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Wii Version of Twilight Princess to Require Wiimote

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the wiitastic dept.

134

1up is reporting that the Wii version of Nintendo's Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess will require the use of the Wiimote. The GameCube controller for the Wii will not be usable for the Wii version of the game, despite the fact that the game will also be coming out on the Cube. This has provoked discussion that the Wii version of the game may include extra content or gameplay elements, which will make it unplayable with the GameCube controller. From the article: "Many had hoped Nintendo would allow for dual Wii and GameCube support ala a number of upcoming Wii releases, but Nintendo appears confident enough in its design that hardened fans will have to pick up the GameCube release if they're that hardcore. You still have time to decide which one sways you, as both versions will be launched simultaneously during Wii's launch date this fall."

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134 comments

Wii version bad for the game, bad for the wii (4, Informative)

ZakuSage (874456) | more than 7 years ago | (#15923599)

According to n-sider [n-sider.com] ,

* Bad for the game: Twilight Princess is a GameCube game, plain and simple. It was developed around a solid traditional foundation, with traditional and cleanly defined control options. The Wii controller is simply unable to completely emulate the functionality that the game was designed around. Even if it could emulate all of the functionality, it's not really adding anything to the game. All it's doing is tacking on more convoluted ways of doing things you could already do with the GameCube controller.

* Bad for the Wii: Again, Twilight Princess is a GameCube game. Gamers might be more forgiving of the fact that the Wii version has GameCube graphics if not for the fact that it has GameCube gameplay as well. The Wii seems to be rife with these kinds of games at the moment -- games that only use the motion-sensing capability of the controller to emulate actions that you could do with a regular controller. When you change the controller without changing the game, you do a piss-poor job of proving the point of your hardware. The Wii is supposed to offer new possibilities, not repackage the past with a shiny new bow.

The same article also says the game plays rather poorly with the wiimote, and that the controls seem to be a bad imitation of fine gamecube controls. The worst part is the lack of camera control on the wii version. Looks like I'll be picking up the GameCube version for sure.

Re:Wii version bad for the game, bad for the wii (5, Insightful)

MBCook (132727) | more than 7 years ago | (#15923674)

See I don't believe this. That article seems to be about the version shown at E3. The fact is by the time the game comes out E3 will have been about 6 months before. In the mean time I have heard that the controls on Excite Truck and it's visuals have improved. I've heard the same about Red Steel and Metroid Prime Three.

I really think that they would have fixed that kind of stuff since then. Nintendo doesn't tend to do that half-assed tack-on-features stuff for something so important as core game play on one of their AAA titles.

Re:Wii version bad for the game, bad for the wii (5, Insightful)

aywwts4 (610966) | more than 7 years ago | (#15923730)

Good point, Back in the day, when these kind of events were populated by industry representatives instead of bloggers who talk about games, Magazines would seldom if ever mention tech demos in a negative light, instead trying to focus on the positive and what the game could possibly become. Any responsible journalist should know these games have six months of development ahead of them, but bashing a game still under testing gets more 'diggs' to your 'blogg' Especially since most of the insults boil down to the controller setup, which is quite possibly the easiest thing to continue to tweak and refine right up until the day it ships.

Re:Wii version bad for the game, bad for the wii (2, Insightful)

abandonment (739466) | more than 7 years ago | (#15924445)

you have a good point - it is so easy to write about the potential downside of any new product, particularly when you have no 'real' experience in what it takes to create a successful product.

i think 'armchair' journalists are doing more harm than good, whether for or against any particular product.

with the amount of testing that is required to meet a console specs just to pass certification, it is very unlikely that nintendo is going to let any launch titles, let alone their BIG first party launch title be anything but killer.

Re:Wii version bad for the game, bad for the wii (2, Insightful)

Gulthek (12570) | more than 7 years ago | (#15924632)

i think 'armchair' journalists are doing more harm than good, whether for or against any particular product.

Funny, I think that people who don't read 'armchair' journalists with the requisite grain of salt are the ones doing harm. More perspectives and voices in the news is fantastic, just don't give most new sources much credence.

If you read something in five 'armchair' sources, you can start to assume that the event they are describing probably happened but never believe the details. The same goes for reputable sources, except that you can drop the required number to three.

Re:Wii version bad for the game, bad for the wii (2, Insightful)

Redlazer (786403) | more than 7 years ago | (#15924013)

I totally agree with you.

I couldn't imagine the controls not being perfect. In on the DS, Super Mario 64's camera is fantastic. It just sounds to me that someone is upset their precious PS3 or 360 may become obsolete, and they can't really tolerate that sort of fear. But that's not exactly what were talking about, eh?

What more than likely happened here was he didn't want to embrace something new. He was used to the old way of doing things - and therefore had trouble adopting a ENTIRELY new control scheme. What i would be much more interested to hear, is what people who have never even touched a video game controller would think - of course, with the necessary practice, as with anything new.

-Red

Re:Wii version bad for the game, bad for the wii (0)

PhetusPolice (934823) | more than 7 years ago | (#15924617)

Also, remember that at E3 they used a Gamecube to run their Wii demonstrations.

Re:Wii version bad for the game, bad for the wii (3, Informative)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 7 years ago | (#15924649)

No, they didn't. They used a gamecube case, thats all. The insides were the Wii.

Re:Wii version bad for the game, bad for the wii (1)

Deadguy2322 (761832) | more than 7 years ago | (#15925925)

Not that there is much of a difference between the two...

Re:Wii version bad for the game, bad for the wii (1)

atomicstrawberry (955148) | more than 7 years ago | (#15925004)

I agree with you. It seems very unlikely to me that Nintendo would have even bothered to port it to Wii if Miyamoto wasn't reasonably convinced it would work with the controller. We would have gotten it a year and a half ago if that were the case. That said, I'm glad EB has a nice returns policy - if it really does play terribly, I'll just bring it back and exchange it for the Gamecube edition.

Re:Wii version bad for the game, bad for the wii (1)

aichpvee (631243) | more than 7 years ago | (#15925085)

While I'll be getting the Wii version myself, I think it's unfortunate that they aren't including a GameCube play option. I'm a little burnt out on the N64-style Zelda controls, especial with Wind Waker where it seems like they were trying to avoid the kind of clunky feeling of having to lock-on to an enemy to accurately target it but it wound up with too many cases of the enemies queuing up for their turn at a beating.

There have been a lot of games released since Ocarina where you can accurately target different enemies without manually having to select them and I'd really like to see Zelda take this approach in the future. Games just feel so much more fluid and dynamic without this very "game-y" play mechanic.

I'm really looking forward to the Wii-specific features of Twilight Princess, but it is concerning that they are just adding extensions to the dated combat engine instead of opening it up in ways that they definitely could with a gamepad and that could be really cool with the freehand controls. It seems to me that if they're so confident in their new mechanics that they'd welcome people directly comparing them to the N64/GameCube style. Including an option to play using the "classic" controller would have been a great way to do that, and a lot cheaper for their fans than shelling out another $50 (hopefully the GameCube version will be a bit cheaper) to get a separate version of the game.

It'd even work if they made it a completely separate game that you had to select from before starting a new game as they did with the original and Master Quest versions of Ocarina of Time on GameCube. But Nintendo knows we're all suckers and going to play the new Zelda either way, and this way they'll just make a few extra sales on the diehard fans buying it twice. Or at least some second-hand sales for the specialty game shops anyway.

Here's hoping that the Wii enhancements blow us all away and we'll all forget that there even is another version.

Re:Wii version bad for the game, bad for the wii (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 7 years ago | (#15925931)

I found the targeting ability in Wind Waker made it way to easy to kill even the boss characters. The fact that you could easily strafe around a kill them without being hit most of the time made it a little too easy. It only got hard when there was more than 3 knights attacking you, which wasn't very many points in the game, and you could often lure they away from the group one at a time, and easily do away with them. I found that the enemies had above average AI (as far as most games go), which made them a little harder, however, the entire game was still too easy.

Re:Wii version bad for the game, bad for the wii (1)

kalirion (728907) | more than 7 years ago | (#15926082)

Hey, anyone remember the original Star Craft visuals shown at E3, using the Warcraft 2 engine?

Re:Wii version bad for the game, bad for the wii (1)

XpL1CiT (992964) | more than 7 years ago | (#15926176)

If this was the PS3 or the Xbox360, you would probably be bashing it.

Re:Wii version bad for the game, bad for the wii (4, Insightful)

Babbster (107076) | more than 7 years ago | (#15923731)

Besides, isn't one of the "tests" for the Wiimote going to be how well previous game styles translate to the new controller? If Nintendo didn't have confidence in their own controller for one of their flagship titles, that would bode ill for every other game on the system.

Frankly, this sounds to me like an old dog who doesn't want to learn a new trick. The game could blow with the Wiimote or it could rock...only the final release will tell.

Refer to Super Smash Brothers (1)

ianscot (591483) | more than 7 years ago | (#15926333)

If Nintendo didn't have confidence in their own controller for one of their flagship titles, that would bode ill for every other game on the system.

For what little it's worth, Nintendo has said it's not using the Wiimote's motion sensing features for the first Wii Super Smash Brothers. Comments to the effect that it didn't add much to the game, etc.

Flagship title? Check.

Re:Wii version bad for the game, bad for the wii (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15923756)


* Bad for the game: Twilight Princess is a GameCube game, plain and simple. It was developed around a solid traditional foundation, with traditional and cleanly defined control options. The Wii controller is simply unable to completely emulate the functionality that the game was designed around. Even if it could emulate all of the functionality, it's not really adding anything to the game. All it's doing is tacking on more convoluted ways of doing things you could already do with the GameCube controller.

* Bad for the Wii: Again, Twilight Princess is a GameCube game. Gamers might be more forgiving of the fact that the Wii version has GameCube graphics if not for the fact that it has GameCube gameplay as well. The Wii seems to be rife with these kinds of games at the moment -- games that only use the motion-sensing capability of the controller to emulate actions that you could do with a regular controller. When you change the controller without changing the game, you do a piss-poor job of proving the point of your hardware. The Wii is supposed to offer new possibilities, not repackage the past with a shiny new bow.


I actually think that this is one of the worst arguments I have seen.

The Gamecube version was basically completed sometime around April of last year; at some point between then and when it was announced for the Wii it became a Wii game. It would be reasonable to assume that the game was intially delayed, they started adding Wii controls (in case you played the Gamecube version on the Wii) and the control scheme started to mature to the point that it was worth creating the game primarily for the Wii.

If you assume that it became primarily a Wii game in December/January then it had 3-4 months of focused development before E3 (most E3 demos are based off of a couple month old build that has been heavily tested to avoid bugs and crashes). What we know is that 4 months into a 10 month development the controls were not perfect (shocking, I know).

Ultimately, Nintendo will have solid controls ready for launch because I have never owned a Nintendo game with sloppy controls.

Re:Wii version bad for the game, bad for the wii (2, Insightful)

techstar25 (556988) | more than 7 years ago | (#15923959)

You could make that same argument for every game that will be released for the Wii. Apparently someone at "n-sider" is still living in 2001. The whole point of the Wii is that it will change EVERYTHING. And we'll have to change the way we think about gaming. For those who still need their controller, there will be a PS3. Nintendo is moving forward. At some point you have to cut the umbilical cord (throw away the old controller) and just go for it. It's taking a lot of balls to make that decision, but they are standing by it. Good for them.

Re:Wii version bad for the game, bad for the wii (3, Insightful)

aywwts4 (610966) | more than 7 years ago | (#15924615)

Well no they aren't cutting the umbilical cord so to speak.

Super Smash Bros will use the classic controller, as I'm sure other games will. The man behind the series realized motion sensitive gaming doesnt make this particular game more fun, only adds a needless gimic.

It takes a great group to take risks, (Motion sensitivity, Touch Screens on the DS etc) but it takes a wise company to know when those features aren't necessary. The DS suffered from it initial, everything needing to be touched in some way, even if it only detracts from the game play; but by now they seem to have it down very well, and only use the touch screen when it directly enhances game play.

Re:Wii version bad for the game, bad for the wii (1)

steveo777 (183629) | more than 7 years ago | (#15926379)

Super Smash Bros will use the classic controller, as I'm sure other games will. The man behind the series realized motion sensitive gaming doesnt make this particular game more fun, only adds a needless gimic.

I don't know what you're talking about. All I know is that if I can use the Wii-mote in SSB, then I dang well want to. What could be more fun than actaully punching your buddy on the couch next to you?! All I know is I can't wait to beat the tar out of Wario with EVERY other character. Because I hate Wario. I used to just love beating on Kirby and Jigglypuff... because it reminded me of those punching ballons I had as a kid. But I always plain hated Wario.

Kidding aside. I don't think Smash Bros would work well with the remote anyway. And it's not like the game has that complex of a control scheme, so they could probably get away with using the Wii-mote, just not the motion/pointer capabilities.

Re:Wii version bad for the game, bad for the wii (1)

MBGMorden (803437) | more than 7 years ago | (#15926521)

You speak as if the "Wii-mote" is somehow intrinsically better than a "regular" controller. They're input methods. We don't have to somehow accept the inevitability of the Wii-mote. It might suck for all we know.

And it could be a great thing. It's just that we have to wait and see. Declaring the regular controller as obsolete is a bit shortsighted though.

Personally, I've yet to try it myself, but just from looking at it there are *SOME* games that it would be kinda fun on. The idea of a Wii controlled light saber or sword, or even an in game gun, seems very neat. I could have fun with those. I don't see it as a good primary/default input though. Basically, I see shades of the light gun all over again. Really nice toy for games that could use it, but in the end just a gimmick.

Re:Wii version bad for the game, bad for the wii (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15924152)

Why not be smart and rent both first? When have reviewers ever been right, particularly before a game is out?

Re:Wii version bad for the game, bad for the wii (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15924480)

"Looks like I'll be picking up the GameCube version for sure."

Looks like everyone is thinking this way, having to choose one or the other. But why should we have to choose? Wouldn't it be best if nintendo sold one box, with both the Gamecube and Wii discs inside, so that we could try them both and play whichever we liked best? That would be the ideal solution. But that's not going to happen. Nintendo is hoping that enough of us fanboys are going to buy both versions, selling one games twice is a good deal for them isn't it? And they know the strategy, they've done it before. Pokemon was the first i believe with it's red and blue versions. Or was it the zelda: oracle of seasons/ages? Seems like this is becoming a bit of a trend with nintendo. Now don't get me wrong, I'm a total nintendo fanboy, but ninty is really starting to tick me off with this game. Anyone remember how nintendo originaly said they were delaying it to finish it, and not to turn it into a Wii game? Hmmm...

Re:Wii version bad for the game, bad for the wii (1)

person132 (986809) | more than 7 years ago | (#15924699)

Oracle of Ages and Oracle of Seasons were completely separate games, and excellent ones, at that. There was just some added content when you played both.

Re:Wii version bad for the game, bad for the wii (1)

mausmalone (594185) | more than 7 years ago | (#15926281)

There's no lack of camera control... according to people who played the E3 demo, you hold Z and move the remote to move the camera. It's just that the people at n-sider never bothered to ask and just assumed that since a 2nd analog stick was missing, the camera control must not be there.

I'm ready to say good-ridance to the WW camera... it was surprisingly hard to use.

Re:Wii version bad for the game, bad for the wii (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15927157)

What? You mean using the CAMERA-stick as a camera, like nearly every other game since the generation has started? Yeah, so hard for someone so fucking obsessed with the Wii tor realize that the controls are simply worse. Idiot.

What can't a "regular controller" do again? (1)

ianscot (591483) | more than 7 years ago | (#15926411)

The Wii seems to be rife with these kinds of games at the moment -- games that only use the motion-sensing capability of the controller to emulate actions that you could do with a regular controller.

I am not understanding this point; maybe it's just been stated clumsily.

A "regular controller" uses buttons that are mapped to [whatever action]. What's the set of actions that cannot be mapped to a button press and analog stick set of controls, again? The motion sensor gives us another way of controlling actions, in the same sense that analog sticks added their element -- but are we supposed to have only games relying on motion sensing, then? Or what?

If what they're saying is that studios -- including Nintendo in this Zelda case -- just took games already under development and made the Wiimote actions "map" to something that was a button before, that makes some sense... But doesn't particularly convince me that the Wiimote couldn't be a dramatic improvement over other controllers. A mouse is much better controller for FPS titles than a keyboard or a "regular" console controller. For similar reasons, people like the idea of the Wiimote in FPS games too. Is that "just emulating" stuff you can do with the other controllers?

To shoot Link's bow, you can either a) use an analog stick to aim and then press a button to fire; or b) draw the Wiimote back and aim it using the motion sensing, with the little speaker in the remote saying "sho-ook" when you release your arrow. Is that just remapping actions from a regular controller?

Re:What can't a "regular controller" do again? (1)

ZakuSage (874456) | more than 7 years ago | (#15927174)

The point is that the controls worked well with Wind Waker, and all the Wiimote seems to be doing with TP is to emulate these controls poorly.

Ironic actually. (1)

dosboot (973832) | more than 7 years ago | (#15926535)

Nintendo most likely feels the need to embrace the motion sensing functionality whole heatedly in order to save face. Think about it, Zelda:TP is their number one launch title; it wouldn't instil much confidence if Nintendo didn't have faith in their own controller. As a direct result of Nintendo's decision a large number of informed gamers may end up buying the GC version over the Wii version. It is quite possible that this will be picked up and used as evidence that gamers don't have faith in the Wiimote, exactly what Nintendo was trying to avoid. There is still a small chance though that they will program a setting which will allow us the use the nunchaku analog stick to aim the bow and do spin attacks.

way to be on the ball (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15923605)

Erm, I suppose I should be complaining about 1up reporting this as news on a slow news day, but didn't Nintendo make this clear back during E3?

in other news (5, Funny)

minus_273 (174041) | more than 7 years ago | (#15923610)

Xbox 360 version of kameo ro require 360 controller. PS3 version of heavenly sword to require ps3 controller..

best headline ever.

Re:in other news (1)

WilliamSChips (793741) | more than 7 years ago | (#15923619)

Except that the 360 and ps3 controllers aren't that much different from their predecessors.

Re:in other news (1)

ZakuSage (874456) | more than 7 years ago | (#15923621)

And the 360 and PS3 don't support at all their previous controllers.

USB Human Interface Device (3, Informative)

tepples (727027) | more than 7 years ago | (#15923782)

And the 360 and PS3 don't support at all their previous controllers.

The original Xbox controller is a USB human interface device (HID). Widely available adapters (such as EMS USB2) make the PS2 Dual Shock controller appear as a USB HID. If a game doesn't support generic USB HIDs, then it's either the game developer's fault (for not checking for USB HIDs in the game's input code) or the console maker's fault (for not providing any driver for USB HIDs to developers, in an attempt to increase attach rate by promoting sales of new controllers).

Re:USB Human Interface Device (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15923855)

Begging your pardon, sir, but who else's fault could it possibly be besides those you mentioned?

Disregarding, trivially, the user/shipper for breaking it or the manufacturer for selling a defective product, which I do not believe to be germane to this discussion.

Or, I suppose, the electrical company and the power distribution network on a longshot chance.

My question is: (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 7 years ago | (#15924323)

but who else's fault could it possibly be besides those you mentioned?

My comment was intended not solely to state a tautology ("it is either A or B") but to start a discussion ("is it A?"). I guess I forgot to make the implied question explicit:

On video game consoles with a USB port, is the lack of support for USB HID gamepads in games more likely the fault A. of the game developers or B. of the console makers?

Re:USB Human Interface Device (0, Redundant)

ZakuSage (874456) | more than 7 years ago | (#15923862)

Uh huh, I know. You can't use your XBox controller on Xbox 360. You can't use your PS1 or PS2 controller on PS3. Therefore, 360 and PS3 don't support all their previous controllers.

But why is it the case? (0, Redundant)

tepples (727027) | more than 7 years ago | (#15924344)

You can't use your PS1 or PS2 controller on PS3.

The PlayStation 3 console runs a Linux operating system. In order for what you said to be true, one of the following has to be the case:

  1. PS3 Linux does not allow homebrew programs to run at all.
  2. PS3 Linux allows homebrew programs to run but does not allow them to read USB HID gamepads through the system's USB port.

Which is more likely?

Re:But why is it the case? (1)

ZakuSage (874456) | more than 7 years ago | (#15924808)

In the future, unofficial homebrew applications or 3rd party accessories may allow it to happen. Does PS3 support it now? No.

Re:But why is it the case? (1)

aichpvee (631243) | more than 7 years ago | (#15925263)

I haven't seen anywhere where Sony has said that standard PS3 games will run on top of a Linux kernel, just that they would be shipping a version of Linux on the harddrive, presumably with some sort of desktop functionality. I can't imagine that it will be the primary platform for commercial games to run on, though that would be really cool.

Re:But why is it the case? (1)

timster (32400) | more than 7 years ago | (#15926035)

PS3 Linux is going to be exactly like PS2 Linux. Lots of ballyhoo and hype, but in the end it will amount to almost nothing of interest to anyone.

Re:in other news (3, Funny)

grammar fascist (239789) | more than 7 years ago | (#15923638)

best headline ever.

I'm going to go out on a limb and predict that the first tag that shows up on this non-story is "duh."

Re:in other news (3, Funny)

spezz (150943) | more than 7 years ago | (#15923809)

...the first tag that shows up on this non-story is "duh."

Is it just me or does everybody forget to close that tag?

Re:in other news (1)

Castar (67188) | more than 7 years ago | (#15923918)

"No duh."

Re:in other news (3, Insightful)

aichpvee (631243) | more than 7 years ago | (#15925253)

Actually, this is a really annoying thing with systems that are backwards compatible with previous controllers. I'm thinking particularly of Silent Hill 2 on PS2 that won't even start without a Dual Shock 2 plugged in, even though the only use it makes of the pressure sensitive buttons is to do a "hard" attack, which could have been done just as easily with a tap vs hold approach. For a game like Mad Maestro! (which is still the ONLY game that I've played where pressure buttons really are required for the gameplay) it makes sense, for games like Silent hill it's just feels like a gimmick and is lame. Konami got it right with MGS2 where there were features that used the pressure buttons (throwing magazine clips further if you pressed harder) but weren't really required to finish the game and fully enjoy it.

It's like someone else said about DS games abusing the touch screen even when it detracted from the game. And for what it's worth, when I played Silent Hill 2 my roommate's only Dual Shock 2 had broken analog sticks and the original Dual Shock's handles are a slightly more comfortable shape. When dealing with PS* controllers I'll take any added comfort I can get because they're cramp-inducing even at the best of times.

Re:in other news (1)

bilbravo (763359) | more than 7 years ago | (#15926183)

As an FYI (not being a smart alleck), the Gran Turismo games are infinitely better with touch sensitive buttons. Still, going along with your post, they were not required.

So Much For My Wii Purchase (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15923627)

This was the only Wii game I planned on buying this year. GameCube for the win!

The more we learn about the Wii controller the less revolutionary it sounds and the more like just another gimmick it becomes. The days of the talk of Nintendo reinventing console gaming back at E3 seem so long ago now.

Re:So Much For My Wii Purchase (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15923795)

I'm willing to bet you're the Sony troll who posts in all the Nintendo stories. The content is different than usual, but the sour smell of shit still pours off your comment.

Re:So Much For My Wii Purchase (3, Interesting)

DesireCampbell (923687) | more than 7 years ago | (#15923804)

Indeed. I had my doubts about how "revolutionary" this controler would be. I always thought I'd never really like it - and everyone else, while thinking the idea novel, would quickly show disdain for the device and be critically panned and fall behind Sony and Microsoft in sales.

Of course, that's what I said about the 'Gameboy DS' - and I was completely wrong about that.

Re:So Much For My Wii Purchase (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15924059)

that's because you're stupid and aren't qualified to make any predictions

Re:So Much For My Wii Purchase (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15924180)

I second that.

Re:So Much For My Wii Purchase (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15924682)

I third it.

Re:So Much For My Wii Purchase (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15925702)

I quarter that.

Re:So Much For My Wii Purchase (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15926902)

I take the fifth

Re:So Much For My Wii Purchase (1)

grumbel (592662) | more than 7 years ago | (#15924297)

Of course, that's what I said about the 'Gameboy DS' - and I was completely wrong about that.

And yet my favorite games on NintendoDS are still Castlevania, MarioKart, Mario64 and NewSuperMarioBros, all of which make little to no use of the touchscreen (a little menu and map, nothing that couldn't be done on a normal non-touchscreen handheld).

I hope for the best with the Wii, but from what I have seen so far I have still quite a bit of doubt if the Wiimote will actually work as a generic game input device, for some it might be great (first person stuff), for other probally not so much (third person stuff). Will be interesting to see if Wiimote actually works out or if developers go back to the classic controller, which SmashBrothers will do as far as I heard.

Re:So Much For My Wii Purchase (2, Insightful)

7Prime (871679) | more than 7 years ago | (#15924432)

Give "Kirby's Canvas Curse" a look. Quite possibly the most revolutionary platformers since the genre went 3D. the entire game uses nothing but the stylus, and in its most basic and truest form. Absolute blast of a game. It's a tough call between New Super Mario Bros. and Kirby's Canvas Curse, though, both games are excellent, in fact, Kirby might have an edge, just because it's so unique and fun.

Similarly, the actual gameplay of Metroid Prime Hunters wasn't bad at all... it's just that the level design, and the decission to make it more of an FPS than an adventure game ruined it for me. I'm kinda hoping that they someday port Metroid Prime 1 to the DS though, because it might be really cool with the stylus. Also, Animal Crossing is pretty nice with it's use of the stylus.

Oh, and Mario64, I've finally come around to greatly preffering the thumb stick method... sure it's not quite as solid as the A-Pad, but once you get used to it, it's a fine alternative.

There will always be games that are better suited to different control setups, which is why the Wii is including GCN controller support. The bottom line is, though, we don't even know what's out there yet that can be done with this thing. The mastery of the controller is probably not going to be evident in this first batch of games, but I expect solid results as well.

Re:So Much For My Wii Purchase (1)

revlayle (964221) | more than 7 years ago | (#15926127)

...and, of course, the GC controller support was originally intended so people can play GC games on the Wii

Re:So Much For My Wii Purchase (1)

brkello (642429) | more than 7 years ago | (#15926891)

While I enjoy some games on the DS, the stylus isn't really that great. If you play for any extended period of time (particularly Metroiod Prime Hunters), your hand will go numb or start to hurt. I think the DS is a neat concept...but it is really not designed very well for use with the stylus. I haven't tried the lite yet...maybe they have improved its egonomics. So to me, an all stylus game isn't very appealing. I am surprised more people don't complain about this.

Re:So Much For My Wii Purchase (1)

trdrstv (986999) | more than 7 years ago | (#15927106)

Do you have the DS Phat? or the DS Lite?

I had similar issues on my Phat with stylus games (except brain age) where you have to support the game one handed. Metroid needed to be played 'Dual digital' or whatever it was called, or it was unplayable. The DS-Lite is smaller, and lighter, and helps in this reguard.

Re:So Much For My Wii Purchase (1)

grumbel (592662) | more than 7 years ago | (#15927297)

Give "Kirby's Canvas Curse" a look. Quite possibly the most revolutionary platformers since the genre went 3D.

Revolutionary platformer, yes, its certainly a new kind of game (even so there are some small parallels to Lemmings and other critter games), however I don't think its an especially good game, its boring and challangeless, I played through half the game and then simply gave up, because there was nothing to care about, no challange, no exciting levels, it all just feld way to passive and uninteresting.

The thing with innovation is that it doesn't gurantee that the result will actually be fun, sometimes it will like in Katamary or SotC, but Kirby Canvas or Yoshi Touch, nope, wasn't much fun for me, after the 'new' feel was gone, there simply wasn't much of a solid game left. I prefer NewSuperMarioBros over Kirby any day, that said NewSuperMarioBros isn't a great game either by Nintendo standards, compared to SuperMarioBros3 or Yoshi Island it just can't hold up, to short, to easy, to unimaginative.

Now with MetroidPrimeHunters those controls where rather awefull, precise they were, but holding the NintendoDS in such a position for longer amounts of time was a total no-go. This was especially annoying because MetroidPrime(GCN) actually had controls that worked great on normal controllers. That said, the level design of MetroidPrimeHunters was among the worst I have seen in a while, one stupid, boring hunt-the-switch puzzle after another, that just wasn't fun at all, so since the game itself wasn't good, the contorls where actually not the main problem.

With Mario64 I tried the thumbstick quite a few times, but it is simply a lot less presise then the good old Dpad, for one because the virtual-thumbstick has the annoyancy to drift away, so if you have to push forward for a while you run into the edge of the screen and have to reset, extremly annoying, but also the virtual thumbstick doesn't exactly lay in an easy to reach position, stretching thumb out that far is no good for longer amounts of play. I gave up and used the Dpad and had lots and lots of fun with Mario64, my favorite DS game so far. That said, the touchscreen was actually very usefull in that game, not because of the virtual thumbstick, but because of map and camera control.

So while the touch screen can actually be helpfull for map and inventory, as a main control device it so far wasn't really all that good, it allowed some new kinds of games (TraceMemory, TraumaCenter, ...), but for many games the classic controls still worked a lot better. I don't think it will be much different with the Wii. In the end it are however the games that matter, control is important, but I don't buy a console for the controller, I buy it for the games, if those aren't good no controller in the world can fix that. Which is why I consider the Wii to be still quite a bit away from winning this generation.

breaking news (5, Funny)

startled (144833) | more than 7 years ago | (#15923666)

"Game released on console to require that console's controller"

Re:breaking news (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15923678)

Film at 11.

Sonic doesn't require a Genesis controller (2, Interesting)

tepples (727027) | more than 7 years ago | (#15923820)

"Game released on console to require that console's controller"

It's different when a system has backward compatibility. You'd be surprised at how few PS2 games need the pressure sensitive buttons; most work fine with a PS1 digital controller or a PS1 Dual Shock controller. Heck, the Sonic the Hedgehog games for Sega Genesis can reportedly be played with an Atari 2600 controller [netjak.com] , as the Sega protocol is just a compatible embrace-and-extension of the Atari parallel joystick protocol.

Shigeru Miyamoto (3, Interesting)

7Prime (871679) | more than 7 years ago | (#15925315)

I've heard that Shigeru Miyamoto, creator of Mario Bros, once praised Naoto Ohshima and the Sonic Team for being able to do what he never could: produce a successful platformer that used only one button. It is, litterally, the Apple of the videogame world. It cuts the platformer genre down to its simplest form: run, and jump. It does away with the traditional "run" button of Mario, and instead uses an exponential accelleration system to compansate, so when walking short distances (like jumping from platform to platform), you're moving slowly, but hold the controlpad over, and you will run faster and faster. If you think about it, during normal play, Sonic isn't really any faster than Mario... it's the exponential accelleration that gives Sonic the kick that made it famous.

This is the main reason why I think the first Sonic game is the strongest in the series (as well as Sonic CD and the original GameGear Sonic). Sonic 2 had great level design, but the addition of the spin dash completely destroyed the purity of the original Sonic's control setup. If you got going really fast in the original, it was a rush, because you had to get to that speed by your own doing... with Sonic 2 and on, going from zero to fast was just too easy to make it that thrilling anymore.

Re:Shigeru Miyamoto (2, Interesting)

Turn-X Alphonse (789240) | more than 7 years ago | (#15927132)

In ways I agree but in other ways I disagree. The spin dash added an extra move which changed the gameplay for the better in ways. It stopped you having to run back to gain speed to make loops in some cases, which made the whole game flow a bit better. It was also possible to use it to make puzzles (aka not getting squished) a bit harder and need better timing (instead of pure luck or waiting and hoping you were fast enough walking).

I also perfer Sonic 2's level design and entire feel better. To me Sonic 2 is the peak of Sonic before it started to get silly (although I admit I like the original sonic adventure). I like one but theres some levels which just feel out of place (Spring yard and scrap brain for example).

One thing people forget about Sonic is it doesn't feel like anything else. Mario seems gritty (yes I know, magic mushrooms etc.) and has a very "drug enduced but simple" style. Where as Sonic's always been "Screw it, this looks fun and cool lets put it in". So instead of "wow it's a mountain" you get cool stuff like dancing flowers, totem poles and weird animal robots (Which they not destroyed just to make Gundam refrences in Sonic games.. great idea guys..). Sonic was onnly ever 50% gameplay if you watch carefully. The loops and spins added very little to the game but they define what Sonic is.. Makes you wonder if Sonic really was just a "Platformer" or if it was one of the earliest "true" artistic games.

Re:Sonic doesn't require a Genesis controller (1)

Akaihiryuu (786040) | more than 7 years ago | (#15926271)

It can be played with an Atari 2600 controller. The connector is identical, the one button on the 2600 joystick is read as button B by the Genesis. I did some experimenting with a 2600 controller on a Genesis at one point (and the other way around too). The only problem you'll run into is you won't be able to actually start the game, because the 2600 controller doesn't have anything that will read as the start button to the Genesis. I guess if you use a regular controller to start it and then plug the 2600 controller in you'd be good to go though. I've done it the other way too, used a Genesis controller on an Atari 2600. Button B works as the button, the other buttons just don't do anything.

Newsflash! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15923725)

Wii don't really care about yet another Wiivertisement on Wiidot.

well shoot! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15923740)

and here I thought I would be able to use my Atari Joystick!

Already own a GC and plan to buy a Wii.. (1)

Wescotte (732385) | more than 7 years ago | (#15923824)

so which version should I get? Is nintendo hoping I purchase both by not allowing GC controllers (since we already know you can plug a GC controller into the Wii) to work w/ the Wii ver?

If the Wii has any additional gameplay elements or improved graphics/sound I would say no question get the Wii ver.. However if it's exactly the same I'd lean towards the GC ver. My logic behind this is that the core of the games controllers were designed first and formost w/ the GC controller in mind.

I really hope we get the specifics on the differences (if any) soon so I can ensure I have the new Zelda on release day

Re:Already own a GC and plan to buy a Wii.. (1)

Das Modell (969371) | more than 7 years ago | (#15924121)

I'm actually a little worried about Wii... I don't know if I'll like the controller, and if it'll work well in my cramped gaming space with my shitty 14" television. I think I'll end up buying Twilight Princess for the GameCube, and then decide if I want to buy the Wii. I used to be excited about the Wiimote, but now I'm having doubts.

Re: Zelda Wii Supports Widescreen. (1)

trdrstv (986999) | more than 7 years ago | (#15927164)

Zelda Wii will support 16:9 widescreen, since the hardware will be able to render more of the playing area without crippling the framrate. That and the controller swap are the only confirmed differences, I've read about so far.

It was also confirmed the Wii Version will run in 480p, but I'd be amazed if TP didn't run in 480p on the GameCube.

Two versions now? (1)

Traiklin (901982) | more than 7 years ago | (#15923838)

Ok, I haven't been keeping up with the TP news but last I knew the game was gamecube 100%, there was no Wii version of the game coming out.

What was going to happen was, The Wii would know it was TP (thanks to the B/C) and add in new Wii-Mote functions for the game.

So now are we going to get two versions of the exact same game?

Re:Two versions now? (1)

Cadallin (863437) | more than 7 years ago | (#15923901)

Yes, personally I think that makes the Wii SKU the one to get, for a variety of reasons: the fishing game (promises to be better on the wii), and Wii's better native support for 480p widescreen displays.

Re:Two versions now? (1)

Babbster (107076) | more than 7 years ago | (#15923987)

...Wii's better native support for 480p widescreen displays.

Let's just hope that Nintendo doesn't remove the component out after a year or two because "nobody's using it." :)

Re:Two versions now? (1)

Cadallin (863437) | more than 7 years ago | (#15924253)

Yes, I hope so too, but in reality they were probably right about the digital out on the Gamecube. Seriously, how many people did use it? While I'll acknowledge there were some people, they really need to acknowledge that they were in a tiny minority (1%? 2%?) It almost certainly made more sense to remove it to facilitate price drops.

To be honest I really don't think there were that many compelling reasons for component out on the GC. I've always used S-Video, which in my experience is perfectly adequate for 480i sources, and the GC only supported Pro-Logic to begin with, so it's not like it NEEDED a digital audio connection.

Re:Two versions now? (1)

Babbster (107076) | more than 7 years ago | (#15924690)

Yes, I hope so too, but in reality they were probably right about the digital out on the Gamecube. Seriously, how many people did use it?

It's no wonder that few people use(d) the digital out on the Gamecube since Nintendo never put the component cable in stores. The only place they sold it was on their website, a fact I only found out after two years of looking in stores and being told by several places that they couldn't even order the thing for me. When I discovered where I could buy the thing, I was so irritated at that point that I wasn't willing to give Nintendo the extra profit they would get by cutting out the retailer.

I will note that I should have checked Nintendo's site sooner, and it's probably an indicator that it wasn't a critical issue for me. That said though, considering Nintendo's retail presence there was no excuse for them not to get that accessory into stores.

Re:Two versions now? (2, Interesting)

a_nonamiss (743253) | more than 7 years ago | (#15925888)

Seriously, how many people did use it?

Anyone with an HDTV would potentially want to use it. I've been using it for a couple years, and I can say that even though it's not HD, any game that has the "Progressive Scan" icon on it looks quite a bit better on my TV. Even for games where that weren't specifically developed to use progressive scan, (the majority of them weren't) the color is more accurate with digital out. Personally, I was pretty disappointed when they took the digital out off the the GC. Made me glad I was an early adopter and had one with the option.

As far as numbers go, depending on what you read, HDTV penetration is anywhere from 25% to 35%, with that number expected to reach 50% by the end of next year. It wasn't a very big market when GC was released, but I'd say that it's a worthwhile option now.

Re:Two versions now? (1)

trdrstv (986999) | more than 7 years ago | (#15926309)

"any game that has the "Progressive Scan" icon on it looks quite a bit better on my TV"

I've noticed that every one of my Nintendo 1st/2nd party games prompt for Progressive scan when I boot up, even if it doesn't have it listed on the box. It's a shame though, more games don't support Widescreen. If F-Zero GX can maintain all that at 480p widescreen and stay locked at 60 fps... There's no reason why most games can't.

Re:Two versions now? (1)

Traiklin (901982) | more than 7 years ago | (#15924359)

oh I'm not denying that the Wii version will be more fun with that (just the bow and arrows and fishing looked great with it) I just didn't know if they were going with two different versions or sticking with what they said when they announced Wii exclusive features (that it would know it was in a Wii and enable those options or you could select them).

for the most part I agree with what others have said though, this game was designed 98% with the gamecube in mind so they are really going to have to prove that the Wii-mote will be adiquit to replace the cube controller.

And now for something completely different (1)

spiderbitendeath (577712) | more than 7 years ago | (#15924124)

In other news, Phantom Hourglass will require you to own a Nintendo DS to play. ... ok, not so completely different.

Other differences (3, Interesting)

Bongo Bill (853669) | more than 7 years ago | (#15924354)

Wasn't there more differences between the two versions of Twilight Princess than just the control scheme? I remember hearing that only the Wii version would support a widescreen aspect ratio. I was considering getting the Wii version just for that, but if it requires you to use a control scheme other than the one for which the game was designed, then I'll have to wait and see....

Re:Other differences (1)

Avacar (911548) | more than 7 years ago | (#15925943)

I seem to recall there were some moves you could pull off easily with the Wii controller setup (shield bash, specifically) that wasn't in previous Zelda games, and had not been mentioned for the GC version. That isn't to say it isn't in the GC version, but we won't know for certain until the game comes out.

Control scheme that bad? (2, Insightful)

person132 (986809) | more than 7 years ago | (#15924758)

Besides the obligatory "zOMG U haff 2 u53 the w11m0t3 4 a w11 game!!!!!11", Do you really think the Wii control scheme will be worse than the GCN controller? I doubt Nintendo would let any of their games, least of all Zelda, ship with controls that were in any way bad. I can honestly say that I have never played a Nintendo game with BAD controls. The Wiimote controls weren't simply tacked on in the last few weeks before release; Nintendo has been working for months on adding the Wiimote (I doubt there was much more development of the main game), and the quality of the controls really matters. Zelda, as a Wii launch title, will one of people's first experiences with the Wiimote, and I doubt Nintendo will let people down. I'll be buying the Wii version just for the novelty, personally.

Re:Control scheme that bad? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15925385)

"I doubt Nintendo would let any of their games, least of all Zelda, ship with controls that were in any way bad."

Super Mario 64.
Metroid Prime.

Oversensitive analog stick in a rigid platformer, and what is basically a FPS with a console controller. Bad controls all the way around.

I'm not too thrilled with the concept of a reimagined lightgun controller that I have to wave around like an idiot for the whole game.

Re:Control scheme that bad? (1)

Roguey (939920) | more than 7 years ago | (#15925652)

Super Mario 64?! Are you kidding me? The controls in that game were absolutely flawless. Metroid Prime I can maybe understand, since it didn't control in the same manner as every other console FPS, but I still thought it controlled fine. The game was designed with its controls in mind.

Re:Control scheme that bad? (2, Interesting)

Knuckles (8964) | more than 7 years ago | (#15925906)

Super Mario 64.
Metroid Prime.


Are you kidding me?

SM64 was a wonderful introduction into 3D gaming. I remember when I came home with my brand-new N64 and started up the game. I had it figured out within a few minutes, and soon it felt like I had never done anything else. I was just running around and trying stuff and feeling good for hours before I even was interested in starting the game in earnest.

As a goodbye to my GC I'm planning on playing a few classics I never had time for and am currently in the middle of Metroid Prime. I love it. Yes, it feels kind of awkward in the beginning, but it handles superbly once you stop treating it as a FPS. There's a reason why Nintendo calls it a first-person adventure game. I think the rather indirect controls, HUD delay and so on perfectly translate that you are stuck inside a big robot, which of course doesn't feel like running around in a ninja suit.

Re:Control scheme that bad? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15927379)

TO SLASHDOT MODS:

Stop modding down things as "troll" when you don't agree with it. It makes you look STUPID. "Holy shit, this poster just said my favorite game isn't as great as I thought it was! TROLL!!!" You are an example of why the moderation system on Slashdot sucks: peer review by the masses is fundamentally flawed. Same reason the US justice system is flawed: jury by peers doesn't work because normal people don't know the law and are swayed by personal opinion and common biases. It's a fucking joke of a system that should be abolished.

And yes, SM64's controls do suck. As said, they are oversensitive, where barely tapping the controller puts Mario into full run mode. It is difficult to use a featherlike touch in the middle of an action game like that to do walking. Of course, that's not the only reason the game isn't any good. The camera is laughably bad, having 3 modes that 1) swings around arbitrarily and doesn't allow you to go in a straight line, since controller motion is relative to the camera angle; 2) sits right behind Mario's head, making it impossible to see where you're going; 3) gives a pretty good first person view, but unfortunately you're UNABLE TO MOVE IN THIS MODE.

Not only that, but the repeating levels for stars sucks too. Stop being influenced by all these "professional" (read: paid) reviews of the game that give it perfect scores and say it's the best game ever. It's a lie, and was only used to sell Nintendo's inferior console system.

And Mario Sunshine had the same control/camera issues as well. Face it, fanboys, platform gaming doesn't fare too well in 3D.

So what? (1)

Jawju (614159) | more than 7 years ago | (#15925510)

I don't see why any of this is a problem. I fear that half the people here imagine having to swing the wiimote around frantically just to get Link to walk from one side of the room to another. You'll be using the nunchuck add-on to move, in other words a regular analog joystick as seen on the N64 and GC. To attack with the sword, you again, just use a regular button on the wiimote.

It's only when it comes to firing the bow, fishing and things like that then you'll start to really use the wiimote's features.

I don't think it'll be any more difficult to control whichever version you get, and if you plan to have both consoles then I would personally go for the Wii version.

Having two versions just lets Nintendo promote the Wii a little more by having a 'killer app' on it. Although why they couldn't stick both a GC disk and a Wii disk inside the same box and charge the price of a normal game is beyond me.

Re:So what? (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 7 years ago | (#15926205)

Although why they couldn't stick both a GC disk and a Wii disk inside the same box and charge the price of a normal game is beyond me.
I buy the game, keep the Wii disc and sell the GC disc which is an original, hence no pirating nor illegal copy. Nintendo sells one less game. Repeat a million times, Nintendo loses a few million dollars. Easy enough to understand.

Re:So what? (1)

grumbel (592662) | more than 7 years ago | (#15927399)

Having two versions just lets Nintendo promote the Wii a little more by having a 'killer app' on it. Although why they couldn't stick both a GC disk and a Wii disk inside the same box and charge the price of a normal game is beyond me.

Aehm, that really wouldn't be a good idea. The Correct Solution[tm] would have been to simply allow the Wii version to be played with a Gamecube controller. Nobody expects that the smaller Gamecube disc will hold new textures and stuff, but I definitvly expect that Nintendo can manage to make the controller choosable on the Wii version, doing not so is just a really stupid move to get more focus on the Wiimote.

In the end we will see how it turns out and if the Wiimote actually controls better then standard controller, since when not it could turn out into a marketing neightmare. When Nintendo can't get the most important launch title to actually work better with the new controller, then with the old, it would basically mean that the new controller simply doesn't work and is a useless gymicky thing, not exactly a good start for a console that relies a lot on the new controller to actually work.

Are you kidding me? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15925885)

Wii Version of Twilight Princess to Require Wiimote

Did you know that Wii is the new console from Nintendo? The sky is blue? Slashdot sucks?

Backup plan? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15926079)

I'm a hardcore Zelda fan; it's the main reason why I buy Nintendo consoles at all. I'm worried that I might not like the Wii controls for the game, but I don't want to find that out only after I've bought a Wii and played the game for a while. Does anyone know if it's possible to save the Wii game onto a Gamecube memory card and transfer it over to the GC to be played there, in case I don't like the control?

Re:Backup plan? (1)

SScorpio (595836) | more than 7 years ago | (#15927453)

Since the Wii version is going to have additional features, that sounds extrememly unlikely. I'd recommend holding off on the purchase and trying out the game in a demo unit at a store before you buy. But note that the controls will become more natural with time.

Of course it does. (3, Insightful)

Qbertino (265505) | more than 7 years ago | (#15926103)

What is this all about?
Hello? It's Zelda. Zelda, Nintendo, ... ring a bell?
They could eben push out variant cover cased versions of the game that only run on Wii's with the matching case color and still make a better revenue even though it costs more than a single version to produce. If I'm a Wii fan and I'm buying a new Zelda Iteration for my new Nintendo Iteration it better be built for that exact Nintendo, using all the neat new features to the max. Especially the Wiimote.
So the GameCube is getting it's own version? Nice move and good for the GameCubers I'd say.

So what's all the fuss about? You want a 'universal binary'? Stupid idea. Wii'ers will think they're getting a dumbed down version and GameCubers will think they're getting ... a dumbed down version.

Bottom line:
Yes, they're selling seperate versions of the new Zelde, one for each plattform - and you (yes, you) will love them for it. As usual, Nintendo has everything under control. Everythings cool, calm down.

I want a Wii, but it has one major flaw...... (1)

ShyGuy91284 (701108) | more than 7 years ago | (#15926252)

Can you imagine using that remove on any TV smaller then 32 in sitting right in front of it? I mean, Wii's remote is a _great_ idea, but I'm not so sure the world is ready for it. With few living rooms having a 50+ inch TV (and I wouldn't be surprised if as HDTV rolls in, that will still be somewhat uncommon), I don't think it'll make for a great playing experience. And sitting 10 feet from a 50" would make it kind of small for a pointing device if a game needs precision..... Although I've never used it..... Maybe it'll work out well.... But I don't think it'll be all that great for my 23".

Re:I want a Wii, but it has one major flaw...... (1)

Clever7Devil (985356) | more than 7 years ago | (#15927299)

I agree that the Wiimote will likely be much more fun on a large screen. But I remember the videos from E3, when all this "Wiimote" hoopla started, and they were using a pretty basic tv to demo it. I'm sure this point is something that Nintendo has considered. I'd make a stretch and say that they used a smaller TV at E3 (may she rest in peace) precisely because of their target market. Lowest cost console, lowest hardware performance, lowest hardware requirements. Makes sense to me.

This hearkens back to the poweer glove. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15926294)

Now don't get me wrong. I'm a Nintendo lover, and I think the Wii has great potential.

But the problem here is the same problem that was seen with the power glove. Instead of designing games around the controller, people came up with clever hand motions and finger movements to simply trigger an action on the screen that was completely unrelated to the actual motion.

If you end up turning the Wii controller 90 degrees to trigger a spin attack, then that is a horrible idea. It will make the controller feel like a gmimmick. The whole point of the controller is to allow you greater immersion in the game, and the way you do that is by having the controller motions emulate control the character. Preprogrammed motions are a no-no. If a character needs to jump, that should be done with a button press, not a flick of the Wiimote. On the other hand, if a character needs to swing a sword, then the Wiimote is perfect for that, and the characters movements can follow the player's exactly. Shooting an arrow? The Wiimote is good for this. Swinging a golf club? Again, it will work great. Throwing a baseball? Swinging a bat? These are good too. But if you've got link in the fishing game, and when you pull back on the Wiimote, he does a preprogrammed jerking animation a moment after you complete your movement, then that's just not going to feel right.

Oh my gawd... (1)

Taimoor (891521) | more than 7 years ago | (#15926373)

A video game requires a controller... this is a new low, slashdot.

But quite seriously, I'd assume they'd be using the wiimote for some sort of pseudo sword combat system... doesn't seem like it's that much of a suprise.

--Nick

Nintendo has some balls...who woulda thunk it? (1)

ProppaT (557551) | more than 7 years ago | (#15926594)

Nintendo must be EXTREMELY confident in how Zelda plays with the Wiimote combo to pull a stunt like this. I mean, it would be no extra effort on their part to enable the Gamecube controller controls. They must be using this title to prove their point. I have a lot of faith in Nintendo, lets hope they know what they're doing.

Man, Nintendo's balls have dropped over the past few years with Reggie at the forefront. I thought the guy was a douche at first, but I really think he knows what he's doing.

Old news, new day. No change in forecast (1)

kinglink (195330) | more than 7 years ago | (#15926914)

When the game was first mentioned, this was said very firmly. The wii version would only be Wiimote compatible, the gamecube version will be playable on the wii with the GCN (gamecube) controller. I'm assuming that at some point we'll also receive news that the GCN version is going to be two discs.

This is neither bad nor good. Though there's some tilt.

It's still definitely a good thing for the company and developers because now they can see how easily a game X is made into a "wii" game. It's also a good thing for Nintendo because a Wii version of Twilight princess at launch will kill.

It's still unknown for gamers, if the Wii version has radically better graphics then it'll be a killer app at launch assuming the controls are right (which they should be). At the same time though it creates the problem "which controller do I want to use with it". Personally I'm grabbing both. But I know for most people this is going to be a serious choice rather then grabbing both. I just am a serious zelda fan and a game collector.

Honestly though this story is nothing unknown or unexpected to the Nintendo fans. Perhaps 1up needs to pick up on press releases and conferences a little more than their humorous snarky reviews of games.
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