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Download Torrents With Your PC Turned Off

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 7 years ago | from the building-your-hardware-with-steroids dept.

318

Mr.Tweak writes to tell us that they have a review posted of a new wireless router from ASUS. What sets this router apart from others is that in addition to being a wireless router/gateway is that it also functions as a thin client system with a pre-installed 160 GB IDE drive (no SATA support sorry) and three USB 2.0 ports for peripherals. If you happen to use one of those USB ports for another drive the router will also support RAID 0 and 1, quite a bit more than the average router.

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318 comments

news? (5, Funny)

macadamia_harold (947445) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945708)

This isn't anything new. According to the RIAA, you can download music without even owning a computer.

news?-Jingle bells. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15945730)

Oh no! Macadamia_harold is downloading music into his pants.

Re:news?-Jingle bells. (0, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15946123)

Oh no! Macadamia_harold is downloading hot grits into Natalie Portman's pants.

That's nothing! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15945734)

According to the RIAA my grandpa downloaded music long after he died! (and yes, without a computer to boot) :D

Re:That's nothing! (2, Funny)

redalien (711170) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946060)

Anon: Have you not considered buying your dead relatives computers? It is the information age you know!

Re:That's nothing! (3, Funny)

Loconut1389 (455297) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946196)

This just in, the RIAA has proof: There is life after death- refuses to share details. Film at 11.

Re:That's nothing! (5, Funny)

AoT (107216) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946208)

Yeah, but it is just because they hate sharing so much.

Re:news? (5, Insightful)

Uruviel (772554) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945843)

Let's not shoot ourself in the foot now. There are perfectly legitimate uses for torrents. Like downloading your favorite Linux distro. Which you could then install on your machine when finished with a wake-on-lan call from that very same router. See the possibilities are endless and all you think of is music.

Re:news? (4, Funny)

Mister Whirly (964219) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945997)

Yeah, I'm relatively sure that 99% of torrent download ARE legitimate things like linux distros... Because terrabytes of distros are released EVERY DAY and that's what the majority of users are downloading...

I'm not denying that there aren't legitimate uses for torrents, but don't try to blow smoke up anyone's ass about what the majority are currently using it for.. I'm sure a few people will chime in and list their legitimate uses, but how many are going to chime in and admit they are violating (bullshit) copyright laws??

Re:news? (1, Insightful)

aussie_a (778472) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946023)

It's important to constantly remind of the legitemate uses becauses otherwise the RIAA will pass a law banning all torrents within America which will then be pressured onto Democracies who apparently have elected Bush to determine our laws.

Re:news? (1)

x_MeRLiN_x (935994) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946024)

Count me in. I violate copyright laws all the time.

Re:news? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15946084)

"I'm sure a few people will chime in and list their legitimate uses, but how many are going to chime in and admit they are violating (bullshit) copyright laws??"

Me!

=P

Re:news? (1)

hackstraw (262471) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946163)

Yeah, I'm relatively sure that 99% of torrent download ARE legitimate things like linux distros..

99% of the torrents I download are legitimate things. Those that aren't are usually software that I want to try and then don't use because they are inferior to freely available alternatives.

Oh, and 99% of the legitimate 99% is music. Its just legal http://bt.etree.org/ [etree.org] and http://www.archive.org/audio [archive.org] for starts.

Re:news? (1)

DesireCampbell (923687) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946203)

"but how many are going to chime in and admit they are violating (bullshit) copyright laws??"
If by "bullshit" you mean "American" then I'm pretty sure you can find 35,000,000 people living just north of you who wouldn't mind saying it.

Re:news? (1)

ArbitraryConstant (763964) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946235)

"Let's not shoot ourself in the foot now. There are perfectly legitimate uses for torrents. Like downloading your favorite Linux distro"

Yes... the mirrors are frequently overloaded after a major release. Torrents are often the only way to get your favorite distro in a timely fashion.

Re:news? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15946013)

Or, in fact, even being alive.

First Post? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15945709)

First Post?

Why not just use a computer? (2, Insightful)

WilliamSChips (793741) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945711)

It seems like a full computer would be better than this in just about every aspect--price, power consumption, etc.

Re:Why not just use a computer? (3, Interesting)

TommydCat (791543) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945733)

In this page-and-a-half-spread-out-to-69-pages review, I didn't actually see the price listed, though it was listed as one of the cons. What is the price of this device?

I personally am not stirred by this as I have a set of linux servers set up to do the same functionality with much more speed and efficiency, but I can see this as a neat black-box turn-key solution for someone who can't deal with that level of complexity but can deal with a straight-forward UI.

What I'd like to see in a review like this is what throughput can the SAMBA server give among multiple clients, how many connections the bit-torrent client can handle before melting, what types of printers it can serve (Jetdirect, USB, real Centronics, etc)... you know, useful information I can use to make an informed decision.

Oh well...

Re:Why not just use a computer? (5, Informative)

livewire98801 (916940) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945768)

$260 on newegg
linky [newegg.com]

Re:Why not just use a computer--Or another SBC? (1)

AndroidCat (229562) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946135)

For $200, I was thinking of getting an OmniFlash board and kit from J&K Microsystem [jkmicro.com] for a lot of my "PC off" needs. I haven't thought of doing torrents with it, so I'm not sure if it has enough ram for the job. (No big fat GUI to feed; it might work.)

I don't really like the idea of piling more tasks on top of a wireless router. All I want from a wireless router is to be solid and secure. I'll add the bells and whistles to something less critical, thanks...

Re:Why not just use a computer? (1)

ryanduff (948159) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945948)

If you googled the part number, you would easilly turn up a price of $259.99 at PCMall [pcmall.com]

Re:Why not just use a computer? (2, Interesting)

nine-times (778537) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946053)

I personally am not stirred by this as I have a set of linux servers set up to do the same functionality with much more speed and efficiency, but I can see this as a neat black-box turn-key solution for someone who can't deal with that level of complexity but can deal with a straight-forward UI.

Well I'm kind of jazzed about the idea, even if not the implementation. The reason is this: I don't have the money or space for a set of Linux servers. I've been expecting for some time that someone would start making "home servers", and I think there's potential in the idea. For my home use, I've been looking for a set of devices provide these features:

  • a web server
  • E-mail (SMTP, IMAP) server
  • DNS server
  • a file server (SMB, AFP) for internal (with a big hard drive)
  • ssh access
  • complete headless setup and configuration
  • very small (Mac mini sized or smaller)
  • maybe a print server
  • wireless access point
  • maybe VPN from the outside, or site-to-site tunnels
  • some means to back the whole thing up (easily)

Now, I know, i could get a wireless router and an ultra small form-factor computer, install linux, and set it all up. Honestly, that's what I'd like to do anyway. At the same time, it seems like such a waste-- to buy a computer with an audio card I'll never use, and more processing power than I need for any of these tasks. Plus, the video subsystems, keyboard, mouse, CDROM drive, etc. will only get used for the initial install, and I might have to buy or borrow a monitor, because I don't know how to do a completely headless linux install and I don't own a monitor.

Ok, so that's a whole lot of information that's particular to me, and I know there are plenty of ways to get what I need, but not an optimal way, without a lot of extra (wasted) money and parts. Or at least none that I know of (feel free to make suggestions). And I kind of doubt I'm alone in this.

Re:Why not just use a computer? (2, Informative)

djrogers (153854) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946115)

* a web server
* E-mail (SMTP, IMAP) server
* DNS server
* a file server (SMB, AFP) for internal (with a big hard drive)
* ssh access
* complete headless setup and configuration
* very small (Mac mini sized or smaller)
* maybe a print server
* wireless access point
* maybe VPN from the outside, or site-to-site tunnels
* some means to back the whole thing up (easily)

2 suggestions spring to mind - a KuroBox [kurobox.com] for about $150, or if you'd like it with a drive already installed, a Buffalo Linkstation [newegg.com] (newegg link) for just a few buck more. I have a 400GB Gig-E Linkstation that's currently running Debian (took all of 5 minutes to reflash it to deb), and it serves just about every purpose you list above except the WAP... It has 2 USB ports for external storage or printers (hmm, you could probably plug in a usb wifi adapter and get the WAP thing working too), it's very quiet, and is about the size of a mac mini.

Even without the debian re-flash, this box can do a lot of what you list above - it *is* a home server - but apt-get goodness just makes it that much more flexible.

Re:Why not just use a computer? (1, Interesting)

JayAEU (33022) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946125)

You are definitely not alone. 2 years ago, I was struggling with the exact same dilemma: How to set up a proper home network that did basically what you listed in your bullets?!

I struggled with all kinds of black boxes and turnkey solutions for years, only to find that they didn't play together too well and that I felt somehow limited in what I could achieve this way.

So I decided to replace all of these routers, NASes, etc. with a set of Linux servers which I was going to install myself. Buying regular PCs for this was (like you pointed out in your post) out of the question. Too much heat and wasted electricity. Too much noise. Too many wasted parts.

In my quest for low-power servers, I became familiar with the Via Epia set of motherboards and the Mini-ITX form factor. What a god send! I ordered some parts from www.mini-itx.com (3 Travla C146 rackmount cases with Via Epia PD6000E, amongst others) and I was set.

Those things consume only a fraction of the power a regular PC would take, plus they're completely headless. No CDROM, only harddisks in a software-RAID1. No screen, keyboard or mouse during normal operation, either. I installed Debian Sarge on them using a bootable USB stick I made, the rest was done over the LAN.

To sum it up, it can be done, but it's a matter of picking the right parts.

Re:Why not just use a computer? (4, Interesting)

ForestGrump (644805) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945763)

Because I'm afraid of having my data compromised.

I use the router to interface with the interweb for what I need.

Firstly, I script what I want the router to send/get. then I disconnect my computer, connect the wAN side of the router to the interweb. When the script is done, I disconnect the WAN side of the router, connect my computer to the router and copy off the router HDD. Sure it's a pain in the butt, but what am I to do? live without the interweb?

Grump.

-------
This message uploaded to you by ASUS WL-700gE router using Interweb interface 3.02

-----

Re:Why not just use a computer? (1)

SynapseLapse (644398) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945791)

That's pretty hardcore geeking to set that up, but cool nonetheless. I'm curious, does that hurt your latency/bandwidth very much? And, what kind of script is it? Python, etc?

Re:Why not just use a computer? (1)

WilliamSChips (793741) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945804)

It would seem much easier to buy a real computer as a firewall.

Re:Why not just use a computer? (1)

cheater512 (783349) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946144)

I find it easier to use a old Pentium 2 to do the same job.

Re:Why not just use a computer? (1)

pboulang (16954) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945813)

Instant Messages give me blisters! :)

Re:Why not just use a computer? (5, Funny)

xQx (5744) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945815)

All your script are belong to us.

It does take a painfully long time to hack your computer tho, I'm like:

CD \windows
dir
[wait for you to disconnect from the web, plug the modem into the PC, run 0wned script, plug back into the net]
cd system32
dir
[again...]

Well, that's where I'm up to anyway...

Why not just use a geek? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15945767)

"It seems like a full computer would be better than this in just about every aspect--price, power consumption, etc."

Heat! Time! Remember not everyone's a geek, and shouldn't have to be to get some of the offered features.

Re:Why not just use a geek? (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946227)

Heat?

If this router isn't pumping out thousands of BTUs, how am I supposed to keep my room warm in the winter?

And I don't even live in the basement!

Re:Why not just use a computer? (1)

JorDan Clock (664877) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945784)

Why not use a full computer? Because this is smaller, easier to set up, and it's probably cheaper, lower power, and it Just Works©.

Everytime something new comes along, there's atleast one person that says "Why not just use $existingTech?" Maybe because the existing method isn't as efficient as it seems?

Why use wireless when you can just use CAT5? Why store files on another machine when you can just add another hard drive to your current one? Why not just use an abacus?

Re:Why not just use a computer? (1)

spicyjeff (6305) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945814)

[quote]Because this is smaller, easier to set up,[...] lower power, and it Just Works©[/quote]

Just use a Mac mini and your existing router and get a whole lot more with everything you wanted above.

Re:Why not just use a computer? (1)

JorDan Clock (664877) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945907)

At a much higher cost. A Mac Mini starts at $600. A WRT54GL is $70 at Newegg. We'll leave out the fact that at most a stock Mac Mini comes with a 120GB hard drive, according to the Apple Store. But what about this handy device? $260 on Newegg. Sure, you could do more with a Mac Mini, but you could also do more with a Mac Pro, so why stop at a Mac Mini?

Re:Why not just use a computer? (1)

dehvokahn (996677) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945953)

Everytime something new comes along, there's atleast one person that says "Why not just use $existingTech?" Maybe because the existing method isn't as efficient as it seems?
Exactly! And for that matter .... If everybody had the mentallity .. "Why not just use $existingTech?" .. then we'd never get anywhere technologically would we!

Re:Why not just use a computer? (1)

aussie_a (778472) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946052)

Of course we would. Don't confuse "why not just use the just-as-efficient existing method" over "why not just use current technology."

Re:Why not just use a computer? (1)

advs89 (921250) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945818)

Not CPU resources... but yeah, I agree, not really worth it, except maybe in the very, very, rare case you are downloading a DVD or something and need full CPU power for something else (like to work on a school project or something). Although in that case, most torrent download managers will allow you to pause the download, so this product is in IMHO, pointless. advs89

Re:Why not just use a computer? (1)

Schemat1c (464768) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945923)

It seems like a full computer would be better than this in just about every aspect--price, power consumption, etc.

I use the Kuro box [kurobox.com] for my always on bittorrent box. It is very small, cheap and only uses about 40 watts of power.

In case your wondering... (4, Funny)

LiquidCoooled (634315) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945714)

Yes, it does run linux.

Re:In case your wondering... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15945789)

If it's on top of linux, it's lacking apache and php then.
Providing those 2, everybody would buy it and replace their big webservers' boxes with just that.
And of course a bash console with rtorrent and screen installed would just make it a must-have.

Re:In case your wondering... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15945838)

Thank you, I have been looking around for a new router to get as I need something with wireless, I have been wanting to get something that runs free-software, this sounds like one of the options then. Now all I have to do is wait for the Intel binary blob to be replaced with something free so that I can use my ipw3945.

Re:In case your wondering... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15945853)

Help people get the OpenWrt distro working on it: http://forum.openwrt.org/viewtopic.php?id=4883 [openwrt.org] .

Natural extension (5, Funny)

Bromskloss (750445) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945715)

Wow, now let's put into it _all_ functionality we expect from a computer! ;-)

Re:Natural extension (1)

bhalo05 (865352) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945854)

Are you telling me I could use my computer for something else? Now I'm confused.

Re:Natural extension (1)

LOTHAR, of the Hill (14645) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945912)

you do this and I won't even *need* a computer!

Great (1)

paulius_g (808556) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945718)

This is good news, but I wonder if it's web interface, stability and value is up to par with other networking routers. I hope that they won't be using a stupid mini OS that will crash every once it receives too many connections. Even better, could people boot Linux on it?

I know this is a bit off-topic, but does it provide sufficent cooling? I've been using many routers throughout the years and most of them have processors without heatsinks which heat up A LOT. In fact, I install a fan on every switch that I have (And use a Linux box as the router). Does heat actually do something to the router? Or are they all designed to support tremendous temperatures?

Re:Great (2, Informative)

Pete Brubaker (35550) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945743)

Well, I know it's a pain, but if you read the _whole_ article, it did say that it was shipped with Linux.

Re:Great (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15945747)

I hope that they won't be using a stupid mini OS that will crash every once it receives too many connections. Even better, could people boot Linux on it?

Make up your mind, please. Do you want something stable or do you want Linux?

Where is TheTorrent? (5, Informative)

junglee_iitk (651040) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945724)

What's with not using the word torrent in the whole summary?

Here is the part of the article:
"Applications lets you enable/disable the router's inbuilt applications - Download Master, Download Daemon, Download Share, Photo Album and Media Server, as well as do some basic configuration like specifying the port range and default seeding time for the BitTorrent client, and the default web server port. You can also configure the settings for an attached USB webcam, enabling to run via a web interface, and even turning it into a security camera controlled by the router, which can enable motion detection and email alerts. And finally, locally-attached USB printers can be configured and shared out - ready for connection from UPnP-enabled clients."

And here is the link :)
http://www.tweaktown.com/reviews/939/5/page_5_syst em_features_configuration/index.html [tweaktown.com]

Power consumption? (5, Interesting)

slapyslapslap (995769) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945726)

I have to assume that power consumption is going to go up to power this thing. If I was turning off my PC to save power, I don't think I'd want this thing.

Smoothwall anyone? (5, Insightful)

Vrejakti (729758) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945736)

What's so new about this? http://smoothwall.org/ [smoothwall.org] , http://ipcop.org/ [ipcop.org] and http://m0n0.ch/wall/ [m0n0.ch] could easily be custimized to perform a similar function. Easy as installing a bittorrent application, and using SSH.

By the way, these 3 options happen to be free and upgradable.

Re:Smoothwall anyone? (4, Interesting)

NetRAVEN5000 (905777) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945806)

How do you install any of those on a ROUTER?

The beauty of this ROUTER is that you don't need to leave a PC on for your downloads anymore. Or, at least you can leave your PC's cycles to do something else, be it gaming, Folding@Home, or whatever else.

Not only that, but now you don't need to run your fileserver AND your Web server, since it's got a built-in fileserver and Web server. It also has a print server if you've got PCs dedicated for that.

Your router needs to be on anyways, so. . .

Re:Smoothwall anyone? (1)

Bob_Sheep (988029) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945858)

Fundamentally a router is just a specialised small form factor PC. People can, and do, make their own routers using low end linux boxes.

Re:Smoothwall anyone? (1)

EvanED (569694) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945989)

But now you have probably a much larger box (unless you go with MiniATX, which can get even more expensive) that costs more (unless you pull it from old computers you no longer use), requires you to install the software yourself, get a switch unless you want to put multiple NICs in the computer, and probably eats up a lot more power. Compare that to a nearly plug-and-play cable modem router that you can go grab for $40. (In this case, $260; but this is still less than a full-blown PC.)

Sure, there are plenty of uses for setting up a Linux box to act as router. But there are plenty of reasons why that's too heavyweight a solution in other instances.

Re:Smoothwall anyone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15946086)

Well, WHY even buy a router in the first place? Use an old box (using the parts from your last upgrade, some cheap refurb PC, basic Dell or whatever you want). It'll likely cost no more than this router, but:

You'll have a far better fileserver - one where you can plug many HDs (add controllers as required - even SATA ones if not onboard already). My video server alone is 1.6TB, and that's for movies in mpeg4 alone (documents, music and everything else is on another array). I don't see this router as a useful fileserver except for those with very minimalistic needs. Also, I doubt this router has very good performance at all (in MB/sec) when compared to any old PC (no idea if it even has GBit Ethernet). Haven't RTFA, so I can't comment about filesystem support and such.

Also, you'll have whatever webserver you want - who says I want to use whatever webserver soft this router runs in the first place? The "normal box" way is far more powerful, configurable and more upgradeable. Run whatever you want. I doubt this router would be useful for anything more than very low loads - especially if being used as a router, downloading bittorrents and serving files at the same time - it's just not powerful enough.

The PC can just as well be used as a [*FAR* better] firewall/NAT box as well as print server, Asterix box (VoIP), VPN, and god knows what else!

I have no router, no need to leave one on. To contradict you, I'd say it's more like "Your PC needs to be on anyways, so. . . [why even buy an overpriced useless router?]"

Seriously, I've got no use for these overpriced boxes. Even as a plain router, EVERY single one I've tried (Linksys, DLink, Netgear, ...) was nothing short of being trash. Not nearly good enough (not enough simultaneous NAT sessions, etc). Heck, P2P traffic alone's fried most of them (emule+BT). I was getting very pissed off at these POS'es, and ultimately getting rid of them altogether solved my issues. Haven't had any of the problems I've had countless times with routers in a couple years at least (slow speeds, network dropouts, cheap swtich chip would overheat and reset constantly, DHCP timeouts from ISP, etc - I've seen it all)

Re:Smoothwall anyone? (1)

LurkerXXX (667952) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946176)

The two main points in favor of this type unit over an old PC?

1) Space
2) Electric bill

Raid over usb? (2, Informative)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945755)

That seem like a bad choice as usb has a lot of cpu over head firewire or e-sata wound of been better.

It also only has a basic BitTorrent client.

I wonder how it stands up under a full raid and bitTorrent load.

RIAA/MCAA/DMCA will love this news (0, Redundant)

lowenstein (996640) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945756)

eom

But it needs...... (4, Insightful)

ericdano (113424) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945758)

It needs more than the ability to run Bittorrent. You need something like Peer Guardian running to filter out all those "bad" IP Addresses.

It's more of a NAS meets Wireless router. Which is cool, but....yeah....so?

Brilliant for retail (3, Interesting)

Nefarious Wheel (628136) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945764)

Just saw this last week. In retail grocery we pump a lot of data back and forth between head office, store back office, and the lanes. Anything -- and I mean anything that keeps us from having to lay another cable or put another piece of bulky hardware under the sales counter is a bonus. I could see these things used in the C racks at the front to stage price changes, etc. and being retail the fact that they are utterly dirt cheap will have a broad appeal.

This one's a winner, I think.

Is it vocab or grammar nazi? (5, Funny)

ArcherB (796902) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945772)

from TFA:
There's a rapidly-expanding section of the home electronics market which revolves around "devices". The reason for the parentheses is that it's difficult to know how to label these gadgets, because they don't fit easily into any pre-defined categories.


Isn't a parentheses one of these ( )?
And aren't these " " called quotation marks?

Sorry, but it's hard to take an article seriously when the author doesn't know the difference.

Re:Is it vocab or grammar nazi? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15945841)

Furthermore, the author of TFA uses the quotation marks incorrectly. This wireless router from ASUS is a device, not a "device."

It could have referred to the rhetorical device. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15945868)

"An explanatory or qualifying word, clause, or sentence inserted into a passage with which it has not necessarily any grammatical connection, and from which it is usually marked off by round or square brackets, dashes, or commas."

Of course, quotation marks aren't in there, so I don't know what they meant by "parentheses."

Re:It could have referred to the rhetorical device (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15945899)

That's parenthesis, singular. Parentheses (plural) are several examples of parenthesis, or a pair of brackets. The article is just wrong.

Re:Is it vocab or grammar nazi? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15945937)

I hate to break this to you, but I know some people who are world-class experts in their (smallish) scientific fields who use grammar from their native languages in English, or who spell at about the level of 13 year-olds (despite being a native speaker). I like good spelling and grammar too, but their absence doesn't automatically invalidate the content of an article.

Re:Is it vocab or grammar nazi? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15946051)

"Or who spell at about the level of 13 year-olds"

Heh, what? Apparently, your idea of how 13 year-olds spell is kinda off, I'm 14 and have understood the concepts of grammar, spelling, and punctuation since I was 6. Stop being so stereotypical, because not all 13 year-olds use the word "lol" every sentence.

Re:Is it vocab or grammar nazi? (0)

StikyPad (445176) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946140)

LOL!

Re:Is it vocab or grammar nazi? (1)

way2trivial (601132) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946076)

I'm not GP poster, but I don't quite agree with you in this particular case.

a REVIEWER better use words the way I and the subject audience expect them to be used.

to describe an object to which I am unfamiliar, with poor english skills, does mean the reviewer fails in their task.

the purpose of the tech review is to use words with which I am familar, to describe something that I am not familar with.

Let's say the review includes the use of the word orange to describe the case.. if it was in fact blue wouldn't that upset you?

Let's do it. (-1, Offtopic)

cjkeeme (980951) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945777)

Increase my killing power, eh? Let's do it.

pre tivo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15945817)

you could use this as a pre tivo loader. Or as a buffer for doing large scale monitoring from diverse sensors or sources. Say your input hits a huge spike for some reason, this do dad could store it until your regular machine could get to it, and with some thought, it could pre ilter out the junk. Hmm, could be a mail milter as well.

Security (1)

treak007 (985345) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945820)

If you were downloading a file from bit torrent that contained a virus or spyware that affected the OS that shipped with the router, would that mean that not only your router, but every computer connected to that router would become infected?

Re:Security (2, Informative)

grolschie (610666) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945863)

If you were downloading a file from bit torrent that contained a virus or spyware that affected the OS that shipped with the router, would that mean that not only your router, but every computer connected to that router would become infected?
Unlikely. If the router was running Windows XP and actually opened or ran the infected files that it downloads, then perhaps a virus might spread to other Windows XP clients on your network by exploiting some vulnerability. This would require firewalls to be turned off, security vulnerability to exist and be exploited, and a lack of up-to-date anti-virus software on your PCs. But since the router runs Linux, does not run the files, then no.

This morning I saw that HIV was cured (5, Funny)

pHatidic (163975) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945821)

And I thought wow, this is by far the best news of the day. Then I saw that there is a new drug just like morphine, only non-addictive. And then I thought, wow, I thought AIDs being cured was a big deal, but that's nothing compared to this. And now I see that I can download porno movies without even turning on my computer. God I love /.

Re:This morning I saw that HIV was cured (2, Funny)

miro f (944325) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945859)

And now I see that I can download porno movies without even turning on my computer.


unfortunately, not. You have to turn on your computer in order to tell the router to download your porno. Then you can turn it off while you wait for the porn. Then your sister uses it to download the second season of Buffy and notices all the stuff you've downloaded.

Meanwhile I've always just used TorrentFlux [torrentflux.com] installed on my linux server, works fine for me. (still doesn't hide my downloads from other users, however)

Thin Client (3, Interesting)

DeathElk (883654) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945828)

Why does a thin client need 160GB?

Re:Thin Client (1)

ttldkns (737309) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945911)

yeah i know
totally the wrong use of the term "thin client". I was expecting it to provide or use some sort of terminal server functionality. Now that would be pointless!

Re:Thin Client (1)

Daengbo (523424) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946111)

I'm still actually confused as to why also functions as a thin client system was even mentioned, since I saw nothing about a thin client system in the article. Since you appear to have figured it out, can you enlighten me?

Re:Thin Client (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15946090)

There's 180K of code for the thin client and ~159GB of .Net runtime.

ASUS Builds Full-Blown PC Without Video Card... (4, Funny)

ivan256 (17499) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945842)

...Video at 11:00.

Security Ramifications (5, Insightful)

duplo1 (719988) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945866)

I find it crazy that people are running more and more applications directly on their Internet router. The more applications and services there are running, the more likely a serious security flaw will be found in the device. Do they really think this through? This is just going to be another attack vector for script kiddies to own peoples' networks. Several months after they release this, another vendor will be releasing a seperate firewall/router to protect this device.

Re:Security Ramifications (1)

cpghost (719344) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945936)

Right; esp. when people are novices. But for experienced sysadmins, a "fat router" is quite useful, especially at home where you want to keep your electricity bill unter control.

A typical setup on any low-power 24/7 device, like some routers, or general purpose boards a la net4801 [soekris.com] includes OpenBSD or FreeBSD with userland-ppp, pf and BIND, plus, if needed, postfix, lighttpd, cyrus-imap, etc...; all running tightly within their jail(8)s and closely monitored.

This would be the maximum, and from a security point of view, still somehow manageable. You definitely don't want to add stuff like NFS (despite airtight good pf settings) at such an exposed place though... But running ctorrent every now and then (again, in its own jail) should be fine...

Re:Security Ramifications (1)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945955)

> But for experienced sysadmins, a "fat router" is quite useful, especially at
> home where you want to keep your electricity bill unter control.

Experienced admins should know better than to run services on a router.

Re:Security Ramifications (1)

cpghost (719344) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946119)

Experienced admins should know better than to run services on a router.

Correct. But experienced admins would also use professional equipment; and it's impossible to run apps on IOS etc...

Fat routers do have their uses though in very special situations. From a security POV, if you're the only user of a router (say, you're sitting at the end of a cable or adsl line) with a tiny home-LAN; the "fat router" is nothing more than two physical machines folded into one. If a cracker were able to break into the router itself (fooling the TCP/IP stack, or firewall etc...), then other machines within the LAN are on their own anyway (you didn't rely on NAT or firewalling there, didn't you?). And if the cracker uses a vuln within one of those apps, well; they're inside a jail, so happy hacking. A cracker who is able to break out of jails (chroot(2) is easy, but not jails) is too skilled anyway for this typical router@home setup.

So yes, it's not a terribly good idea; but as long as sound admin practices are used within the fat router, it's a manageable risk. If someone then still breaks in, well, it's bound to happen anyway; and in security aware setups, DMZs and multiple layers (read: multiple machines) would be used.

This device needs a killer app: Skype (4, Interesting)

Dr. Spork (142693) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945877)

Seriously, I'm sure the processor in that router is strong enough to handle Skype. Just put a radio transmitter on it and bundle two wireless handsets , and you get what lots of people wish for: Skype without a running computer! (Maybe it should also plug into a regular phone socket so you can use your old phones.)

Here's why it makes sense to do this on a router:

For one thing, everyone's router is always on, so there is nothing extra in the house sucking power. Maybe more relevant: The router, when Skype is being used, can be set to automatically throttle back the up/down bandwith that it's passing to connected computers (or using for its own bittorrent). This helps prevent degradation of Skype quality. And third, this would be totally simple - just plug in the router, tell it your Skype login/pass, and all your contacts are imported (Skype itself stores those things).

The effect with SkypeIn would essentially be: Vonage without the fees (or for $30/year for SkypeIn)... no, better, because Vonage sounds like crap when I'm using unthrotteled bittorrent. This would justify the price of the hardware, and if the manufacturer could keep the costs low, it would also be very good for Skype/eBay and its userbase. Maybe Ebay could subsidize the costs a bit, and offer free SkypeIn for a year, since anyone who buys this will also probably buy SkypeOut minutes eventually.

That's almost perfect! (0, Redundant)

silverdr (779097) | more than 7 years ago | (#15945908)

Now I only miss the ability to watch the downloaded pr0n with my eyes turned off...

Hey there (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15945938)

Information wants to be free. Since binary code is a form of information, I have a god given right to access EVERYTHING from databases of credit card numbers to Hawt hawt XXX pr0n.

I don't see why this is so hard for people to understand.

Re:Hey there (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15945985)

As a grey hat who has on more than one occaision slipped to the dark side, I happen to agree with you. However, in the name of being pedantic (about everything but my possible spelling mistakes):

Information wants to be free. That doesn't give you the right to access it. I want to have carnal drunken sex with Angelina Jolie... doesn't mean it is my right to do so. Like anything, I would have to work for it. And in this case I would have to work bloody hard to do so.

Don't think that you can't access my credit card numbers, if you do, well done, but if you used one exploit you found in your script kiddie tool box, or you didn't spend 3 month's analysing every weakness in the firewall, then you do not deserve what you have obtained, and thus you have no right to be accessing said data. Only the truly elite have this power (no that is not me) and you do not hear them screaming "hack the planet" at every opportunity.

Botnets (2, Insightful)

DigitAl56K (805623) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946018)

This is a great idea, _but_ imagine the possibilities for rooting these devices. With a harddrive so large, and a processor at least powerful enough to handle BitTorrent, imagine the possibilities for a remote user to install malware on it. Mail relays, fake websites, even packet sniffers to capture your login as you use online banking.

Worse still, you can run various anti-malware and anti-virus tools on your desktop, but how do you plan to even detect your router being rooted, let alone repair it? (and no, that is not an invitation for the top 1% brainiac population to suggest ripping out the drive, re-installing the firmware, or running Linux on it - we're talking about the general public).

I think it's a great idea, but if it becomes popular and these are always-on devices with a lot of services running on them, that could be a problem.

I already do this with... (2, Interesting)

exp(pi*sqrt(163)) (613870) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946030)

...my NSLU2 [nslu2-linux.org] .

Old news (1)

matt328 (916281) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946036)

Will this do anything my *nix box won't?

Re:Old news (1)

DigitAl56K (805623) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946069)

Yes, it will download torrents while your *nix box is turned off.

Did you miss the headline? ;)

suck my balls (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15946042)

suck my balls please

I misread the subject line briefly... (1)

jtseng (4054) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946066)

I thought it read "Download Tourette's." I knew your computer could get viruses but neurological disorders too?!?!?!

Re:I misread the subject line briefly... (1)

Namlak (850746) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946159)

I thought it read "Download Tourette's."

I used to suffer bouts of "Download Tourette's" back in the dial-up days...

Use your Words (1)

SpectreZero2002 (590945) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946143)

Read these 2 sentences and find the error. I can't understand how people miss things like this. There's a rapidly-expanding section of the home electronics market which revolves around "devices". The reason for the parentheses is that it's difficult to know how to label these gadgets, because they don't fit easily into any pre-defined categories. For those of you who are a little slow or lack vocabulary, "" are not parentheses.

This is completely pointless.... (1)

frostoftheblack (955294) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946199)

...because I never shut off my 'puters.

Missing something (3, Interesting)

kahrytan (913147) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946217)

This type of router would be much more functional if it had a proxy server capabilities with builtin virus scanner.

  Though, Asus is starting something Linksys, Dlink and Netgear will probably jump on.

but... (0)

crankshot999 (975406) | more than 7 years ago | (#15946231)

will it run linux?
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