported their 42nd victim of bird flu, will now have one less thing to worry about."

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145 comments

Excellent! (4, Funny)

rpjs (126615) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730389)

No need to worry about bird flu any more, just the incipient WWIII brewing in the Middle East...

Re:Excellent! (2, Funny)

tgd (2822) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730466)

Thankfully Isrealis, Palestinians, and Lebanese don't tend to fly migratory patterns that cross New Hampshire.

Mass pandemic scares me more than $100 oil, even with a 10mpg car and a 15mpg truck.

Barely, though. I had to fill the car up this morning!

Re:Excellent! (1)

clickclickdrone (964164) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730748)

>a 10mpg car and a 15mpg truck.
What kind of car does that sort of mileage? i thought they pretty much all managed 30-50mpg these days? Heck, even my crummy Ford Focus does about 45mpg on a long run.

Re:Excellent! (1)

drDugan (219551) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731035)

I was shocked when I looked for my last car about 6 months ago. most sedans I looked at leasing got around 20-24 MPG highway and 18-22 city.

there seemed to be huge variation - some were mid 30- and higher, but it was not the rule, the exception. -- I"m not an expert, and I wan't making the choice based on milage. After looking, I was surprised at how low the numbers were.

I wish I had my motorcycle still, where 50+ was the norm, but people would need to accept riding gear in professional sales meetings, or I'll be changing clothes 4 times a day.

Re:Excellent! (1)

StarvingSE (875139) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731037)

I drive a focus, and only avg about 30mpg, mostly highway. How the hell do you get 45mpg???????? Please let us in on the secret!!! (yes, gas is $3.15 around here!!!)

Re:Excellent! (1)

plague3106 (71849) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731444)

Actually for trucks and SUVs, that's pretty standard MPG ratings. Their heavier, thus require more power (gas) to move them.

Re:Excellent! (1)

TenLow (812875) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731594)

Depends on what and how you drive. A 60's muscle car with a 400ci engine wont get poo for mileage, and any car will have bad mileage if you floor it all the time.

Re:Excellent! (1)

tgd (2822) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731673)

First generation Porsche 911 with a race configuration engine running a little on the rich side and a power curve that necessitates keeping it above 4500rpm. 10mpg is optimistic... thats when I'm just putzing around.

Cost me $10 to drive to work today.

And was SO worth it.

Re:Excellent! (0, Offtopic)

AviLazar (741826) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730772)

Until you can 100% prove that some country, other then Israel (which is not confirmed but many experts assume they do), can launch an intercontinental ballistic nuclear strike there is no reason to be an alarmist. None of the countries, not even Israel, in the Middle east can start WWIII without the use of nuclear bombs. Thankfully, very few countries have thsi capability. On a conventional warfare (non-nuclear) it requires sizeable infrastructure in a military - and very few militaries have this infrastructure.
BTW, I am not counting India/Pakistan in middle east group.

Re:Excellent! (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15730807)

Read history - WWI was started by an assasination and followed up by some pretty poor diplomacy.

Remember - George Bush is not exactly a great diplomat.

Re:Excellent! (1)

plague3106 (71849) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731476)

Sorry, this is just plain incorrect. You don't need to have nukes to start WW3. WW1 was started because of all the alliances dragged nations in that weren't directly involved. Given that Russia, the US and other countries back different sides, it seems to be a pretty similar situtation. If Russia starts helping Lebanon, do you think the US would sit back and let Israel be overrun?

Re:Excellent! (1)

AviLazar (741826) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731694)

When you ignore this part, yea my statment is incorrect, but you shouldn't ignore part of my statement: "None of the countries, not even Israel, in the Middle east can start WWIII without the use of nuclear bombs. Thankfully, very few countries have thsi capability"

I do not think Russia will help Lebanon in a military fashion (they might medically), and thus the US will not get involved in a military fashion. Those that have the power to wage world war do not want world war and know what that means. It is what kept the cold war from spiraling to WW3. Luckily, the extremists who are willing to wage this war do not have the ability to do so.

Re:Excellent! (2, Informative)

utnapistim (931738) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730815)

No need to worry about bird flu any more, just the incipient WWIII brewing in the Middle East...

Ummm ... no, not really, at least not for Israel. I've been in Tel Aviv for two months now, and it's - for lack of a better term - "business as usual".

If it was by what you get on CNN, I'd have expected to crawl under debris by now; In truth, life goes on unaffected in 90% of the country, but that's nothing sensational, so it won't probably appear on the news.

Re:Excellent! (2, Insightful)

Instine (963303) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730852)

Mod up informative /\

The worry comes from how the rest of the world reacts to this (and of course the worry in the effected area is very real and worth noting!). If Syria, and Iran, and Afghanistan can coerce Pakistan (or some other sizable ally) then World War is not far away. This was unlikely before. But after questionable actsperformedin the area, committed by Israeli allies, this is more likely. If Pakistan were to 'join in' then it means two opposing aggressors have Nuclear 'deterrents'.

As for Bird flu. Great news!

Re:Excellent! (2)

aplusjimages (939458) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730916)

Honestly though, the news only reports on stuff they know viewers will watch. Would you watch news about zero attacks in some part of Tel Aviv? Here in Florida millions of people don't get attacked by aligators, so should the news report about those people instead of the people who did get attacked? That's why I can't stand watching the news, it just dumps all this depressing stuff in your lap and at the end they bid you good night. ps - thumbs up on the bird flu vacine

Re:Excellent! (1, Flamebait)

Scarblac (122480) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731182)

But how's life in Beirut? Business as usual too?

Re:Excellent! (4, Informative)

Erwos (553607) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731313)

At the risk of igniting a real flame war, life in Beirut is never really business as usual, because the central government there doesn't have real power over their entire country. They've been occupied by the Israelis and the Syrians over the years, and even once the Syrians and Israelis were gone, they couldn't figure out how to get Hezbollah under control. Lebanon is a country I generally sympathize with - they've gotten screwed by a number of parties in the region and outside of it, and once they get their domestic situation under control, they'll probably be a stabilizing influence in the region.

I do agree with your implication towards the poster who somewhat blithely replied that Tel Aviv was doing OK. For one thing, a good bit of northern Israel isn't doing so hot (witness the shelling of Haifa), and it's a bit crass of him to ignore his own countrymen. Second, the folks in Beirut generally don't want this conflict - they were dragged into it by Hezbollah in the south. Maybe once the Israelis decimate Hezbollah, they can take some real control of their country. Well, here's hoping...

Anyways, back on topic: the Middle East does have substantial interests in poultry, since religious Muslims and Jews don't eat pork. This kind of a vaccine is quite helpful in protecting their flocks and themselves - and that's one less thing they all have to worry about in these troubled times.

-Erwos

Re:Excellent! (1, Insightful)

hotsauce (514237) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731586)

Maybe once the Israelis decimate Hezbollah, they can take some real control of their country.

Or maybe Hezbollah really does represent the country, at least the south? Kinda like Hamas really does represent Palestine? The inconvenient truth may be that you may not actually like your neighbor's governments, but you still have to learn to get along. Decimating them doesn't change how your neighbors feel. In any case, Israel hasn't been able to decimate them in almost 20 years despite their best efforts, what makes you think they can now?

...and it's a bit crass of him to ignore his own countrymen.

I think it's a bit crass to let lines on a map change your empathy for another human being.

Re:Excellent! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15731365)

Its not business as usual here in Haifa. (About an hours drive North of Tel-Aviv). Its a little scary. You have less than a minute (usually about 10 secs) after the siren goes off before you hear the explosion (courtesy of Hezbollah). They arent huge, and come sporadically, but if its not your lucky day, then its see you later, mate.

Re:Excellent! (2, Informative)

mdozturk (973065) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731420)

The cover of Sunday's New York Times had a picture of 16 dead Lebanese, which were mostly children. Business as usual?

Re:Excellent! (0, Redundant)

sinai (989310) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731556)

Business as usual, except now instead of my alarm clock waking me up in the morning, the distant sounds of shelling and gunfire demand, "Rise and Shine!" (Though here in Rafah it surely can't be as loud as it is in TA or Haifa.)

Hardly a solution, and better sources for flu news (1)

sampas (256178) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731192)

There is no way the U.S. health system can handle a pandemic, and distributing vaccine to a large portion of the population is years away. Most hospital emergecy rooms can barely cope with a busy Saturday night.

If you want to track the march of the Avian flu on Google Earth, or just don't want your bird-flu news dumbed down to the level that journalists can understand, Declan Butler [declanbutler.info], a reporter for Nature magazine, has an excellent blog on the subject.

Re:Hardly a solution, and better sources for flu n (1)

TheShadowzero (884085) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731239)

Amen to that, brother. A year or so ago during the big flu vaccine shortage, it was impossible to get a vaccine anywhere in my area for about a month or so. Even now, flu shots are scarce during flu season.

If confirmed ... (0, Flamebait)

Petrushka (815171) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730392)

... I hope this will give at least some pause to all the tired old jokes about outsourcing. For supposedly open-minded people there're way too many racist jokes around here.

Re:If confirmed ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15730457)

Indeed. And considering the state of science education and research in the US, it won't be long until most medical breakthroughs will be coming from Asia and Europe.

In the meantime, the workers in the US who don't have a Government, Medical, Law, or CEO position can save up their Walmart pay and maybe get some sort of charity or "alternative medicine" for their ills.

Am I blaming India or Asia? Nope. Just the direction I see (the) US taking and our leadership's desire to cater towards the folks who want to keep us ignorant. I may have to emigrate to Canada myself. Fortunately, I love the snow! Hated Toronto in February, though!!!

Re:If confirmed ... (1, Funny)

utopianfiat (774016) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731196)

On another note, the vaccine is a dramatic change from the prior treatment for bird flu in india, which was "Just reformat"

Birds or Humans ? (2, Interesting)

JohnHegarty (453016) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730394)

As the comment on the pages says... is this for the birds or humans ?

Re:Birds or Humans ? (3, Informative)

fletchermemorial (983057) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730839)

It's for humans. The Avian flu is not a serious things for birds. Think of it this way, a cold is shitty, granted, but it won't destroy your life. In very rare cases will a cold last longer than a week and a half, and even rarer for it to have a permanent effect. But if...a dog, somehow someway contracted a common cold, and was completely unprepared to accept the virus and combat it, the dog would die without much of a fight. Monkeys live with AIDS like it's nothing, but it destroys us. The Avian flu is a bird disease, and when cross-genus diseases spread, there's (as far as we know) no way to stop almost certain death. Yay for vaccines!

Re:Birds or Humans ? (1)

fmoliveira (979051) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730930)

Bird flu IS serious for birds. It kills them, and do it fast.

Re:Birds or Humans ? (1)

fletchermemorial (983057) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730993)

Similarly, the human Flu can kill humans. It's possible, even likely, but in juxtaposition with the Avian flu's effect on humans, it looks almost insignificant. Though, you're right..I did a little more looking after i posted and i learned that my inferred comparison of the avian flue being relatively harmless was wrong, perhaps i shouldn't have compared it to the common cold, rather Pneumonia might be a better choice. Either way, thank you for the clarification

Re:Birds or Humans ? (1)

drDugan (219551) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731081)

wait... I think this is a bit different

by itself, a virus crossing species does not necessarily imply increased morbidity in the new species. In fact, typically, viruses inside other species have little or no effect at all. They usually don't function. Only in rare cases when a cross species jump occurs (typically through mutations/and viral DNA exchange with native viruses), then it MIGHT be dangerous.

Note that in the case of bird flu, the reason people die is from the extreme overreaction by the immune system to the infection. You essentially end up drowning in your own fluids, caused by the immune system reaction. Tamiflu basically down-regulates the a person's immune response.

IANA-virologist, nor am I an expert in epidemiology - but this is how I understand it.

I share your excitement... antiseptics and vaccines are two human achievements that we can all be proud of. most of the rest of what we spend our energy on just keeps us all busy with "busi-ness".

Re:Birds or Humans ? (1)

slashrogue (775436) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731173)

From a Wikipedia article on the subject (and I won't go into any debate on credibility of that here):

So far as we know the most common result of this is an illness so minor as to be not worth noticing (and thus little studied). But with the domestication of chickens and turkeys, we have created species subtypes (domesticated poultry) that can catch an avian flu virus adapted to waterfowl and have it rapidly mutate into a form that kills in days over 90% of an entire flock and spread to other flocks and kill 90% of them and can only be stopped by killing every domestic bird in the area.

Re:Birds or Humans ? (1)

fletchermemorial (983057) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731328)

A list of things i've learned since posting my comment:
  • Bird flu is serious for birds
  • Bird flu is not that serious for some birds
  • Bird flu is serious for humans
  • Bird flu doesn't actually kill humans, it's humans that kill themselves with their own immune system
  • Bird flu doesn't affect humans that seriously


But the most amazing revelation of all
  • Nobody really knows that much about the avian flu, least of all people me.

All i can tell you for sure is that I don't have it, I don't know anyone that has it, I don't know anyone that knows anyone that has it (or has had it at all for that matter). So like a ostritch, since i don't see it, it obviously can't see me! :-P

No, it is for birds... (2, Informative)

denjin (115496) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731397)

The article above is missing the specifics, so try this one:
http://www.mumbaimirror.com/nmirror/mmpaper.asp?se ctid=4&articleid=7162006205183757162006204743859 [mumbaimirror.com]

"The vaccine will be injected into birds to prevent them from getting infected, he said.
A government statement said it was a homologous vaccine derived from the H5N1 strain."

The point of it is to stop it in birds, so it can't get on to humans I imagine.

Re:No, it is for birds... (1)

fletchermemorial (983057) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731488)

Ah, very good! Thanks for clearing up the misconception! I suppose technically, it's for humans, because as the imperial human race, we couldn't care less about chickens, we'll move on to like other meats. It just gets put into the chickens, so that we don't have to deal with medical bills, it turns out vets are cheaper to employ than medical doctors :-P

Gotta love the selfishness, and thanks again for the clarification

Re:Birds or Humans ? (1)

0111 1110 (518466) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731613)

But if...a dog, somehow someway contracted a common cold, and was completely unprepared to accept the virus and combat it, the dog would die without much of a fight.
There is no evidence for that. Quite the contrary. A pathogen needs to be sufficiently well adapted to its host to cause any real symptoms. For instance a virus that is well adapted to attack a rose or a tobacco leaf is not likely to do any damage to a human. Also, (to use a famous example) consider how deadly Ebola Reston is to monkeys and how benign it is in humans. A virus that is versatile enough to jump species is the exception, not the rule. Even in that case, your characterization is way exaggerated. A dog's immune system would in most cases be more than sufficient to fight off the common cold. Do a little studying of how the immune system works, and you will quickly see why. It is quite able to handle pathogens it has never encountered before. That is mostly the point. The immune system is well suited for precisely that.

Re:Birds or Humans ? (1)

fletchermemorial (983057) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731650)

Yeah, i clarified my exaggerations as exactly that, exaggerations. :-P get with the program! haha, i realized my error in making the umbrella statements and the likes. Thanks! -Avi

Re:Birds or Humans ? (1)

kasgoku (988652) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731788)

As far as i know there has not been a single case of bird flu in humans in india. However, mass chaos resulted when bird flu hit the poultry industry. This research might've resulted from that. So, i am not sure if they have tested it on humans... since there haven't been any cases.

US needs to intensify the outsourcing of the MEDICAL INDUSTRY AS WELL!!!

Re:Birds or Humans ? (1)

dc29A (636871) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730959)

It's for humans.

I am not a biologist, far from it but how can they develop a vaccine for a disease that hasn't appeared yet? I mean this bird flu is supposed to mutate into a dangerous virus that could kill a lot of humans but scientists don't know the final version of the virus yet they developped a vaccine for it?

Re:Birds or Humans ? (1)

drDugan (219551) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731120)

They can't, for sure.

We are in an "arms race" between the viruses and the vaccines. THe other side (the viruses) can always recombine and mutate around the current vaccine. The virus we have not seen yet is bird flu in humans with high transmissibility. Until we see this in the wild, we can't possibly know (for sure) if a vaccine would work against it.

The current process for annual flu vaccines are derived from a global search for current viruses, a bunch of annalysis, and a selction of strains which we THINK will be the flu that takes hold during the flu season. Mostly, those guesses are very good, and the flu vaccine covers a large number of different strains.

They only way to really solve this issue would be to create a general vaccine system against all flu-type viruses, and we have no where near the capability to do that now.

I know the answer is allegedly "humans" ... (1)

jabberwock (10206) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731399)

... but I wanted to add, cynically perhaps:

If it's for humans, it will be enormously expensive, and none of the people who actually need it will be able to afford it. Meanwhile, the maker of the vaccine will try to get the U.S. government to buy 300 million doses at retail price.

If it's for animals, it'll be cheap enough to lace the entire food chain with it, and we'll only find out it has horrific side effects five years from now. ;-)

One less thing to worry about; True (3, Insightful)

erroneus (253617) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730395)

Now they just have to worry about patents and the costs of the vaccine and deployment. After all, now that there is a vaccine, any capitalist-minded people would think, "Hey! Let their chickens die out! We'll have a monopoly on chickens!"

Are we to believe that they'll just give it out to the world?

Re:One less thing to worry about; True (1)

GundamFan (848341) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730496)

India is trying really hard to catch up to the US but I don't think they are that jaded and incompasonate yet. (kidding :))

Re:One less thing to worry about; True (3, Funny)

myth24601 (893486) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730639)

"Are we to believe that they'll just give it out to the world?"

The Indians are usually quite willing to give away something that would help the animals because it would put them in better standing with their spirit guides. I wonder which tribe developed this? Was it Cherokee or Apache? I bet it was the Shawnee.

Re:One less thing to worry about; True (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15730734)

Does India really give a rat's ass about American patents?

Are we to believe that they'll just give it out to the world?

No, they will sell it to the world. If some silly American patent is violated, well too bad for the Americans. If the bird flu ever hits the US, will the Americans deal with it efficiently or will they get caught up in who owns that patent (read: who gets a cut of the profits)?

Re:One less thing to worry about; True (1)

Nexus7 (2919) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730934)

You wrote:
> Does India really give a rat's ass about American patents?
> o, they will sell it to the world. If some silly American patent is violated, well too bad for the Americans.

This is incorrect. Indian Patent Law is in conformance with the WTO.

However, a lot of people think this isn't a good thing.

Re:One less thing to worry about; True (1)

erroneus (253617) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730996)

If the way things are presently any indication of the way people are at present, then I would say yes. The people who hold patents would be much more concerned over their profits and IP rights over the lives of people and chickens. Yes, I really and truly believe that. Examples of this include, but are not limited to, AIDS treatments for this and other countries. People die on a regular basis because they cannot afford to live.

One thing about Pharmaceutical Industry (1)

Coleon (946269) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731820)

We could talk pages and pages about pharmaceutical industry, and i think no matter where you are, you need money to continue researching and of course a LITTLE incentive. But i need to mention one particular case. Two years ago, i read an article about the HPV (Human Papiloma Virus) and the vaccine against Cervix Cancer. It said the vaccine was already aproved and tested, but the farmaceutic industry didnt wanted to release ir because the treatment for cervix cancer was way higher than the vaccine. So it wasnt business. TWO YEARS and i dont know how many women dead after, they have just announced that a vaccine has been found. So we can see that farmaceutics dont exist with the motivation of saving people... or at least is not the primary.

Did you even read the article? (4, Informative)

Rogerborg (306625) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730398)

There's already a vaccine for H5N1; all this article is saying is that now an Indian lab has produced one as well, so they don't have to import it.

Great editing, as usual.

Also, India != Indonesia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15730404)

So, the fact India has this does nothing to directly help Indonesia.

Re:Also, India != Indonesia (1)

GundamFan (848341) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730545)

That's a good point, but I would have to assume given the fact that this is for innoculating birds that India would share in the intrest of not seeing a human for of the virus develope in another country and spread to India's population or at the very least damage the global economy that India depends on right now.

Re:Did you even read the article? (2, Interesting)

minus_273 (174041) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730487)

i wonder if this is an announcemnet of a generic copy. Indians usually leave the Rnd to other companies then use that research to make generic copies of drugs. That way they do not need to invest money in developing the drug, just copying it. This allows them to charge much less for the drug and still make money because there were almost no costs in developing it. Sucks for the company that did the Rnd though.

Re:Did you even read the article? (4, Insightful)

Halo1 (136547) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730565)

From the article:

Rai informed the meeting that a comprehensive draft report had been submitted to an ICAR committee to develop guidelines for intellectual property management and commercialisation of technologies in the national agricultural system under the ICAR.

Your comment reminds me of the large US hi-tech companies accusing the Chinese of "stealing their IP" [ffii.org] and then getting caught with their pants down when it turns out they were not delivering the "IP" they promised in their contracts.

The "all the Chinese, Indians and other Asians can do is copy our great Western inventions" story is getting old very quickly, and more untrue every day. It would surprise me if they don't soon overtake the Western companies concerning the amount of awarded patents and things like that.

Re:Did you even read the article? (1)

FooAtWFU (699187) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730799)

You should take a look at IBM's "globally integrated enterprise" [ft.com] ideas.

Big Blue's chairman and chief executive writes in today's Financial Times that traditional multinational companies need to abandon their almost colonial approach to operations outside their home country. He cites as examples of this old-style method the way GM, Ford and his own company built factories in Europe and Asia but kept all the research and development in the US.

Instead, he argues they need to move towards full global integration of their operations...

Re:Did you even read the article? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15731242)

General Motors and Ford have more R&D facilities in Europe than they have in the US. That's probably the reason they keep selling fuel-thirsty downsized 1950's trucks in the US while in Europe they can more or less compete with other car manufacturers.

Re:Did you even read the article? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15730629)

Sucks for the company that did the Rnd though.

But then everyone can just copy shared research. After all, it is called RE-search, right? That means it was already found once, probably on Google. We just have to find it again with a better search. And maybe not lose it again. That would be better, right?

And maybe with things like "sampling" we can even combine the results of these searches to come up with something even better. That would eliminate all need for re-searching for lost stuff.

Re:Did you even read the article? (1)

vally_manea (911530) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730600)

No, actually at the moment there is no vacine for the H5N1 virus. They used in some cases Tamiflu but later testing showed it's useless.

Re:Did you even read the article? (1)

Jugalator (259273) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730685)

They used in some cases Tamiflu but later testing showed it's useless.

... due to resistant strains in H5N1 that were discovered.

Which makes me wonder what's saying it won't happen again with this vaccine.

Let's hope it won't though...

Re:Did you even read the article? (1)

vally_manea (911530) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730779)

From what I have read it has never been usefull [wikipedia.org] against avian flu.

On a side note, living in a affected country(Romania, lots of avian cases) this whole thing seems a little over-blown.

Re:Did you even read the article? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15730989)

Well, I guess that puts to rest the meme that "if there were no patents, we wouldn't have any cures", eh?

But it sounds as if it's no big deal :( (3, Informative)

CurtMonash (986884) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730405)

It is described as an indigineous replacement for something they can already import. It sounds as if it's just for birds.

And you hardly can inoculate all the poultry in a country. So the significance of this seems pretty limited.

Dang. I had my hopes way up from reading the headline.

mass poultry innoculations (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15730715)

There are several ways to innoculate birds, one of them is by using aerosols inside the chicken containment house. You can do a large number quickly that way. I don't know if this new med can be used that way, but some can.

vaccinces irrelevant to good health (1)

nido (102070) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731685)

And you hardly can inoculate all the poultry in a country. So the significance of this seems pretty limited.

Especially so, considering that the largest outbreaks of bird flu have been in countries with the most environmental polution (legacy agent orange contamination in Vietnam + chickens == weakened immune system especially susceptible to influenza).

See Dr. Sherri Tenpenny's FOWL! Bird Flu: It's Not What You Think [amazon.com]

or this interview [healthliesexposed.com].

"FOWL!" is an investigative report into how dioxins, POPs and other environment chemicals are contributing to illness in migratory birds, chickens and humans by making them more susceptible to the effects of influenza viruses.

The avian flu scare is just the latest act in an ongoing world government drama. This book is a disclosure about betrayals on many levels. Here are a few of the truths that will be exposed: -Who wants the rural chickens dead? Who benefits from the destruction of the family farm, here and abroad? -What are the real reasons that domestic chickens and ducks are sick? -What is the connection between toxic environmental conditions and the death ofmigratory birds? -Why are human deaths associated with bird flu concentrated in Southeast Asia? -Who benefits from the manufacture of a 'pandemic vaccine'? What's in it? -Why vaccines are not the answer.

It's ambiguous... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15730406)

... from a quick read of the article whether they developed or copied a vaccine that they were importing. Too many comments re: IP, importing a vaccine, etc. If it's a clone job, we'll have another example of the, uhh, benefit of using others to develop stuff you want to have value.

Over-stating the case (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Brave Guy (457657) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730436)

Let's not jump the gun here. The big threat to humans is a mutated strain of something like H5N1 that does the damage of the original bird flu but spreads through humans as fast as a human flu. Developing a vaccine for this threat requires knowing what the threat is, and as yet, there have been no confirmed cases of human-human transmission.

Even with recent advances, developing and mass-producing vaccines takes several weeks, by which time the vaccine will be irrelevant for many people if the mutated strain starts to spread. This is the nightmare scenario, and is why so much research is currently being done into improving vaccine development, and so much planning focusses on identifying human-human transmission as early as possible.

Of course anything to reduce the spread of the original bird flu also reduces the opportunity for a mutated strain to develop, and is therefore a good thing. But let's not misunderstand what's been achieved here.

Re:Over-stating the case (3, Insightful)

spiritraveller (641174) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730548)

Of course anything to reduce the spread of the original bird flu also reduces the opportunity for a mutated strain to develop, and is therefore a good thing. But let's not misunderstand what's been achieved here.

But that is exactly what makes it important. India having it's own vaccine means that she can do a much better job of innoculating her own chickens, which dramatically reduces the likelihood that a mutated human-to-human-contagious form of the disease would come from India.

Being that India is the 2nd most populated country in the world, I'd say that this is very significant.

Re:Over-stating the case (1)

neatfoote (951656) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730617)

I understand that, should the flu develop a mutated strain capable of human-human transmission, there's no guarantee that this vaccine will be effective against the new virus. But there's no guarantee to the contrary, either, is there? My understanding was that many vaccines can have some cross-applicability to viruses of slightly different strains (ex. cowpox/smallpox); a mutation that changed the virus's transmission capabilities might or might not alter the particular proteins that are recognized as antigens by the body. If it didn't alter them substantially, the old vaccine should work against killer strains too, I'd think.

Re:Over-stating the case (1)

_iris (92554) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731382)

The problem with the popular prognosis (which you are expressing here) is that the popular view of how quickly influenza spreads in humans is extremely skewed. Our view is almost entirely shaped by the evidence provided by the 1918 pandemic. Left out of the popular description of the 1918 pandmic is the putrid conditions of World War I victims living in close quarters, in warm weather, with multiple open wounds. Influenza was more of the lucky disease that found ripe pasteurs than a blood-thirsy, human-killing super-virus. H5N1 has similar pasteurs in the over-crowded, under-tended chicken coups in southeast asia.

this is what no ip does... (1)

scum-e-bag (211846) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730520)

without strict enforcement of IP vaccine development is possible...
with strict enforcement of IP vaccine development is not possible...

but then again, this is slashdot and i am preeching to the converted...

thank goodness for the bill and melida gates foundation.

Re:this is what no ip does... (2, Interesting)

ShadowFlyP (540489) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731200)

I don't know which choir you think you're preaching to, but it is not the majority of the Slashdot crowd.

Many of us may not agree with the current implementation of some IP protections (software patents especially), but I think there are very few of us that would be for the abolishment of IP enforcement. If you truely think about it, it is only with IP enforcment that software licenses such as the GPL can work. Without IP rights, anyone would be able to take all of the GPL licensed code and integrate it into closed source applications without any contribution back to the community. Only through IP enforcement can we prevent the "embrace and extend" philosopy that leads to proprietarity.

This unlikely to be effective (1)

ChowRiit (939581) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730581)

It's most likely going to prove impossible to inocculate the entire wild bird populations in the areas which are affected by Bird Flu. Further more, one of the main problems with flu strain viruses is their speed of mutation: every year the flu vaccine is different as the strains have adapted. It's a good start, but it doesn't guarantee the flu won't just hide in wild bird populations and re-emerge an even more agressive strain...

The point insn't to vaccinate wild birds (1)

blueZ3 (744446) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730883)

you vaccinate the non-wild birds (domesticated somehow doesn't fit), because these are the birds that humans are most likely to come in contact with. This reduces the chances of people catching the current virus from infected birds (regular, close contact with an infected bird seems to be a factor in bird/human transmission. In addition, once these birds are vaccinated, you've hopefully created a significant reduction in the bird/human interface where mutation to a more transmissible form is likely to occur.

Re:The point insn't to vaccinate wild birds (1)

Anemophilous Coward (312040) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731748)

Not domesticated, the term you are looking for is Commercial Livestock. That is essentially what they want to protect from infected wild birds which are typically what is moving the virus around the globe right now.

Vaccine... (1)

Kranfer (620510) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730599)

Well while I am happy to see a Vaccine being announced... However I am hoping that one will be developed for my parrots. I love my birdies, and do not wish for them to get the bird flu.

Re:Vaccine... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15730854)

That sure is a problem. In big emergencies pets always seem to be left out. I have no idea if it would be effective or not, but in a last ditch try to save your pets action, google for colloidal silver, see how to make it yourself (it's easy really), or just buy some pre-made. The other thing you can do is inside your house air filtration. They make some pretty good quality filters now, that have ultraviolet light incorporated into the particle filtration, what doesn't get filtered gets sterilised as it comes inside. Expensive, but might be worth it for both you and the parrots.

Glass half empty and full (4, Insightful)

Hao Wu (652581) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730615)

Developing a vaccine was never the problem, rather making it FAST enough in sufficient quantities in the event of a pandemic. There is no guessing the genetic sequence of the virus before then, and basically a year of production is required after when ever it appears. Not before.

Whatever vaccine they made today is not going to be greatly effective when a bird flu mutates and becomes transmittable from person-to-person.

It doesn't have to be (1)

brunes69 (86786) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730847)

If the vacceine is effective againstt he current popular strain in avians, and they can make it rapidly (easier to do with chickens since they need smaller doses than humans, they can innoculate all the chickens in the country. Having the virus nealy eliminated in the bird population greatly mitigates the risk of having it mutate into the human strain of the virus.

Re:Glass half empty and full (1)

_iris (92554) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731401)

So there is "no guessing the genetic sequence of the virus before [a pandemic]" yet you know that current vaccines are "not going to be greatly effective"?.

Oh man!!! (2, Funny)

rowama (907743) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730862)

I just finished my underground shelter yesterday. It had food, cable internet, food, cable and sat TV, food, PS2, food, games, food, a bed, food, etc. I ordered a special computer. What shall I do with all these preps...

I guess I could just seclude myself, eat, sit at the computer, play games, watch TV. Actually, nothing has changed.

Now all we have to do in convince Moslems.... (-1, Flamebait)

gothamboy (699451) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730897)

Now all we have to do is convince Moslems that the vaccine isn't all part of a western conspiracy to make them sterile. As you all may recall this is the reason that polio isn't quite iradicated. Certain Moslem religous leaders have been telling their followers not to take the polio vaccination for this reason.

where are the vaccines for AIDS or herpes? (0, Offtopic)

chrisinsocalif (984172) | more than 7 years ago | (#15730986)

They sure came up with a vaccine of the bird flu fast. I am still waiting for the vaccine for herpes....cause this itching is starting to get annoying. Damn herpes! Its been out longer and still nothing for it. What a buncha cr@p. The drug companies make too much money on suppresive medication, thankfully a country outside of the USA developed a vaccine. In the USA they would find a way for you to buy a pill or few pills at 30 dollars a pop, so they will make a profit.

one of many to come (0, Offtopic)

drDugan (219551) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731008)

This is one of the many successes the Indians and Chineese will have showing up the West (US/Europe) in science and technology. I think over the next 10-20 years, it will become more frequent that we see breakthroughs from these areas.

Can't we all just get along? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15731177)

Seriously, this tainting of every scientific or technical event with ideological or political claptrap is tiresome.

How Effective is It? (3, Interesting)

giafly (926567) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731093)

Until we know how well it works - and I can't find any information linked to today's news - it's too soon to say "one less thing to worry about."

BTW: Didn't Hungarian Scientists do this in 2005? "Hungary's health minister says a bird flu vaccine appears to be effective in early tests. The vaccine works against H5N1 Hungary's health minister says a bird flu vaccine appears to be effective in early tests. The trial jab appears to protect humans and animals against the lethal H5N1 virus, preliminary results show." - BBC 19 October 2005 [bbc.co.uk]

In Relelated News (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15731115)


US Pharmas have developed a suite of drugs to control the symptoms of the flu. They immediately opened talks with both Congress and the administration to pressure India to prevent deployment of their vaccine. "Implementation of the Indian solution would not be in the best interests of the US or the world," said a Pharma spokesperson.

Is there a +5 Cynical?

Great! Let's get our VIPs protected then! (1)

gd23ka (324741) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731191)

I would love to see the really important people get this kind of protection first
and along with it why don't we give them the same vaccination regimen that has
worked so well for our troops deployed to the gulf.

There is no vaccine for H5N1 until now (1)

gluecode (950306) | more than 7 years ago | (#15731254)

There is no vaccine for H5N1 until now. The post is correct. This is not a generic version of an existing vaccine. BTW, you cannot have a generic released into the market until the patent of the original expires. That takes 20 years. Also there is nothing wrong with someone making generics. Without generics, the poor countries have no way of buying medicines.
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