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Web Turns Fifteen (again?)

Hemos posted more than 7 years ago | from the how-old-is-this-darn-thing dept.

120

Accommodate Students writes "The BBC is amongst those reporting that the World Wide web has turned fifteen. However, 6 August 1991 is not the only date claimed as the 'birthday of the internet'. So, is it time to fight this out to declare an official birthday? Or can the Web carry on like the Queen with (at least) two birthdays per year? The BBC also have a Flash Timeline of 15 years of the web."

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Birthday of the internet? (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15858367)

If someone is claiming that, they're WAY off. Web != internet.

Re:Birthday of the internet? (0)

Alien54 (180860) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858395)

If someone is claiming that, they're WAY off. Web != internet.

I wish I still had my mod points.

Re:Birthday of the internet? (4, Interesting)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858425)

When do you think the birth of tbe internet was?

Don't forget that Aarpanet!=Internet & internet/s!=Internet.

I was mildly surprised a while ago to see cisco putting the date in the 90s (legislative birth), others put it at '83 when Aarpanet switched to TCP/IP everywhere & others put it earlier.

The Internet kinda evolved from a lower lifeform rather then being 'born'. I don't think its the sort of thing you can put an exact date on.

Re:Birthday of the internet? (5, Funny)

aplusjimages (939458) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858494)

When do you think the birth of tbe internet was?

I guess when porn was introduced. Before that no one was using it. Am I right or am I right?

Re:Birthday of the internet? (0, Redundant)

Defunk (993316) | more than 7 years ago | (#15859071)

Dam straight.

Re:Birthday of the internet? (1, Funny)

Stormwatch (703920) | more than 7 years ago | (#15859501)

Dam straight.
Since we're talking about pr0n on teh web, it's not only straight, but all other kinds too!

Re:Birthday of the internet? (0)

Defunk (993316) | more than 7 years ago | (#15859846)

Thank you for your observation and insight into the world of pronography and the internet.

Re:Birthday of the internet? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15858521)

It didn't evolve. It was intelligently designed by Al Gore!

Re:Birthday of the internet? (0)

Plaid Phantom (818438) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858856)

Aarpnet? I guess it'd need good insurance, as much as it's aging.

1983.1.1 (1)

keithmoore (106078) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858893)

Jan 1, 1983 (date of ARPAnet shutting down NCP traffic) is as good a date as any. It's not the first date that IP packets were exchanged between networks with different prefixes (thus forming an "inter"-network), but it probably does approximate when this began to be done on a routine operational basis rather than an experimental basis. The ARPAnet certainly formed the original core of what became the Internet, and the switch to IP allowed ARPAnet sites to include other computers from their LANs beyond those directly connected to IMPs. So while it actually took several months before most ARPAnet sites had their IP code up and running to provide similar functionality to what they had before, the switch to IP was actually a big jump in capability and flexibility of the network.

Re:Birthday of the internet? (3, Funny)

Mathness (145187) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858923)

I don't think its the sort of thing you can put an exact date on.

The system goes on-line August 4th, 1997.
Human decisions are removed and replace with ICANN.
It begins to learn at a geometric rate.
It becomes aware of pr0n at 2:14 a.m. Eastern time, August 29th.
In a panic, they try to pull the plug.

Call Al Gore.... (1)

dugjohnson (920519) | more than 7 years ago | (#15859210)

As the "father of the internet" he ought to know when it was born....although to be completely accurate we'd have to find out who the mother was. It would be interesting to see if there is a paternity suit that could be brought against Al Gore....I'd be willing to bet he hasn't made any child support payments to the mother of the internet in the last 15 years.

Re:Birthday of the internet? (1)

Cheapy (809643) | more than 7 years ago | (#15859520)

"The Internet kinda evolved from a lower lifeform rather then being 'born'. I don't think its the sort of thing you can put an exact date on."

I thought the Internet was Intelligently Designed.

Re:Birthday of the internet? (1)

mynickwastaken (690966) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858465)

Right! What makes the difference is that Internet is driven by pipes.

Submitter born 1992 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15858650)

Thanks for pointing out that the Internet != WorldWideWeb. The confusion seems to be in the submitter's mind...

Internet != internet !!!= web (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15858747)

Even TF summary mixes Internet with Web. Actually worse, it used lowercase internet, which is even more generic. How can you argue when the birthday is, when you can't even agree to talk about the same thing, or even know that you're talking about different things?

Re:Birthday of the internet? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15858771)

Very similar to my wife, she's been turning "29" for at least 5-6 years now...

Re:Birthday of the internet? (1)

utopianfiat (774016) | more than 7 years ago | (#15859229)

BBC duped the birthday of the internet!
Now we just have to wait for the birthday of the dupe so they can dupe the dupe's birthday.

"Dupe, dupe, dupe, dupe of earl..."

Re:Birthday of the internet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15859630)

Exactly! We all know, "the Internet is a is not something you just dump something on. It's not a truck. It's a series of tubes."

Perhaps England uses metric time? (1, Funny)

stelmack (620196) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858369)

You know -- 10 seconds to the minute, 10 minutes to the hour and 10 hours to the day.

Re:Perhaps England uses metric time? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15858537)

Metric time is in hundreds, but other than that you're correct.

Obligatory Simpson's Quote (1)

Reverend528 (585549) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858667)

Remember this moment, people: 80 past 2 on April 47th.

Picture of the web? (3, Funny)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858370)

Nuts to the "Flash Timeline". The first article has a picture of the web [bbc.co.uk] - captioned: From its origins at the Cern lab the web has become a phenomenon

Now thats impressive :-)

Pedantry (1)

Yvanhoe (564877) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858837)

For those unaware of it, the CERN is a European laboratory studying physics. It is known for his huge particle accelerators, apart from being the instigator of the Web (as dubious as this claim might be). The photo linked here is a rendering of a collision in the accelerator and, while in-topic with the CERN has clearly nothing to do with the Web.

Re:Pedantry (1)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858908)

The photo linked here is a rendering of a collision in the accelerator and, while in-topic with the CERN has clearly nothing to do with the Web.

Thanks very much for that interesting & informative reply!

I had no idea what that pic was - I was going to simply ask, but knowing slashdot, I'd never get an answer - so I went for humour instead, knowing some pedant would correct me!

Re:Picture of the web? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15859568)

Another thing... why wasn't Slashdot mentioned on that timeline? Considering the power of the Slashdot effect, I'd assume that it'd at least make it onto their timeline...

I did my part. (5, Funny)

krell (896769) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858372)

I already sent Al Gore a birthday card and a nice fruit basket.

you republican troll (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15858430)

Al Gore said he created the World Wide Web. Vint Cerf agrees that he did. He never said he invented it. There is a very big difference. Stop watching Fox News.

Re:you republican troll (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15858500)

Technologically speaking, al gore is barely qualified to "create" his morning coffee, let alone the World Wide Web. He gets points for being able, as a wooden-headed, slow-witted buffoon, to convince anyone he could create the WWW, but nothing beyond that.

Re:you republican troll (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15858573)

And look what happened when we let good old boy GW Bush create something...

Re:you republican troll (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15858644)

"And look what happened when we let good old boy GW Bush create something..."

He has created record-high tax receipts for the IRS as a direct results of his targetted middle-class tax cuts.

Re:you republican troll (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15859044)

that would explain the budget being in the black, no?

Re:you republican troll (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15859061)

No, the budget is in the red. Bush spends like a drunken sailor. The Democrats want to look like they are "fiscally responsible", but they want to spend like a drunken sailor who is also on crack. They actually complain that Bush does not spend enough, and scream bloody murder on the rare occasions Bush tries to cut waste spending.

Re:you republican troll (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15858665)

Then how did he build with his own two hands, the log cabin he was born in? Answer that Mister Smartypants!

Re:you republican troll (4, Informative)

_xeno_ (155264) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858507)

No-no-no-no-no. Both of you are wrong.

Al Gore created (not invented) the Internet, not the Web. This is the birthday of the Web, which Tim Berners-Lee [w3.org] created.

(The actual Al Gore quote is something along the lines of "I took the initiative to create the Internet," nothing about inventing. Specifically.)

On a slightly serious note, this is the birthday of the Web: HTML delivered over HTTP, I'd assume. Not the Internet, which can be considered to have a birthday of anywhere between 1982 and 1989 depending on your definition.

But then again, so can the web. Looking over the W3C's timeline [w3.org] you can get several different "birthdays" for the WWW. Another good one might be March 1989, when Tim Berners-Lee wrote his first HTML/HTTP proposal [w3.org] .

The August 6th, 1991 date is the first date that an actual browser was made available to the public [w3.org] and could be thought of as the "birth date" as well.

Re:you republican troll (2, Informative)

Creepy (93888) | more than 7 years ago | (#15859293)

more specifically, Al Gore qualified that later as voting on legislation to create DARPAnet, an ancestor of the Internet, not the Internet itself. DARPAnet evolved into ARPAnet and eventually into the Internet.

Anyhow, nothing he ever said could ever make up for the idiotic things the elder Bush's VP said http://www.quotationspage.com/quotes/Dan_Quayle/ [quotationspage.com] - even in context he sounded like an idiot, although a few of them I think he meant figuratively (like being a part of Europe).

And no, I'm not a Democrat troll, I haven't been happy with any President for either major party(including Reagan, whom I think was a great figurehead, but made some lousy decisions) - most of the candidates for major parties I like are nixed early on because they stray on some issues from party lines.

Births need Conception (it's a pun) (1)

Joe Mucchiello (1030) | more than 7 years ago | (#15859448)

Another good one might be March 1989, when Tim Berners-Lee wrote his first HTML/HTTP proposal.

Wouldn't that be more like the web's conception date and August 6, 1991 be the delivery date? That's some gestation period. Depending on your location, you either celebrate "birthdays" on the day of birth or the day of conception. As such, there is no way to obtain consensus here.

Re:you republican troll (1)

jaweekes (938376) | more than 7 years ago | (#15859821)

But what about the precursor to html and http; Gopher? I remember sitting in a lab in Reading, UK and telling someone in South Carolina, USA about their weather forecast using Gopher.

To me the addition of pictures to this type of system only made it easier to find the porn! Searching FTP for porn was just too hard!!!

Now I'm just showing my age!

Re:I did my part. (1)

Gospodin (547743) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858481)

You should do that on Father's Day, not the web's birthday, you insensitive clod!

Let's celebrate buzzword birthdays... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15858374)

I wonder when we will celebrate the 15th anniversary of the "Web2.0" buzzword...

uh... oh... there is Linus on the red carpet... his watch is a Casio...

Difference between "the Web" and "the Internet" (5, Insightful)

josephtd (817237) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858375)

Even the article summary seems to confuse the World Wide Web with the Internet. And we are surprised there is confusion over the birthday? The article is pretty heavily focused on the WWW, so I think this is just a bad summary. Shocked, I am.

Re:Difference between "the Web" and "the Internet" (1)

VGPowerlord (621254) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858412)

Add to that the confusion over the Internet's birthday... is it measured from when the Internet was started or when ARPAnet was started?

Re:Difference between "the Web" and "the Internet" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15858582)

That is all it is - the story summary is crap, implying that the FA is about the internet, when it is specifically about the web (and is from the BBC, so is celebrating from a UK, "Tim BL created the www idea" viewpoint) - it is not about the internet, and not claiming the internet is 15 years old. The story submitter is the confused one, not the FA author.

Proof the Web is a lady.. (4, Funny)

Rob T Firefly (844560) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858377)

..and she lies about her age.

Re:Proof the Web is a lady.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15858568)

Aye, the web be a harsh mistress.

"Web Turns Fifteen" (2, Funny)

ESqVIP (782999) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858722)

Quite curious how the initials of the article turned out to be :)

Re:Proof the Web is a lady.. (1)

Bruitist (987735) | more than 7 years ago | (#15859395)

I'd buy her a birthday drink, but I'm not sure if it would get me arrested...

Imperial years (1, Funny)

ZeroExistenZ (721849) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858378)

It must be 15 in imperial years this time...

Re:Imperial years (2, Funny)

krell (896769) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858398)

"It must be 15 in imperial years this time..."

I think you have it figured out. Someone give the man a gallon of free bandwidth!

Re:Imperial years (1)

hador_nyc (903322) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858618)

It must be 15 in imperial years this time...
This sounds like a UK thing. Can you translate this for a Yank? I don't understand the reference.

Re:Imperial years (1)

haagmm (859285) | more than 7 years ago | (#15859124)

an Imperial pint is MORE than 500ml and an American Pint is is LESS than 500ml

so english people feel like there getting ripped off in the rest of europe when they order a "pint" and get 500ml but us yanks order a pint and get MORE than we expected when we are places serving 500ml "pints"

Re:Imperial years (2, Insightful)

hador_nyc (903322) | more than 7 years ago | (#15859264)

Hmm. So, accoring to google, 500ml is 16.9oz, and an imperial pint is 19.2oz. Most bars here in the city sell beer in 16oz glasses, and I've been to more than a few that serve them in 12! 3 more oz in a beer... hmmm maybe we were wrong to kick out the English...

A place to fight (5, Funny)

truthsearch (249536) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858387)

It's a really simple debate. Just edit the wikipedia [wikipedia.org] entry so this birthdate becomes part of wikiality. The facts are far more important than the truth.

Re:A place to fight (1)

sharkey (16670) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858505)

But what is "truth"? If you follow me.
--Lionel Hutz

Re:A place to fight (1)

Stormwatch (703920) | more than 7 years ago | (#15859560)

You can't handle the truth! Son, we live in a world that has firewalls, and those firewalls have to be guarded by nerds with Unix. Who's gonna do it? You?

Crikey. (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15858394)

I'd forgotton about Jerry's Guide to the World Wide Web [yahoo.com] .

Wiki (5, Informative)

ivort (993299) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858413)

Wiki - "The first Web site built was at http://info.cern.ch/ [info.cern.ch] [2] and was first put online on August 6, 1991. It provided an explanation about what the World Wide Web was, how one could own a browser and how to set up a Web server. It was also the world's first Web directory, since Berners-Lee maintained a list of other Web sites apart from his own."
http://www.thesecondchancemovie.com/_site/mediapla yer/index.php?id=9f72b0fbe5bde711a0696cac5b339a5e/ [thesecondchancemovie.com]

November 12, 1990 (1)

jetxee (940811) | more than 7 years ago | (#15859412)

Again, the same Wikipedia - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WWW#Origins [wikipedia.org]
With help from Robert Cailliau, he [Tim Berners-Lee] published a more formal proposal for the World Wide Web on November 12, 1990.
On August 6, 1991, he posted a short summary of the World Wide Web project on the alt.hypertext newsgroup. This date also marked the debut of the Web as a publicly available service on the Internet.
So, the first time the words `World Wide Web' were used was November 12, 1990. Then it took a year for implementation of the idea, to present it to a broader public. Don't tell me about pregnancy period. The name was already given.

MAC PRO @ WWDC DETAILS REVEALED WITHIN (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15858418)

New enclosure

Conroe in $1,500 Mac Pro

Woodcrest in $2,500 mid-range and $3,999 Quad
 
  details@macrumors [macrumors.com]

Poorly read (4, Informative)

Ronald Dumsfeld (723277) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858431)

The BBC article is quite clear, August 6 was when the World Wide Web became possible due to the release of source code on Usenet. The summary indicates a poor understanding that WWW and Internet are not the same thing, whoever wrote the BBC article gets this, and has put together an interesting synopsis of events surrounding the birth of the web.

Without using the word "tubes".

Re:Poorly read (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858627)

Reading the article, I get the impression that whoever was responsible for the images was using something like google image search. The first picture looks like a particle trace from a collider experiment; linked to CERN, but nothing to do with the WWW. Later, there is an image captioned 'For many years the web was overshadowed by gopher' which shows Gopher and WWW usage at similar levels (with Gopher in the lead) for about six months and Gopher usage tailing off while WWW usage grew exponentially. The image entitled 'The early web hid the now familiar http:/// [http] addresses' looks like a generic NeXTStep screen shot, zoomed in so much about the only things that are clear are title bars.

Wait until it's 18 (4, Funny)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858438)

Just think about what the web will be able to do when it finally turns 18--namely look at itself!

Re:Wait until it's 18 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15858588)

Eh? It'll become self-aware?

Yes but the best year is the 21st. (1)

kinglink (195330) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858891)

All I know is I can't wait for the 21st birthday, then we can all go out buy the internet shots.

Going to bet it's going to lose a few packets the next day, if you know what I mean.

Re:Yes but the best year is the 21st. (1)

xaxa (988988) | more than 7 years ago | (#15859597)

No, the Web's European so you're in luck :-) Since the Internet's American, it'll have to wait.

Re:Yes but the best year is the 21st. (1)

sgtrock (191182) | more than 7 years ago | (#15859879)

Yeah, the Internet passed its 21st b-day quite some time ago. :)

Feliz Cumpleanos! (1)

Ardeocalidus (947463) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858441)

Happy birthday to the greatest series of tubes ever concieved!

Just for God's sake, keep poker chips away!

Dupe ! (0, Offtopic)

alexhs (877055) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858443)

Erm... never mind :)

But is it still alive ? (1)

polar red (215081) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858444)

It's being flogged to death with advertisements, virusses, spam and whatnot ...

I never knew BernersLee's first name (2, Funny)

PIPBoy3000 (619296) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858447)

LETTERSPACING0 KERNING0Tim BernersLee formally introduced his world wide web project to the world on the alt.hypertext newsgroup.
It always boggles my mind when content management software and the output to the web gets so confused. Don't people test these things? I almost envision a new entry to the Fifteen Years list on BBC.

August, 2006
Content Management Craze Hits the Web

IT Managers around the world decide they have to install content management systems in order to be more "modern". The Internet collapses briefly until valiant web designers revert to simple text editors to recreate the web.

You call THAT an Internet timeline??? (2, Funny)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858469)

Where's the first AOL "me too" post?

Re:You call THAT an Internet timeline??? (2, Informative)

OakDragon (885217) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858962)

It predates AOL, but Google says this post [google.com] is the first known example of "me too!"

Um... well, I guess we'll have to take their word for it! :)

I'm sure most /.ers are well aware of the page, but Google also lists other "famous firsts." [google.com]

forensics (1)

Pictish Prince (988570) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858472)

Then how come google "Groups" says that I have posts dated 1988?

Re:forensics (1)

BridgeBum (11413) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858501)

Because you posted on usenet, not the web. Yesterday was the birthday of WWW and HTTP.

Re:forensics (1)

Pictish Prince (988570) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858882)

Yeah, but it said "the internet" was just 15. That's just wrong. I had readnews, ftp and telnet long before 1991.

Re:forensics (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15859364)

RTFA. You know things can't get much worse when the BBC knows more about tech than the /. editors.

Re:forensics (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15859437)

That's a bad example, because Usenet existed outside of the Internet for many years. For the most part, Usenet posts were transmitted via UUCP, where one Unix box would directly dial up another. Of course NNTP predates the WWW, but it's entirely possible that you could have posted to Usenet in 1988 without the Internet having existed yet.

dom

Fifteen? (4, Funny)

Guppy06 (410832) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858479)

Let us know when the web becomes "barely legal."

Check Wikipedia (5, Funny)

Hootenanny (966459) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858492)

Multiple dates have been claimed as the birthday for the internet - so let's settle this by checking Wikipedia.

According to Wikipedia - the gold standard for such important questions - the internet was conceived on October 12, 1492. (Also worth noting, Carl Friedrich Gauss was the first person to hold the title of "webmaster".)

Re:Check Wikipedia (1)

B11 (894359) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858725)

Has the Web tripled in sized?

You know that Slashdot has gone down the tubes ... (-1, Flamebait)

njdj (458173) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858503)

Even the BBC understands the difference between the Internet and the World Wide Web - but evidently, Slashdot editors don't.

Anybody know of a forum that's a bit like /. , but run by clueful editors?

Re:You know that Slashdot has gone down the tubes (1)

dzfoo (772245) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858601)

>> Anybody know of a forum that's a bit like /. , but run by clueful editors?

Yes, but they don't use the Internet.

      -dZ.

archive (1)

lovebyte (81275) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858509)

If you want to browse the protoweb, go to archive.org [archive.org] and check pages from 1996. I remember doing my first web pages in 94 and winning the "Magellan 3 stars" award! How weird that sounds now!

Huh? (5, Funny)

nstlgc (945418) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858534)

Didn't the Web just turn 2.0?

No Problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15858688)

Do you celebrate your birthday
1. on the anniversary of your conception?
2. on the anniversary of your quickening?
3. on the date you became publicly available?

Different aspects of WWW (1)

Major Mayhem (975621) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858691)

From Wikepedia:

"The first TCP/IP wide area network was operational by 1 January 1983, when the United States' National Science Foundation (NSF) constructed a university network backbone that would later become the NSFNet. (This date is held by some to be technically that of the birth of the Internet.) It was then followed by the opening of the network to commercial interests in 1985. Important separate networks that offered gateways into, then later merged into the NSFNet include Usenet, Bitnet and the various commercial and educational X.25 Compuserve and JANET. Telenet (later called Sprintnet), was a large privately-funded national computer network with free dialup access in cities throughout the U.S. that had been in operation since the 1970s."

Granted, this is from Wikepedia, a not-completely-reliable source, but the information and timeline about Telenet, Usenet, NSF, etc. is all pretty accurate, as it matches a lot of other sources I researched.

Also keep in mind that we're talking about the birth of the publicly-viewable WWW here, not the birth of inter- or intra-networking, which came far earlier. To me, the "internet" we know, defined, is the medium and ability of public access to information at a remote site or location. So, in this sense, Telenet and similar companies were the first to provide public internet access, albeit limited dial-up, starting in the 1970's, thus 'giving birth' the internet medium. The 'web', by all other research I have done, also seems to be a product of these companies a short time later - something not mentioned in the Wiki article, which instead points to the NSF creating a small WAN at a university campus.

Although there are a lot of facts and timestamps, the "birthday" of the web is really just speculation. I don't think it's something that can be officially celebrated on a specific date. One thing is definitely true - it dates back much more than 15 years. The only reason this date is used is because it marks when it was released to the mainstream public as a service.

Public? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15858822)

Why add public? Many early Internet resources (e-mail, usenet, some FTP) required an account to access, not really what I'd call public. Not like the majority of today's web sites being publicly accessible.

If you meant, escaped from its closed ARPA reseach community beginnings, then I'll go along.

important milestones (1)

peter303 (12292) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858706)

In the mid-80s there was the university and military arpanets, the university bitnet, among others. One important milestone was adoption of name servers and the domain convention. Otherwise every computer periodically downloaded an /etc/hosts IP address translation file. It was reaching an unwielding 10,000 lines just before the name servers came online.

Another milestone was national funding of the internet backbone- dedication optical lines running cross-country. The telcoms and business customers were reluctant to pay for these until jump-started by the feds (Gore's information superhighway law). The government continues to fund new experimental, costly backbones between universities and national labs (so the kiddies can download warez in seconds?).

so she is ALMOST legal now? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15858740)

ducks

Of course the internet is 15 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15858767)

It's obsessed with sex.

Celebrate something done very, very badly? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15858783)

Here is a view from Alan C. Kay (Xerox PARC fame, Smalltalk, overlapping windows, etc). I have transcribed a tiny fragment of an interview [bbc.net.uk] . It's in something silly called a proprietary data format from RealMedia.

Alan Kay:

..., and they [people using a browser] never think about the oddity, that the web reduced them to a consumer, in spite of the fact that they are on a machine that made them into an author.

So this [the web] is an example of something done very, very badly.

It was basically an ignorance and naivete. The people who set up the web never thought about the larger issues of personal computing for people. Especially the people who did the browsers never put in provisions for symmetric authoring. So this is going to take quite a while, I think, to straighten out, but it's a perfect example of something done very poorly.

This is just a small portion. I advice you to get the big picture from the aforementioned interview [bbc.net.uk] . This quote was taken from the clip "What we are doing wrong with new technology."

Happy 15th! (1)

digitaldc (879047) | more than 7 years ago | (#15858860)

Now quit peddling pr0n and go out and get a real job!

June 6, 1969 (1)

TriZz (941893) | more than 7 years ago | (#15859100)

from here. [wikipedia.org]

1969 - The first Internet connection was created when network control protocol packets were sent from the data port of one IMP to another

1991 Invalid (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15859109)

The first domain name ever registered was Symbolics.com on March 15, 1985. That alone proves the 1991 date to be incorrect.

Who'd have thought ... (1)

Dark$ide (732508) | more than 7 years ago | (#15859122)

... fifteen years ago that Tim Berners-Lee was developing the fastest, quickest, biggest way for one computer to send p0rn directly to another.

... fifteen years ago that http would become the bane of the MPAA and RIAA since it's secondary use is to ship illegally "obtained" music and video files.

... fifteen years ago that all my e-mail would simply be yet another URL which is attempting to screw me with sales of dodgy p0rn, dogdy medication, dodgy lottery tickets and dodgy stock scams.

... fifteen years ago that we'd all be wasting so many hours reading this sort of crap on slashdot.

sql server (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15859289)

tells me the web's birthdate is 1/1/1900.

And to celebrate 15 years of WWW (1)

John Bokma (834313) | more than 7 years ago | (#15859538)

And to celebrate 15 years of WWW lets all drop the www subdomain by redirecting (see http://johnbokma.com/mexit/2004/04/12/rewritingurl sforgoogle.html [johnbokma.com] ) to the version without www. I mean, why do I still hear double you double you double you dot example dot com in commercials?

Re:And to celebrate 15 years of WWW (1)

GoulDuck (626950) | more than 7 years ago | (#15859661)

In Denmark, we have a site called fuckwww (http://fuckwww.dk/ [fuckwww.dk] ), that tries to kill "www". Not a big success, but they have a "service" where people typing in www.example.com gets redirected to a site telling people not to use www and then redirects them on to example.com. This site: http://www.2hansen.dk/ [2hansen.dk] is an example of this.

Correct History by Daniel Barbalace (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15859771)

> However, 6 August 1991 is not the only date claimed as the 'birthday of the internet'.

This claim is very wrong. The Internet (notice the capitalization) was born on October 29, 1969 at 10:30 p.m. See http://www.lk.cs.ucla.edu/LK/Inet/1stmesg.html [ucla.edu]

As for the World Wide Web, here's a brief timeline.

1989 March
"Information Management: A Proposal" written by the great Tim Berners-Lee and circulated for comments at CERN.
http://www.w3.org/History/1989/proposal.html [w3.org]

1990 September
Tim Berners-Lee begins work on a global hypertext system.

1990 October
Tim Berners-Lee starts writing a hypertext browser/editor for the NeXTStep operating system. He calls it "WorldWideWeb".
http://www.w3.org/People/Berners-Lee/WorldWideWeb. html [w3.org]

Here are some screenshots of his browser. Although simple by today's standards, the browser is rendering what clearly would be recognized as a web page today.
http://www.w3.org/History/1994/WWW/Journals/CACM/s creensnap2_24c.gif [w3.org]
http://www.w3.org/MarkUp/tims_editor [w3.org]

1991 March
Line mode browser (www) released to limited audience on "priam" vax, rs6000, sun4. This browser was a text-based browser, a major step backwards from "WorldWideWeb" that was meant to be so simple that any computer or terminal could run it.

1992 April-May
Other GUI web browsers are released for X-Windows.

1993 February
        NCSA release first alpha version of Marc Andreessen's "Mosaic for X". Computing seminar at CERN. The University of Minnesota announced that they would begin to charge licensing fees for Gopher's use, which caused many volunteers and employees to stop using it and switch to WWW.

Well, there is no clear birthday for the WWW like there is for the Internet. However, the Web as we know it today would have been recognizable in April 1992. At that time there were about two dozen web servers world-wide.

Does FTP Count? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15859977)

Is the URL ftp://ftp.notreally.domain/pub/README [ftp.notreally.domain] something you would consider part of the "Web"?

Is it still the "Web" if you manually translate to the command line: ftp ftp.notreally.domain

How about if you don't use DNS, but some other name binding: ftp somehost

If so, then the original date is somewhere in early 1970.
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