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Cook Your Breakfast With MacBook

timothy posted about 8 years ago | from the preparation-of-food-with-heat dept.

118

Kisom writes "Everyone knows Apple isn't famous for their cold notebooks. Dan Lurie however discovered it was possible to cook eggs on the bottom of his MacBook. Even though it took three times as long to cook the egg, Apple should probably be concerned."

cancel ×

118 comments

I do not... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15733959)

I do not like MacBooks and ham,
I do not like them, Sam I am!

Re:I do not... (1)

SamTheButcher (574069) | about 8 years ago | (#15738283)

Tough...I *do* like them!

Now, gimme that ham! More importantly, gimme a MacBook!

I don't understand the big deal - I've been using my 65W power adapter to heat up my muffins in the morning for about a year now.

Seriously.

But nobody complains about hot power adapters. Doesn't sell papers...or...pixels, or whatever.

Apple looking at other markets (5, Funny)

yagu (721525) | about 8 years ago | (#15733961)

From the summary: Even though it took three times as long to cook the egg, Apple should probably be concerned. Actually McDonalds should be concerned. Apple is coming out with a previously unannounced, now leaked, new product, the Egg MacMuffin.

Re:Apple looking at other markets (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15734024)

Why is this in the apple section, and doesn't at least have the Terry Gilliam Foot Icon, as the article itself reads:

If you didn't know yet this is a
joke.

(you guys really need to read the whole thing)

Other one-liners... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15734094)

...not to mention the new baked Apple Pie.

Didn't they have the iGrill on thinkgeek?

But doesn't it just overheat in the most user-friendly, fashionable, ultra-hip and trendy way?

Should you run out of supplies for your own experiment, you can get a fresh dozen from newegg.

With the designer colors, this cookware seems less Emeril and more Martha Stewart, doesn't it?

Steve Jobs is announcing that the iPod Souffle will be available in November.

Re:Other one-liners... (3, Funny)

Kelson (129150) | about 8 years ago | (#15734386)

Steve Jobs is announcing that the iPod Souffle will be available in November.

And this time, they won't need a disclaimer warning you not to eat it [google.com] !

Re:Apple looking at other markets (2, Interesting)

b1t r0t (216468) | about 8 years ago | (#15734242)

Apple is coming out with a previously unannounced, now leaked, new product, the Egg MacMuffin.

Maybe they should cool their laptops with an Egg MacMuffin Fan?

Disclaimer: my new 17" MacBook Pro actually seems to run cooler than my old 17" 1.33MHz G4. And the fan hardly ever comes on at all. Wth my old G4 I would somtimes set it to "reduced power" mode just to keep the fan from running.

Re:Apple looking at other markets (2, Funny)

Solra Bizna (716281) | about 8 years ago | (#15734299)

Titanium PowerBook G4s (either 450MHz or 600MHz, I forget) can get frelling hot.

Like, flash point of some fabrics hot.

Like, I might've killed a blanket or two with mine.

>_>

-:sigma.SB

Flash point?!? (1)

A nonymous Coward (7548) | about 8 years ago | (#15735356)

Flash point is the lowest temp at which a substance creates enough vapor to catch on fire, altho real engineers will probably cringe at that definition. It's usually applied to gasoline etc, altho I suppose it could be applied to anything, since even coal will presumably produce a flammable vapor at a sufficiently high temperature.

But fabrics? I don't think that word means what you think it means.

Re:Flash point?!? (1)

crerwin (971247) | about 8 years ago | (#15736428)

The term can and is applied to fabrics, ask any firefighter. The term's definition may be slightly different in the context of fire suppression, and would probably be more correctly substituted with "fire point," but it can be applied to anything combustible.

Of course I highly doubt that even a MacBook gets hot enough to ignite fabric. Being hot enough to discolor fabric is not the same as being hot enough to ignite it.

Re:Apple looking at other markets (1)

wik (10258) | about 8 years ago | (#15734250)

Concerned? Apple could turn it into a marketing opportunity [nytimes.com] .

Re:Apple looking at other markets (2, Funny)

JavaPunk (757983) | about 8 years ago | (#15734339)

Would you like WiFrys with that?

Re:Apple looking at other markets (1)

carlmenezes (204187) | about 8 years ago | (#15735162)

Didn't you hear? It's all part of the new iLife 2006 Suite - others are iToast, iFry, iMelt. Apple acknowledged this in a press release titled iKnow.

Unlike some others... (1)

Seoulstriker (748895) | about 8 years ago | (#15735397)

Unlike Microsoft's typical crash and burn solution, the new MacGrittle will cook your eggs differently: while leaky, the runnyness will be smooth, and you won't face the dreaded viruses and E. coli of the competition.

For those who are curious, like me (5, Informative)

truthsearch (249536) | about 8 years ago | (#15733963)

From the Egg Nutrition Center [enc-online.org] :

Egg white coagulates between 144 and 149F, egg yolk coagulates between 149 and 158F and whole eggs between 144 and 158F. Plain whole eggs without added ingredients are pasteurized but not cooked by bringing them to 140F and maintaining that temperature for 3 and 1/2 minutes.

Re:For those who are curious, like me (1)

Firehed (942385) | about 8 years ago | (#15734274)

It's no problem to start cooking eggs then. My MBP, just being used for posting right now (so effectively idle) is cooking along at about 60c CPU temp, 140F. When I did a burn-in test, I saw it hit 85c (185F!), which is just insane. I picked the thing up to move it to a different table, and almost dropped it, since it was well hotter than the steering wheel was in my car after sitting with all the windows closed in the middle of a heat wave.

I have noticed that this is a much bigger problem when plugged in, not so much when on battery. It's still hot then too, but not to the point of being unusable. I don't know if it's the say way on MacBooks, but I have no reason to think that behaviour is limted to the MBP. I'd be a lot happer if the fan was on low speed always... I've very rarely heard it rev up, and ironically enough it runs far cooler when in Windows via BootCamp than in OSX (even though the battery life is almost halved). I suppose part of the problem is that there seems to be no space for air intake, and the exhaust vent is pretty small and restricted. On the rare occasions when the fan is audible, I still can't feel any heat coming out of the rear vent. That whole thing with the thermal paste can't be helping either.

Re:For those who are curious, like me (1)

ForestGrump (644805) | about 8 years ago | (#15734678)

About plugged in vs on battery.

ON the battery, it's probably more conservative with bringing the CPU to full speed, and when plugged in, give it max performance because battery life is not worried about.

Also when plugged in, the charging circuitry and battery charge are probably working hard to charge the battery.

grump

Re:For those who are curious, like me (1)

dal20402 (895630) | about 8 years ago | (#15735020)

ironically enough it runs far cooler when in Windows via BootCamp than in OSX (even though the battery life is almost halved).

Interesting. My 2.16 MBP runs very hot in OS X: between 55 C idle and 83 C at full load according to CoreDuoTemp. I can't imagine that it's running much hotter than this in Windows or the processor would either throttle itself or shut down. (I haven't taken the machine apart to look at thermal paste application.)

Yet the machine *feels* hotter in Windows, even though I have no way to actually measure the CPU temp. In OS X the strip above the keyboard is warm to the touch. In Windows (XP or Vista beta) it's quite hot and I can feel significant heat coming through the keyboard.

My fan is often on at very low speed in OS X if the machine is doing anything but idling. In Windows (Boot Camp) it is usually off but ramps up to a considerably higher speed frequently.

(I'll second the observation about battery life. No more than 2 hours tops in Windows. About 3:15 in OS X with no efforts to be frugal.)

More than just the MacBook (1, Redundant)

rockhome (97505) | about 8 years ago | (#15733975)

My PowerBook runs pretty hot as well. I've always figured that it was the form factor. Unlike my Latitude, my PowerBook is minimal in dimension, making it necssaary to cram all the pieces parts in there. I've never really thought that much air actually gets into the PowerBook, but it is nice on a cold day.

Re:More than just the MacBook (1)

tezbobobo (879983) | about 8 years ago | (#15734856)

So does my humble 1.25Ghz iBook. My 12" powerbook, same specs but more 512mb more RAM though, is friid. Go figure. Metal case, must be a heat dissipation aid.

Re:More than just the MacBook (1)

Rakshasa Taisab (244699) | about 8 years ago | (#15734909)

I don't think it is the form factor, or atleast it isn't for my 17" MacBook Pro. (Nor the 15" i guess) A few weeks ago Apple updated the SMC firmware which handles amongst other things the cooling. Although it used to be somewhat warmer than I would have expected, the fan is now more active and it is much cooler.

When the SMC was being updated the fan was going at full power, and I was almost expecting it to take off. So they either tried to make the macbook run too quietly and/or the firmware had some bugs.

Re:More than just the MacBook (2, Insightful)

megaditto (982598) | about 8 years ago | (#15735429)

Now the problem is that your battery will only last 2 hours or so with this new 'update'. Yeah, back in the day the original 'Toilet Seat' iBooks could deliver 8-10 hours battery time with no problems exactly because they had no fan.

That's the one thing I cannot stand about Apple: they keep tweaking settings with their updates without giving users any options to adjust them afterwards.

Like disabling SuspendToDisk ('hibernate') option in 9.0->9.0.4 update, removing 'swappiness' control from 10.1, disabling iTunes internet filesharing, etc.

Oh, and microsofting their users by requiring the f***** CD keys.

Re:More than just the MacBook (1)

laffer1 (701823) | about 8 years ago | (#15735862)

Yeah well they did the opposite with my iBook G4 800mhz. They released a firmware update which makes the fan NEVER kick in unless the unit gets so hot my apps crash anyway. The fan still works in hardware test, etc. I want the fan on. I wish apple would make it configurable. I can change the fan settings on my pc motherboards, etc. I don't mind more noise if i can actually run a game.

Incorrect summary (3, Informative)

SoCalChris (573049) | about 8 years ago | (#15733982)

Granted, it probably took something like 3 times as long than if he had used a stove, but thats obviously not the point.
That doesn't say that it took 3 times as long, it's just a candid guess by the article writer.

Re:Incorrect summary (3, Informative)

Senjutsu (614542) | about 8 years ago | (#15734201)

I'd say the:

If you didn't know yet this is a
joke.

at the end of the article makes the summary a tad more incorrect than that.

So Sad (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15733992)

Macs have always been the pinnacle of computers - but ever since they were forced to turn to Intel they seem to have a "we just don't give a shit anymore" attitude.

I wouldn't be surprised if Apple wants to just make iPods from now on...

Re:So Sad (-1, Troll)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 8 years ago | (#15734045)

Macs have always been the pinnacle of computers - but ever since they were forced to turn to Intel they seem to have a "we just don't give a shit anymore" attitude.

Macs have never been the pinnacle of computers, and have seldom been the pinnacle of personal computers - in fact, they haven't since shortly after the release of the initial macintosh, which is arguably the only one which was really inspiring in its day. In particular, no Macintosh has ever come close to comparing to the Unix workstation of its time.

In the 68k days, the Amiga made it look like a little bitch. An Amiga 2500 with an emplant board was faster than a Mac IIci when emulating said machine - and they have the same processor. Today, macs are just intel-based PCs, and you might as well buy one from Dell, aside from the OS. You'll probably get better service, sad as that is.

Oh and the PPC601 through G3 were pathetic compared to the competition, the G4 had piss-poor price:performance, and so did the G5. Snootchie boochies!

Re:So Sad (1)

kalidasa (577403) | about 8 years ago | (#15734444)

You're comparing a desktop computer to workstation? Isn't that a little like comparing ... oh, I don't know, Apples to oranges? As far as service is concerned, only one of my four Macs has ever needed service: a dropped laptop. They fixed it in 3 days for a reasonable price, given the amount of damage. Still works great, after 5 years. No other issues with them. Now, with Dell, on the other hand, I have NEVER managed to get a broken machine fixed, and I've sent in at least a dozen (and they were all under-warranty hardware failures, not user damage).

Re:So Sad (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 8 years ago | (#15738291)

You're comparing a desktop computer to workstation? Isn't that a little like comparing ... oh, I don't know, Apples to oranges?

Actually, it's like comparing Apples to something that doesn't suck. In any case, the statement was about "computer"s, not "personal computer"s (read the comment I replied to in the first place.

What I find interesting about this whole conversation is that I got modded down as a Troll. I could see "flamebait" but marking me "troll" is simply an abuse of moderation. I really do believe that Macs and MacOS prior to X fucking sucked. I also believe that Apple's use of the PowerPC was a huge mistake.

Re:So Sad (1)

be-fan (61476) | about 8 years ago | (#15734511)

The 604e was quite a powerful CPU in its day, and the G5 was very competitive at release, when the 1.8 GHz Opteron was the fastest thing on the block.

Re:So Sad (2, Interesting)

digitalhermit (113459) | about 8 years ago | (#15734526)

One thing that it did have going for it was some really cool desktop apps. At the time when the Amiga 1000 and Atari 520 STs were out (yeah, I had those too) the Macs had a lot of cool software. That's why they were being emulated. The first Amigas and Ataris had Motorola 68000 processors. They were pretty quick for their day, but when they came out the current Macs were then using newer processors. It was fun to use Spectre128 and SpectreGCR on the Atari to emulate a 68K Mac, and it was useful, but the truth was that it would be emulating old tech -- like someone making a machine to run MacOS8 today. Interesting, but maybe just a geeky thrill than practical. The Amiga had a powerful OS, but it was lacking in some applications. For example, there was a word processing application (don't recall the name but I think it was WordPerfect) for the Amiga. It ran, but scrolling and inserting images was not optimized properly. As a consequence, an older Mac could scroll a page faster even though its hardware was primitive compared to the Amiga. This also happened on the Atari ST. The drawing routines in GEM were so abysmal that there was a market for improved libraries. There was a text editor called Tempus that used these improved routines and it was super fast compared to the TOS routines.

But Macs did things that were not easily available on other machines. For example, I've had multiple desktops on my Macs for years. Only recently (last couple years) has this become stable in XP (though some apps still are not multiple screen aware - E.g., some Java apps, full screen applications, etc.). This has worked for as long as I can remember in Unix, but recently it has actually been problematic for some configurations (dual head on Linux laptops, for example).

Don't get me wrong -- I loved my Amigas and Ataris, but there are clearly areas where the Mac led the pack.

Mac History Lesson for the Forgetful (2, Interesting)

wintermute1974 (596184) | about 8 years ago | (#15735219)

Sorry parent poster, you're wrong. The Commodore Amiga came out with a full-screen, 4,096-color palette, high-resolution monitor, with sound and a multitasking OS all in 1985. It was far more advanced than the Mac of the day.

As memory fades, we tend to remember the PCs that have lived on until today, notably the IBM PC and the Apple Mac. But just because these PCs are around now does not mean that they were necessarily the better computers then. Far from it.

At the time of the Amiga's release, Apple was still selling the monochrome, single-tasking Macintosh and for roughly three times the price, and the Apple bosses were sick with worry.

In fact, Apple considered buying the Amiga and selling it as their own product. Look it up. I'd recommend reading On The Edge [commodorebook.com] if you need a reference.

Re:So Sad (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 8 years ago | (#15738415)

The first Amigas and Ataris had Motorola 68000 processors. They were pretty quick for their day, but when they came out the current Macs were then using newer processors.

Amiga: 1985; Apple: 1984. Gee, a year later, same processor, 4,094 more colors than the Apple, and with hardware graphics acceleration. The Macintosh was a graphics-only system with no graphics acceleration until the second wave of graphics cards for Macintosh II-generation machines.

It was fun to use Spectre128 and SpectreGCR on the Atari to emulate a 68K Mac, and it was useful, but the truth was that it would be emulating old tech -- like someone making a machine to run MacOS8 today.

Or like someone making their modern Macintosh run OS9 in a sandbox so they can run old applications.

Interesting, but maybe just a geeky thrill than practical.

Yeah, I can't imagine why anyone would do that.

he Amiga had a powerful OS, but it was lacking in some applications. For example, there was a word processing application (don't recall the name but I think it was WordPerfect) for the Amiga. It ran, but scrolling and inserting images was not optimized properly. As a consequence, an older Mac could scroll a page faster even though its hardware was primitive compared to the Amiga.

You're telling me that the Macintosh had more advanced hardware because you once used a shitty Amiga word processor? Good logic there, spanky.

The simple fact is that classic macintoshes cannot scroll anything as quickly as an Amiga can, because they have no graphics hardware to accelerate scrolling, or anything else, whereas the Amiga has a bit blitter and a bunch of other crap, because it was designed to be able to support multimedia applications, whereas the Macintosh was only designed to support graphics. And black and white ones, at that (back in that time anyway.)

This also happened on the Atari ST. The drawing routines in GEM were so abysmal that there was a market for improved libraries.

But this didn't happen on the Amiga, because the drawing routines were so good, and supported by hardware. There WAS a program called cpublit that would patch around the blitter and let the CPU do things, it was useful if you had about a 20 MHz 68020 or better. This was possible because AmigaDOS has a patchlist that enables you to modify the operation of the OS in a safe manner (assuming you don't screw anything up that is) and because AmigaDOS is a microkernel-based system in which all drivers, handlers, etc are processes in their own right. Of course, that in turn was possible because the system had no memory protection.

But Macs did things that were not easily available on other machines. For example, I've had multiple desktops on my Macs for years.

That's nice. AmigaDOS has had multiple screens since day one, and you can switch between them. It was a reasonable thing to do when screen resolutions were so low. Now, virtual desktops make more sense. Granted, they weren't multiple desktop screens, but you could (for example) run directoryopus on one screen (it always created one) and workbench on another (ditto) while you had deluxe paint running (another screen.) In 512kB memory, no less. (And no more!)

Don't get me wrong -- I loved my Amigas and Ataris, but there are clearly areas where the Mac led the pack.

Right, in consumer acceptance.

Snootchie bootches yourself... (1)

MsGeek (162936) | about 8 years ago | (#15734540)

I'm reading this from my original-recipe blueberry iBook. Yes, still useful after all these years. It might not be the fastest computer on the block, it might not run Tiger, but it runs Panther and it still does everything I need it to do. And does it in so much style people still stop and stare at me when I bring the thing to my local coffeehouse. Not because they think I'm nuts because I'm running on an antique. It's because it still looks bitchen. Snoogans, biotch!

Re:Snootchie bootches yourself... (1)

laffer1 (701823) | about 8 years ago | (#15735995)

Those are quite nice. My wife kept hers as it was her first Mac. It runs OpenBSD well. I planned on attempting to put a 40gb drive in there from my iBook after I upgraded it, but 52 screws on mine convinced me otherwise. Apple fixed that problem with the new intel macs.

Re:Snootchie bootches yourself... (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 8 years ago | (#15738445)

Those are quite nice. My wife kept hers as it was her first Mac. It runs OpenBSD well. I planned on attempting to put a 40gb drive in there from my iBook after I upgraded it, but 52 screws on mine convinced me otherwise.

Yes, quite nice, if you're a fucking assembly robot, otherwise not so nice, unless you just want to stare at it, and ooh and aah.

You unabashed apple apologists are the reason why those with clues cannot take apple seriously. They have such a huge fanbase of people willing to excuse their every error that they never have to actually fix anything!

Re:So Sad (-1, Flamebait)

Who235 (959706) | about 8 years ago | (#15734466)

Yeah, the pinnacle of computers. . .

These high temperatures should sterilize enough people like you that eventually we won't have to read crap like that.

What 'Do Everything Out of the Box' Means (5, Funny)

theRhinoceros (201323) | about 8 years ago | (#15734009)

"Introducing the superfast, blogging, podcasting, breakfast-cooking, do-everything-out-of-the-box MacBook."

By the way, yes, I am a Mac user.

Re:What 'Do Everything Out of the Box' Means (2, Funny)

steveo777 (183629) | about 8 years ago | (#15734263)

Right, but you have to hang upside-down to fry that baby and use the computer at the same time... you know, like Batman! [imdb.com] Have fun!

Suppose you could be "Mac"man... but I somehow doubt that a guy in tights with a rainbow colored apple on his chest is going to stop any criminals in their tracks.

Re:What 'Do Everything Out of the Box' Means (1)

heinousjay (683506) | about 8 years ago | (#15734297)

If the criminals die of laughter, crime is just as fought.

Re:What 'Do Everything Out of the Box' Means (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15734552)

Just curious, but did you really need to link to the IMDB page for the film "Batman"? Were you anticipating a lot of people seeing your comment and thinking, "What the hell's a batman? Is this a baseball term or what?"

Re:What 'Do Everything Out of the Box' Means (3, Funny)

Skevin (16048) | about 8 years ago | (#15737799)

> but I somehow doubt that a guy in tights with a rainbow colored apple
> on his chest is going to stop any criminals in their tracks ...until those same criminals realize his main power is spontaneously generating ungodly amounts of heat in any object in a very short amount of time. You'd think twice about trying to pull a gun on a superhero who just caused your buddy's teeth to explode in his head without so much as blinking. Oh, you might try to run, but I think one of his other powers is immobolizing you on a platform, making it impossible for you to migrate anywhere else. Criminals are dragged off to jail where they sit until they Switch or Think Different.

I've heard, however, that Macman is vulnerable to flying chairs, and that you can force him to revert to mortal form (a la Shazam back to Billy Batson) by shouting "Developers!" over and over. In fact, this was how he was defeated back in issue #382 by his arch nemesis performing both actions silmutaneously. Macman only barely fended off the storm of flying chairs by counteracting it with a storm of flying toasters and then wounding his arch-enemy with his very last HyperCard.

Solomon Chang

Re:What 'Do Everything Out of the Box' Means (1)

nolsen (518298) | about 8 years ago | (#15734922)

If someone could just figure out how to replace the DVD drive with a slot-loaded panini press...

Uh, guys? (4, Informative)

Otter (3800) | about 8 years ago | (#15734015)

From TFA:
Now you know the secret of the overheating notebook.

If you didn't know yet this is a joke.

(you guys really need to read the whole thing)

(Although I have no idea what's going on in that murky YouTube video so maybe I'm missing something...)

Re:Uh, guys? (1)

jasonla (211640) | about 8 years ago | (#15734073)

Hey Slashdot editors: Now YOU'RE spreading FUD. Either relabel this as "Humor" or pull it from the site.

Re:Uh, guys? (4, Interesting)

arivanov (12034) | about 8 years ago | (#15734148)

Fud - dunno.

I still have fond memories of my first Am386DX. It was spread around the desk surface with the more critical components bolted to it (so we could use it to test boards and components). A few days after we put it into action we found out that the CPU heat sink (this was in the days before CPUs had fans) perfectly doubles up as a coffee warmer for one of those neat little copper kettles used for Turkish coffee. Just the right form factor (the later CPUs became too big for that).

I also remember burning my hand on the first slotted Celery after forgetting to plug the fan in. The scar is still visible, because I got my hand trapped in the case against it (it hurt like hell). I also remember cooking eggs on one of these after moderately overclocking it. Amazingly enough it was still working throughout the process. In those days (P2/P3) Intel used to have nearly perfect thermal throttle which prevented CPUs from baking. It lost it sometimes around P4.

Frankly, I would not be surprised if an egg will cook on the bottom of a new Mac. I am pretty sure that it will cook on the bottom of my HP if I run a make bzImage on it and turn the cpufreq off. Do not see why the Mac will be any different.

Re:Uh, guys? (2, Informative)

KozmoStevnNaut (630146) | about 8 years ago | (#15735988)

My Pentium 4 Northwood-C first throttles and then shuts down if it reaches approximately 96 degrees C. I "discovered" this because I forgot to plug in the fan on the CPU after assembling the system...

In the manual for my Thinkpad T42 (Pentium-M Dothan) it says that the CPU will shut itself off (triggering the rest of the system to shut down) at a little over 100 degrees C. And I'm pretty sure that it starts throttling at around 72 degrees C, since that's the highest I've ever gotten it to, by running Prime95 on full tilt in the background while working. And while it does get rather hot while playing games (it's amazing how much heat is generated by playing something as old as the two first Fallout games on a 1.7GHz Pentium-M).

So it seems that the thermal throttling is still very much alive and kicking in more moderne Intel CPUs.

Re:Uh, guys? (1)

KozmoStevnNaut (630146) | about 8 years ago | (#15736016)

I'll just finish this sentence which I seem to have overlooked...

And while it does get rather hot while playing games (it's amazing how much heat is generated by playing something as old as the two first Fallout games on a 1.7GHz Pentium-M), it has never once affected stability. It just keeps on going, although the fan noise does build to pretty high levels, and it never seems to shut the fan off once it's started. It just sorta stays in low speed mode, even if I force the clock speed down to 600MHz. Putting it on standby and resuming makes it stop, though, so it's probably a small firmware bug somewhere...

Re:Uh, guys? (1)

Shadow Wrought (586631) | about 8 years ago | (#15734378)

Ever since I saw it in the "Mysterious Future" it has had the Monty Python foot next it. Its Funny. Laugh.

Re:Uh, guys? (1)

jasonla (211640) | about 8 years ago | (#15734449)

It was only recently changed after numerous people pointed it out. I'd like to also point out that the Slashdot editors made no attempt to recognize that they were wrong. If everyone likes to blame the "mainstream media" (or since people love to make up accronyms now, 'MSM') for not admitting fault, here would be a great instance for Slashdot to set an example. Any takers?

So... (2, Funny)

Kesch (943326) | about 8 years ago | (#15734018)

When will we start seeing iOmlettes?

This is faked - and really a joke. (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15734023)

Take a look at the original link:

http://www.sagags.com/?p=441 [sagags.com]

It mentions that it is in fact a joke.

Re:This is faked - and really a joke. (4, Insightful)

Golias (176380) | about 8 years ago | (#15734079)

Obviously. The Slashdot editors have proven, once again, that they suck at what they do. Actually, worse than that, they don't actually DO what they do!

For fuck's sake, the "article" is shorter than most emo kids' blog entries, and says "This is a joke" in bold, oversized text at the end!

VA Linux should fire every last /. editor, and hire a whole new staff. They don't need to be geeks, or even slightly tech-aware. They just need to be literate, and it would be a huge step up.

The joke is on those that miss the obvious (1)

dbIII (701233) | about 8 years ago | (#15734681)

They just need to be literate
For those who are not paticularly literate there is the image of a foot at the top of the page above the text of the article to indicate that it is a joke. Moving the mouse pointer over the foot gives you some text that lets you know that it is a joke. For those that are more literate there is also link to the article. For those that can't bother to spend the time to notice either of these things there also appears to be the option to fly off the handle, demand the sacking of all of the editors and look like a complete idiot.

Re:The joke is on those that miss the obvious (1)

daeley (126313) | about 8 years ago | (#15738549)

For those who are not paticularly literate there is the image of a foot at the top of the page above the text of the article to indicate that it is a joke. Moving the mouse pointer over the foot gives you some text that lets you know that it is a joke. For those that are more literate there is also link to the article. For those that can't bother to spend the time to notice either of these things there also appears to be the option to fly off the handle, demand the sacking of all of the editors and look like a complete idiot.

Really? Because if you have the /. preference to display those icons turned off (or have images not displaying for some other reason), all you get is a bit of linked text that says "[ It's funny. Laugh. ]" in the midst of a crapload of ads, links, and other /. textual folderol.

Re:This is faked - and really a joke. (1)

soliptic (665417) | about 8 years ago | (#15735155)

Um. Calm down. The editors put it in the "funny" category.

Re:This is faked - and really a joke. (2, Informative)

Tim C (15259) | about 8 years ago | (#15735658)

The Slashdot editors have proven, once again, that they suck at what they do. Actually, worse than that, they don't actually DO what they do!

Actually, if you read the FAQ, you'll find that the editors don't even claim to do what you think they do:
How do you verify the accuracy of Slashdot stories?

We don't. You do. :) If something seems outrageous, we might look for some corroboration, but as a rule, we regard this as the responsibility of the submitter and the audience. This is why it's important to read comments. You might find something that refutes, or supports, the story in the main.

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 10/28/00

I'm not saying it's right, just that you really shouldn't be surprised. It's always been this way.

Why do we link to blogs? (3, Interesting)

HockeyPuck (141947) | about 8 years ago | (#15734041)

So why does /. link to a blog which in turn links to the actual article: http://www.sagags.com/?p=441 [sagags.com] ? The normally adds NO value.

Re:Why do we link to blogs? (1)

fobbman (131816) | about 8 years ago | (#15734154)

They should have linked to this article [slashdot.org] , really.

Re:Why do we link to blogs? (4, Funny)

19thNervousBreakdown (768619) | about 8 years ago | (#15734270)

This comment [slashdot.org] sums it up much better.

Re:Why do we link to blogs? (1)

Kelson (129150) | about 8 years ago | (#15734374)

Well, if they linked to the actual article [sagags.com] , they'd still be stuck linking to a blog [sagags.com] ...

It's a joke (3, Insightful)

CtrlPhreak (226872) | about 8 years ago | (#15734043)

This is more satire taken seriously by an idiot on the web. The link in the article above is a blog that picked up another blog where the guy clearly says he's making a joke. This is like when the onion is taken seriously...

That aside, props to the Egg MacMuffin joke...

Re:It's a joke (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15734206)

This is like when the onion is taken seriously...

There was once an "article" about Larry Ellison giving a commencement speech for Yale, I believe, that was circulated around the a bunch of friends of mine. It was taken seriously. Until I dug around and found out that it was originally published by something called "The Onion". I found out from some research that it is some site that attempts satire and humor.

The fact that their "articles" can be mistaken so easily for serious journalism either means that: they suck at humor and satire, and/or the general news media is so "out there" that false stories seem "normal".

Re:It's a joke (1)

QuantumFTL (197300) | about 8 years ago | (#15735200)

This is more satire taken seriously by an idiot on the web.

I happen to be a friend of Dan Lurie, and he's only 17, so it's possible that he took this seriously, however he is also very bright, so I can believe that his presentation of it as fact was perhaps a joke to see who he could fool. Apparently that list includes slashdot editors...

New MacBook Owner... (1)

creimer (824291) | about 8 years ago | (#15734049)

I just got a new (black) MacBook. It doesn't run any hotter than my old three-year old Dell Inspiron 1100 (Celeron 2GHz) laptop. Besides, why would anyone mix food and laptops together? Especially if you have the black MacBook. :P

it's a joke. (0, Redundant)

yincrash (854885) | about 8 years ago | (#15734055)

if anybody actually looked at the original article, this is a joke.

original [sagags.com]

It's a joke (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15734065)

"If you didn't know yet this is a

joke."

http://www.sagags.com/?p=441 [sagags.com]

It's a JOKE people (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15734083)

Does anyone read beyond the headlines? It's a JOKE.

My Macbook burns (4, Interesting)

eebra82 (907996) | about 8 years ago | (#15734112)

I wasn't surprised at all when I read this blog entry. My Macbook (the vanilla version, cheapest of the three) is so hot that I actually burnt my skin. If I put it on a pillow, it gets excessively hot and makes the laptop hum like hell.

I have experienced heat before, but not this kind. I wonder what the airports say about the new portable egg toasters.

Use a Lap Pad (1)

rsborg (111459) | about 8 years ago | (#15734220)

I wasn't surprised at all when I read this blog entry. My Macbook (the vanilla version, cheapest of the three) is so hot that I actually burnt my skin. If I put it on a pillow, it gets excessively hot and makes the laptop hum like hell.

Dude, use a frickin LapPad [xpad4laptop.com] ... you know something designed to work with laptop vents, that isn't too heavy and has a cusion for your parts... all while deflecting the heat from the laptop.

Having had several P4M space heaters that double as a notebooks for the past 3 years ( 5 laptops in two seperate companies no less), I have become averse to frying my balls :-)

Re:Use a Lap Pad (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15734345)

Dude, use a frickin LapPad..

So what are they going to call laptops then? LapPadTops?

Re:Use a Lap Pad (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15734447)

yeeeeayy, lets all go out a score ourselves the i-lap-pad-o-rama! or else our laptops will fry our seeds to a crisp.

forgive me for asking but do you mac users ever get the feeling you've been had?

if you feel you have to express yourselves with your purchasing power and make a lifestyle choice with your computer then frankly i feel a bit sorry for you, but go ahead- what you cannot escape is that your faith in the marketing machine that is apple is fast turning into a joke to everyone else.

have any of you bought one of those larger than average piles of crap that you slot the ipod into? surround sound from a single point in space! wow! what next apple! i mean how long before they you start punting out genuine snake oil to these muppets?

Re:My Macbook burns (1)

iangoldby (552781) | about 8 years ago | (#15734372)

The should have used spirits cooling [totl.net] (and a freezer that goes up to 11...)

(Yes, I know it is an old link. Shame that totl doesn't get updated these days.)

Re:My Macbook burns (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15734597)

Laptops and notebooks are never supposed to be placed on cushions, pillows, blankets or other padded and insulating material. For God's sake, every single user's manual for notebooks and laptops have stated just that ever since they came out!

If you want to use a notebook or laptop, then follow the extremely basic rule of keeping the vents clear and if possible, place on a hard surface.
Again, just as it says in the bloody user manual.

RTFUser Manual!

Try running BootCamp and Vista - Dangerously Hot! (4, Interesting)

ironwill96 (736883) | about 8 years ago | (#15734113)

With some recent software updates my new Macbook Pro (around a month old now) doesn't run overly hot under OS X, even when charging the battery. However, I installed Vista under Boot Camp and since it isn't supported by Boot Camp yet the power management functions don't all seem to work as normal (it is a beta after all). Well, needless to say you can't put the Macbook Pro on your lap at all, especially not when plugged in (which, running Vista you get maybe 90 mins of battery life or less so plugged in is a constant state). I could easily cook many things on that upper left corner which is where I assume the battery is located at since the charging input is on that side. My guess would be that the temperature on that side exceeds 130 degrees fahrenheit or more.

And yes, it is blasphemy that I am running Vista on a Mac and its unsupported blah blah blah blah, but either way the Macbook Pro's still run way too hot and don't ever seem to run their fan. Their own documentation tells you not to use your *laptop* on your lap, which seems quite stupid to me. Whats the point of a mobile computer if I have to be tied to a *DESK*.

Re:Try running BootCamp and Vista - Dangerously Ho (5, Funny)

CallistoLion (651747) | about 8 years ago | (#15734410)

I have difficulty taking someone seriously who can't figure out where the battery is on a laptop.

Re:Try running BootCamp and Vista - Dangerously Ho (2, Funny)

SmittyTheBold (14066) | about 8 years ago | (#15735148)

Exactly. If you have no idea where your battery is, you probably aren't the target market for beta-testing software. I can just imagine what that guy's bug reports would look like.

- - - -
SUMMARY: When I click right there [::insert gesture, not written in summary::] I get an error.

HOW TO REPRODUCE ISSUE: Click right there.

POSSIBLE SOLUTION: Keep that error from showing up. Or make it impossible to click there.
- - - -

Re:Try running BootCamp and Vista - Dangerously Ho (1)

Paperweight (865007) | about 8 years ago | (#15734797)

Anyone for a software solution? It should be that when motion is detected, on your lap, the fans are programmed to run more and keep it cooler. When no motion is detected, on a desk, the fans are programmed to keep it quieter.

Cooking with technology (2, Informative)

Kelson (129150) | about 8 years ago | (#15734136)

This reminds me of a story I once heard about a scoutmaster who rigged up a miniature oven you could put on top of a car engine. He supposedly had recipes where the time had been converted to miles driven. On camping trips, the boy scouts would set up a meal before they left, and by the time they arrived at the campsite, dinner would be ready.

Re:Cooking with technology (2, Interesting)

kfg (145172) | about 8 years ago | (#15734241)

Common practice in the 30s through 50s. You could even buy commercial units. You can bake potatoes by simply wrapping them in foil and jamming them between the tubes of the exhaust manifold, although there is a certain risk of them falling out and I won't comment on the taste.

KFG

Re:Cooking with technology (1)

NayDizz (821461) | about 8 years ago | (#15734769)

This is also common practice on modern industrial cranes. I had a conversation recently with a guy who operates a crane and cooks out for lunch every day on a platform he rigged up to the muffler.

Apparently egg-cooking time is becoming a common metric by which we rate our computer hardware these days. I recall a similar article not too long ago. A quick search popped up This Link [slashdot.org] .

Koobie cooker (1)

IamGarageGuy 2 (687655) | about 8 years ago | (#15734568)

Up in the great white north we have gadgets that cook kabasa under the hood of your snowmobile. I have heard of store bought ones but never seen one. After a 3 or 4 hour ride, whatever is in the box is heated or cooked enough to have a beside trail snack.

Never study web UI design at U of Michigan! (2, Funny)

briansmith (316996) | about 8 years ago | (#15734174)

So many options! So little importance!

Someone had to say it... (2, Funny)

iangoldby (552781) | about 8 years ago | (#15734198)

Is this an exampe of egg-streme programming?

Or have reports of overheating MacBooks been egg-sagerated?

<ducks>

JOKE (2)

fountain09 (948808) | about 8 years ago | (#15734231)

Please read TFA (http://www.sagags.com/?p=441), which states, "If you didn't know yet this is a joke (you guys really need to read the whole thing)." Engadget messed this one up too.

beyond a joke (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15734344)

What isn't a joke is the apple laptop that caught fire at some conference the other week.

There was no video but stills of the incident and the shocked reactions of the watching crowd was really something.

Apple computers and their pretentious/pig-ignorant users have always been a bit of a joke but this kind of thing is ridiculous!

Undervolting (1)

TeknoHog (164938) | about 8 years ago | (#15734349)

From the article:
its (sic) important to understand the fact that Apple has no control over how hots (sic) Intel's processors run

Actually, Pentium M processors have sofware adjustable voltages. I've successfully undervolted [gentoo-wiki.com] my Dothan 725 and the difference in cooling (and the lack of fan noise) is quite stunning. I believe the Core processors have something similar, in which case Apple does have control over the CPU heating.

Oh noes... (1)

Anubis333 (103791) | about 8 years ago | (#15734392)

A good rule of thumb is for every 10 degrees Centigrade rise above maximum temperature specification the chip's reliability is cut in half. Notebook vendors fudge temp spec. Many have altered BIOS's that allow them to perpetually run hot, even beyond normal shutdown temp.

Or you could get a Dell (2, Funny)

cab15625 (710956) | about 8 years ago | (#15734421)

And grill your dinner to a crispy state in five seconds flat.

cooking forensics (2, Insightful)

pikine (771084) | about 8 years ago | (#15734472)

I know the article is a joke, but I could tell that from just looking at the picture. If he really cooked an egg on his MacBook, he would need a bigger foil, otherwise the moment you crush the egg, it would spread and stain the uncovered parts of the laptop. The foil is too small to cover the spread of one egg. Thus, it is apparent from the picture that the egg was cooked before it is placed on the foil.

Oooo! (1)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | about 8 years ago | (#15734483)

Yummy Egg MacMuffins every morning! :-)

How to cook your eggs quicker... (1)

pookemon (909195) | about 8 years ago | (#15734525)

Buy a dell (and a frying pan)...

um, don't put it on your laptop (1)

josepha48 (13953) | about 8 years ago | (#15734654)

.. unless you want that cooked too ;-)

blame fashion and wimpiness (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15735086)

The fixation on light/powerful/ultra thin and chic has lead to a plethora of problems with notebook computers. Battery life, still dismal in 2006 because every battery advancement which should have gone to extended useage times has been completely negated by making them increasingly smaller to reduce weight. Heat dissipation has gotten worse (now they have to use fans when orginally most laptops got by without fans using passive cooling) because of packing so much stuff inside a too closed up case. Slightly thicker with better bottom to out the back airflow, using normal thermodynamics would help with the heat problem immensely. But no-o-o-o-o, can't do those things because it would result in a slightly heavier laptop and a little bulkier and that just won't do, wouldn't be fashionable. So now we get li-on batteries that can explode or catch fire and laptops continue to get too hot to use as laptops,so they have to call them "notebooks" or some other dodgy marketing name to help diffuse potential lawsuits from people actually holding them in their laps.

Wimpy users demanding wimpy laptops=get what you deserve. Can't tote an single extra pound because your girly man arms can't handle the temporary stress going from the cab to the starbucks table? Too bad, suffer crummy battery life. Can't tote something a little thicker, insist that "thinner is better" when from an engineering standpoint of getting rid of heat it *isn't*? Too bad, suffer overheating. And pay an extra 500 to 1,000 dollars for the privelege of being commercially identified in marketing databanks as "wimpy". And double too bad that apple contiues to slide into an also-ran company, forgoing good engineering to be replaced entirely with "style". Style has its place, and that is AFTER engineering. Sticking it in first place results in this sort of nonsense. Apple used to have (and I used to be a fanboy but not any longer) engineering as job #1 at Apple and you paid for it, but it was there and worth it. Ya, you got a decent looking box usually, but it performed as advertised and wasdn't a commodity POS with curb feelers and fins on it. Now the fashion fetishists have *completely* taken over, so I predict an eventual decline of Apple (I never did before but I will now), even if they are riding high with iPod right now. Going to intel chips will not help them, nothing will if they keep fashion first. If they change back, they'll survive, if they don't, SGI-ville for them. Pretty, but losing it on where the computing rubber meets the road to stay "looking mah-ve-lous"

Fiddling with the fans (1)

The Mutant (167716) | about 8 years ago | (#15735666)

Now I hate fans in computers as much as any other Mac Fanboy, but as Parallels on the MacIntel hw is just too damn compelling to ignore any longer I'm pricing out one of these notebook computers.

So I got to thinking - if the fan kicked on at a lower threshold, perhaps the case wouldn't get so unreasonably hot? Is the fan threshold temperature in PRAM or some other place that's reasonably easy to manipulate?

I've got two G4 PowerBooks (a 12" and a 15") and after cooking my the logic board in the fifteen inch have learned to always have the computer sitting on a book of some kind, to help insure airflow about the box.

Anyone have a clue if this is possible? I'd rather hear the fans earlier if it meant a much cooler system overall.

Re:Fiddling with the fans (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15735769)

I have a 15" MBP running XP in parallels for about 8 hours a day. I sit my machine on a road tools cool pad and I have had no issues with the fan even coming on while running in this mode. The pad lifts the MBP up about an inch off the top of my desk or lap. The one time the fan came on, I had a process that causing both CPU cores to reach about 80 - 90% utilization. Remember, the MBP case is metal, so it's going to conduct heat a little bit better than the plastic cases most PCs use.

65 C (1)

humajime (952879) | about 8 years ago | (#15736012)

Well, considering that my Powerbook can easily get to the temperature needed to cook an egg (which is 65 C), how is this news worthy? They run hot, they have run hot for as long as I've been using Macs. A lot of electronic components crammed into not a lot of space, then wrapped in thin plastic or aluminum equals quite a hot computer.

New Mac Add (2, Funny)

bean123456789 (938830) | about 8 years ago | (#15737928)

Mac: Hi, I'm a Mac
PC: Hello, I'm a PC
Mac: I can cook an egg!
PC: You must think you're hot shit
Mac: Yes, yes I do

Bad Cuisine (1)

Swift2001 (874553) | about 8 years ago | (#15738404)

The thing is, you want to fry an egg quickly. Otherwise, it gets all rubbery. Put an egg on a city sidewalk on a hot day. It actually fries. And the point...?
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