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Deja Vu Recreated in a Lab Setting

ScuttleMonkey posted about 8 years ago | from the haven't-i-given-you-funding-before dept.

331

esocid writes writes to tell us BBC News is reporting that scientists may have found a way to study deja vu, that uneasy feeling you have seen something before. Using hypnosis, scientists claim to be able to incorrectly trigger the portion of the brain responsible for recognition of something familiar. From the article: "Two key processes are thought to occur when someone recognizes a familiar object or scene. First, the brain searches through memory traces to see if the contents of that scene have been observed before. If they have, a separate part of the brain then identifies the scene or object as being familiar. In deja vu, this second process may occur by mistake, so that a feeling of familiarity is triggered by a novel object or scene."

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331 comments

The Matrix! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15785542)

Welcome to The Matrix v0.0001 (unstable alpha)

Dupe! (5, Funny)

taxman_10m (41083) | about 8 years ago | (#15785543)

I've seen this story before.

Re:Dupe! (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15785586)

I've seen your comment before!

Re:Dupe! (2, Funny)

Trigun (685027) | about 8 years ago | (#15785591)

No you haven't, you just think that you did.

Re:Dupe! (1)

szembek (948327) | about 8 years ago | (#15785659)

That was his point fool! It was a joke!

Re:Dupe! (1)

Trigun (685027) | about 8 years ago | (#15785774)

I understood the joke. I'm just raising the chatter of it to a dull roar.

Re:Dupe! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15785592)

I've seen your post before. The mods really savaged that one.

Re:Dupe! (1)

Conspiracy_Of_Doves (236787) | about 8 years ago | (#15785732)

Ok kids, who saw that one coming?

It's the Mind (3, Funny)

Kelson (129150) | about 8 years ago | (#15785737)

Tonight on "It's the Mind [orangecow.org] ", we examine the phenomenon of déjà vu. That strange feeling we sometimes get that we've lived... through something before, that what is happening now has... already... happened?

*runs*

Re:Dupe! (1)

Chabil Ha' (875116) | about 8 years ago | (#15785823)

This must mean that the /. has made a modifcation to the underlying code...does that mean that Agent Smith is coming???

hmm (1)

Tacylm (775168) | about 8 years ago | (#15785547)

I think I read this before...

Dupe!!! (4, Funny)

Red Flayer (890720) | about 8 years ago | (#15785551)

Oh wait... Never mind. My bad.

Re:Dupe!!! (4, Insightful)

Stavr0 (35032) | about 8 years ago | (#15785661)

Ok, let's be honest. How many of us came in here just to make that exact same joke?

Re:Dupe!!! (5, Funny)

QuantumFTL (197300) | about 8 years ago | (#15785797)

Ok, let's be honest. How many of us came in here just to make that exact same joke?

Actually I was, but then I got a weird feeling that I'd seen that joke on here before...

You've just experienced Vuja De! (5, Funny)

spun (1352) | about 8 years ago | (#15785687)

That's the feeling that you will be reading the exact same article tomorrow.

Re:You've just experienced Vuja De! (1)

Kelson (129150) | about 8 years ago | (#15785756)

That's the feeling that you will be reading the exact same article tomorrow.

Given the increasing number of Backslash posts, that doesn't seem too unlikely.

Re:You've just experienced Vuja De! (1)

scheming daemons (101928) | about 8 years ago | (#15785819)

Actually, according to Steve Martin, "Vuja De" is the feeling that none of this has ever happened before.

Re:You've just experienced Vuja De! (1, Interesting)

Kesch (943326) | about 8 years ago | (#15785866)

Actually, the French for 'Will See Again Tommorow' is something like 'Vais Voir Deja Demain' or 'Verr Deja Demain'

or of course you could 'Read' the article tommorow which would be 'Vais Lire Deja Demain, or 'Lirai Deja Demain'

Of all of them, I think Verr Deja sounds the best. It is that feeling that you will have this same experience in the future. This can be applied to experiences like reading a post welcoming our new Overlords on /. at work or wanking off in front of your computerat home.

Remember, French can be fun!(TM)

Deja-huh?!? (1)

_Griphin_ (676977) | about 8 years ago | (#15785552)

I used to suffer with Deja-Vu years ago, but after awhile, it stopped happening to me. Bizarre.

Re:Deja-huh?!? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15785716)

It's called "Alzheimer's."

Deja-huh?!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15785719)

I used to suffer with Deja-Vu years ago, but after awhile, it stopped happening to me. Bizarre.

Whoa

Re:Deja-huh?!? (1)

waTR (885837) | about 8 years ago | (#15785787)

Step 1: Find cause. Step 2: Test pill as cure for condition Step 3: Do PR Blitz to expose the hidden "Cancer Causing" effects of Deja-Vu Step 4: $$$

DUPE (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15785556)

This was posted on... oh wait...

damn! (1)

PresidentEnder (849024) | about 8 years ago | (#15785558)

And here all this time I thought that persistent recurrent deja vu was an indication of my latent psychic powers.

Great news! (1)

UnknowingFool (672806) | about 8 years ago | (#15785560)

Good to know! Now maybe they can get to work on those other trifling brain disorders like Alzheimer's, Mad Cow disease--you know the minor ones that don't mean anything.

You're quite the Unknowing Fool (5, Insightful)

2nd Post! (213333) | about 8 years ago | (#15785614)

Research is research. Understanding how the brain works is vital in progressing the state of the art. We will only be able to find a cure for Alzheimer's or MCD by pure luck unless we also happen to have a decent understanding of how the brain works. Science is not at all directed, as most people imagine, but much more like evolution; a hundred million different approaches all aiming for different goals, filtered through successful applications, and then repeated all over again.

Who knows but maybe the cure to Alzheimer's is FOUND because we understand how the brain triggers recall, which is touched upon when deja vu is wrongly invoked?

Re:You're quite the Unknowing Fool (3, Informative)

dfedfe (980539) | about 8 years ago | (#15785791)

Actually deja vu isn't recall, it's familiarity (two distinct processes in the brain). But it definitely is true that Alzheimer's starts in the hippocampus, which is nestled in and intricately connected with the medial temporal lobe, which is very likely where deja vu occurs, and so the two are at least somewhat related.

Re:You're quite the Unknowing Fool (1)

Fweeky (41046) | about 8 years ago | (#15785849)

Deja vu and similar events are also very common in epilepsy.

Re:Great news! (1)

Tucan (60206) | about 8 years ago | (#15785618)

Are you an engineer or marketing guy, or aspiring to be one? No more useless extra knowledge please!

Re:Great news! (4, Interesting)

CRCulver (715279) | about 8 years ago | (#15785630)

Good to know! Now maybe they can get to work on those other trifling brain disorders like Alzheimer's, Mad Cow disease--you know the minor ones that don't mean anything.

Actually, deja vu--along with similar phenomena like presque vu and jamais vu--is a major part of senility. Studying it could lead to a better understanding of getting soft in the head in general.

If you like science fiction, Kim Stanley Robinson's Mars trilogy, specifically the volume Blue Mars [amazon.com] has these symptoms of senility as a major plot point. It's a sort of fate that might await us all as lifespans grow increasingly longer.

It's Official (5, Funny)

Average_Joe_Sixpack (534373) | about 8 years ago | (#15785564)

Scientists have officially ran out of things to study

Re:It's Official (2, Insightful)

2nd Post! (213333) | about 8 years ago | (#15785647)

I do hope you're joking and not serious. Being able to understand how something works (like the brain) as well as how it works incorrectly (like deja vu) is pretty important in figuring out how to fix it when something really breaks (like Alzheimer's or dementia or psychosis).

Re:It's Official (1)

operagost (62405) | about 8 years ago | (#15785755)

Oh, I've heard that one before. Or have I?

I'll take "obvious joke" for 500, Alex (4, Funny)

cliveholloway (132299) | about 8 years ago | (#15785566)

All that work - and all they had to do was read Slashdot headlines for a few weeks.

*rimshot*

Dupe! (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15785569)

I think. wait...

Repost? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15785570)

Or am I just having deja vu?

So... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15785575)

Deja Vu isn't the Matrix resetting itself?

This is deja vu (2, Insightful)

palindromic (451110) | about 8 years ago | (#15785584)

all over again..

Seriously though, as soon as I read the line "using hypnosis in a laboratory" the plausible-interest part of my brain shut off and my eyes glazed over. Recreate THAT in a laboratory.

Re:This is deja vu (1)

blindbug (979761) | about 8 years ago | (#15785682)

What I *really* would like to see is how many times they repeated this experiment before someone said they have Deja Vu... with the most likely answer being '2'.

Re:This is deja vu (3, Informative)

Almonday (564768) | about 8 years ago | (#15785796)

Yeah, my eyes glazed similarly, but then it occurred to me that so long as there's someone with a big honking imaging device collecting data about brain states, the form of whatever external stimulus they choose to use doesn't matter so much. One doesn't need to be a fan of transcendental meditation to demonstrate that its practice causes physical changes in the brain, nor to record and draw certain, albeit tenative conclusions from said data. I'm not sure if these folks are actually doing that or just conducting a poll of their volunteers, but the mere presence of hypnosis in a scientific setting doesn't necessarily mean that the experiment is without merit. A red flag, sure, but nothing more.

Hypnoscience (5, Insightful)

Attaturk (695988) | about 8 years ago | (#15785813)

Seriously though, as soon as I read the line "using hypnosis in a laboratory" the plausible-interest part of my brain shut off and my eyes glazed over. Recreate THAT in a laboratory.

My thoughts exactly. Since when did data gathered from hynposis or 'hypnotised' patients make its way into the lab? Even hypnotists admit that the discipline involves suggestion. Subjects' responses are usually compatible with the expectations of those around them - the data is tainted. Find a biochemical way of triggering a neurological deja-vu response and I'm interested.

From the article:
The Leeds team set out to create a sense of deja vu among volunteers in a lab.
They used hypnosis to trigger only the second part of the recognition process - hoping to create a sense of familiarity about something a person had not seen before.
The researchers showed volunteers 24 common words, then hypnotised them and told them that when they were next presented with a word in a red frame, they would feel that the word was familiar, although they would not know when they last saw it.
Green frames would make them think that the word belonged to the original list of 24.
After being taken out of hypnosis, the volunteers were presented with a series of words in frames of various colours, including some that were not in the original 24 and which were framed in red or green.
Of the 18 people studied so far, 10 reported a peculiar sensation when they saw new words in red frames and five said it definitely felt like deja vu.


I suppose science - or at least its standards - must have changed a lot since I was in school.

Not to get all metaphysical (1)

kensai (139597) | about 8 years ago | (#15785600)

but how can these scientists claim to have recreated a feeling? Sure they can measure brain activity and the like. But deja vu is more than just recognition of a "familiar" item or setting.

It is more than a 'feeling.' (1)

GungaDan (195739) | about 8 years ago | (#15785697)

The experiment begins with awakening from sleep, after which subjects turn on some music to start their day. Eventually, subjects "lose themselves" in a familiar song, close their eyes, and slip away.

Re:It is more than a 'feeling.' (1)

dgatwood (11270) | about 8 years ago | (#15785782)

"Hooked on a feeling?"

Re:Not to get all metaphysical (0)

wealthychef (584778) | about 8 years ago | (#15785751)

Duh, they ASK the subject to let them know when they feel something looks familiar.

Asking people? (1)

dfedfe (980539) | about 8 years ago | (#15785767)

Unless I misread TFA, they presented the subjects with framed words that they had not seen before, then some subjects stated that the unfamiliar word elicited a perculiar "sensation" and a smaller set of the subjects said it felt like deja vu.
It's right there in the article, left to right, words and sentence.

How about we get to the real issue? (2, Funny)

BlackCobra43 (596714) | about 8 years ago | (#15785603)

Forget Deja Vu, we must study Vuja De. The strange feeling that somehow, none of this has ever happened before. That one REALLY creeps me out.

Much love to George Carlin

Re:How about we get to the real issue? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15785760)

Ne Jamais Vu

All hail the French!

Re:How about we get to the real issue? (1)

BlackCobra43 (596714) | about 8 years ago | (#15785798)

Actually, the "ne" in that sentence is superfluous. It would just be "Jamais vu".

Re:How about we get to the real issue? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15785821)

Did you ever lose a sock? Where does it go?

Deja Vu (0, Redundant)

roman_mir (125474) | about 8 years ago | (#15785612)

A deja vu is usually a glitch in the Matrix. It happens when they change something...

another experiment (1)

saturnism (177882) | about 8 years ago | (#15785613)

i'm sure reading slashdot on daily basis can consistently reproduce deja vu sensations

by mistake? (2, Interesting)

astanley218 (302943) | about 8 years ago | (#15785619)

I read once a while back that deja vu was caused by the brain processing visual data from one eye marginally faster than from the other. This seems like a logical theory to me, but I am not a neurologist. Has anyone else heard of this?

Re:by mistake? (1)

Politburo (640618) | about 8 years ago | (#15785733)

Wiki [wikipedia.org] mentions that theory.

Re:by mistake? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15785776)

how is visual data relevant? What about having a conversation or other experience that gave you deju vu?

Re:by mistake? (1)

omeomi (675045) | about 8 years ago | (#15785814)

I read once a while back that deja vu was caused by the brain processing visual data from one eye marginally faster than from the other. This seems like a logical theory to me, but I am not a neurologist. Has anyone else heard of this?

If that were true, wouldn't I be able to trigger deja vu by closing my eyes, and then opening one before the other one?

Scientists always take the fun out of everything! (1)

ZipR (584654) | about 8 years ago | (#15785633)

Why can't they just let us go on thinking that Deja Vu MEANS something profound, rather than just a brain mistake. Life is more fun that way.

it all makes sense (1)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | about 8 years ago | (#15785634)

Deja Vu Recreated in a Lab Setting

Want to test an experimental interface for comments?


nuff said...

Works for me (2, Funny)

phorm (591458) | about 8 years ago | (#15785635)

I'll just wait until my victims are in front of the billboard advertising McDonalds burgers and then blow them into kibbles. A few well placed meaty chunkss and perhaps a little arterial spray near the picture of some dude chomping on a burger should add to the overall effect of the ad, no?

I hate touchpads (1)

phorm (591458) | about 8 years ago | (#15785655)

Damn thing skipped from the "Billboards" article to this one. Sort for the mispost :-(

Re:I hate touchpads (2, Funny)

TopShelf (92521) | about 8 years ago | (#15785665)

I was gonna say, that's some crazy-ass deja vu...

Strangely, it still made sense... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15785674)

Just kidding. It didn't.

MOD PARENT FUNNY (after reading the grandchild) (1)

cliveholloway (132299) | about 8 years ago | (#15785861)

Well, it worked for me, anyway...

What's this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15785636)

In deja vu, this second process may occur by mistake, so that a feeling of familiarity is triggered by a novel object
 
You mean like when I see a copy of Dune on my book shelf? That's odd that only a novel object triggers this reaction. I would think that albums and DVDs might do the same thing.

Re:What's this? (1)

csoto (220540) | about 8 years ago | (#15785721)

You mean like when I see a copy of Dune on my book shelf? That's odd that only a novel object triggers this reaction.

Dude, that's just genetic memory.

Recreated? BS! (1)

Mikachu (972457) | about 8 years ago | (#15785637)

They're just causing more glitches in the matrix. Great job drawing attention to yourselves, retards. It's almost as if you want the agents to kill you.

Re:Recreated? BS! (1)

another_fanboy (987962) | about 8 years ago | (#15785731)

Maybe the "research" is just an elaborate hoax to draw attention away from the matrix...

This happened to me many times (1)

soft_guy (534437) | about 8 years ago | (#15785641)

When I was much younger, I used to experiment with certain substances.

One particular substance always made it seem like things had happened before - like I was experiencing something in real life that I had dreamt about before and it was very weird/scary. I'm guessing that it was causing the portion of my brain responsible for identifying familiar things to trigger (as mentioned in the article).

No scientific content... (1)

pegr (46683) | about 8 years ago | (#15785649)

To demonstrate...

"Using hypnosis, scientists..."

I rest my case.

Re:No scientific content... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15785804)

Hypnosis has been scientifically studied, and it's a real, non-magical process. Take a look at any introductory course in psychology.

Not even single-blinded (1)

jfengel (409917) | about 8 years ago | (#15785809)

Hypnosis is not completely useless as a scientific tool, but I gotta agree with you here. FTA:

The researchers showed volunteers 24 common words, then hypnotised them and told them that when they were next presented with a word in a red frame, they would feel that the word was familiar, although they would not know when they last saw it...Of the 18 people studied so far, 10 reported a peculiar sensation when they saw new words in red frames and five said it definitely felt like deja vu.

This sounds badly blinded: the same people self-reporting deja vu are also being told what to feel. In theory they aren't consciously recalling what they were told under hypnosis, but I didn't see a control to demonstrate that.

In the end, this result isn't important in itself ("Look, we can recreate deja vu in a lab") but rather the tool it provides for further research, being able to generate deja vu on demand without electro-zapping the brain. If that makes other experiments possible, to understand how memories are stored and recalled using this as a kind of mental stick to poke at the brain, that's an interesting result.

But that result has a caveat that this isn't necessarily identical to real deja vu, might be a completely different phenonmenon, and may simply be research subjects telling experimenters what they want to hear.

I think they're missing a step here (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15785676)

I think they need to first convince me about the validity of hypnosis before they start drawing scientific conclusions from using it.

Re:I think they're missing a step here (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15785848)

I wasn't aware that your acceptance was the barrier to entry in scientific pursuits.

Why Deja Vu occurs... (0, Redundant)

AccUser (191555) | about 8 years ago | (#15785678)

In deja vu, this second process may occur by mistake, so that a feeling of familiarity is triggered by a novel object or scene.

Or there is an alteration in the Matrix...

Huh? (link NSFW) (1)

TopShelf (92521) | about 8 years ago | (#15785686)

Why bother recreating deja vu in the laboratory? Are they too cheap to pay the cover charge [dejavu.com] ?

Of course it happened in a lab setting (3, Funny)

Biff Stu (654099) | about 8 years ago | (#15785702)

They needed to reproduce their results!

Re:Of course it happened in a lab setting (1)

Lord Bitman (95493) | about 8 years ago | (#15785729)

Did they reproduce their results, or do they just think they had the same results before?

Old news (1)

iabervon (1971) | about 8 years ago | (#15785712)

This was previously reported by another British group here: . [ibras.dk]

FARK Headline (1)

ballsmccoy (304705) | about 8 years ago | (#15785715)

Scientists Reproduce Deja Vu in controlled environment. In other news: Applicable bugzilla entry for the Matrix status changed to "minor"

Will they also study the companion sensation? (1)

mmell (832646) | about 8 years ago | (#15785717)

Deja foobar - the feeling of having made the same mistake before.

Re:Will they also study the companion sensation? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15785834)

Or it's companion feeling, Deja Doodoo

The feeling this shit has happened before.

I disagree a little (1)

lawpoop (604919) | about 8 years ago | (#15785723)

The claim here is that the sensation of Deja Vu is the same sensation as our everyday recognizing-something-familiar sense. The thing is, Deja Vu is that 'weird', 'erie' feeling that you get when you see something you think you have seen before. I don't get that same weird, erie feeling when I wake up in my familiar room, or hop into my familiar car.

Maybe the model could be modified a little. In my understanding, the feeling of Deja Vu is its own feeling, not the regular, everyday familiarity feeling.

strip club ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15785725)

wait they built a strip club in there lab ? cool... :)

Vuja De (1)

Eradicator2k3 (670371) | about 8 years ago | (#15785739)

As I read TFA, it suddenly dawned upon me: I had never seen this story before!

I wonder... (2, Interesting)

vishbar (862440) | about 8 years ago | (#15785750)

if something like this could be used to help one who suffers from social anxiety? According to TFA, the part of the brain that triggers deja vu is responsible for one feeling "familiar" with their environment. Maybe something like this could be used to cure the "jitters" from an unfamiliar social situation or a first date?

Great - just what we need... (1)

NotQuiteReal (608241) | about 8 years ago | (#15785808)

Just what we need - a pill that turns someone into a know-it-all.

Questionable science (1)

gigne (990887) | about 8 years ago | (#15785754)

I realise the importance of such studies, but isn't hypnosis itself a questionable science?

The current studies done on the subject of hypnosis are inconsistant, and provide no real answers to it's existence.
Two highly dodgy sources from google show how much dispute about the subject there really is.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypnosis [wikipedia.org]
http://www.psychoheresy-aware.org/hypnos93.html [psychoheresy-aware.org]

Therefore I find the study questionable as to it's scientific merit.
I could be wrong. Please tell me if I am.

B

Possible explanation (2, Interesting)

MarkByers (770551) | about 8 years ago | (#15785763)

I read once that deja vu can occur when the messages from each eye are handled by the brain out of synchronisation. First the image from one eye is processed, processed and stored in the brain, then a millisecond or so later, the brain starts to process the image from the other idea, and finds that it has already an exact copy of the same image in memory. You then get a sudden and very powerful feeling of having already seen the location before, because you just have seen it a millisecond ago!

Usually the brain is able to pair up the two images as being the same, but an occasional glitch can happen. Taking drugs or being tired might increase the chance of these glitches. Of course it would be possible to test this theory (it is falsifiable, unlike most other theories for deja vu) by seeing if people with only one eye get deja vu as frequently as people with two eyes.

I have no evidence that this theory is true, but it sounds plausible and I think the truth could be close to this explanation.

Re:Possible explanation (1)

Target Practice (79470) | about 8 years ago | (#15785859)

I do buy that for sight, but what about sound? I would point the blame more at short term and long term memory, their appropriate'bus speed', and a possible glitch there. The image processing alone wouldn't account for the audio portion of Deja Vu I experience...

So they fixed the bug in the Matrix... (1)

Faw (33935) | about 8 years ago | (#15785768)

... how will we know when the Agents change something???

Tail recursion. (1)

rowama (907743) | about 8 years ago | (#15785771)

Have you ever felt the sensation (i.e., deja vu) start, then while you're telling someone, "Hey, this has happened before," you start feeling like you've had this same episode of deja vu before. You end up in a tail recursion of deja vu about deja vu about deja vu... I'm sure it has never happened to me, because I'm still sane. Just wondering if it's happened to you...hmmm?

Nice article for pseudo science fans (1)

955301 (209856) | about 8 years ago | (#15785789)


Hypnosis? A sample size of 18 people with only 10 experiencing the feeling? They haven't created anything but much ado about nothing.

Wake me when 38 people out of 40 experience it without any persuasion.

Something just occurred to me. (1, Insightful)

Kelson (129150) | about 8 years ago | (#15785816)

Technically, no post on this article should be "Redundant."

Actual, serious question (1)

QuantumFTL (197300) | about 8 years ago | (#15785818)

Trying to resist the urge to make yet another bad Deja Vu joke, I offer up this question: Has anyone ever had something like Deja Vu, but where they feel familiarity of an event or situation, not from a memory of real life, but that it occurred in a dream that they can't quite remember? I get this sometimes, and it's much creepier (IMHO).

Re:Actual, serious question (1)

tpjunkie (911544) | about 8 years ago | (#15785872)

Not really, but I have experienced even creepier things where I'm in a situation where I don't feel any deja vu, but I know that in a second I will, and then a few moments later I do get the deja vu feeling. What the hell is up with that?

The point? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#15785828)

So... people were hypnotized and told that certain things they hadn't seen before would look familiar. Then, when they saw those objects, they felt like they'd seen them before... Just what is this supposed to prove, other than the hypothesis that hypnosis works?

Deja Vu was stimulated artificially in 1959 (1)

giafly (926567) | about 8 years ago | (#15785842)

Scientists knew the basics of Deja Vu, including how to stimulate it electrically, back in 1959 (Mullan) [google.com] .

Wakeup call (1)

quokkapox (847798) | about 8 years ago | (#15785845)

One of the things that's unnerving about deja vu is that it reminds you that your perceptual systems are not perfect. What is reality is not necessarily what you perceive. Go have a look at this: http://www.ritsumei.ac.jp/~akitaoka/index-e.html [ritsumei.ac.jp] . Your mind doesn't always register and record exactly what you're seeing.

Fortunately, deja vu can be (and is) being explained by science. I hope we don't get an influx of pseudoscientific theories like we did with the recent telepathy/esp article...

Every Solaris admin know to ignore memory errors (3, Funny)

wsanders (114993) | about 8 years ago | (#15785879)

Just the other day...

> Jul 25 04:11:11 blah UDBH Syndrome 0xb6 Memory Module Board 3 J3801
> Jul 25 04:11:11 blah SUNW,UltraSPARC-II: [ID 436398 kern.info] [AFT0] errID 0x000a3f92.c551de55 ECC Data Bit 30 was in error and corrected
> Jul 25 04:11:11 blah SUNW,UltraSPARC-II: [ID 858871 kern.info] [AFT0] errID 0x000a3f92.c551de55 Corrected Memory Error on Board 3 J3801 is Persistent
> Jul 25 04:11:11 blah SUNW,UltraSPARC-II: [ID 888460 kern.info] [AFT0] Corrected Memory Error detected by CPU10, errID 0x000a3f92.c551de55

As the hardware gets older these errors become more frequent. Leftover form the dot-com boom days, they can be safely ignored, and one just keeps on drinking.
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