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Holographic Storage a Reality in 2006?

CowboyNeal posted more than 7 years ago | from the future-now dept.

214

vitaly.friedman writes "What do you do when you're getting close to the limits of 2-dimensional optical technology? Well, how many dimensions do we have to work with?" From the Ars Technica article: "How much greater data density? In the Hitachi Maxell device, a single disc about 1 cm larger in diameter than a CD will buy you 300GB. By way of contrast, HD-DVD currently offers a maximum of 30GB on a 2-layer disc, and Blu-ray tops out at 50GB. Although upgrades are in the works that promise to increase the capacity of both of those formats, even the most pie-in-the-sky predictions fall short of what is planned for merely the first commercial generation of holographic storage. Future plans for that medium include boosting the capacity to 800GB in two years, and 1.6TB per disc by 2010."

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214 comments

I don't want a disc 1cm larger than a CD!!! (3, Insightful)

hummassa (157160) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852114)

I want a disc with 1cm radius TOPS, with 4G+ of storage.

Re:I don't want a disc 1cm larger than a CD!!! (2, Interesting)

joshetc (955226) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852164)

I agree.

Maybe not even 1CM.. 2-3CM would be just fine. An important question is why the hell does all of our media have to be huge? Something the size of a flash card or slightly larger would be MUCH better. I'd take a 2.5CM disc with 30GB storage over a 8-9CM disk with 400GB storage any day.

Imagine your whole 300+ movie collection weighing less than 5 lbs and taking a cubic foot of shelf space including the case!

Re:I don't want a disc 1cm larger than a CD!!! (1)

91degrees (207121) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852219)

I agree. I'm starting to find storage media getting perhaps too small. SD is pretty funky, but I keep losing the cards on my desk. But the CDs are way too big and ugly. They need to be smaller than displays screens.

Re:I don't want a disc 1cm larger than a CD!!! (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15852200)

Did you read the article?

It says at the end that the consumer version they are looking at would most likely be the size of a postage stamp and have 75G to 100G of storage.

Re:I don't want a disc 1cm larger than a CD!!! (5, Funny)

hummassa (157160) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852527)

Did you read the article?
You must be new here :-)

Yea I won't lose that... (2, Interesting)

djtachyon (975314) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852317)

I have a hard enough time keeping track of my cd's ... as if I won't lose something the size of a quarter.

Re:I don't want a disc 1cm larger than a CD!!! (0, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15852369)

From the article:

Still, the real money lies in coming up with a product that can be sold in the mass market. With that in mind, InPhase and Hitachi Maxell have been discussing what form a consumer version of the technology might take. One possibility that has been mentioned is a disc around the size of a postage stamp, which would probably hold about 75-100GB.

1 CM larger? (5, Insightful)

insanarchist (921436) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852115)

Wouldn't it make sense to keep it the same size so they can still use existing cd cases & so we don't have to buy new CD racks/holders? I mean, what's an extra ~50GB between friends? :p

Re:1 CM larger? (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15852165)

The disc is thicker and might damage an ordinary cd/dvd drive if it is inserted by mistake. The larger diameter prevents this.

Re:1 CM larger? (4, Funny)

Unknown Poltroon (31628) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852255)

"The larger diameter prevents this."

No, unfortunatley it won't. It will TRY to prevent this.

"Hello, tech support, my dvd drive shrunk, and then it broke when i used the hammer to get the disk in....."

Re:1 CM larger? (1)

gumpish (682245) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852618)

The disc is thicker and might damage an ordinary cd/dvd drive if it is inserted by mistake. The larger diameter prevents this.
This strategy can't be sustained. What happens if yet another disc format medium appears on the market that is slightly thicker than this disc? Do we all go out and buy new cases with 6 inch drive bays to accommodate a slightly bigger disc? Or will the drives for the disc mentioned in this article be "future-proofed" by being able to accept a thicker disc without damaging themselves?

Re:1 CM larger? (4, Informative)

Izmunuti (461052) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852853)

On Inphase's web site they have a PDF file with details on their media.

http://www.inphase-tech.com/products/professional/ download/DataSheet_MEDIA.pdf [inphase-tech.com]

You don't have to worry about inserting it into an ordinary CD/DVD drives because it's in a 135x153x11 mm cartridge. This is exactly the same dimensions of existing MO cartridges. I suppose one could cram one of their holo-cartridges into a MO drive or maybe if one had one of those ancient CD-ROMs that used a caddy...

I like this from the PDF: "Recording Format: Phase Conjugate Polytopic Holographic". Not sure what that means, exactly, but it sounds cool.

Iz

Re:1 CM larger? (2, Funny)

jozmala (101511) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852949)

Do not underestimate the power of the force!

Its like millions of cup holders had screamed, and then silence.

Re:1 CM larger? (5, Interesting)

julesh (229690) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852304)

Not to mention the fact that one of the reasons CDs/DVDs are the size they are (12cm) because it's the widest that can fit in a standard 5 1/4" drive bay (about 14.5cm) with enough space left at the sides for a tray open/close mechanism. These new disks are the same size as a 5 1/4" disk (13cm), which leaves just enough space at the side for guide mechanisms. So we're going to have to push these disks in like floppies. Hope they're not susceptible to scratching.

Re:1 CM larger? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15852416)

They'll probably use cartidges like old PD media and some DVD-RAM media, rather than a bare disc. If nothing else, there's always disc caddies.

Re:1 CM larger? (1)

Fluffy the attack ki (890645) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852437)

Perhaps that was the reasoning behind it, but you can get around that with a simple redesign of the tray. That extra 1cm on the outside pushes the total disk area from about 355.3cm^2 to about 417cm^2. The few cents per drive that changing the tray adds would be more than made up for by the added capacity IMHO.

Re:1 CM larger? (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15852568)

The reason CDs are 120 mm is because that size holds 74 minutes of 16-bit stereo audio. The original specification presented by Philips was 115 mm with 14-bit audio and 60 minutes of storage. However, Sony wanted the extra storage and audio quality (I presume they had a reason behind this -- perhaps the longest LP ever made was 74 minutes long?)

Re:1 CM larger? (3, Interesting)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852739)

I've heared that the reason was Herbert von Karajan complaining that Beethoven's 9th symphony, when played correctly, would not fit onto the disk as originally specified.

Re:1 CM larger? (4, Informative)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852752)

Ok, I've now googled around a bit and found this [philips.com] . Given that it is from a Philips server, it should be a reliable source. Seems what I've heared was not entirely correct, but also not entirely wrong either :-)

Re:1 CM larger? (1)

hitmark (640295) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852738)

hmm, i have a inphase promo video on my machine.
and there the "drive" is a big as two shuttle barebones end to end.

by the looks of it, they have to move the disc in all kinds of directions to get a proper 3D write done.

so my guess is that its not designed to fit in any normal pc drive bay at all.
instead it will use a "rack" drive hooked up to a external scsi connection. and most likely able to interface with most existing backup systems so that you only have to disconnect and remove the old tape bot and put the holo drive in its place...

Re:1 CM larger? (3, Insightful)

Sj0 (472011) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852924)

First you make it work, THEN you make it small.

If you try to get a new technology to exit the birthing process completely ready to sell, you're going to overwhelm your poor engineers.

Re:1 CM larger? (1)

hitmark (640295) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852955)

true. so most likely the current version will never be found inside a desktop pc kinda box.
yet, given that they have to move the very disc around (could maybe be handled by having two R/w heads i guess) indicates that it may take some time for them to shrink it down to a device that can fit inside a 5.25" bay...

Why? (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852315)

For one reason, it means you have to go out and buy more stuff... Its all about the money.

A practical might be to prevent you from shoving the wrong disk in the wrong machine.

Re:1 CM larger? (1)

avirrey (972127) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852885)

If they can force it on to us, they will. Haven't you seen how technology always come with 'accessories' that screw us even further? Companies only consider backwards compatability if they know that exclusion will piss everyone off.

Don't hold your breath. (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15852119)

From the look of it, there won't be affordable writers for home use. So what's left? Another huge storage medium which could hold a lossless movie? But uh oh, MPAA must be spinning at the thought of this. At most we will see $LAME_MOVIE_SERIES all on one disc so you can be milked for cash once again.

Re:Don't hold your breath. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15852682)

From what I remember hearing, these devices were never meant to compete with Blu-Ray and HD-DVD in the entertainment field - they probably won't be used for watching high-definition video content in the living room. Instead, they're meant primarily for data backup purposes.

I could be wrong on the above, but that's the impression that I got from reading the Wikipedia article a few months ago. There are many backers to this technology, but none of them own movie studios.

now one scratch will cost you (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15852133)


your entire pr0n collection

Maybe for you one scratch is all it'll take (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15852184)

Obviously you, sir, are not a true collector of the fine arts...

Re:now one scratch will cost you (1)

Barny (103770) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852214)

Was thinking the same thing, will stick with raid5 ^_^

Re:now one scratch will cost you (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15852462)

your entire pr0n collection


But at least your imaginary girlfriend will love the extra centimeter.

Re:now one scratch will cost you (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15852483)

Yours is that small?

A backup solution (3, Insightful)

laffer1 (701823) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852135)

Finally, some progress on a real backup solution. Backup storage has not kept up with hard drives. It would be nice to be able to backup one of the new seagate disks with 1 or 2 discs. When you consider businesses have terabytes of data now this is still a floppy in terms of capacity. Its a great start though.

Re:A backup solution (4, Insightful)

stubear (130454) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852198)

I was going to say the same thing. Storage isn't the problem these days, backing up extremely large hard drives or RAID arrays is. Not only that but access speeds are really becoming the greater bottleneck. Scanning through 100GB of photos can take a little while. I'd like to see companies work on faster indexing and file management. Microsoft, give us back the unified file storage in Vista damnit.

Re:A backup solution (4, Interesting)

Lord_Dweomer (648696) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852308)

Actually I think storage IS still a problem today. Not necessarily the space for storage, but the durability of it.

For example, my main concern with this new storage is that it will hold a ton, but will still only have the couple year shelf-life that DVD-Rs and CD-Rs have.

As storage space increases but shelf-life lags behind, it becomes increasingly riskier to actually use that full amount of space because you're basically putting more of your chickens in one basket.

Does anybody know of any current developments that are working to solve this issue? Is having a home server the best way to reliably store all those old CD-Rs?

Re:A backup solution (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852765)

Well, it's still better (both in handling and in safety) e.g. to have three copies of the same content, than three disks containing 1/3 of the content each.

Re:A backup solution (2, Informative)

Tweekster (949766) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852840)

Well CD-rs and DVD-r have upwards of 4-8 years and counting for life. Those people that claim 1-2 years, they are full of shit.

Sure if you leave it directly in the sun im sure it will degrade. If you put it in a case in a drawer, it will work just fine for atleast 5 years

Re:A backup solution (1)

MarkByers (770551) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852258)

Why not just backup to another hard disk?

Re:A backup solution (1)

IIRCAFAIKIANAL (572786) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852365)

Because you often don't just back something up once - when dealing with important data (i.e. not your MP3 and porn collection) you want at least 30 days of daily backups... that's 30 gigs right there. Not too cost effective there.

Re:A backup solution (1)

MarkByers (770551) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852388)

that's 30 gigs right there. Not too cost effective there.

Not cost effective? You can get a 30Gig harddrive for $21.99 [ebay.com]

Re:A backup solution (1)

Finn61 (893421) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852374)

For backing up large amounts of data I agree. Now that 700GB SATA drives are available and 200-300GB drives are pretty inexpensive I'd recommend RAID-1 in your severs/desktops and USB attached drives for backing up. The real benefit of optical storage is ease of transport and durability when you accidently drop it on the floor.

Re:A backup solution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15852322)

BS. By the time this hits the street (and by the time you'll have writers within reach) HD capacity will have moved again and surpassed this. At the rate we're moving optical might not ever equalize w/ magnetic (i.e. HD) capacity to be useful for full backup. At best (as now) it's useful for select file backups.

Even your pr0n collection wont' fit, cuz by that time I expect all my pr0n will be in true HD format with surround, etc. so just as today, you'll get 6 or 8 on a disk with compression. If I'm lucky ;)

Great! (0)

bepe86 (945139) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852153)

1.6TB per disc? Nice, a cakebox of those, and I can have a backup of all of my pr0n :D

well start saving.. (1)

scenestar (828656) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852217)

Don't get too excited, though. First generation systems tend to be expensive--on the order of US$15,000 for the reader/writer and between US$120-$180 for the discs.

120x50 = 6 grand.

unless you are a real coinesseur no pron can be worth that much.

Re:well start saving.. (1)

bepe86 (945139) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852448)

You can't put a price on pr0n...

Re:well start saving.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15852464)

US$15,000 for the reader/writer and between US$120-$180 for the discs.

120x50 = 6 grand.

unless you are a real coinesseur no pron can be worth that much.


  FIFTY 300 gig discs? Egad, man, you mean to say you need 15 TERABYTES to back up your porn collection?
 

another format? (1)

dredson (620914) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852158)

Who wants Yet Another Disc Format? Actually, this would fine and great for server backup solutions, but not really for consumer-level stuff like music and videos.

Another waste of time... (1)

Yaa 101 (664725) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852195)

So soon it get's forgotten forever, why do these people waste their and our time with such incompatible media?
Do they really think we pick it up?

Dream on Hitachi / Maxell...

Re:Another waste of time... (1)

Sj0 (472011) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852939)

Would you have said the same thing about companies working on CDs and DVDs before they became popular?

The only real problem with this format is it's been in development for well over a decade and the whole time it's been "almost ready, hope to have it going by this year".

Well, how many dimensions do we have to work with? (5, Funny)

AWeishaupt (917501) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852208)

Give it a few years... 11 dimensional storage. Oh yes.

Re:Well, how many dimensions do we have to work wi (1)

article author (993398) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852228)

i agree with dredson, server backup yes but not on a commercial user level, my opinnion.

Re:Well, how many dimensions do we have to work wi (2, Insightful)

radarsat1 (786772) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852270)

Hm, too bad 7 of those dimensions will only fit one Planck-size bit each.. ;-)

Re:Well, how many dimensions do we have to work wi (3, Funny)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852274)

Great. So when you slide your disc into the drive it spontaneously crosses the Einstein-Rosen bridge and ends up in an alternate reality.

Re:Well, how many dimensions do we have to work wi (1)

SheeEttin (899897) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852510)

Einstein-Rosen bridge
Most people just call them wormholes. I mean, that's what they call them on Stargate...

Re:Well, how many dimensions do we have to work wi (1)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852555)

I was referring to the Sliders series, where Quinn said "I've crossed the Einstein-Rosen bridge."

Re:Well, how many dimensions do we have to work wi (1)

teknimage (930150) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852278)

11 dimensional storage... absolutely! What better back up for a quantum computer? A string theory-based storage solution! MC Hawking will be popping wheelies over this!

Re:Well, how many dimensions do we have to work wi (1)

DivineOmega (975982) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852327)

Media that travels through time. Does that mean if I put work on it, and leave it in the disc drive for a while, it would come out complete?

If so, I need some of this!

DIsc? (5, Interesting)

JanneM (7445) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852232)

I don't want a disc. I want something small we're able to use in smaller portable devices, something where the medium doesn't need to move.

I want a cube. I want a cube about 1cm^3 in size. If that's too thick, a 2x1x0.5cm sliver is OK. Preferably translucent moss green, but other colors are of course also acceptable as long as they've appeared for futuristic storage in at least one reputable sci-fi movie.

To be slightly serious, there's non-aesthetic reasons for this as well. With optical storage it's much faster to move the beam around than the media, and with rotating media your seek and read times alike are limited by the rotation speed.

But mostly I just want a translucent green block because it's cool. Bonus points if there's a small LED inside making it glow.

Re:DIsc? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15852311)

That sounds remarkably similar to the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy media storage. Though I think it was a 16cm^3 cube (1 cubic inch).

Re:DIsc? (1)

dreamchaser (49529) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852366)

Think about those little data cartidges that Spock used to stick into the computer on Star Trek.

Re:DIsc? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15852439)

16cm ^3 = 1 inch ^3?

Try again buddy.

Re:DIsc? (1)

Tylerious (836357) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852394)

What I want to see are the storage units that look like pieces of plexiglass from Minority Report. Maybe when we've reacehd the maximum capactity of holographic storage we'll start embedding data into the actual atomic structure of the glass.

Re:DIsc? (1)

bhima (46039) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852511)

You forget the bit about them making this shit work before the next time my RAID goes fubar...

but otherwize I am very much with you.

Re:DIsc? (5, Interesting)

Finn61 (893421) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852536)

Maybe this IBM Millipede [ibm.com] thing would float your boat. It uses nanotechnology to push indentations into a plastic card.

I think they're working on the translucent green part now.

Hmm (1)

Xymor (943922) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852241)

Doesn't toshiba have a prototype of a Blu-ray with 6 layers and 200GB storage already? How many layers does it take to be considered 3D or holographic?

Re:Hmm (1)

Xymor (943922) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852256)

And by toshiba I mean TDK.

Re:Hmm (1)

Urza9814 (883915) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852323)

Um....a lot more than that? Do you consider a painting to be 3D? It probably has several layers....the canvas is probably a few layers, then a few layers of paint on top of that....

Re:Hmm (2, Informative)

joecr (922134) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852377)

Well for Cds, DVDs, HD-DVD, & Blue-Ray it is all about one single laser beam that doesn't get split.

With Holographic memory [wikipedia.org] it is a question of a beam being split then both beams being pointed to the same spot [wikipedia.org] . So to be Holographic memory you need the beam to be split then to hit the same point at different angles.

Re:Hmm (1)

Zentac (804805) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852405)

Toshiba is the major HD-DVD pusher, no they don't have 200GB Blu-Ray drives, You are probably refering to TDK who is working on 200GB Blu-Ray discs, in 8 Layers though.

Screw holographic storage! (1)

The Living Fractal (162153) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852245)

I want holographic displays!

TLF

Check out millipede (3, Interesting)

Maury Markowitz (452832) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852254)

1Tb / 1 in. This holographi stoage is nowhere near as good as millipede.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Millipede [wikipedia.org]

Re:Check out millipede (1)

mattkime (8466) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852908)

No, but its much less likely to produce high pitched screams followed by the pounding of a blunt object.

2010 reference... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15852262)

Holographic memory... Will these be read in WORM drives?

(ducks)

Yea Scratches! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15852281)

That much storage on a standard size disk I would be afraid to touch it! A pin head scratch and you just lost 20 Gigs of Info.

Better late than never... (2, Interesting)

frostilicus2 (889524) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852286)

Its interesting how some tech predictions can be so wildly wrong. I read some advice in a magazine about 9 or 10 years ago which read something like this - "Don't buy a DVD-R drive, within a year or so they'll be replaced by holographic storage". I waited, but it just never came. Holographic storage has been just on the horizon for so long and never materialized, so its really great that a workable solution has been developed for technology with such promise. A little late, but better than not at all.

Re:Better late than never... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15852314)

I remember that, too. It was 1994 and they said it would be out in a couple years: http://www.byte.com/art/9403/sec6/art1.htm [byte.com]

How many Libraries of Congress is that? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15852287)

"How much greater data density? In the Hitachi Maxell device, a single disc about 1cm larger in diameter than a CD will buy you 300GB. By way of contrast, HD-DVD currently offers a maximum of 30GB on a 2-layer disc, and Blu-ray tops out at 50GB. Although upgrades are in the works that promise to increase the capacity of both of those formats, even the most pie-in-the-sky predictions fall short of what is planned for merely the first commercial generation of holographic storage. Future plans for that medium include boosting the capacity to 800GB in two years, and 1.6TB per disc by 2010."

Yeah but what's that in Libaries of Congress? Or how many Volkswagons can it hold?

Not for mass market... (2, Interesting)

LordVader717 (888547) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852292)

As I understand it, these discs are meant almost exclusively for backup and storage purposes. The thing about HDDVDs and BVDs are that you can press them in a production line for a few cents, while these things are a little more complicated.

Eat my BVDs? (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852484)

The thing about HDDVDs and BVDs are that you can press them in a production line for a few cents

I hope you meant BDs (Blu-ray Disc), not underwear [wikipedia.org] .

Still Disc (5, Interesting)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852295)

Why do these discs have to rotate? How about rotating just the spindle, inside the hub, directing the read/write laser? The reference laser for interference can shine from a fiber around the circumference, or from one side or the other. Rotating the disc is a waste of energy and time.

Re:Still Disc (1)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852622)

Why do these discs have to rotate?


Probably for the same reason that early automobiles came with buggy whips. Because that's what you're 'supposed' to do.

Re:Still Disc (1)

drsquare (530038) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852805)

Rotating the spindle would waste even more energy, and be more complicated.

Just in time. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15852301)

"Future plans for that medium include boosting the capacity to 800GB in two years, and 1.6TB per disc by 2010"

This is the break they [microsoft.com] have been waiting for. Maybe it will fit on a disk now!

"How" is Largely Irrelevant. (3, Insightful)

webword (82711) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852310)

Personally, I don't care how my data is stored. It can be holographic, electromagnetic, or paper-click-o-matic. I care about how much I can store. I want it secure and I want it instantly available. Getting excited about "holographic" is pretty much a waste of time. Just tell me how much I can store, tell me how it can be (easily) set up and secured, and how much it is going to cost. After that, I'm just hearing 01010100101010. No thanks.

By the way, I recently found out about the Data Storage Industry Wiki [pbwiki.com] . From a business perspective, this is pretty cool. They talk about trends and big picture stuff, and there are many good links to useful resources and smart people. Good stuff; relevant.

Re:"How" is Largely Irrelevant. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15852341)

You might be on the wrong website, then.

Re:"How" is Largely Irrelevant. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15852409)

Wrong site? Yeah, that dude'z mauybe got a point through right? I want security and storeage and low co$t too. Its important to everyone, sure. Where else are spots for talking about this - so ynot here yeah? Mod up, up.

Trim it? (1)

Lord_Dweomer (648696) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852320)

They say that its only 1cm bigger than a traditional CD...but couldn't they just trip it down like they do with those CD/business cards and those mini DVDs? I mean yeah, its less space, but its still a HUGE increase.

The one issue of course is whether they read/write like traditional burners, from the inside to the outside. Anybody know whether these do that or not?

Expensive (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15852330)

A HVD disc will cost about $100.
A HVD reader/writer will cost about $10000.

1 cm larger than a CD/DVD sucks. Then it dont fit in standard jewel case boxes, it don't fit in current CD towers, and the device probably wouldn't fit in a 5½ drive bay in the computer chassi. Changing the form factor is a bad idea, changing the form factor to a larger form is an even worse idea!

Re:Expensive (1)

Asztal_ (914605) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852442)

TFA:
InPhase and Hitachi Maxell have been discussing what form a consumer version of the technology might take. One possibility that has been mentioned is a disc around the size of a postage stamp, which would probably hold about 75-100GB.

Great (1)

squoozer (730327) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852337)

They have come up with a disc that will be hard to make a drive for that will fit in a standard drive bay. Why not shave off 1 cm making the disk only 250GB but fit in with every computer in the world.

Re:Great (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15852549)

They have come up with a disc that will be hard to make a drive for that will fit in a standard drive bay. Why not shave off 1 cm making the disk only 250GB but fit in with every computer in the world.


Another yank who can't do conversions.

Well... (1)

jrothwell97 (968062) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852559)

...I hate to be a pedant, but are you sure it would fit in EVERY computer in the world? What about the ones without 5 1/4" drive bays? :-)

But you could ALSO decrease the size of the laser and motor that reads/writes the disk. Thus you would have your 1.6tB (which I can't imagine anyone in the world needing, unless they're a system administrator or Bill Gates) AND it would fit into a 5 1/4" drive bay.

Don't make them too small, dammit. (4, Interesting)

WWWWolf (2428) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852561)

I have a belt bag for my Nintendo DS. I keep six GBA games on the side pocket. GBA games are small enough, yet not too small, easy enough to handle. But currently, I'm keeping one Nintendo DS game in the console itself and keeping the others in my bag in the retail packages. DS games are much smaller than GBA games. I keep worried that I might lose them. I'm trying to come up with a decent, safe enough solution. (Let's see if I can find my old wallet that had all those pockets, that ought to do the trick...) I always get the same sort of worries with memory cards, SIM cards, etc...

The point is, the smaller the storage media comes, the easier it is to lose.

I'm all for 1 cm disks, as long as they come with a caddy that is half the size of a 3.5" floppy.

Re:Don't make them too small, dammit. (1)

dfloyd888 (672421) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852684)

There is a happy medium between cards that are so small that they are easily lost (MicroSD/TransFlash), and too big for pockets (CD/DVD size). For a size engineered for general storage, I've always liked the size of 4mm cartriges or CF media, where one has enough room on the media to write a label with something fairly meaningful (date, time, format, and very terse content description.)

However, this size won't work well for devices like cellphones, PocketPCs, or PSP-like devices.

Maybe a remedy for this would be something postage stamp sized for smaller devices, and having an adapter (like what MiniSD and MicroSD cards come with) to work in a larger sized drive.

Two techno-blog editors are sitting in a bar.... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15852578)

Techno-blog editor one: What time is it?

Techno-blog editor two: Time for another Holographic Storage [slashdot.org] article!

----
I suggest a moratorium on Holographic Storage articles until some device is actually shipping from the factory floor!

dual layer, already 3D (1)

G3ckoG33k (647276) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852601)

What's this nonsense about 2D? Well, in my world a dual layer would be 3D. Why insist on that this is new? It's better, yes, but it's essentially only more layers.

Yohoo for more layers, BTW!!!

YES! That is what i'm lookin' for since i ... (1)

TransEurope (889206) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852631)

... bought my first CD-ROM-Drive more than 10 years ago.
A cool _and_ cheap storage system with small size medias
with about the size of a MiniDisc or 8 cm CD-ROM. Maybe in a
caddy for best protection.
Small medias, easy to transport, fitting easily in the pockets
of your jacket.

Small devices (maybe without a rotating media), consuming low power,
ideal for subnotebooks or fitting in a 3.5"-bay in your desktop computer,
to replace the old floppy-drive.

And what's going on? From generation to generation the standard (!) size of
the medias stays at 12cm. And the memory on it doesn't increase like the
storage capacity of the harddisks, meaning that the conventional optical
medias become less usefull.

I hope the holo-medias have a chance against the existing BR/DVD/HD-DVD-consortiums
to establish the storage-solution which i demand. Would buy it, even if it would be
a few percent higher in price.

Some Idiot (1)

Nom du Keyboard (633989) | more than 7 years ago | (#15852651)

Of course, some idiot had to make it 1cm bigger, just so it won't fit into all existing form factors. Hey, the diameter of a CD/DVD/HD/BluRay is one of the few standards we actually have today.

Older standards include the dimensions of the punch card, and the width of magnetic tape.

Wow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15852675)

I'm not even 30 yet, and I still remember when a 200 MB Hard Drive was the latest thing!!!
Now, if we could only increase competition in the telecommunications industry so that broadband service speeds could keep up with these other more rapidly advancing technologies
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